Sample records for tool sustainable land-use

  1. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  2. Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting 10 March 2008 7:00 p.m. - 9 will coordinate with a student the Sustainable Development Audit before Dr. Bardati leaves Bishop's University. Motion: Proceed with the Sustainable Development Audit in accordance with the CREPUQ guidelines. Proposed

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  4. Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseeker Energy HoldingEnergyLand-use Impact Assessment

  5. Planners' Perceptions of Land Use Planning Tools in the U.S. Pacific States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Yue

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , tools, and strategies have been extensively applied in growth management or development management (Daniels, 1999; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning (Beatley, Brower, & Schwab, 2002; Burby, 1998), emergency management and disaster..., 1999; Levy, 2009; Mantell et al., 1990; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning for natural hazard mitigation (Berke, 1998; Beatley, 2009; Beatley et al., 2002; Berke & Beatley, 1992; Berke & Conroy, 2000; Burby et al., 2000; Godschalk et al...

  6. Using soft-systems methods to evaluate the outputs from multi-objective land use planning tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    of soft-systems based analysis of land-use planning tool outputs is recommended, not only for evaluating? This paper reports on a soft-systems based evaluation of the multi-objective land-use planning tools within-off between objectives. The paper then details the soft- systems-based evaluation strategy. Land managers

  7. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United StatesSustainable Food and Energy Production in the United Statesquality of renewable energy production and then assessing

  8. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Comparisons. Renewable and Sustainable Energy ReviewsEnergy Storage in a Renewable Energy Sytsem. Proceedings ofPractices, and Constraints. Renewable Agriculture and Food

  9. Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After identifying institutional change rules and roles, a Federal agency should identify the tools that create the infrastructural context within which it can achieve its sustainability goals.

  10. Software-based tool path evaluation for environmental sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KONG, DAEYOUNG; Seungchoun Choi; Yusuke Yasui; Sushrut Pavanaskar; Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, while the sustainability and energy ef?ciencyof sustainability of a tool path (i.e. energy consumption

  11. Connecting Land Use and Transportation Toward Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Houston-Galveston Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Su

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of sustainable development; rather it has been defined and applied according to the goals and objectives of each agent or organization (Beatley 1995; Litman and Burwell 2006). There is, however, a widely used concept of sustainable development defined...

  12. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  13. CDM Sustainable Development Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda,BurkeNebraska:CDM Sustainable Development Tool Jump to:

  14. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  15. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use Suzanne Tegen WINDExchange Webinar June 17, 2015 2 Overview * Current NREL Research *...

  16. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  17. LAND USE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    ....................................................................8 SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES AND GREEN BUILDING Green Building Design Studio.........................................................................................................................9 Green Building Materials and Construction Methods: Design Tools for Non-Design Professionals LEED Building Certification Overview of Environmental

  18. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  19. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  20. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the...

  1. Transportation Planning in France and the challenge of Sustainable Development: actors, tools and methods. Stphanie LEHEIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Transportation Planning in France and the challenge of Sustainable Development: actors, tools and the challenge of Sustainable Development: actors, tools and methods. Stéphanie LEHEIS LATTS Ecole des Ponts et: · Draw a parallel between one side the introduction of the sustainable development, which imposes new

  2. Measuring the Effectiveness of Educational Tools and Hyrdologic Metrics in Raising Awareness About Stormwater Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Tommi Jo Grace

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of infrastructure, but this does not capture the changes in the flow regime, nor does it convey the importance of stormwater sustainability to the general public. To further the general public's understanding about stormwater sustainability, an educational tool...

  3. Research Summary Sustainability impact assessment: tools for environmental, social and economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Sustainability impact assessment: tools for environmental, social and economic to produce Sustainability Impact Assessment Tools (SIATs) that will be used to predict the impacts) and will be used as part of the Impact Assessment (IA) process, as set out in the Impact Assessment Guidelines

  4. TOOLS TO MODEL ROAD IMPACTS Providing scientific knowledge and technology to sustain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    TOOLS TO MODEL ROAD IMPACTS Providing scientific knowledge and technology to sustain our nation://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE_home.shtml BACKGROUND The Rocky Mountain Research Station has a long his- tory of developing tools that meet the needs. Existing tools have been optimized to answer particular man- agement questions at specific spatial scales

  5. Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science: · Models & tools developed for the forestry sector are typically under-used · Impact assessment has little involvement to be deliberative, we need analytical tools, commonly associated with `the experts'." · "The most

  6. Software-based tool path evaluation for environmental sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KONG, DAEYOUNG; Seungchoun Choi; Yusuke Yasui; Sushrut Pavanaskar; Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    available life cycle assessment (LCA) tools provide only aanalyses. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is generally accepted

  7. ISSE2011: Hossain (2011): A sustainable diagnostic test tool Paper ID: 108-59871

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISSE­2011: Hossain (2011): A sustainable diagnostic test tool 1 Paper ID: 108-59871 International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and the Environment (ISSE) 2011 American University of Sharjah, Sharjah was introduced in beginning of 19th century when rotary drilling system was developed to drill a hole on earth [1

  8. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    in other areas. Students in our Green Building and Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy certificate1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces Fall 2013 Including: Mitigation and Conservation Banking Climate making changes in our lives. We move to another city, change jobs or change our diet to be healthier. UC

  9. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  10. Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenormand, Maxime; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

  11. A value mapping tool for sustainable business modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bocken, Nancy M. P.; Short, S.; Rana, P.; Evans, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Food Multinational, UK Industry 1 2 Automotive Start-up, UK Industry 2 Use of expanded introduction to tool 3 Cleaning Start-up, UK Industry 1 Use of blank stakeholder segments 4 Agriculture Multinational, Germany Industry 3 5 Furniture SME, UK... , UK University, UK, Engineering and Management graduates 40 (8 groups of 5 students, each group with own case) Simplified tool, using examples 13 Automotive, agriculture, IT Various: start-up, SME, Multinational, UK Industry 15 (3 groups of 5...

  12. Sustainable Transport Illustrative Scenarios Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpods IncEurope ResearchTechnologiesSustainable

  13. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  14. Social vulnerability indicators as a sustainable planning tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yung-Jaan, E-mail: yungjaanlee@gmail.com

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the face of global warming and environmental change, the conventional strategy of resource centralization will not be able to cope with a future of increasingly extreme climate events and related disasters. It may even contribute to inter-regional disparities as a result of these events. To promote sustainable development, this study offers a case study of developmental planning in Chiayi, Taiwan and a review of the relevant literature to propose a framework of social vulnerability indicators at the township level. The proposed framework can not only be used to measure the social vulnerability of individual townships in Chiayi, but also be used to capture the spatial developmental of Chiayi. Seventeen social vulnerability indicators provide information in five dimensions. Owing to limited access to relevant data, the values of only 13 indicators were calculated. By simply summarizing indicators without using weightings and by using zero-mean normalization to standardize the indicators, this study calculates social vulnerability scores for each township. To make social vulnerability indicators more useful, this study performs an overlay analysis of social vulnerability and patterns of risk associated with national disasters. The social vulnerability analysis draws on secondary data for 2012 from Taiwan's National Geographic Information System. The second layer of analysis consists of the flood potential ratings of the Taiwan Water Resources Agency as an index of biophysical vulnerability. The third layer consists of township-level administrative boundaries. Analytical results reveal that four out of the 18 townships in Chiayi not only are vulnerable to large-scale flooding during serious flood events, but also have the highest degree of social vulnerability. Administrative boundaries, on which social vulnerability is based, do not correspond precisely to “cross-administrative boundaries,” which are characteristics of the natural environment. This study adopts an exploratory approach that provides Chiayi and other government agencies with a foundation for sustainable strategic planning for environmental change. The final section offers four suggestions concerning the implications of social vulnerability for local development planning. -- Highlights: • This study proposes a framework of social vulnerability indicators at the township level in Chiayi County, Taiwan. • Seventeen social vulnerability indicators are categorized into four dimensions. • This study performs a three-layer overlay analysis of social vulnerability and natural disaster risk patterns. • 4 out of the 18 townships not only have potential for large-scale flooding, but also high degree of social vulnerability. • This study provides a foundation for sustainable strategic planning to deal with environmental change. • Four suggestions are proposed regarding the implications of social vulnerability for local development planning.

  15. Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After determining your agency's institutional change sustainability goals, the next step is to analyze the context within which these goals are to be achieved. Start by identifying the organizational rules, roles, and tools that shape the current context and may influence success in achieving these goals. Identifying the linkages among rules, roles, and tools and how they interact will help in implementing solutions for success.

  16. Novel scenarios for sustainable waterway sediments management deduced from a decision-support tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dredging releases millions of m3 of sediments, from which a large part is contaminated or even polluted with quantitative data, in order to evaluate various scenarios taking into account cost and sustainability for the GeDSeT tool. Fig.2: Selective dredging and detail characterisation. Crosses: sampling points. Boxes

  17. The Earth Institute I Corporate Circle The latest information, tools and networks to achieve sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Earth Institute I Corporate Circle Fall 2009 The latest information, tools and networks to achieve sustainability #12;The Earth Institute I Corporate Circle STRATEGIC OPPORTUNITIES GOAL Engage and allow for flexibility in the nature and extent of engagement. The Earth Institute I Corporate Circle #12

  18. Use-phase memory: a tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). The statistics show that this sector consumes and pollutes more than industry (22% energy) or transport sectors1 Use-phase memory: a tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings manuscript, published in "Automation in Construction 36 (2013) 53-70" DOI : 10.1016/j.autcon.2013.08.003 #12

  19. Can Electricity pricing be a tool for efficient, equitable & sustainable use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    energy requirements in farming different seasons; and q Assess technical losses separately o Therefore2/22/11 1 Can Electricity pricing be a tool for efficient, equitable & sustainable use with Policy San Francisco, California, USA 15-17 June, 2010 Scope of the Presentation o Modes of electricity

  20. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  1. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  2. An Overview of Public Domain Tools for Measuring the Sustainability of Environmental Remediation - 12060

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypool, John E.; Rogers, Scott [AECOM, Denver, Colorado, 80202 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of sustainability principles to the investigation and remediation of contaminated sites is an area of rapid development within the environmental profession, with new business practices, tools, and performance standards for identifying, evaluating, and managing the 'collateral' impacts of cleanup projects to the environment, economy and society coming from many organizations. Guidelines, frameworks, and standards of practice for 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) have been released and are under development by the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF), the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), the Interstate Technology Roundtable Commission (ITRC) and other organizations in the U.S. and internationally. In response to Executive Orders from the President, Federal government agencies have developed policies, procedures and guidelines for evaluating and reporting the sustainability of their environmental restoration projects. Private sector companies in the petroleum, utility, manufacturing, defense, and other sectors are developing their own corporate GSR programs to improve day-to-day management of contaminated sites and to support external reporting as part of their corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. The explosion of mandates, policy, procedures and guidance raises the question of how to determine whether a remediation technology or cleanup approach is green and/or sustainable. The environmental profession has responded to this question by designing, developing and deploying a wide array of tools, calculators, and databases that enable regulatory agencies, site managers and environmental professionals to calculate the collateral impacts of their remediation projects in the environmental, social, and economic domains. Many of these tools are proprietary ones developed by environmental engineering/consulting firms for use in their consulting engagements and/or tailored specifically to meet the needs of their clients. When it comes to the public domain, Federal government agencies are spearheading the development of software tools to measure and report emissions of air pollutants (e.g., carbon dioxide, other greenhouse gases, criteria air pollutants); consumption of energy, water and natural resources; accident and safety risks; project costs and other economic metrics. Most of the tools developed for the Government are available to environmental practitioners without charge, so they are growing in usage and popularity. The key features and metrics calculated by the available public-domain tools for measuring the sustainability of environmental remediation projects share some commonalities but there are differences amongst the tools. The SiteWise{sup TM} sustainability tool developed for the Navy and US Army will be compared with the Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT{sup TM}) developed for the US Air Force (USAF). In addition, the USAF's Clean Solar and Wind Energy in Environmental Programs (CleanSWEEP), a soon-to-be-released tool for evaluating the economic feasibility of utilizing renewal energy for powering remediation systems will be described in the paper. (authors)

  3. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  4. LCA-IWM: A decision support tool for sustainability assessment of waste management systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, J. den [Institute of Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Cycles, Environmental and Spatial Planning (Institute WAR), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 13, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: j.denboer@iwar.tu-darmstadt.de; Boer, E. den; Jager, J. [Institute of Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Cycles, Environmental and Spatial Planning (Institute WAR), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 13, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper outlines the most significant result of the project 'The use of life cycle assessment tools for the development of integrated waste management strategies for cities and regions with rapid growing economies', which was the development of two decision-support tools: a municipal waste prognostic tool and a waste management system assessment tool. The article focuses on the assessment tool, which supports the adequate decision making in the planning of urban waste management systems by allowing the creation and comparison of different scenarios, considering three basic subsystems: (i) temporary storage; (ii) collection and transport and (iii) treatment, disposal and recycling. The design and analysis options, as well as the assumptions made for each subsystem, are shortly introduced, providing an overview of the applied methodologies and technologies. The sustainability assessment methodology used in the project to support the selection of the most adequate scenario is presented with a brief explanation of the procedures, criteria and indicators applied on the evaluation of each of the three sustainability pillars.

  5. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality ............................................. DESCRIPTION OF BRIDGE CREEK BASIN ........................ PHYSICAL SETTING'T. ................................ 5.1 CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ....................................... 5.1.1 Bridge Creek basin upstream

  6. Policy Strategies and Paths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamic Invert Simulation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Kranzl, Lukas; Huber, Claus; Haas, Reinhard; Tsioliaridou, Elena

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schemes for sustainable energy systems”. InternationalPaths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamicmoney - for promoting sustainable energy systems - be spent

  7. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  8. Purdue extension PurdueLandUseTeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue extension Val Slack Jon Cain Co-Chairs, PurdueLandUseTeam PurdueUniversity ID-351 CAFOs. The role of the Agricultural & Natural Resources (ANR) Educator as a plan commission member is to help plan and natural resources and provide insight into the impact on these two areas when there are proposed changes

  9. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  10. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water free. 5. Construction Progress Update - M. Caron Energy Efficiency with Ameresco - Michel Caron basement was too dark, a row of overhead lights were not installed. B&G are looking into solving

  11. Bishop's University Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 22nd , 2011 from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. in Hamilton #300 Present: Drew Leyburne (Chair), Michel Caron appreciation to Lynn Hyde's work as the recording secretary for the committee for the past years. He suggested 26th . At present, Ameresco is working on all the mechanical rooms on campus. The geothermal heating

  12. MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use 0. Let's consider apartment complex under construction August 1, 2003 "If you build it we will burn it. The E.L.F.s are mad of life and the planet." Is ELF pursuing a sustainable "smart growth" strategy? 2. Is open space near

  13. Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Opening Plenary Session: Bioenergy Sustainability—Charting the Path toward a Viable Future Jody Endres, Assistant Professor, College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois

  14. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicy Homepv land use Home

  15. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  16. LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF ABRASIVE TOOLS AND EFFECTS ON SUSTAINABLE GRINDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Barbara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    life. energy, energy resource efficiency and sustainabilityd i use Energy E Waste Toxicity Sustainability S t i bilit dsustainability, - Coolant reduction reduction, - Less energy

  17. Fuzzy cognitive mapping as a tool for analysing the sustainability of common-pool resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosma, Charissa

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of two parts. The first paper reviews the existing body of literature on the sustainability of common-pool resources and tries to find a theoretically based answer to the question: How can fuzzy ...

  18. Land use regulation and intraregional population-employment interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, JH; Hewings, GJD

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levine J (2006) Zoned out: Regulation, markets, and choicesprices, externalities, and regulation in U.S. metropolitanCT (2000) Land use regulation and new construction. Regional

  19. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  20. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

  1. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  2. Smart*: An Open Data Set and Tools for Enabling Research in Sustainable Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Prashant

    important aspects of the home environment, including aver- age household electricity usage every second, as well as usage at every circuit and nearly every plug load, electricity generation data from on on designing sustainable homes. 1. INTRODUCTION The rise in energy prices over the last decade combined

  3. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  4. State and Local Energy Planners: New Tool Helps Shape Your Sustainability Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Department and National Renewable Energy Laboratory develop the State and Local Energy Data (SLED) tool, a new website capable of analyzing and sorting data in real-time to quickly assess regional energy system, demand and resources.

  5. Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peckett, Haley Rose

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

  6. Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

  7. Town of Chapel Hill- Land-Use Management Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003, the Town of Chapel Hill adopted a land-use management ordinance that includes prohibitions against neighborhood or homeowners association covenants or other conditions of sale that...

  8. The need for subjectivity in EIA: discourse as a tool for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Hugh

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subjectivity is often viewed as one of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment (EIA). Politicized evaluations, narrow boundary setting, data gaps and simplified assumptions are frequently seen as problems in EIA that must be addressed. This paper takes a different approach to the issue. It views subjectivity as one of the positive attributes of the process that should be encouraged in order to promote sustainability and to inspire confidence in EIA. A satisfactory decision at the end of a specific EIA is not the only goal of the process. As a forum in which the public, proponents and regulators deliberate on the design and implementation of development plans, the creation of discourse around the pertinent issues at stake is also an important result. EIA promotes the development of values that foster greater social responsibility and has the capacity to increase the importance of long-term environmental considerations in decision-making.

  9. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  10. Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II the requirement of the Seveso II directive and an analysis of the use of LUP as part of a risk management policy management policy combining several tools. To describe the risk management policy implemented in France

  11. Photon-mediated interactions: a scalable tool to create and sustain entangled many-body states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camille Aron; Manas Kulkarni; Hakan E. Türeci

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation and sustenance of entangled many-body states is of fundamental and applied interest. Recent experimental progress in the stabilization of two-qubit Bell states in superconducting quantum circuits using an autonomous feedback scheme [S. Shankar et al., Nature 504, 419 (2013)] has demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of driven-dissipative approaches, i.e. engineering a fine balance between driven-unitary and dissipative dynamics. Despite the remarkable theoretical and experimental progress in those approaches for superconducting circuits, no demonstrably scalable scheme exists to drive an arbitrary number of spatially separated qubits to a desired entangled quantum many-body state. Here we propose and study such a scalable scheme, based on engineering photon-mediated interactions, for driving a register of spatially separated qubits into multipartite entangled states. We demonstrate how generalized W-states can be generated with remarkable fidelities and the entanglement sustained for an indefinite time. The protocol is primarily discussed for a superconducting circuit architecture but is ideally realized in any platform that permits controllable delivery of coherent light to specified locations in a network of Cavity QED systems.

  12. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  13. ICSE Workshop on Green and Sustainable Software Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, 3rd June 2012 An Energy Consumption Model and Analysis Tool for Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    system-level optimisation. Keywords-green computing; Cloud computing; energy consumption; performanceIn 1st ICSE Workshop on Green and Sustainable Software Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, 3rd June 2012 An Energy Consumption Model and Analysis Tool for Cloud Computing Environments FeiFei Chen, Jean

  14. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

  15. anthropogenic land-use change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David M. 35 Quantifying the impact of future land-use changes against increases in GHG concentrations Physics Websites Summary: Quantifying the impact of future land-use...

  16. Land Use Manager Application Ensures Protectiveness Following Remediation on the Oak Ridge Reservation - 13355

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, Sid; Brown, Sally; Sims, Lynn [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Darby, Jason [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term stewardship is the set of activities necessary to return contaminated land to safe and beneficial use. The activities include physical and legal controls to prevent inappropriate exposure to contamination left in place at a site. It is the longest phase of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Program and ensures the protection of human health and the environment for varied end uses. At the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation an automated program has been developed and implemented that tracks the multitude of long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a large site that currently has over 50 actions requiring long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation consists primarily of three plant sites, and long-term stewardship will enable these sites to be leased to private entities (East Tennessee Technology Park), modernized for an evolving national security mission (Y-12 National Security Complex), and revitalized to continue multi-disciplinary research (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The varied site end uses of the individual plant sites coupled with the multitude of controls required by leaving waste in place presents challenges. A single remedial action may include surveillance and maintenance activities, media monitoring, property record notices as well as physical controls such as fences and signs. Thus, the array of long-term stewardship activities is complex and intermingled (over 200 inspections each year at various frequencies are required currently) and requires an effective tracking program, termed the Land Use Manager. The Land Use Manager is a web-based data management application for use by personnel responsible for implementing, maintaining, and verifying engineering and land use controls on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The program is a data entry and tracking tool, as well as a notification tool. The status and performance of engineering and land use controls are checked annually for evaluation in the required Remediation Effectiveness Report, and the automated Land Use Manager collects, maintains, tracks, notifies, monitors, and manages the information necessary to perform this evaluation. Land Use Manager tracks site information including type of contamination, regulatory requirements, locates land use controls; provides information on inspections, certification, and reporting; and provides reports. Most data access features, e.g., view, print, query, and download, are available to all users; however, data input, updating, and editing are restricted to the personnel directly responsible for monitoring and inspection. The Land Use Manager application was developed for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office by URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, Restoration Services Incorporated, and MIJARA Corporation to meet the specific needs of long-term stewardship tracking on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The successful implementation of long-term stewardship enables the future government and private activities being planned on the Oak Ridge Reservation to proceed. (authors)

  17. Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Ian

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotland’s strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

  18. Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought impacts and promoting recovery J response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Land classification based on the land's potential: soils response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Grassland Shrubland ­ high wind erosion Knowledge

  19. Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (crude refineryLand Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H and Alberta as examples for conventional oil production as well as oil sands production in Alberta

  20. The Amazon Frontier of Land-Use Change: Croplands and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    -cropping intensification. Greenhouse gas emissions are estimated for the period 2001­06 due to conversion of natural; Hansen et al. 2008). Economic de- velopment and global markets have driven large-scale conversionsThe Amazon Frontier of Land-Use Change: Croplands and Consequences for Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  1. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  2. Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia Andre´s Etter a, Australia c Facultad de Estudios Ambientales y Rurales, Universidad Javeriana, Bogota´, Colombia Received 14, including Colombia. However, the location and extent of deforestation and associated ecological impacts

  3. Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

  4. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. energy policy tilts away from fossil fuels. The Essay argues that the energy-land use nexus provides a useful frame for approaching policy to minimize points of conflict between energy goals on the one hand and land conservation on the other....

  5. 4, 42654295, 2007 Impact of land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methodol- ogy which involves coupling a land-use change model with a water balance model and a groundwater groundwater model. Results show that the average recharge slowly de- creases for all scenarios, the decreases / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Groundwater is a major source

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  7. REPORT ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AT BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #1591302.2 REPORT ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AT BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY PRESENTED TO THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE CORPORATION by the SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND LAND USE COMMITTEE January 23, 2009 #12;#1591302.2 REPORT TO THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE CORPORATION ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AT BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY 1

  8. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable...

  9. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  10. Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

  11. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian, E-mail: cumt_chenlongqian@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: • A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). • Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. • The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. • The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. • The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  12. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  13. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  14. Property:FedLandUsePct | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Ezfeedflag PropertyFedLandUsePct Jump to:

  15. H.R.S. 205 - Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville ElectricControlon State - Land Use Jump to:

  16. Title 36 CFR 251 Land Uses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson,OpenOpen EnergyR. 297 Wild and8Land Uses

  17. Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing Liz Isenstein Faculty Mentor: Professor Mi-Huyn Park, Civil & Environmental Engineering features within each land use. In order to classify the aerial photo digital images, GIS (Geographic

  18. An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and...

  19. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  20. Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa: Land Use and Abandonment Through the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannion, A.M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa: Land Use andJ. Brett. Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa. Land Use andcombination of the two. The Wadi al-Hasa, a canyon draining

  1. 2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

    matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

  2. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributions for soybean biodiesel (food fixed) . . . . . .distributions for soybean biodiesel (food not fixed) . . .land use from expanded biodiesel production. Technical

  3. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation SYSTEMÃ?KOLOGIE ETHZ., 2008. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation Systems Ecology Report. Photo by Nathalie Baumgartner (2005) #12;A. Fischlin Emissions from land-use change (deforestation) 1

  4. extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomases, Becca

    Writing for Planners, Engineers and Policymakers n Bicycle Planning and Design n Green Building DesignAiNABilitY ANd grEEN BUildiNg Free Information Session: Green Building, Sustainability and Renewable Energy.........14 Green Building Design Studio

  5. Can we reconcile differences in estimates of carbon fluxes from land-use change and forestry for the 1990s?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from land-use change and forestry LUC area (100 km 2 yr ?1 )land-use change and forestry Table 6. Sum of Terrestrialfrom land-use change and forestry for the 1990s? A. Ito 1 ,

  6. An Environmental and Economic Trade-off Analysis of Manufacturing Process Chains to Inform Decision Making for Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Stefanie L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturing. (2011). Sustainability framework model.for Advanced Manufacturing (NACFAM) Sustainability FrameworkScreenshot of NACFAM Sustainability Framework tool (National

  7. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential biomass, energy content, and liquid fuel yieldsPotential biomass, energy content, and liquid fuel yieldsBiomass Yield (Billion Tonnes y -1 ) Energy Yield (EJ y -1 ) Liquid Fuel

  8. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2009-2010 #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve recycling and composting on campus. One of the things that they have asked to change is to remove the black garbage bags from the composting containers in The Grill as the composting containers look like

  9. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2008-2009 #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the issue. Composting for residences ­ students are not composting. The SDAG group will consider a new

  10. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    without the use of fossil fuel energy. Examining seasonalof renewable energy as the longevity of fossil fuel reservessuch energy production can completely replace fossil fuels.

  11. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Storage in a Renewable Energy Sytsem. Proceedings ofto contribute to a renewable energy system consisting ofintermittent nature of renewable energy sources. Lastly, I

  12. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy sources and storage technologies may makeproduction technologies may make seasonal energy storageenergy portfolio, the next step would be to incorporate other types of storage technologies

  13. Elizabeth Harvey Memorial Sustainable Development Intern Year End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Harvey Memorial Sustainable Development Intern Year End Report For the Academic Year 2011 ­ 2012 Submitted May 8th , 2012 to the Bishop's Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee by Lauri Lidstone #12;Sustainable Development Student Intern Report 2011-2012 1 I would like to thank the Elizabeth

  14. Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review of the Literature Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Acceptability of Sustainable...

  15. Prospects of Smart Grid Technologies for a Sustainable and Secure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for a Sustainable and Secure Power Supply Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prospects of Smart Grid Technologies for a Sustainable and Secure Power Supply...

  16. Preliminary Study on Sustainable Low-Carbon Development Towards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preliminary Study on Sustainable Low-Carbon Development Towards 2030 in Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Preliminary Study on Sustainable...

  17. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  18. RCW - 43.21B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution Control Hearings Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  19. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  20. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington: Energy(B2G)BunkerE-Forms

  1. California Land Use Planning Information Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013Management86Use Planning

  2. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    around the cluster of points representing cities in KS Use the ?Previous Extent? button to return to the last zoom ? Click on Identify tool , then on a city to get tabular information such as city name 10. What other kinds of information does the table...

  3. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    a comprehensive greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, which the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will develop over the next year. In addition to a GHG inventory and mitigation tools, a state climate action to increasingly dominate urban climate. · Florida ranks sixth in the US for total GHG emissions. The agricultural

  4. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  5. Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

  6. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  7. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  8. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  9. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

  10. Sustainability - is it for the CIO?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangal, Vandana Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Tool for Corporate Sustainability. Journal of BusinessM. L. (Mar 1997). Sustainability and Technical Progress. The2009 ISSN 1076-7975 Sustainability - is it for the CIO?

  11. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  12. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  13. Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ...

  14. A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards...

  15. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  16. Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

  17. FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Sohngen

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

  18. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Sustainable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Sustainable Design and Technology Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) LN 0010 NRE 501 (Biofuels and Sustainability, Land Use and Global Change), 574, 576, 605, 687, ARCH 575, CEE 460, 582, 686, MECHENG 589), 501 (Bio Based Carb Mitig & BioFuel), 574, 576, 605, 687, ARCH 575, CEE 460, 582, 686, CHE 496

  19. Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for...

  20. Zoning administrators and others con-cerned with airport land use will soon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Zoning administrators and others con- cerned with airport land use will soon have help when of the current regulatory rules and climate. The manual describes proce- dural requirements and guidelines, along

  1. The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isurban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and

  2. Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Shannon Ashley

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

  3. Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product ofthe area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =

  4. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  5. Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Noel R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

  6. aeronautical land-use assurance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY RULE 41.05.02.M1 Space and Land Use Management Approved October 6, 1999 Revised April 22 in Brazos and Burleson Counties. The President delegates...

  7. Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

  9. Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

  10. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental flows are important to maintain the ecological integrity of the estuary. In a watershed, it is influenced by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, ...

  11. Datacenter Sustainability Page 1 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Datacenter Sustainability Page 1 Datacenter Sustainability #12;Datacenter Sustainability Page 2 sustainability imperative and how advanced technologies, smart business practices, and strategic partnerships are helping us reduce our impact on the environment. Also learn how our investments in efficient, sustainable

  12. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  13. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bioenergy program” land-use baseline (i.e. , one in which prices,BIOENERGY POLICIES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE IMPACTS POLICY ACTION ENERGY SYSTEMS MATERIALS LAND USE, ECOSYSTEMS ECONOMIC SYSTEM (PRICES)Prices, yields, supply curves, and land uses can change over time, year-by-year, in the “with bioenergy

  14. Sustainable Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exascale for Energy, Ecological Sustainability and Globalrating energy efficiency and other sustainability features,of sustainability often do so in highly energy- intensive

  15. Towards sustainable settlement growth: A new multi-criteria assessment for implementing environmental targets into strategic urban planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schetke, Sophie, E-mail: schetke@uni-bonn.de [Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Dept. of Urban Planning and Real Estate Management, University of Bonn, Nussallee 1, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Haase, Dagmar, E-mail: dagmar.haase@ufz.de [Humboldt University of Berlin, Department of Geography, Rudower Chaussee 16, 10099 Berlin, Germany, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Computational Landscape Ecology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Koetter, Theo, E-mail: koetter@uni-bonn.de [Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Dept. of Urban Planning and Real Estate Management, University of Bonn, Nussallee 1, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For nearly one decade, the German political and research-agenda has been to a large extent determined by the ongoing question of how to limit the expansion of settlement areas around cities in order to preserve natural resources, make settlement growth more sustainable and to strengthen the re-use of existing inner-urban areas (see a.o. Koetter et al. 2009a, 2010; Schetke et al. 2009, 2010b). What is already under discussion within the international literature are the recommendations of the German Council for Sustainability to quantitatively reduce the daily greenfield consumption from the current rate of over 100 ha per day to a rate of 30 ha per day in 2020 and to bring urban infill development up to a ratio of 3:1 with greenfield development (German Council for Sustainability, 2004).). This paper addresses the added value beyond those abstract political targets and presents an innovative, multi-criteria assessment (MCA) of greenfield and infill sites to evaluate their sustainability and resource efficiency. MCA development and its incorporation into a Decision Support System (DSS) were accomplished by utilising a stakeholder-driven approach. The resulting tool can be applied in preparing and revising land-use plans. The paper presents the concept and the development process of the MCA-DSS. Test runs with planners prove that the evaluation of potential housing sites using individually weighted environmental indicators helps to identify those strategies of housing development that accord most closely with sustainability goals. The tests further show that the development of greenfield sites generally exhibits less sustainability than that of infill sites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper presents an innovative, multi-criteria assessment (MCA) of greenfield and infill sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MCA evaluates sustainability and resource efficiency of potential housing sites in a stakeholder-driven approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test runs with planners identified prominent environmental indicators and assigned individual weights. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resulting tool can be applied in preparing and revising land-use plans according to sustainable housing development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test runs also show that greenfield development generally exhibits less sustainability than infill development.

  16. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    160 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Degree options BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences in arts subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA

  17. Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL

    2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

  18. Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

  19. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

  20. GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

  1. Land use implications of future energy system trajectories – the case of the UK 2050 Carbon Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konadu, D. Dennis; Mourão, Zenaida Sobral; Allwood, Julian M.; Richards, Keith S.; Kopec, Grant; McMahon, Richard; Fenner, Richard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of „biodiversity protection and food production, before low-carbon energy/GHG sequestration?. This is consistent with 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36... Highlights ? The Carbon Plan could result in significant land use change for bioenergy by 2050 ? Higher Nuclear; less efficiency pathway has the highest land use change impact ? Higher Renewables; more energy efficiency pathway has the lowest...

  2. Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station interest in "new outreach methods" ·!Demonstrated value added in more collaborative process #12;Lessons Learned 1.! Begin internal & external outreach earlier 2.! Our "good ideas" were not necessarily good

  3. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  4. TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SOLUTIONS FOR LOW-CARBON CITIES Kara Kockelman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    at the NSF`s U.S.-China Workshop on Pathways to Low Carbon Cities Hong Kong Polytechnic University, December1 TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SOLUTIONS FOR LOW-CARBON CITIES Kara Kockelman Professor and William prove helpful as cities grow. For example, densification facilitates carbon- saving reductions in trip

  5. Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing Liz Isenstein and Mi-Huyn Park Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University digital images, GIS (Geographic Information systems) and RS (Remote Sensing) software were used. A maximum

  6. Dischargecalcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil or land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discharge­calcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil ecosystem function. Throughout the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil rapid changes in land use and land with data from 28 streams throughout Brazil. These streams come from three distinct regions and varied

  7. Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judjahn, Stephanie K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this...

  8. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  9. The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hee Ju

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel...

  10. Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making by Howard W. Reeves1 improve water resources management by illustrating the nonlinear behavior of the coupled system (Pahl systems arise from the decisions of many individuals and groups (Holland 1995; Batty 2005). For the agent

  11. Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles Pricope, N. G., G. López-Carr, D. Redo, M. Bonilla, M. Levy (2013). Deforestation and reforestation of Latin America and the Caribbean (2001-2010). Biotropica. 45(2): 262-271. López-Carr, D. and J. Burgdorfer (2013) "Deforestation

  12. Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

  13. Biofuels and land-use A simpler approach to the problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and land-use change A simpler approach to the problem John J. Sheehan Presented of increased biofuels demand "Consequential" Life Cycle Assessment is a new concept #12;Technical uncertainty ethano #12;Political and ethical dilemmas The ceteris paribus argument: Biofuels effects should

  14. ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    that undisturbed neotropical forests remove a significant portion of human-derived CO2 emissions fromW ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon indicate that CO2 doubling enhances the production of woody tissue per unit leaf area by about 25% (ref. 5

  15. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

  17. Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judjahn, Stephanie K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this...

  18. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  19. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    150 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development MA or BSc (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA degree, and students most interested in Science subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development should apply for the BSc degree. Subject

  20. Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

  1. Sustainability Support

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sustainability Support serves as a corporate technical assistance, coordination, and integration resource to support line organizations in the resolution of sustainability issues and management concerns.

  2. Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented...

  3. Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  4. Green Paper: A European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paper: A European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Paper: A European Strategy for...

  5. SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining an environment that enhances human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, Johan

    #12;#12;SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining species. · · · Developing planning tools to enable comparative analysis of sustainability implications an environment that enhances human health and fosters a transition toward sustainability. Sustainability should

  6. The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

  7. Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon, Boulder, 80309-0488, United States 1. Introduction Carbon management through changes in land, 2010). Human land-use change is the second largest contributor of increasing carbon dioxide

  8. As sustainability becomes integrated into public policy decision making,comprehensive and easily accessible sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    As sustainability becomes integrated into public policy decision making,comprehensive and easily accessible sustainability information will be needed to assist policy analysis.As visual analytics emerges as a major tool of policy analysis,sustainability information,particularly sustainability indicators

  9. Bus Str Sustainability Spring 2011 MGT 6359: BUSINESS STRATEGIES FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Bus Str Sustainability Spring 2011 1/11 MGT 6359: BUSINESS STRATEGIES FOR SUSTAINABILITY Professor and management tools Corporate environmental programs Sustainable development Environmental marketing and capitalizing on these opportunities. #12;Bus Str Sustainability Spring 2011 2/11 Course Outline The course

  10. Connecting seas: western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    of changing land use and climate M E N N O B A R T R . VA N E E R D E N *, R U D O L F H . D R E N T w, J U L the tundra and taiga belts of Russia with north-west Europe is the major migratory avenue for an estimated 9; accepted 24 January 2005 Introduction Profound changes have occurred in the European landscape during

  11. Land Use in Relation to Sedimentation in Reservoirs : Trinity River Basin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Garin, Alexis N.

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cash in advance foY docks, fishing camps, et cetera. Few permanent. imprdvements, how- ever, and the period of time since the construction of the reservoir has been so short that not much road construction has been possible. *That is, annual...LIBRARY. ' A & M COLLEGE. 1 - k TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas 'ULLETIN NO. 597 JANUARY 1941 LAND USE IN RELATION TO SEDIMENTA- TION IN RESERVOIRS, TRINITY RIVER BASIN, TEXAS I I 1...

  12. “Sustainable development of hydropower in third countries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    basis has been an array of humanitarian and economic development, especially for local people as well as an important tool in the fight agains &8220;Sustainable development of...

  13. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  15. SustainabilityStudies sustainability@uci.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    SustainabilityStudies sustainability@uci.edu Sustainable Business Management Certificate Program in the sustainability field, such as managers, directors, architects, urban planners, landscape architects, designers opportunities and risks while minimizing potential liability. extension.uci.edu/sustainability Sustainable

  16. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  17. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  18. Departmental Sustainability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines requirements and responsibilities for managing sustainability DOE to ensure that the Department carries out its missions in a sustainable manner that addresses national energy security and global environmental challenges, and advances sustainable, efficient and reliable energy for the future; institute wholesale cultural change to factor sustainability and greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions into all DOE corporate management decisions; and ensure that DOE achieves the sustainability goals established in its Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Cancels DOE O 450.1A and DOE O 430.2B

  19. A Blueprint for Urban Sustainability: Integrating Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Blueprint for Urban Sustainability: Integrating Sustainable Energy Practices into Metropolitan Planning, May 2004 A Blueprint for Urban Sustainability: Integrating Sustainable...

  20. Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every Consumer Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every Consumer Highlights of Ford's near, mid, and...

  1. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  2. The impact of land use change on migrant birds in the Sahel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, William M.; Small, Robert D. S.; Vickery, Juliet A.

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -1967 but below it between 1968-1985. In fact, the early 1970s were a period of rainfall failure and famine in the Sahel, and coincided with population declines in many of the migrant bird populations wintering in these drought-affect d dryland habitats... and grazing reserves have been subject to more intensive use (both legal and illegal). The extent of Sahelian wetlands has been reduced by the construction of dams for hydro power and irrigation. The spatial patterns of land use change and the associated...

  3. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  4. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations What’s Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

  5. Traffic Volume as a Primary Road Characteristic Impacting Wildlife: A Tool for Land Use and Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charry, Barbara; Jones, Jody

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbines: A summary of existing studies and comparisons to other sources of avian collision mortality

  6. Living Sustainably

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milbrath, Lester W.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sustainable society does something more than keep people alive; livingsustainable modes of behavior that also lead to quality in living.

  7. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Report on SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2 0 1 1 ­ 2 0 1 2 ISCN-GULF Charter Report #12;3 1. FACILITIES with projects of our University's Cell for Sustainable Development; it also presents evidence for steady alike. THIS REPORT This is the second report on sustainable development at the University of Luxembourg

  8. Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Heather Grace

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    service valuation model to each of the land use classes over the discreet time periods. Hydrologic peak flow models using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method were developed and applied to each watershed for each discreet time period...

  9. Investigating the effect of farmer land-use decisions on rural landscapes using an agent-based model approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Eleni

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and cover change (LUCC) is increasingly recognised as one of the most visible impacts of humans on nature. In rural areas, most of the observed LUCC is associated with agricultural activities. This has traditionally been attributed...

  10. Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyung Cheal

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

  11. Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

  12. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

  13. Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for...

  14. Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

  15. A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    to the driving forces influencing the usage of agricultural land, while land use must suit the natural conditions.laggner@ti.bund.de Abstract Agricultural land use in Germany and related im- pacts on the environment and the use of natural and land use changes are re- lated to environmental impacts like groundwater pollution, greenhouse gas

  16. Metropolitan Accessibility and Transportation Sustainability:Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Metropolitan Accessibility and Transportation Sustainability:Sustainability: Comparative Reduce (fulfillment of)Promote Sustainability: Meet needs of (fulfillment of) needs present Institute SMART Sustainable Mobility and Accessibility Research andSMART Sustainable Mobility

  17. SUSTAINABLE A university for sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    THE SUSTAINABLE UNIVERSITY #12;A university for sustainable development The University. The University of Gothenburg believes the future is important. We want to ensure sustainable development universities in Europe for research and education in sustainable development. Sustainable education

  18. SUSTAINABLE A university for sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    THE SUSTAINABLE UNIVERSITY #12;A university for sustainable development The University contribution to a sustainable future. By systematically integrating sustainable development into research. The University of Gothenburg's Vision 2020 confirms that sustainable development is important; we always consider

  19. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

  20. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  1. Venice Sustainability Advisory Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Venice Sustainability Advisory PanelFINAL REPORT Venice Sustainability Advisory Panel FinalInvestigator The Venice Sustainability Advisory Panel (

  2. Environmental Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 ERM40450 Impact Assessment Procedures 51 ENVB4XXXX* Environmental Legislation 54 ENVB40410Environmental Sustainability Distance Learning Masters in Science Graduate Diploma & Certificate #12;Prospectus for Environmental Sustainability: Distance Learning 2013-2014 2 CONTENTS 1.0 FOREWORD 5

  3. sustainable environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainable resource management environment fisheries aquaculture Cefas capability statement #12 that they can manage their environments and resources in a responsible, effective and sustainable manner. Our costs · Understand, assess and develop opportunities in the short, medium and long-term · Build

  4. Bishop's University -Environment and Land Use Committee Minutes for the Meeting #1 -July 10, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's. Composting: The composting of yard waste from the campus is underway at a site behind the old tool shed. Kit

  5. Sustainability Performance Office | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office...

  6. New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

  7. Science Serving Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buildings Greening Transportation Green Purchasing & Green Technology Pollution Prevention Science Serving Sustainability ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at...

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    27 ICT AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY T he environment is a large complex sys- tem. Managing. Environmental Monitoring and Associated Resource Management and Risk Mitigation ICTimprovestheabilitytoobtain,storeandinte- grate large volumes of environmental data and to conductsimulationandanalysisinrealtime

  9. A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

  10. Land-use planning for phosphate mining and resource areas: the central Florida case. A workshop synopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFevers, J. R.; Toner, W. J.; Guernsey, J. L.; Rifkin, E.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 19-20, 1978, a workshop was conducted in Bartow, Florida, on the topic of land-use and reclamation planning in the local phosphate mining region. More than 100 participants attended the workshop representing the phosphate mining industry, environmental groups, research organizations, planning agencies, news media, and governmental regulatory agencies. Various aspects of the environmental and land-use impacts of phosphate mining, together with the state-of-the-art of mitigating adverse impacts, were discussed. The participants were required to work cooperatively to develop a series of alternative land-use plans for a selected mining site that was the focus of a half-day field trip. Overall, the participants developed a number of rational land-use and reclamation plans for the site that were considered acceptable by the majority of the group. There was general agreement that the most valuable aspect of the workshop was the opportunity for individuals with such diverse interests to work cooperatively on a common problem and develop acceptable solutions.

  11. The habitat use and selection of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in a land use landscape in Kenya, Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    in Kenya, Africa Ashley Coe Ashley Coe (Corresponding author) Montana State University Bozeman, MT Email) to examine how land use and cover types affect the distribution of African elephants in Kenya (2, Kenya had approximately 23,353 ­ 31,636 individuals (Blanc 2007); mainly, savannah African elephants

  12. Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2 Mark A to show that a regional irrigation cooling effect (ICE) exists, opposite in sign to urban heat island magnitude, but opposite sign, to predictions for future regional warming from greenhouse gases. Given our

  13. THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

  14. Sustainabiliity Sustainability Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Sustainabiliity IIT Campus Sustainability Plan 2010­2020 Published Fall Semester 2010 www.iit.edu/campus_sustainability #12;IIT Campus Sustainability Plan 2010-2020 Fall Semester 2010 1 Section I: Background Sustainability ...................................................................................................................................................................8 IIT Academic Entities on Sustainability

  15. Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University Sustainability Strategic Framework #12;Sustainability Framework 2 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 Queen's Sustainability Mission

  16. Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of the Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool, which is designed to assess impacts of future land use/built environment patterns on transportation-related energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tool can be used to evaluate a range of population distribution and urban design scenarios for 2030 and 2050. This tool was produced as part of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  17. Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

  18. Bureau of Land Management - Table 1.4-1 - Land Use Planning Process Steps |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington:Information Resource Advisory

  19. Sustainable value analysis tool for value creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Miying; Vladimirova, Doroteya; Rana, Padmakshi; Evans, Steve

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities in the company. For example, the waste of low-grade heat and water was identified to be a major value uncaptured in the MOL, and the value opportunity is that it can be used to produce electricity or drive the compressor, or vaporize the liquid O2... to environment and society. However, the concept of value missed needs further clarity – value currently squandered, wasted or inadequately captured by a current business model. Besides, selling service is intangible, flexible and unpredictable, therefore...

  20. ucsf sustainability healthy environment, sustainable future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    ucsf sustainability healthy environment, sustainable future UC SAN FRANCISCO ANNUAL REPORT FY 2009-2010 Annual Report of the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 UCSF Sustainability Governance 3 Table 1: CACS Members 4 Figure 1: UCSF Sustainability

  1. Review: Hijacking Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonelli, Monika

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    addressing the attack on sustainability, Sharon Beder’s 2002Review: Hijacking Sustainability By Adrian Parr Reviewed byParr, Adrian. Hijacking Sustainability. Cambridge, MA: MIT

  2. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  3. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  4. Psychology of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milfont, Taciano Lemos

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,Psychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck andPsychology of Sustainable Development. Norwell, MA: Kluwer

  5. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  6. Psychology of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milfont, Taciano Lemos

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,out historical aspects of sustainable development and itsPsychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck and

  7. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  8. Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

  9. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  10. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  11. Exergy sustainability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  12. Environmental Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Systems & Climate Change 21 3.2 Communication 24 #12;Prospectus for Environmental Sustainability: Distance Learning 2014-2015 3 MEEN40820 Technical Communications 24 IS40030 People Information & Communication 26 ENVB40380 Managing the Interface between Science & Policy 28 3.3 Resource Characterisation

  13. ONLINE LEARNING Managing energy for a sustainable future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ONLINE LEARNING Managing energy for a sustainable future The Energy Resource Management Certificate energy management. Pursuing sustainable energy management strategies can be a powerful tool for achieving the California Energy Commission. Gain practical knowledge that matters n Explore the practical, sustainable

  14. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  15. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  16. The University of Winnipeg Campus Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Land Use Planning and Property Management....................................... 29 Materials................................. 55 Appendix D ­ Land Use and Property Management Indicators........... 57 Appendix E ­ Materials Management.................................................................... 21 Energy Use Management

  17. Sustainability Published December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Sustainability Report Published December 2009 #12;#12;NIEHS Sustainability Report #12;#12;Table........................................................................................................9 Managing for Sustainability....................................................................................................45 #12;A Message from Our Director In order to sustain and improve life on Earth, we must

  18. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  19. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2014 Sustainability Awards.

  20. Sustainable NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  1. Sustainable NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  2. Sustainable Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armendariz, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an organizational chart. It?s about ensuring that we see the big picture, and are not addressing one environmental issue only to create another consequence in the process.? -- Lisa P. Jackson Remarks to the National Academy of Sciences November 30... environmentally protective and sustainable we can be. ? -- Lisa P. Jackson Remarks to the National Academy of Sciences, November 30, 2010 Awareness Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them. A. Einstein...

  3. Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action Title: Sustainable Environment

  4. sustainability and u} Sustainability at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Peter

    sustainability and u} #12;Sustainability at the University of Minnesota is a continuous effort. The University of Minnesota is committed to incorporating sustainability into its teaching, research and outreach and the operations that support them. sustainability} From groundbreaking research to unique recycling options

  5. Assessment of University Sustainability Activities SUSTAINABILITY TRACKING,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    Assessment of University Sustainability Activities under the SUSTAINABILITY TRACKING, ASSESSMENT Rashed-Ali, PhD. Prepared for: The UTSA Sustainability Council May 3rd , 2011 #12;yhd/s ^hDD Zz 2 | P a g-Ali, Assistant Professor in the College of Architecture, conducted a survey and assessment of UTSA sustainability

  6. EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A.

  7. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  8. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards Newsletter highlights the...

  9. Diesel Truck Traffic in Low-Income and Minority Communities Adjacent to Ports: Environmental Justice Implications of Near-Roadway Land Use Conflicts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Douglas; Krudysz, Margaret; Winer, Arthur

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Includes Fleet of 400 Low-Emission Trucks. Long Beach Press-truck-related land use conflicts and current planning and emissionemissions standards and will travel only on nonresidential truck

  10. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications ofecosystem service values and (2) to show how the valuationecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation

  11. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  12. Sustainable Furman NOVEMBER 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and destination taking the long view #12;SUSTAINABLE FURMAN 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Living sustainably entails takingSustainable Furman #12;NOVEMBER 2009 sustainability meeting humanity's needs journey in perpetuity, a commitment to sustainability promotes the well-being of people and campuses over the long term

  13. Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Achieving Sustainability at MnDOT Cindy Carlsson MnDOT Office of Policy Analysis, Research and Innovation 22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference May 24, 2011 #12;Sustainable practices respect Sustainability #12;Environmental Sustainability Sustainable practices · Are compatible with and may enhance

  14. Sustainability Cal State Fullerton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from the Sustainability Initiative Study Group October 28, 2008 #12;Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from the Sustainability Initiative Safety Sally Yassine Contracts & Procurement #12;Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from

  15. Multi-Metric Sustainability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.; Macknick, J.; Mann, M.; Pless, J.; Munoz, D.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily accessible framework that allows for evaluating impacts and comparing tradeoffs among factors in energy policy, expansion planning, and investment decision making is lacking. Recognizing this, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) funded an exploration of multi-metric sustainability analysis (MMSA) to provide energy decision makers with a means to make more comprehensive comparisons of energy technologies. The resulting MMSA tool lets decision makers simultaneously compare technologies and potential deployment locations.

  16. Sustainability. Systems integration for global sustainability.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study of the energy-water nexus. Sustainability 2, 945–962 (sustainability studies have fo- cused on flows of real material and energysustainability have been place- based even if they look at coupled systems [for example, the energy-

  17. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of Biomass Based Fuel Use,” Energy Policy L.Energy and Carbon Budgets of Wood Fuel Coppice Systems,” BiomassBiomass Fuels and Forest-Management Strategies: How Do We Calculate the Greenhouse-Gas Emissions Benefits? ,” Energy

  18. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solve the energy crisis through biological methods, including genetically engineering algae and cyanobacteria. Create a Sustainable Future: Living Living a Sustainable Future How...

  19. Sustainability Bulletin USGBC Sustainable Speaker Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    series of events recognizing Earth Day and the need to increase sustainable living on campus. This yearMay 2014 Sustainability Bulletin #12;USGBC Sustainable Speaker Series May 13 Give and Go May 13th themselves from many of the technology devices that have become ubiquitous in our daily lives, and to start

  20. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    03 Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation:17 Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation:Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and International

  1. Sustainable Development & Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    03 Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation:17 Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation:Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and International

  2. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final amongst university's invested in sustainable development. Our small but mighty size allows us to build through positive sustainable practices. As the Sustainable Development Summer Intern I am fortunate enough

  3. Sustainable Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  4. McKinney Sustainability Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CATEE Conference: Planning for Sustainability McKinney?s Draft Community Sustainability Plan: Shaping Our Sustainable Future Julie Smith Office of Environmental Stewardship November 8, 2011 Sustainability Planning ? Why bother? ? Who has... aspect of sustainability ? Created the Green Advisory Committee (GAC) ? November 2008: Green Sustainability Initiative Report ? Recommended forming a comprehensive, sustainability program to coordinate the sustainability agenda for the city...

  5. Received two 2013 Sustainability Awards from DOE for "Sustainable Campus" and "Innovative and Holistic Sustainability." PNNL advances the DOE sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received two 2013 Sustainability Awards from DOE for "Sustainable Campus" and "Innovative and Holistic Sustainability." PNNL advances the DOE sustainability mission with a diverse, focused effort toward goals for 2020 and beyond. The Sustainability Program and Information Management Services put

  6. Office of Sustainability Support

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Sustainability Support serves as AU’s organizational lead in partnering with the Department’s Sustainability Performance Office to support the understanding and implementation of sustainability programs and requirements within the Department, including through supporting development and implementation of DOE’s annual Strategic Sustainability Program Plan.

  7. Federal Sustainable Print Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides acceptable approaches for implementing the IT sustainability requirements and criteria required by DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, dated 5-2-11 and related to the sustainability requirements contained in Executive Order 13693, "Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade”.

  8. Sustainability Commitments Commitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    : On a fully sustainable urban campus, campus buildings become a living example of environmental researchSustainability Commitments Emissions Commitment: On a fully sustainable urban campus, the materials for elimination. Supply Chain/Waste Management Commitment: On a fully sustainable urban campus, material flows

  9. Sustainability in colleges 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Sustainability in colleges 15 Carbon reduction 5 Water 7 Travel8 Waste,recyclingandreuse10 Sustainability Report 2011/2012 #12;2University of Oxford Environmental Sustainability Report 2011/12 "As Chair of the Sustainability Steering Group, I have seen a significant shift in staff and students' expectations

  10. Progress Report 2014 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y Yale Progress Report 2014 Sustainability Strategic Plan #12;President Salovey announced Yale's continued commitment to sustainability when he released the University's second Sustainability Strategic-going efforts to address sustainability and called upon students, faculty, and staff to play an active role

  11. Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson Mn/DOT Office of Policy Analysis, Research and Innovation April 21, 2011 #12;Sustainability Is Not New Mn/DOT has long been a leader in CSS and environmental excellence. . . . . . so we're well along on the path to sustainability! #12;Today Sustainability is More

  12. Measuring Energy Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20 Measuring Energy Sustainability David L. Greene Abstract For the purpose of measurement, energy sustainability is defined as ensuring that future generations have energy resources that enable them to achieve that there are valid, more comprehensive understandings of sustainability and that energy sustainability as de- fined

  13. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by MeadWestvaco Corporation held on June 26, 2012

  14. Framework for Measuring Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Knight Foundation will use this sustainability framework for internal organizational purposes with the possibility

  15. Percussion tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Teddy R.

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A percussion tool is described and which includes a housing mounting a tool bit; a reciprocally moveable hammer borne by the housing and which is operable to repeatedly strike the tool bit; and a reciprocally moveable piston enclosed within the hammer and which imparts reciprocal movement to the reciprocally moveable hammer.

  16. NEW MEDIA LITERACY communication for sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    1 NEW MEDIA LITERACY communication for sustainability John Blewitt, Director of Lifelong Learning - its habitats and peoples - is derived from new and traditional media, it is imperative that any notion critical freedom', then we will perceive the media, traditional and new, as essential tools and instruments

  17. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le, A. Z. Khan, Improving integration for integrated coastal347 ISSUE 6225 Systems integration for global sustainabilitySUSTAINABILITY Systems integration for global sustainability

  18. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liu et al. , Framing sustainability in a telecoupled world.teleconnections and sustainability. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.framework for analyzing sustainability of social-ecological

  19. Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options Byand William A. Peters. Sustainable Energy: Choosing AmongAll the authors of Sustainable Energy are associated with

  20. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistry–climate–land model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  1. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint Source Pollution Jennifer Thacher, and Janie Chermak, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico Project descriptors: Risk aversion, non-point source

  2. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

  3. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls ({Sigma}PCB). The objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. The authors detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was {Sigma}DDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and {Sigma}chlordane. Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, {Sigma}DDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although {Sigma}DDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, the study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  4. Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use in the Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Guatemala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    1 Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use In explaining variability in tropical deforestation, scholars have focused almost exclusively on in situ (or "on causes of deforestation in the humid tropics with a case study from Guatemala. To investigate the first

  5. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

  6. Sustainability Curriculum Models Sustainability Design Charrette Curriculum Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    Sustainability Curriculum Models Sustainability Design Charrette Curriculum Workshop December 4 student that goes through WWU understands how sustainability is practiced on campus Students leave with a commitment, knowledge, and resources to practice sustainability in work and private life. Content

  7. Sustainability Peer Educator Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    Sustainability Peer Educator Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educator Available Positions 2013 ­ April 2014 Position Summary: Working with the Sustainability Project Coordinator, this team of students will be responsible for enhancing and educating UTSC students, staff and faculty on sustainability

  8. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 1 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final of Bishop's University. The role of the Sustainable Development Summer Intern (SDSI) is to coordinate and organize sustainable development information and activities during the summer months. Ensuring

  9. Environmental Sustainability & Green Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    Environmental Sustainability & Green Energy With escalating concerns about global energy shortages of carbon nanotubes for solar energy · ChemicalReactorEngineeringCentre: developing innovative green reactor contaminants in air, water and soil through advanced oxidation Environmental Remediation · Focus on sustainable

  10. Sustainability, Ethics, and Aesthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moldavanova, Alisa

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among four dimensions of sustainability (environmental, economic, social, and cultural), it is the latter aspect that is least examined by scholars. However, understanding how culture contributes to the long term sustainability of communities...

  11. Corporate sustainability assessment methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinchuk, Natallia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability is a vague concept specifically in the context of a corporate world. There are numerous definitions for corporate sustainability and just as many ways of evaluating it. This work attempts to define, structure ...

  12. Environmental Frontier of Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    A A Global Environmental Studies Frontier of Sustainability Science Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced Energy, etc Integrated Research Bld This class is designed for graduate students to acknowledge research frontier of Sustainability Science

  13. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop (held in Washington, D.C., on June 26, 2012) gathered stakeholders from industry and academia to discuss the current state of the art for sustainable nanomat...

  14. February 22, 2010 Shifting from the Economics of Obesity to Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    in Vermont, California and New York. Learning from others and offering new tools for energy sustainabilityPrint February 22, 2010 Shifting from the Economics of Obesity to Sustainable Energy The Potential for Clean Energy, Low-Carbon Gains through a 'Sustainable Energy Utility.' by John Byrne, Francis Hodsoll

  15. The University of Winnipeg Campus Sustainability Performance Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Land Use Planning and Property Management....................................... 29 Materials................................. 59 Appendix D ­ Land Use and Property Management Indicators........... 61 Appendix E ­ Materials Management.................................................................... 21 Energy Use Management

  16. Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report i Biannual Sustainability Report Projects $5 Million and Over August 2012 Active Projects

  17. Metrology for Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Michael Postek (National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop on June 26, 2012

  18. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    ­ Encourage research and innovation in sustainable development 14 - Standard of Living, EconomySUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2011-2012 #12;2 Table of Contents UNIVERSIT� LAVAL AT A GLANCE 3 A WORD FROM THE RECTOR 4 A WORD FROM THE EXECUTIVE VICE-RECTOR, DEVELOPMENT 5 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

  19. Sustainability Masters Programmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability Masters Programmes School of Earth and Environment FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT #12 for sustainability (e.g. a low-carbon economy, or economic development that considers environmental and social issues) needs people with an in-depth understanding of sustainability and climate change issues. Forward

  20. WINTER 2014 Sustainability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    WINTER 2014 Sustainability and Renewable Energy in Costa Rica January 4 - 14 Dr. James Hoffmann, Program Director Lecturer Sustainability Studies Program E-511 Melville Library Stony Brook, NY 11794 sustainability and renewable energy. Students will spend 11 days in Costa Rica to participate in site visits

  1. Sustainability Bulletin Clothing Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    Sustainability Bulletin April 2014 #12;Upcoming Clothing Collection March 3-April 14 Hunter Lovins on Wednesday, April 23rd from 11am-2pm brought to you by EAP and the Office of Environmental Sustainability will be in the Campus Center Ballroom to highlight other aspects of well-being such as health, nutrition, sustainability

  2. Social Sustainability: Geography 446

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social Sustainability: Geography 446 submitted to Sally Hermansen & Lorna Seppala The University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC Curranne Labercane February 4th, 2009 #12;Definition Social Sustainability- A socially sustainable community provides an inclusive, equitable, and decent quality of life for current

  3. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  4. Final Report Sustainability at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    1 Final Report Sustainability at Oregon State University Prepared by The Institute for Natural Resources Oregon State University June 2009 #12;2 Sustainability at Oregon State University June 2009 The Institute for Natural Resources Created by the Oregon Legislature through the 2001 Oregon Sustainability Act

  5. Sustainability and Horticulture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    N2O CH4 CO2 CO2 Sustainability and Horticulture: Examples from Tree Fruit Production David Granatstein WSU-Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources Wenatchee, WA USA Kermit Olsen Lecture, St. Paul, MN, March 21, 2012 Yakima Valley #12;#12;CH4 Outline What is `sustainability' ? Global

  6. SUSTAINABILITY WHO CAN APPLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUNDED BY CALL FOR SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH STUDENT WHO CAN APPLY Undergraduate and graduate Participate in the Global Change & Sustainability Center's Research Symposium; attend workshops with faculty or publish in the U's student-run sustainability publication to be released in May 2014. Are you conducting

  7. BERKSHIRE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    BERKSHIRE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SUSTAINABILITY V O L U M E S 1-10 A ground-breaking interdisciplinary@berkshirepublishing.com | Tel +1 413 528 0206 19 April, 2012 In the 10-volume Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability, experts, regional sustainability issues, and resource and ecosystem management. The ten volumes are available

  8. Sustainable energy Risindialogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable energy Risøindialogue Risøindialogue Energy is a fundamental precondition for growth and prosperity. A sustainable and reliable energy supply is essential to ensuring that the future energy demand flexibility and robust- ness. Society and systems A sustainable and reliable energy supply is necessary

  9. Sustainable Development Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    Sustainable Development Report 2010-2011 #12;2 Table of Contents Université Laval at a glance 2-2011 highlights 9 University community initiatives 15 Sustainable development educational program 21 Research and creativity in sustainable development 24 Awards, recognition, and distinctions 28 Implementation

  10. The Sustainability "Green Initiative"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    sustainability approach aimed at: ·Lowering energy use and cost ·Reducing greenhouse gases ·Water and waste waterThe Sustainability "Green Initiative" At LAPPA October, 2008 #12;Sustainability is the capacity ·Carbon Footprint ·Ozone Friendly ·Global Warming ·Renewable Energy ·Biodegradable What does this whole

  11. ETSU Department of Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    ETSU Department of Sustainability Kathleen Moore- Director of Sustainability MOORE their peers. Our hope is to make ETSU the most sustainable, eco- friendly, and resource efficient university and energy conservation, and as well help plan activities in their residence halls with their complex's Hall

  12. University of Saskatchewan Sustainability Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    · Management for Sustainability · Energy · Transportation · Waste #12;Executive Summary Page 2 of 90 UUniversity of Saskatchewan Sustainability Assessment Prepared by: Kerri Klein Sustainable, Micheal Molaro and Jennifer Menzies) for their confidence in the vision of a sustainable University

  13. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

  14. Sustainable Bioenergy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Bioenergy Sustainable Bioenergy Argonne's research in bioenergy includes topics associated with feedstock production and biomass conversion. Argonne scientists also...

  15. Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on environment and energy sustainability is given as well.an account of energy systems and sustainability metrics.

  16. Queer Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Chindogu. Did someone say "Bless you?" No need. This is a Japanese word that means "queer tools" and it was coined to describe the Japanese penchant for unusual inventions. From toilet paper rolls that attach to the head...

  17. Workflow Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at NERSC go here. Galaxy - Galaxy is a web based workflow tool that is use by the genomics community. It allows you to define job dependencies via a web based workflow engine....

  18. Tools | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tools JCESR Logos Logos are available for download in jpg format. To view the full-size logo file, click the description under the version of the logo you are interested in. When...

  19. Sustainable Urban Development: A Literature Review and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Stephen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards Sustainable Development and Sustainable Urban Forms,Sustainable Urban Development Sustainable Seattle Indicatorseds. , Making Development Sustainable: From Concepts to

  20. Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 1 (to sustain instream #12;Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology Supporting Information 1.0 Produced Water Regulatory Framework for WY and NM

  1. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  2. Implementation of Sustainability at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    0 Assessing Implementation of Sustainability at UiO Grønt UiO S u s t a i n a b i l i t y i n R e sustainability commitment among universities and proposed Best Green University Practices in 2010. It presents the current status of UiO Environmental Sustainability. #12;1 If you cannot measure it, you cannot manage it

  3. Financing Sustainable EnergyFinancing Sustainable Energy City of Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Financing Sustainable EnergyFinancing Sustainable Energy City of Berkeley #12;Source of Green House for Sustainable EnergyFramework for Sustainable Energy Financing District · Adopted new Special Tax Financing Law indebtedness by unanimous consent of property owner #12;Framework for Sustainable Energy

  4. Sustainability Studies at WWU Minor and Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    Sustainability Studies at WWU ­ Minor and Major Schematic Concept Draft October 13, 2008 Sustainability Faculty and Advisement: WWU Sustainability Academy WWW SUSTAINABILITY MINOR -- 30 Credits A. Sustainability Literacy, (4 Credits) B Sustainability research skills (9 Credits) C. Research and seminars

  5. Workflow Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to &83 3.3 Table3WorkToolsTools

  6. Sustainability | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability "Much of Argonne's cutting-edge research is dedicated to discovery and development of clean energy solutions. We are tasked with an extraordinary opportunity-to...

  7. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

  8. Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

  9. Law, Sustainability, and the Pursuit of Happiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the steps needed for sustainability can actually improvesatisfaction. Thus, sustainability for society and theSustainability.

  10. WWU Sustainability Curriculum Design Charrette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    WWU Sustainability Curriculum Design Charrette Feburary 4, 2009 6-9 PM ­ (VU 462 AB) "What Does Sustainability Literacy look like at WWU"? Hosted by: WWU Sustainability Academy & WWU Sustainability Committee's Subcommittee on Curriculum Dear Colleagues: You are invited to join fellow WWU Sustainability Academy members

  11. Supporting integrated design through interlinked tools: The Labs21 toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Bell, Geoffrey; Carlisle, Nancy; Sartor, Dale; van Geet, Otto; Lintner, William; Wirdzek, Phil

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainable design of complex building types such as laboratories and hospitals can be particularly challenging, given their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. Tools such as design guides, energy benchmarking, and LEED rating systems are especially helpful to support sustainable design in such buildings. Furthermore, designers need guidance on how to effectively and appropriately use each tool within the context of an integrated design process involving multiple actors with various objectives. Toward this end, the Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program has developed an interlinked set of tools -- the Labs21 Toolkit -- to support an integrated design process for sustainable laboratories. Labs21 is a voluntary partnership program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to improve the environment al performance of U.S. laboratories. In this paper, we present the Labs21 Toolkit, and illustrate how these tools can be used to support sustainable design within an integrated design process. The tool kit includes core information tools, as well as process-related tools, as indicated below: Core information tools: -A Design Guide, which is a compendium of publications on energy efficiency in laboratories -Case Studies that showcase high-performance design features and applications. -Best Practice Guides that highlight industry-leading sustainable design strategies. -A web-based Benchmarking Tool to benchmark laboratory energy performance.Process tools: -A Design Intent Tool, which can be used to used to plan, document, and verify that a facility's design intent is being met at each stage of the design process. The Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC), a rating system specifically designed for laboratory facilities that builds on the LEED(TM) system. -A web-based Process Manual, that provides a ''portal'' to the tools and a step-by-step process for using these tools during each stage of the design process.

  12. Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University of California, Davis Kate Scow, Deputy Director of Agricultural Sustainability Institute Professor, Department of LAWR With input from Steve Kaffka, Ford Denison

  13. ASSET Minor Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solutions. · PV practicum Disassemble and study a product powered with solar cells in our productASSET Minor Sustainable Design Engineering Sustainable Science, Engineering and Technology (ASSET). Well-known projects of the ASSET institute are the Nuna solar cars, the Superbus and the Laddermill

  14. Sustainability at BPA 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA’s Sustainability Action Plan is grounded in our commitment to environmental stewardship and Executive Order 13514 that calls on the federal agencies to “lead by example” by setting a 2020 greenhouse gas emissions target, increasing energy efficiency; reducing fleet petroleum consumption; conserving water; reducing waste; supporting sustainable communities; and leveraging federal purchasing power to promoting environmentally responsible products and technologies.

  15. Sustainability Statement Environment Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metropolitan University www.mmu.ac.uk/environment MMU Annual Sustainability Statement 2008/2009 CO2 2 Contents 6 MMU Environment Strategy 7 Key Area 1 ­ Environmental Management Systems & Reporting 8 ­ 9 Key Area 2 ­ Energy and Carbon Emissions 10 ­ 11 Key Area 3 ­ Sustainable Buildings 12 Key Area 4 ­ Water

  16. UC Student Sustainability Survey Dr Matt Morris, Sustainability Advocate, UC Sustainability Office, October 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    1 2013 UC Student Sustainability Survey Dr Matt Morris, Sustainability Advocate, UC Sustainability (but like the 2011 survey, n=300) it also asked about specific sustainability initiatives on campus the findings from the 2012 survey, again indicating a strong level of student interest in sustainability

  17. UC Student Sustainability Survey Dr Matt Morris, Sustainability Advocate, UC Sustainability Office, October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    1 2012 UC Student Sustainability Survey Dr Matt Morris, Sustainability Advocate, UC Sustainability the results of the inaugural 2011 UC Sustainability Survey, and partly to test an alternative method asked questions relating to attitudes to and awareness of sustainability, as well as knowledge

  18. Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report Projects $5 Million and Over February 2012 Alice Crocker Lloyd Hall Renovation

  19. CONCRETE PAVING & TEXTURING FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    CONCRETE PAVING & TEXTURING FOR SUSTAINABILITY Bernard Igbafen Izevbekhai, Research Operations 2012 #12;OUTLINE #12;SUSTAINABILITY · Meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising Brundtland Commission in 1987: · Successful application of the principles of sustainable development lies

  20. SUSTAINABILITY AND FOOD Anthropology Professors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    SUSTAINABILITY AND FOOD Anthropology Professors Maribel Alvarez Diane Austin Mamadou Baro Tim. Potential Helpful Minors Environmental Studies Environmental Sciences Nutritional Science Sustainable Built Environments Sustainable Plant Systems Potential Employers Documentary Films Government Jobs

  1. Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds Compiled by Erwin Wodarczak and Melanie Hardbattle Projects series Sous-fonds Description o "Women and Sustainable Development: Canadian Perspectives (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Fonds Description Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds. ­ 1985

  2. Environmental Frontier of Sustainability Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    A Global Environmental Studies Frontier of Sustainability Science Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced Energy, etc Master July 14 frontier of Sustainability Science. Sustainability Science is a new academic field that was lately created

  3. Downhole tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Muradov, Andrei; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A double shouldered downhole tool connection comprises box and pin connections having mating threads intermediate mating primary and secondary shoulders. The connection further comprises a secondary shoulder component retained in the box connection intermediate a floating component and the primary shoulders. The secondary shoulder component and the pin connection cooperate to transfer a portion of makeup load to the box connection. The downhole tool may be selected from the group consisting of drill pipe, drill collars, production pipe, and reamers. The floating component may be selected from the group consisting of electronics modules, generators, gyroscopes, power sources, and stators. The secondary shoulder component may comprises an interface to the box connection selected from the group consisting of radial grooves, axial grooves, tapered grooves, radial protrusions, axial protrusions, tapered protrusions, shoulders, and threads.

  4. Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

  5. Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsDiversity & Flexibility Key to SustainabilityDavid Babson, Senior Fuels Engineer, Union of...

  6. A positive approach to sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dossa, Zahir (Zahir A.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability is a complex term that is becoming increasingly used. While extremely important, sustainability is often misused and misunderstood, yielding undesirable effects. Furthermore, many organizations promote the ...

  7. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  8. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE89 002669 RFandEndLand Use

  9. The Sustainability FYE Cluster The Sustainability FYE Cluster will make sustainable urban living a core experience for First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Sustainability FYE Cluster The Sustainability FYE Cluster will make sustainable urban living University. The Sustainability community infuses the learning-living community with practical and theoretical approaches to sustainable living, merging students' living community with unique academic and field

  10. Workflow Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to &83 3.3 Table3WorkTools

  11. Office of Sustainability 2013-2014 Sustainability Ambassador Student Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Office of Sustainability 2013-2014 Sustainability Ambassador Student Internship Organization: The University of Utah Office of Sustainability's primary objective is to decrease the University's environmental of sustainability. We work with the many campus organizations on topics that include energy, food, water, grounds

  12. GPHY 421 Sustainable Cities Prof. Ulrich Kamp 1 SUSTAINABLE CITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    architecture, and urban forestry and agriculture. We will discuss how sustainable cities of today are, and howGPHY 421 ­ Sustainable Cities ­ Prof. Ulrich Kamp 1 SUSTAINABLE CITIES (GPHY 421) - Fall 2011 of sustainability efforts in cities around the world. Topics include, for example, urban sprawl and smart growth

  13. Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions with Sustainable Energy By Mark DiesendorfSolutions with Sustainable Energy. Sydney, NSW: University

  14. May 07, 2009 Sustainability Task Force Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    . Sustainability Awareness at SJSU 23 - 28 6. Infusing Sustainability Across the Curriculum 29 ­ 30 7

  15. Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 – 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

  16. Total Sustainability Humber College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot and ventilation Exclusively e-book based curriculum 2. Ethics of Care: "Care For" v. "Care About": "without

  17. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides approaches for implementing the High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB) requirements of DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-6.

  18. JSC Sustainability Engagement Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1 Platinum) 2 ? The Agency?s sustainability policy is to execute NASA's mission without compromising our planet's resources. ? December 1972, Apollo 17 ? ? NASA provides photo of ?The Blue Marble? ? Catalyzes the Environmental Movement...

  19. JSC Sustainability Engagement Strategy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JSC-Sustainability@mail.nasa.gov ? NASA has 10 healthy centers across the U.S. ? Johnson Space Center (JSC) is located in the southeast part of Houston, Texas. ? JSC primarily support human spaceflight development & operations. ? The JSC..., 1 Platinum) 2 ? The Agency?s sustainability policy is to execute NASA's mission without compromising our planet's resources. ? December 1972, Apollo 17 ? ? NASA provides photo of ?The Blue Marble? ? Catalyzes the Environmental Movement...

  20. Sustainable Energy Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanner, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program • Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment... • Appoint Energy Manager • Analyze Existing Conditions • Develop Plan • Implement and Monitor Program ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Sustainable Programs Feature – District Commitment...

  1. Assessing the health equity impacts of regional land-use plan making: An equity focussed health impact assessment of alternative patterns of development of the Whitsunday Hinterland and Mackay Regional Plan, Australia (Short report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Colleen, E-mail: Colleen_Gunning@health.qld.gov.a [Health Promotion Service (Mackay), Tropical Population Health Services (Australia); Harris, Patrick [CHETRE-UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia); Mallett, John [Regional Planner, Department of Communities (Australia)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health service and partners completed an equity focussed health impact assessment to influence the consideration of health and equity within regional land-use planning in Queensland, Australia. This project demonstrated how an equity oriented assessment matrix can assist in testing regional planning scenarios. It is hoped that this HIA will contribute to the emerging interest in ensuring that potential differential health impacts continue to be considered as part of land-use planning processes.

  2. Sustainability at BPA 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THIS IS THE THIRD YEAR BPA has reported on sustainability program accomplishments. The report provides an opportunity to review progress made on sustainability initiatives, evaluate how far we have come and how much we can improve. The program has demonstrated maturation as the concepts of sustainability and resource conservation are communicated and understood. The sustainability program started as an employee-driven “grass roots” effort in 2010. Sustainability is becoming a consideration in how work is performed. The establishment of several policies supporting sustainability efforts proves the positive progress being made. In 2009, BPA became a founder and member of The Climate Registry, a nonprofit collaboration that sets standards to calculate, verify and report greenhouse gas emissions. This year, BPA completed and published our Greenhouse Gas inventory for the years of 2009, 2010 and 2011. The 2012 inventory is currently in the process of third-party verification and scheduled for public release in January 2014. These inventories provide a concrete measure of the progress we are making.

  3. Going for "Green" Sustainable Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Going for "Green" Sustainable Building Certification Statistics Europe Status May 2011 rics.org/sustainability #12;Sustainable Building Certification Statistics Europe Foreword Investors are increasingly the usefulness of sustainability certificates in mainstreaming the uptake of so-called `green' buildings across

  4. School of Environment and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    School of Environment and Sustainability Room 323, Kirk Hall 117 Science Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8 Telephone: (306) 966-1985 E-mail: sens.info@usask.ca Master of Environment and Sustainability (MES) Opportunity Sustainability Science in the Delta Dialogue Network The School of Environment and Sustainability

  5. A Sustainability Plan for Princeton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Sustainability Plan for Princeton #12;Princeton University adopted its Sustainability Plan and environmental degradation, Princeton has a responsibility to shape the national sustainability agenda and alternative energy sources. The campus can serve as both a model for advanced sustainability practices

  6. Sustainability Across the Curriculum Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Sustainability Across the Curriculum Symposium March 23, 2011 9:00am ­ 12:00pm 100 Nedderman Hall, and Community Engagement Work Group of the University Sustainability Committee The "Sustainability Across Sustainability Committee will feature faculty and graduate student panels discussing a variety of topics related

  7. Harnessing Sustainability to Uplift Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Harnessing Sustainability to Uplift Communities Thursday, February 28, 2013 12:00 - 1:30 p sustainable can also be applied to solve other problems. In this way, sustainability creates value sustainability is being applied locally to uplift communities from poverty and malnutrition. Brooks is a founder

  8. Security & Sustainability College of Charleston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    Security & Sustainability POLI 399 College of Charleston Fall 2013 Day/Time: T/H; 10@cofc.edu Office: 284 King Street, #206 (Office of Sustainability) Office Hours: by appt or virtual apt Instructor is that if sustained well-being and prosperity of human and ecological systems is the goal of sustainability

  9. Campus Sustainability at Virginia Tech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Campus Sustainability at Virginia Tech 2011 Annual Report Presented by the Virginia Tech Office of Energy and Sustainability #12;2 2011 ANNUAL REPORT ON CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY AT VIRGINIA TECH 2011 Annual Report on Campus Sustainability at Virginia Tech Table of Contents Acknowledgement 3 Executive Summary 3

  10. Applied Sustainability Political Science 319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    1 Applied Sustainability Political Science 319 College of Charleston Spring 2013 Day/Time: TH 1 Address: fisherb@cofc.edu Office: 284 King Street, #206 (Office of Sustainability) Office Hours: by appt sustainability. It will focus on the development of semester-long sustainability projects, from conception

  11. Sustainable Stanford Greening Infrastructure & Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Communication and Publication Sustainable Stanford website Year In Review Annual Report Cardinal Green

  12. Environmental Studies Minor Sustainability Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and decision-making in pursuit of sustainability goals Example courses: ECON 75 Environmental and Energy2/17/14 Environmental Studies Minor Sustainability Track W O R K S H E E T The sustainability track (numbered 10 or above) 1. One course in team problem-solving or design/innovation for sustainability 2. One

  13. Integrated Coastal Resource Management: A Prescription for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Brian J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996). Sustainable Development Sustainable developmentNations' role in sustainable development. In C. Thomas (protection and sustainable development. Another positive

  14. Sustainability in the product cycle : adopting a shared standard for the apparel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Alice C. (Alice Catherine)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decisions made by product designers strongly influence the social and environmental impacts that a consumer product will have over its lifetime. This study examines the Sustainable Apparel Index, a decision-support tool ...

  15. The design of effective policies for the promotion of sustainable construction materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kua, Harn Wei, 1971-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the associated effects of policy tools employed to promote sustainable building materials. By comparing the original motivations and intended effects of these policies and their actual outcome, and ...

  16. Austin's Green Building Program: A Tool for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiter, D. L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented by the Association of Demand Side Management Professionals in November, 1993. This paper will follow the implementation and operation of the Green Building Program, with discussions on the successes, challenges, and modifications of the program...

  17. Sustainable Urban Transport Project (SUTP) Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co LtdLLC Place: Missoula, Montana| Open

  18. Sustainable Transport Illustrative Scenarios Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpods IncEurope ResearchTechnologies

  19. Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),Energy Petroleum TechnologyEnergy Rules for

  20. Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosshans, Raymond R.; Kostelnik, Kevin, M.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30 X 30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30 X 30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the mitigation of predicted global climate change. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

  1. Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond R. Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jacob J. Jacobson

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30x30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30x30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

  2. CITRIS Undergraduate Sustainability Research Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    in power generation, or changes in land use. Climate adaptation might involve agriculture, water systems or urban infrastructure. Projects might investigate sensors or smart materials, designing equipment a research budget totaling up to $10,000. Research funds may be used to support the students performing

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scale. The group has developed a tool by which sustainability of the UBC campus may be periodically defined "sustainable development as `development that meets the needs of the present without compromisingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing

  4. Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tools Tools logofemp.png The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers links to tools that can help agencies reduce energy use and meet federal laws and requirements. Tools...

  5. The road to sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crabtree, George [ANL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability is the hottest topic in energy research today, but what does it actually mean? George Crabtree and John Sarrao describe what makes a technology sustainable, and outline the materials-science challenges standing between us and clean, long-lasting energy. Although most people agree that more-sustainable energy technologies are desirable, they often find it harder to agree on exactly how sustainable these technologies need to be, and even precisely what is meant by sustainability. To clarify the debate, we suggest three criteria for sustainability, each of which captures a different feature of the problem. While we do not have the lUxury of achieving full sustainability for all of our next-generation energy technologies, we can use these definitions to select our strategic sustainability targets and track our progress toward achieving them. As will become clear, the most sustainable energy technologies require the most challenging fundamental science breakthroughs. The first criterion for sustainability is 'lasts a long time'. This quality has been a feature of many energy sources we have used historically, including wood in ancient times and oil throughout most of the 20th century. The definition of 'long time' is, of course, relative: the world's demand for energy long ago outpaced the ability of wood to supply it, and the production of oil is likely to peak sometime within the next few decades. Substantial reductions in the rate of oil consumption through higher-efficiency processes can significantly impact on how long non-renewable resources last. In applying the 'long time' criterion, we need to distinguish between energy sources that are effectively limitless and those that are finite but, for the moment, adequate. The second criterion for sustainability is 'does no harm'. Burning fossil fuels releases pollutants such as sulphur and mercury that endanger human health, as well as greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that threaten climate stability. Some alternatives to fossil fuels have their own degrees of potential harm, including the underground migration and leakage of sequestered carbon dioxide and the hazards of storing spent nuclear fuel. The third and most strict criterion for sustainability is 'leaves no change'. When the material outputs of energy generation and use are recycled to replace the inputs, the chemical cycle is said to be closed and the chemical state of the world is unchanged. The process of converting renewable energy sources like sunlight and wind to carriers like hydrogen or electricity comes closest to fulfilling this restrictive definition. Fossil energy systems, in contrast, usually operate as once-through processes, irreversibly converting hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide and water. Some such systems could, however, be retrofitted to collect and recycle the combustion products to make new hydrocarbon fuel. If this process used the Sun as its energy source, fossil fuels, too, could meet this criterion.

  6. Agron. Sustain. Dev. c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of biofuel chains, notably the impact on global warming. This tool, whose holistic nature is fundamental by 2030 a global 10% biofuel share in the transport sector, contributing to lower global greenhouse gas online at: www.agronomy-journal.org for Sustainable Development Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate

  7. Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

  8. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 (Management Publication)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  9. Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Buildings Implementation Plan DOE Sustainable Buildings and Campuses USGBC Roadmap to Sustainable Government Buildings DOE Greening Federal Facilities, Resource Guide...

  10. The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, R. James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia R.The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia. (Ais between sustainable and unsustainable development of the

  11. Is sustainability science really a science?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively...

  12. Campus Sustainability Office Campus Planning Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Campus Sustainability Office (CSO) Campus Planning Office (CPO) Campus Sustainability Manager (Molly Bressers) Campus Sustainability Office and Campus Planning Office September 2014 Student Employee

  13. Sustainable Development: Physical and Moral Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermanowicz, S W

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Development: Physical and Moral Issues Slav W.e-mail: hermanowicz@ce.berkeley.edu Sustainable developmentaims and objectives of sustainable development are right and

  14. Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Guide to Sustainable Development and EnvironmentalEds. ). Guide to Sustainable Development and EnvironmentalThe Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental

  15. Pursuing happiness: The architecture of sustainable change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyubomirsky, S; Sheldon, K M; Schkade, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activity Set Point Architecture of Sustainable Happiness 46Circumstantial Change Architecture of Sustainable HappinessSage Foundation. Architecture of Sustainable Happiness 36

  16. Sustainability of Concrete forSustainability of Concrete for Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Sustainability of Concrete forSustainability of Concrete for Infrastructure Dr. Jason H. Ideker limits sustainability in concrete materials? ­ Degradation: Alkali-silica reaction ­ Environmental for infrastructure rehabilitation and rapid repair ­ Instrumentation and monitoring to track performance · Testing

  17. ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT NAMAs and the Carbon Market Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions of developing countries PersPectives series 2009 #12;NAMAs and the Carbon MarketPPrOPriate MitigatiON actiONs: china's experience and Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Fei

  18. Manchester Metropolitan University Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    key technologies such as rainwater harvesting and grey water systems to reduce our water usage & Healthy Buildings Water savings · We've reduced our yearly water consumption by 12.1%. · We've utilised of the most visibly sustainable in Manchester city centre. 2,592,000 Ltr Water Management Biodiversity 39 #12

  19. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A and provides useful information on the incorporation of high performance sustainable building principles into building-related General Plant Projects and Institutional General Plant Projects at DOE sites. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-6A. Does not cancel other directives.

  20. Governance and Environmental Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in their adoption of environmental protection and natural resource conservation policies? · If variation in cityGovernance and Environmental Sustainability Ann Bowman Kennedy Chair at the Bush School #12;Outline Policymakers and specific environmental media Implementation Local communities and multi- media #12

  1. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  2. HumanoidHospital Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    HHO HumanoidHospital Nanoscale Science Nano-Bio Interface Sustainable Energy Renewable Materials Areas Vision IcHHo will address the problem of accidental medical errors by developing an intelligent real-life medical scenarios. Mission IcHHO will develop interactive Humanoid Patients (male, female

  3. Cities and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The information and communications revolution has spawned the idea of the "smart city," which places the relevant technologies at the heart of systems that collect and respond to information: smart power grids, smartCities and Sustainable Development By: Jeffrey D. Sachs NOV 25, 2013 NEW YORK ­ Tacloban

  4. of Biofuels Sustainable Feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Next Generation of Biofuels Sustainable Feedstocks Cost-Competitive Options #12;Photos courtesy the evolutionary code for an entirely new generation of biofuels capable of transforming the American automobile biofuels at a cost competitive with that of gasoline. Equally important, they are using crops

  5. Agriculture - Sustainable biofuels Redux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Doering, Otto C. [Purdue University; Hamburg, Steven P [Brown University; Melillo, Jerry M [ORNL; Wander, Michele M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices - as will a 2007 legislative mandate for 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year by 2022. Similar directives elsewhere, e.g., the European Union's mandate that 10% of all transport fuel in Europe be from renewable sources by 2020, make this a global issue. The European Union's current reconsideration of this target places even more emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks (1). The need for knowledge- and science-based policy is urgent. Biofuel sustainability has environmental, economic, and social facets that all interconnect. Tradeoffs among them vary widely by types of fuels and where they are grown and, thus, need to be explicitly considered by using a framework that allows the outcomes of alternative systems to be consistently evaluated and compared. A cellulosic biofuels industry could have many positive social and environmental attributes, but it could also suffer from many of the sustainability issues that hobble grain-based biofuels, if not implemented the right way.

  6. SFU SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a priority in the early 1980s, and recycling was begun in the early 1990s in response to lobbying it became a signatory to the Talloires Declaration. The Policy articulates two principles that led directly them." In 2012, these fundamental commitments led to the creation of a new Senior Sustainability

  7. Biomarkers for Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Sustainable Environments PaCIFIC NorThwEST NaTIoNaL LaBoraTory Detecting environmental damage before it's too to significantly alter our environment, and environmental damage will ultimately disrupt our economy. Our efforts an environmental monitoring strategy based on predictive indicators that detect environmental risks before damage

  8. The Sustainable Building-Accelerator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maassen, W.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stages to generate optimal design solutions. The ''Sustainable Building - Accelerator'' supports stakeholders to decide on sustainable solutions by giving them cost and benefit information of design solutions. This information provides them...

  9. Sustainable FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    Working Together Towards a Sustainable Energy Future FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE Clean Energy aspects of sustainable energy solutions, and is committed to using its extensive expertise to serve, Electrical & Computer, Materials, Mechanical, Mining), the School of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

  10. Communicating about bioenergy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Perla, Dr. Donna [US Environmental Protection Agency] [US Environmental Protection Agency; Lucier, Dr. Al [National Council on Air and Stream Improvement] [National Council on Air and Stream Improvement

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defining and measuring sustainability of bioenergy systems are difficult because the systems are complex, the science is in early stages of development, and there is a need to generalize what are inherently context-specific enterprises. These challenges, and the fact that decisions are being made now, create a need for improved communications among scientists as well as between scientists and decision makers. In order for scientists to provide information that is useful to decision makers, they need to come to an agreement on how to measure and report potential risks and benefits of diverse energy alternatives, including problems and opportunities in various bioenergy production pathways. Scientists also need to develop approaches that contribute information relevant to policy and decision making. The need for clear communication is especially important at this time when there is a plethora of scientific papers and reports, and it is difficult for the public or decision makers to assess the merits of each analysis. We propose three communication guidelines for scientists whose work can contribute to decision making: (1) relationships between the question and the analytical approach should be clearly defined and make common sense; (2) the information should be presented in a manner that nonscientists can understand; and (3) the implications of methods, assumptions and limitations should be clear. The scientists job is to analyze information in order to build a better understanding of environmental, cultural and socioeconomic aspects of the sustainability of energy alternatives. The scientific process requires transparency, debate, review, and collaboration across disciplines and time. This paper serves as an introduction to the papers in the special issue on Sustainability of Bioenergy Systems: Cradle to Grave because scientific communication is essential to developing more sustainable energy systems. Together these four papers provide a framework under which the effects of bioenergy can be assessed and compared to other energy alternatives in order to foster sustainability.

  11. "Sustainable energy is critical to Canada's economic future." carleton.ca/sustainable-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    "Sustainable energy is critical to Canada's economic future." carleton.ca/sustainable-energy GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SHAPE YOUR FUTURE BASED ON YOUR RESEARCH INTERESTS Sustaining programs in sustainable energy address these crucial challenges in a unique interdisciplinary fashion

  12. Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22: Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22nd , 2010, Economic Sustainability: Room to Move? Workshop Hosted by Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Walden

  13. Master of science in Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Master of science in Sustainability Management #12;"As someone who is passionate about sustainability, I want my work to have an impact and I know my future efforts will have an even greater impact on society with the knowledge and experience I gain from the program." --Davida Heller, Sustainability

  14. Our commitment to business sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Our commitment to business sustainability `Timber is one of the most environmentally friendly intensive materials' Sustainability is about achieving a balance between meeting the needs of humans that sustainable principles are embedded in every aspect of our business ­ which means considering our impact

  15. SUSTAINABILITY CONNECTIONISSUE 12 JANUARY 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    SUSTAINABILITY FOCUS ON ICTAS CONNECTIONISSUE 12 · JANUARY 2013 A V I R G I N I A T E C H R E S E SUSTAINABILITY and the FABRIC OF ICTAS RESEARCH Building a future that includes the availability of water, energy to Examine the Building Plumbing Microbiome New Faces at ICTAS ICTAS Center of Excellence in Sustainable

  16. Nordic network for Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordic network for Sustainable Energy Systems in Isolated Locations (NordSESIL) Gordon A. Mackenzie of the Nordic region to access sustainable energy solutions by creating and stimulating a network of relevant sustainable energy projects happening' in isolated areas of the Nordic region. #12;Partners, organisation (1

  17. WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESEARCH (WISER) Strategic Plan Summary #12;WISER Strategic Plan Summary | 1 WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESEARCH (WISER) STRATEGIC PLAN SUMMARY 1 by developing and supporting undergraduate research in energy and sustainability related areas. · Develop co

  18. Towards Evidence-Based Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    Towards Evidence- Based Sustainable Communities Report on Survey of Urban Sustainability Centers 2. Template of Initial Outreach E-Mail to Research Centers 41 Appendix 3. Template of E-Mail to Research Centers Containing Link to Survey 42 Appendix 4. Sustainability Centers Survey 44 Appendix 5

  19. Modelling sustainable development Ivar Ekeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekeland, Ivar

    Modelling sustainable development Ivar Ekeland www.ceremade.dauphine.fr/~ekeland CERMADE.ceremade.dauphine.fr/~ekeland (CERMADE, Universite Paris-Dauphine)Modelling sustainable development Collloque Sorin, IHP, Juin 2012 1 / 17 #12;Sustainable development The de...nition given by the Brundtland commision to the UN (1987

  20. REGULATORY CONCEPTS ON SUSTAINABILITY GOALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Energy Commission staff find no single definition or measurement system for sustainability Requirements AB 118 requires the Energy Commission to develop and implement sustainability goals as part Section 44271(a)(2) requires the Energy Commission to: "Establish sustainability goals to ensure

  1. 2012 Sustainability Plan Public Version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Sustainability Plan (SP) meets the Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy1 2012 Sustainability Plan Public Version 16 November 2012 Point of Contact: Candice S. Walters, and Economic Performance, Section 8 requirement to annually update an integrated Strategic Sustainability

  2. Benchmarking Sustainability: the use of Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    Benchmarking Sustainability: the use of Indicators Introduction The concept of sustainable development is both very popular and elusive. The overwhelming appeal of sustainability is situated to build a generally shared perception of sustainable development (Butler, 1998). For many people

  3. THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY GREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERFall 2010 - Spring 2011 GREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENERGREENER Working for a Sustainable Campus

  4. Sustainability Plan Part I: Strategy and Goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Sustainability Plan Part I: Strategy and Goals Prepared By: Oregon State University Sustainability University (OSU) Sustainable Facilities Committee (SFC) was established in November, 2004 by the OSU infrastructure and operations toward sustainability. Additionally, the group serves as a discussion forum

  5. Course Syllabus -Page 1 Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermanowicz, Slawomir W.

    Course Syllabus - Page 1 Sustainable Development: Ethics, Physics and Technology Proposed Course 94720, USA Course Description Although sustainability and sustainable development have become common issue underlying sustainable development, change and its limits, from different perspectives: ethics

  6. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  7. Towards sustainable urban communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haapio, Appu, E-mail: appu.haapio@vtt.fi

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Requirements for the assessment tools of buildings have increased, assessing of building components or separate buildings is not enough. Neighbourhoods, built environment, public transportations, and services, should be considered simultaneously. Number of population living in urban areas is high and increasing rapidly. Urbanisation is a major concern due to its detrimental effects on the environment. The aim of this study is to clarify the field of assessment tools for urban communities by analysing the current situation. The focus is on internationally well known assessment tools; BREEAM Communities, CASBEE for Urban Development and LEED for Neigborhood Development. The interest towards certification systems is increasing amongst the authorities, and especially amongst the global investors and property developers. Achieved certifications are expected to bring measureable publicity for the developers. The assessment of urban areas enables the comparison of municipalities and urban areas, and notably supports decision making processes. Authorities, city planners, and designers would benefit most from the use of the tools during the decision making process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The urban assessment tools have strong linkage to the region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tools promote complementary building and retrofitting existing sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sharing knowledge and experiences is important in the development of the tools.

  8. City of Bloomington - Sustainable Development Incentives | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bloomington - Sustainable Development Incentives City of Bloomington - Sustainable Development Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Residential Savings...

  9. TNA Data Collection Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The TNA Data Collection Tool Instructions provides guidance on how to complete the TNA Data Collection Tool. The TNA Data Collection Tool is an Excel spreadsheet that the organization's designating training POC will use to populate their organizations training needs.

  10. The power tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAYFIELD, J.P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER Tool--Planning, Optimization, Waste Estimating and Resourcing tool, a hand-held field estimating unit and relational database software tool for optimizing disassembly and final waste form of contaminated systems and equipment.

  11. ORNL Sustainable Campus Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halford, Christopher K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) spans many disciplines and has the potential for far-reaching impact in many areas of everyday life. ORNL researchers and operations staff work on projects in areas as diverse as nuclear power generation, transportation, materials science, computing, and building technologies. As the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) largest science and energy research facility, ORNL seeks to establish partnerships with industry in the development of innovative new technologies. The primary focus of this current research deals with developing technologies which improve or maintain the quality of life for humans while reducing the overall impact on the environment. In its interactions with industry, ORNL serves as both a facility for sustainable research, as well as a representative of DOE to the private sector. For these reasons it is important that the everyday operations of the Laboratory reflect a dedication to the concepts of stewardship and sustainability.

  12. Greensburg Sustainable Comprehensive Plan

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Greensburg, KS In October 2007, the architectural and planning firm, BNIM, was selected formally by the City of Greensburg, with support from the USDA, to prepare the first phase of a comprehensive master plan to rebuild the city, which provides a framework for the rebuilding of Greensburg based around the principles of economic, social and environmental sustainability. The BNIM Planning team presented the final draft of Greensburg's Comprehensive Plan to the City Council and to a public hearing on January 16, 2008.

  13. Sustainability: Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedofsidentoihonorsSustainability:

  14. Sustainable Environment Technologies (4578)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action Title: Sustainable Environment Technologies

  15. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After establishing a goal and assessing the rules, roles, and tools, Federal agencies can develop an action plan (select the strategies that will be implemented over time to achieve and maintain energy and sustainability goals). This action plan should target specific audiences with tailored strategies and take into account the need to review and revise strategies in the long-term. The action plan must include appropriate metrics and regular measurement. Remember that planning useful efficiency and sustainability evaluation is necessary before an organization begins to implement an action plan.

  16. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE AS AN INNOVATIVE COMPUTER TOOL FOR SUPPORTING DECISIONS IN SME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE AS AN INNOVATIVE COMPUTER TOOL FOR SUPPORTING DECISIONS IN SME Justyna the model of sustainable development of SME based on using Business Intelligence as an innovative computer Management, Business Intelligence, SME BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE JAKO PRZYKLAD INNOWACYJNEGO NARZDZIA

  17. Sustainability 2013 Poster Contest & Guidelines The Clark School Engineering Sustainability Workshop 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Sustainability 2013 Poster Contest & Guidelines The Clark School Engineering Sustainability Workshop 2013 Call for Submissions ­ Engineering Sustainability Student Poster Contest OPEN TO: All

  18. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and International1098-A, September Sustainable Development and Public PolicyThe Economics of Sustainable Development. ” Population and

  19. Sustainable Development & Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and International1098-A, September Sustainable Development and Public PolicyThe Economics of Sustainable Development. ” Population and

  20. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004) “What Makes a Good Sustainable Development Plan? AnPrinciples of Sustainable Development,” Environment and1396. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California

  1. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Adoption of Energy Sustainability and Climate Protectionclimate protection and energy sustainability policy actions;climate protection and energy sustainability programs, such

  2. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  3. Sustainable hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  4. Sustainability fact sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergy State and UtilitySustainability Around

  5. Sustainability | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...SuccessSurprising ControlSustainability Subscribe

  6. Enthusiastic employees: sustaining the Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    innovations with some of the world's most powerful technology without consuming excessive energy or creating waste? Green Teams work hard to make sustainable choices at home, at...

  7. Benefits of Sustainable Building Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The application of sustainable building design not only helps Federal facilities meet laws and regulations, it also provides them with many other benefits. These benefits include:

  8. Introducing the DOE Sustainability Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us as we introduce DOE's new Sustainability Dashboard. This webinar will provide an overview and demonstration of the new Dashboard and offer an opportunity for questions.

  9. Sustainable Building Rating Systems Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to offer information that could be used to compare and contrast sustainable building rating systems.

  10. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Association of Alaska Housing Authorities (AAHA), this three-day training event covers strategies and technical issues related to sustainable housing development.

  11. Sustainable Sourcing of Biomass Feedstock

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Opening Plenary Session: Bioenergy Sustainability—Charting the Path toward a Viable Future Al Lucier, Senior Vice President, National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc.

  12. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages Sustainability has become an essential

  13. SuStainability 02 University of Calgary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    SuStainability RepoRt 2012-2013 #12;02 University of Calgary Table of Contents What is Sustainability? The University of Calgary Sustainability Policy defines sustainability as articulated: "Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability

  14. Sustainability 2012, 4, 210-226; doi:10.3390/su4020210 sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability 2012, 4, 210-226; doi:10.3390/su4020210 sustainability ISSN 2071-1050 www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability accounting. Keywords: climate policy; burden sharing; negative emissions OPEN ACCESS #12;Sustainability 2012

  15. KTH Sustainability a bibliometric overview 1 KTH Sustainability a bibliometric overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    KTH Sustainability ­ a bibliometric overview 1 KTH Sustainability ­ a bibliometric overview Peter of Publication Infrastructure 2011-10-24, Version 1.0 Contents 1 KTH research on sustainability (hållbar ..............................................................................................................................14 5 Citation impact of KTH sustainability research

  16. Sustainability Peer Educator Group Lead Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educators Group Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    Sustainability Peer Educator Group Lead Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educators Group times) Term of position: September 2013 ­ April 2014 Position Summary: Working with the Sustainability Project Coordinator, the Sustainability Peer Educator Group Leads will be responsible

  17. Efficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable Buildings M. Kostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Efficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable proven and the "cutting-edge" comprehensive buildings' "green & sustainable" energy technologies of the Northern Illinois Region, an inspiration for multidisciplinary "Energy & Environmental Sustainability

  18. Sustainable Development Student Intern Report 2013-2014 Sustainable Development Student Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Student Intern Report 2013-2014 Sustainable Development Student Intern demonstrated its commitment to sustainable development through supporting student and university projects to sustainable development concentrated their efforts in both the campus and the Lennoxville community. Student

  19. Sustainable Urban Development: A Literature Review and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Stephen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction I. What is Sustainable Development in General?PAGE Definitions of Sustainable Development Perspectiveson Sustainable Development Perspectives on Sustainable Urban

  20. Boston Architectural College Urban Sustainability Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, Arthur C.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability initiative is a demonstration project as defined by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. BAC's proposed project with the U.S. Department of Energy - NETL, is a large part of that overall initiative. The BAC's Urban Sustainability Initiative is a multi-part project with several important goals and objectives that will have a significant impact on the surrounding neighborhood including: energy conservation, reduction of storm water runoff, generation of power through alternative energy sources, elimination/reduction of BAC carbon footprint, and to create a vehicle for ongoing public outreach and education. Education and outreach opportunities will serve to add to the already comprehensive Sustainability Design courses offered at BAC relative to energy savings, performance and conservation in building design. At the finish of these essential capital projects there will be technical materials created for the education of the design, sustainability, engineering, community development and historic preservation communities, to inform a new generation of environmentally-minded designers and practitioners, the city of Boston and the general public. The purpose of the initiative, through our green renovations program, is to develop our green alley projects and energy saving renovations to the BAC physical plant, to serve as a working model for energy efficient design in enclosed 19th century and 20th century urban sites and as an educational laboratory for teaching ecological and sustainable technologies to students and the public while creating jobs. The scope of our project as it relates to the BAC and the U.S. Department of Energy- NETL combined efforts includes: Task I of the project is Phase II (Green Alley). Task I encompasses various renovation activities that will demonstrate the effectiveness of permeable paving and ground water recharge systems. It will aid in the reduction of storm water runoff into the Charles River Basin in one of its most significantly polluted sections and, will provide a green renovation mechanism for the redirected storm water of a public alley way. This activity is designed to improve the quality of water recharging the ground water and protecting the vulnerable wood pilings under many of the historic masonry buildings in Boston's Back Bay. Sustainable design research and system monitoring opportunities will also be incorporated, providing ongoing tools for public outreach and education through innovative signage and "virtual tour" technology. The monitoring will include a "building performance dash board" that reflects real time operating conditions and improvements in environmental and economic performance to be prominently displayed on the face of our 320 Newbury Street building (approximately 1.5 million people walk by annually). The project site and demonstration area is located at the rear of 951 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115 and the parking area adjacent to Public Alley #444 in Boston's historic Back Bay. Task II of the project is Geothermal Solution. This task involves the installation of approximately seven Geothermal wells which will tap into the earth's constant underground temperatures to provide air-conditioning and heating for BAC facilities. The environmentally friendly geothermal system uses no fossil fuel, produces no emissions and runs silently, providing a sustainable model for commercial and residential buildings throughout Boston. Ultimately the combination of this project and other projects will assist in making the BAC "carbon-neutral", and could generate enough additional energy to provide free power to the Engine 33 and Ladder 15 Firehouse located at 941 Boylston Street. The project is located at the rear of 951 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115 and the parking area adjacent to Public Alley #444 in Boston's historic Back Bay. Task III of the project is the Sustainability Design Curriculum at the BAC. The BAC is the nation’s largest independent, multi-disciplinary college of spatial design, and a leader in

  1. Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Major Projects Quarterly Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    1 Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Major Projects Quarterly Sustainability Report June 2011 Alice Crocker Lloyd Hall Renovation

  2. Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 use to 10% below 2008 levels by 2020. Built Environment Design future projects to minimize energy and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital

  3. Asian Perspectives on Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Asian Perspectives on Sustainable Development Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:00 ­ 10:30 a.m. Wrigley society can help spur a more sustainable growth. Pamela Mar's work focuses on Asian development, corporate and social development. Asia needs to rethink how it grows to ensure that social progress and environmental

  4. Economic Architecture and Sustainable Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Economic Architecture and Sustainable Communities Wednesday, January 30, 2013 12:00 ­ 1:30 p and investment conditions during the sustainability movement. Join scientist and Green Sense radio show host Robert Colangelo and author and economic developer Mark Lautman to discuss how economic architecture

  5. Sustainable Internet Architecture PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Sustainable Internet Architecture PROJECT DESCRIPTION 1 Introduction The Internet currently plays that the problems in the current Internet architecture stem from its lack of sustainability which impedes future de of challenges. Numerous research studies on a new Internet architecture (e.g., [16, 37, 48, 54, 55]) have

  6. Sustainability at UCSB CampusSustainability at UCSB Campus Perrin Pellegrin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Sustainability at UCSB CampusSustainability at UCSB Campus Perrin Pellegrin Campus Sustainability Manager Facilities Management, UCSB April 25, 2006 Perrin Pellegrin Campus Sustainability Manager Facilities Management, UCSB April 25, 2006 #12;Sustainability at UCSB CampusSustainability at UCSB Campus

  7. Efficient and Sustainable EnergyEfficient and Sustainable Energy NIU Energy Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Efficient and Sustainable EnergyEfficient and Sustainable Energy NIU Energy Initiative: Efficient and Sustainable EnergyEfficient and Sustainable Energy EnergyEnergy//EconomyEconomy//Ecology Challenges and OpportunitiesEcology Challenges and Opportunities #12;Efficient and Sustainable EnergyEfficient and Sustainable

  8. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherry, T. D.; Kohlhorst, D. P.; Little, S. K.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to resources, including energy/fuel, water, waste, pesticides, and pollution generation; (8) Incorporate sustainable design principles into the design and construction of facility upgrades, new facilities, and infrastructure; and (9) Comply with federal and state regulations, executive orders, and DOE requirements. Y-12 is working to communicate its sustainment vision through procedural, engineering, operational, and management practices. The site will make informed decisions based on the application of the five Guiding Principles for HPSBs to the maximum extent possible.

  9. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Charles G

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan, while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-effi cient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. The plan addresses greenhouse gases, buildings, fleet management, water use, pollution prevention, waste reduction, sustainable acquisition, electronic stewardship and data centers, site innovation and government-wide support.

  10. Hopi Sustainable Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman Honie, Jr.; Margie Schaff; Mark Hannifan

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hopi Tribal Government as part of an initiative to ?Regulate the delivery of energy and energy services to the Hopi Reservation and to create a strategic business plan for tribal provision of appropriate utility, both in a manner that improves the reliability and cost efficiency of such services,? established the Hopi Clean Air Partnership Project (HCAPP) to support the Tribe?s economic development goals, which is sensitive to the needs and ways of the Hopi people. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded, Formation of Hopi Sustainable Energy Program results are included in the Clean Air Partnership Report. One of the Hopi Tribe?s primary strategies to improving the reliability and cost efficiency of energy services on the Reservation and to creating alternative (to coal) economic development opportunities is to form and begin implementation of the Hopi Sustainable Energy Program. The Hopi Tribe through the implementation of this grant identified various economic opportunities available from renewable energy resources. However, in order to take advantage of those opportunities, capacity building of tribal staff is essential in order for the Tribe to develop and manage its renewable energy resources. As Arizona public utilities such as APS?s renewable energy portfolio increases the demand for renewable power will increase. The Hopi Tribe would be in a good position to provide a percentage of the power through wind energy. It is equally important that the Hopi Tribe begin a dialogue with APS and NTUA to purchase the 69Kv transmission on Hopi and begin looking into financing options to purchase the line.

  11. Law, Sustainability, and the Pursuit of Happiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Small Step Toward Sustainable Living and Adaptation ToIn the long run, sustainable living is the only real option.strategy for more sustainable living. Thus, the consumption

  12. campus as living laboratory institutional Sustainability Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    operations campus as living laboratory diversity campus waste institutional Sustainability Plan eliminate priorities energy research 35%ofwastedivertedSTARSSilver 275 sustainability courses investment 60 accessibility faculty leadership 100+ sustainability research projects over $3.8 million in bursaries Calgary

  13. Sustainability Double Degree Double Degree Info

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    Sustainability Double Degree Double Degree Info: · 36 credits in B for graduation. Sustainability Core: Take each course below for a total of 17 -20 credits. Term/Grade Course _____ ____ *NR 350 (4) Sustainable

  14. UCSF Sustainability Action Plan: Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    UCSF Sustainability Action Plan: Executive Summary Issue Date: April 21, 2011 #12;UCSF Sustainability Action Plan Executive Summary April 21, 2011 Page 1 Table of Contents An Introduction to the Sustainability Action Plan

  15. Scholarly Communication: Academic Values and Sustainable Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, C. Judson; Harley, Diane; Earl-Novell, Sarah; Arter, Jennifer; Lawrence, Shannon; Perciali, Irene

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    libraries. Scholarly Communication: Academic Values and SustainableSustainable Model? , Oxford, U.K. International Coalition of LibraryLibraries, Washington, D.C. Available at http://www.escholarlypub.com/oab/oab.pdf Scholarly Communication: Academic Values and Sustainable

  16. Jane Mwenechanya Degree studied: MSc Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

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