Sample records for tons year rank

  1. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  2. 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

  3. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  4. Our 6-year-old plantation in Escanaba is growing 3.6 dry tons per acre each year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hybrids, aspen, and European larch in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. USDA: A guide to insect, disease The paper and oriented-strand board industries in Michigan consume a large quantity of aspen fiber each year. Prices for aspen pulpwood have hit record highs in recent years as a result of increased demand

  5. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  6. 90-Ton Triple Cylinder Jack Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, Al; /Fermilab

    1988-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The three D-Zero cryostats (2 EC and 1 CC) will rest on three carriages which in turn ride on a set of hardened ways in the center beam. A pair of Tychoway rollers will be fitted to each of the four corners of the three carriages to provide the rolling support. In the final design, the two EC cryostats will be able to roll out and away from the CC cryostat in order to provide access to the space between each cryostat for maintenance and repairs. The cryostat will be frequently accessed, about once a month. during a collider run. The heaviest cryostat weighs about 360 tons. The large roller weight in one position for such a long period of time, created a concern about the rollers dimpling the hardened ways or even suffering permanent deformations themselves. There is also the possibility that the vertical position of the cryostat will need to be adjusted to align it with the beam line or that the carriage and cryostat will have to be lifted to remove and service the rollers. A device or system was needed to (1) relieve the weight of the cryostats from the rollers and the hardened ways, and (2) minimally adjust the vertical position of the cryostats, if necessary, and/or service the rollers. Compact hydraulic jacks seemed to be the answer. The first and foremost criteria was capacity. It was desired that the jacks be rated to twice the actual load. A jack is to be placed beside each roller, giving a total of eight per cryostat. The load per jack for a 360 ton cryostat would then be 45 tons, leaving 90 tons as the required capacity. The second and equally important criteria to be met was size. After installation of the Tychoway rollers. room to mount these jacks is very limited underneath the carriage. The space surrounding the bottom of the carriage is cluttered with wiring and plumbing and thus further limits available space for the jacks. What was left was a 3.75-inch x 6.0625-inch x 12.25-inch rectangular envelope on each side of a pair of rollers (see Appendix A).

  7. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbH JumpOne MoliTON

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 29 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 9 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  15. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2004. Two companies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    80 INDIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium-efficiency photovoltaic devices. A major manufacturer is testing indium for a new application as a heat-management material in computers, which could increase consumption by 40 metric tons per year. The estimated

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 59 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  1. OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62% Landfill 1080 tons / 38% Electricals 36 Landfill As of Monday 7 March 2011, no general waste generated from the Bloomsbury Campus has been sent to landfill. Through partnership between UCL Estates and Office and General, an agreement has been reached

  2. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign to minimize odor, electroplating, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood

  3. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, with an estimated total output of 2,500 tons from domestic and foreign ores and concentrates, and from old and new, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment. Silver was used for miniature antennas

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  5. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,370.00 0.32 72 ft3 solid rad waste; 35 gal of mixed waste; 108 gal of haz waste; 324 ft3 of rad DIS waste 6Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1 waste 2 Replacement of Mercury Thermometers Basic Energy Sciences, Condensed Matter Physics & Material

  6. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste 2 Motion Lights Energy Sciences & Technology, EENS (Dave Elling) $3,200 $7,000.00 0.46 Energy Light Source, NSLS (John Aloi) $1,500 $5,200.00 0.29 200 gallons corrosive waste 6 Electronic RecyclingRank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1

  7. Guide to journal rankings 1. What are journal rankings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCusker, Guy

    Opus Guide to journal rankings 1. What are journal rankings? Journal rankings are metrics that provide information on how a journal performs in comparison with other journals in the same discipline. Articles in high impact journals are more likely to be cited. Good citation counts are often considered

  8. Upgrading low rank coal using the Koppelman Series C process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriam, N.W., Western Research Institute

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the K-Fuel technology began after the energy shortage of the early 1970s in the United States led energy producers to develop the huge deposits of low-sulfur coal in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. PRB coal is a subbituminous C coal containing about 30 wt % moisture and having heating values of about 18.6 megajoules/kg (8150 Btu/lb). PRB coal contains from 0.3 to 0.5 wt % sulfur, which is nearly all combined with the organic matrix in the coal. It is in much demand for boiler fuel because of the low-sulfur content and the low price. However, the low-heating value limits the markets for PRB coal to boilers specially designed for the high- moisture coal. Thus, the advantages of the low-sulfur content are not available to many potential customers having boilers that were designed for bituminous coal. This year about 250 million tons of coal is shipped from the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The high- moisture content and, consequently, the low-heating value of this coal causes the transportation and combustion of the coal to be inefficient. When the moisture is removed and the heating value increased the same bundle of energy can be shipped using one- third less train loads. Also, the dried product can be burned much more efficiently in boiler systems. This increase in efficiency reduces the carbon dioxide emissions caused by use of the low-heating value coal. Also, the processing used to remove water and restructure the coal removes sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and chlorides from the coal. This precombustion cleaning is much less costly than stack scrubbing. PRB coal, and other low-rank coals, tend to be highly reactive when freshly mined. These reactive coals must be mixed regularly (every week or two) when fresh, but become somewhat more stable after they have aged for several weeks. PRB coal is relatively dusty and subject to self-ignition compared to bituminous coals. When dried using conventional technology, PRB coal is even more dusty and more susceptible to spontaneous combustion than the raw coal. Also, PRB coal, if dried at low temperature, typically readsorbs about two- thirds of the moisture removed by drying. This readsorption of moisture releases the heat of adsorption of the water which is a major cause of self- heating of low-rank coals at low temperature.

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43 YEAR

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144 YEAR

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 2013

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 20138

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 201387

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558563

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR85573380 YEAR

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 2014

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 201434

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43417

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR424

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  20. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  1. The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering is accepting applications for open rank non-tenure track faculty positions for academic year 2014-2015. All positions require teaching undergraduate and/or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering is accepting applications for open rank non/or graduate courses related to Industrial and Systems Engineering, and service to the department. A successful of Industrial and Systems Engineering provides competitive compensation packages and benefits. To apply, please

  2. Low-rank coal research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  3. Astronomy Ranking Task: Stellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Cloud of Gas and Dust C Neutron Star I White Dwarf D Supernova Type II J Black Hole E Nothing K Supernova Type I F Giant L Nova M Gravity Collapse of Gas/Dust Cloud A) Ranking Instructions: Rank, from

  4. PageRank of integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Frahm; A. D. Chepelianskii; D. L. Shepelyansky

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We build up a directed network tracing links from a given integer to its divisors and analyze the properties of the Google matrix of this network. The PageRank vector of this matrix is computed numerically and it is shown that its probability is inversely proportional to the PageRank index thus being similar to the Zipf law and the dependence established for the World Wide Web. The spectrum of the Google matrix of integers is characterized by a large gap and a relatively small number of nonzero eigenvalues. A simple semi-analytical expression for the PageRank of integers is derived that allows to find this vector for matrices of billion size. This network provides a new PageRank order of integers.

  5. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to perform reservoir simulation and economic sensitivity studies to (1) determine the effects of injection gas composition, (2) determine the effects of injection rate, and (3) determine the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection on CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas. To predict CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds for these three sensitivity studies, we constructed a 5-spot pattern reservoir simulation model and selected reservoir parameters representative of a typical depth, approximately 6,200-ft, of potential LCB coalbed reservoirs in the focus area of East-Central Texas. Simulation results of flue gas injection (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern (40-ac well spacing) indicate that LCB coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 0.46 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with a median ECBM recovery of 0.94 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 4,270 days (11.7 years). Simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicated that these same coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 1.75 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft with a median ECBM recovery of 0.67 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 1,650 days (4.5 years). Breakthrough was defined as the point when CO{sub 2} comprised 5% of the production stream for all cases. The injection rate sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to injection rate. The main difference is in timing, with longer breakthrough times resulting as injection rate decreases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 670 days (1.8 years) to 7,240 days (19.8 years) for the reservoir parameters and well operating conditions investigated. The dewatering sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection. As time to start CO{sub 2} injection increases, the time to reach breakthrough also increases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 850 days (2.3 years) to 5,380 days (14.7 years) for the reservoir parameters and well injection/production schedules investigated. Preliminary economic modeling results using a gas price of $7-$8 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits of $1.33 per ton CO{sub 2} indicate that injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) and 50% N{sub 2}-50% CO{sub 2} are more economically viable than injecting 100% CO{sub 2}. Results also indicate that injection rate and duration and timing of dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection have no significant effect on the economic viability of the project(s).

  6. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  7. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-García, Virginia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm --similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity-- here we propose a method which --by exploiting their nested architecture-- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  8. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration Field Officerelocates 18-ton machine

  9. Robust Rankings for College Football

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 11, 2011 ... tournament at the end of a season to determine the best team (or national champion). ?Department of Management Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, ... practice. One such method, which is one of six computer rankings used ...... inconsequential set I. One could also manually choose a completely ...

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were closed temporarily, and Issues: In February 2013, the owner of the 270,000-ton-per-year Hannibal, OH, smelter filed for chapter in October. In June, the Sebree, KY, smelter was sold as part of a corporate restructuring. Expansion

  11. POLYTOPES OF MINIMUM POSITIVE SEMIDEFINITE RANK 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    M ? rank M. In Exam- ple 2.3 we saw that the first inequality may be strict. We now ..... Let Si denote the ith row of SP . Since rank SP = n+ 1, we have ? n+2.

  12. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

  13. Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

  14. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  15. Coal rank trends in eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of coal rank (by vitrinite maximum reflectance) for eastern Kentucky coals has revealed several regional trends. Coal rank varies from high volatile C (0.5% R/sub max/) to medium volatile bituminous (1.1% R/sub max/), and generally increases to the southeast. One east-west-trending rank high and at least four north-south-trending rank highs interrupt the regional increase. The east-west-trending rank high is associated with the Kentucky River faults in northeastern Kentucky. It is the only rank high clearly associated with a fault zone. The four north-south-trending rank highs are parallel with portions of major tectonic features such as the Eastern Kentucky syncline. Overall, though, the association of north-south-trending rank highs with tectonic expression is not as marked as that with the anomaly associated with the Kentucky River faults. It is possible that the rank trends are related to basement features with subdued surface expression. Rank generally increases with depth, and regional trends observed in one coal are also seen in overlying and underlying coals. The cause of the regional southeastward increase in rank is likely to be the combined influence of greater depth of burial and proximity to late Paleozoic orogenic activity. The anomalous trends could be due to increased depth of burial, but are more likely to have resulted from tectonic activity along faults and basement discontinuities. The thermal disturbances necessary to increase the coal rank need not have been great, perhaps on the order of 10-20/sup 0/C (18-36/sup 0/F) above the metamorphic temperatures of the lower rank coals.

  16. Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

  17. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  18. RANK-SPARSITY INCOHERENCE FOR MATRIX DECOMPOSITION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2009 ... nuclear norm of the components. We develop a notion of rank-sparsity incoherence, expressed as an uncertainty principle between the sparsity ...

  19. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2} tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class 2 packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class 1 with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum {sup 235}U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2{1/2}-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class 1 with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class 1 packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 11 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Top for economics Rank Business School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Top for economics Rank Business School 1 University of Chicago: Booth Rutgers Business School University of Toronto: Rotman Cranfield School of Management University of California at Irvine: Merage University of Rochester: Simon Columbia/London Business School 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Rank Business School 1

  1. (psd) rank of a nonnegative matrix w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    at least k and we pose the problem of deciding whether the psd rank is exactly k. Using geometry ... referred to as the psd rank of P) is exactly the smallest k such that P is the linear image of an ..... References. [1] J. Bochnak, M. Coste, M. Roy.

  2. Universal Emergence of PageRank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Frahm; B. Georgeot; D. L. Shepelyansky

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The PageRank algorithm enables to rank the nodes of a network through a specific eigenvector of the Google matrix, using a damping parameter $\\alpha \\in ]0,1[$. Using extensive numerical simulations of large web networks, with a special accent on British University networks, we determine numerically and analytically the universal features of PageRank vector at its emergence when $\\alpha \\rightarrow 1$. The whole network can be divided into a core part and a group of invariant subspaces. For $ \\alpha \\rightarrow 1$ the PageRank converges to a universal power law distribution on the invariant subspaces whose size distribution also follows a universal power law. The convergence of PageRank at $ \\alpha \\rightarrow 1$ is controlled by eigenvalues of the core part of the Google matrix which are extremely close to unity leading to large relaxation times as for example in spin glasses.

  3. 9,997,638 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 9, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  4. 9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  5. 9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  6. 9,355,469 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 29, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  7. 9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  8. 10,045,885 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 16, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  9. 10,180,047 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of May 28, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  10. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  11. A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Empl, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

  12. Ranking Outlier Nodes in Subspaces of Attributed Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antwerpen, Universiteit

    . Our graph outlier ranking (GOutRank) introduces scoring functions based on these selected subgraphs by looking at the most promising objects first. They 1http://www.ipd.kit.edu/~muellere/GOutRank/ allow users

  13. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  14. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  15. Provable Low-Rank Tensor Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2014 ... rank, which here we refer to as the sum-of-nuclear-norms (SNN), has been proposed in [23] and serves as a tractable measure of the tensor ...

  16. Penalty Decomposition Methods for Rank Minimization ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 22, 2010 ... In Section 2, we establish some technical results on a class of rank minimization ..... Without loss of generality, assume that {( ŻZk. X,. Ż. Zk ...... Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, 2009.

  17. Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergy Policy Act of 2005 | Department ofCO2 |

  18. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 40% was used in the armor, chemical

  19. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was produced. In 2011, an estimated 66% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 34

  20. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon produced titanium forgings, mill products, and castings. In 1996, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  1. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 35% was used in the chemical process

  2. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon produced titanium forgings, mill products, and castings. In 1997, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  3. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2005, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal was used

  4. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 40% was used in armor, chemical processing

  5. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2004, an estimated 60% of the titanium metal was used

  6. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot to produce forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2001, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  7. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2006, an estimated 72% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  8. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was produced. In 2012, an estimated 72% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 28

  9. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Titanium ingot and castings. In 2013, an estimated 73% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  10. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2007, an estimated 76% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  11. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms in Nevada and Oregon. Ingot was made by the two sponge producers and by nine other firms in seven States. About 30 companies produced titanium forgings, mill

  12. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2002, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal used

  13. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by four operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2010, an estimated 75% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  14. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2008, an estimated 79% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  15. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2003, an estimated 55% of the titanium metal used

  16. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. A fourth, an estimated 76% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 24% was used in armor

  17. CO{sub 2} SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. There were three main objectives for this reporting period, which related to obtaining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and modeling reservoir performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The first objective was to collect and desorb gas from 10 sidewall core coal samples from an Anadarko Petroleum Corporation well (APCL2 well) at approximately 6,200-ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. The second objective was to measure sorptive capacities of these Wilcox coal samples for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}. The final objective was to contract a service company to perform pressure transient testing in Wilcox coal beds in a shut-in well, to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal. Bulk density of the APCL2 well sidewall core samples averaged 1.332 g/cc. The 10 sidewall core samples were placed in 4 sidewall core canisters and desorbed. Total gas content of the coal (including lost gas and projected residual gas) averaged 395 scf/ton on an as-received basis. The average lost gas estimations were approximately 45% of the bulk sample total gas. Projected residual gas was 5% of in-situ gas content. Six gas samples desorbed from the sidewall cores were analyzed to determine gas composition. Average gas composition was approximately 94.3% methane, 3.0% ethane, and 0.7% propane, with traces of heavier hydrocarbon gases. Carbon dioxide averaged 1.7%. Coal from the 4 canisters was mixed to form one composite sample that was used for pure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} isotherm analyses. The composite sample was 4.53% moisture, 37.48% volatile matter, 9.86% ash, and 48.12% fixed carbon. Mean vitrinite reflectance was 0.54%. Coal rank was high-volatile C to B bituminous. Comparison of the desorbed gas content (395 scf/ton, as received) at reservoir pressure (2,697 psi) with the sorption isotherm indicates that Lower Calvert Bluff coal at this well site is oversaturated, but lost gas may have been overestimated. This high gas content suggests that little or no depressurization would be required to initiate methane production. Sorption isotherms results indicate that the sorptive capacity of CO{sub 2} is about 2.5 times that of CH{sub 4} at 1,000 psia. This ratio is similar to that of higher rank bituminous coals from other basins (e.g., Carroll, and Pashin, 2003), and it is very low in comparison to results of other low-rank coals and to the values that we used in our preliminary reservoir modeling. If this value from the APCL2 well is representative, Wilcox coals in this area will sequester less CO{sub 2} on a per ton basis than we had earlier inferred. However, because measured methane contents are higher, enhanced coalbed methane production potential is greater than we earlier inferred. Pressure transient testing for determining coal fracture permeability will be conducted soon by Pinnacle Technologies. The data from these analyses will be used to finalize our coal model for the reservoir simulation phase of the project.

  18. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  19. Computational Enhancements in Low-Rank Semidefinite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 12, 2004 ... ?Department of Management Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, .... Moreover, it has been observed in practice that the ... do not suggest that one particular version of the low-rank algorithm is best for all problem ...... Scientific Library Reference Manual, second edition. http://www.gnu.org/software/.

  20. The generating rank of the symplectic grassmannians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blok, Rieuwert J.

    . Blok Department of Mathematics and Statistics Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 U and Statistics Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 Tel.: +1 (419) 372-7455 FAX : +1 (419) 372, the generating rank of a geometry equals the dimension of the universal embedding of that geometry, if it exists

  1. Link Analysis Ranking Algorithms, Theory, and Experiments #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

    and the widespread accessibility of the Web has led to surge of research activity in the area of information retrieval on the World Wide Web. The seminal papers of Kleinberg [31], and Brin and Page [9] introduced Link Analysis Ranking, where hyperlink structures are used to determine the relative authority of a Web page

  2. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  3. HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems Mark F. Adamsmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. HPLmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. When

  4. Quantifier rank spectrum of L-infinity-omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Nathaniel Leedom

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Part A we will study the quantifier rank spectrum of sentences of L!1,!. We will show that there are scattered sentences with models of arbitrarily high but bounded quantifier rank. We will also consider the case of ...

  5. Graded Relevance Ranking for Synonym Discovery Andrew Yates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the pointwise mutual information (PMI) between the 16-term windows that a given pair of terms appear in. When used to rank synonym candidates, this method ranks them by the PMI between a target term and each

  6. Rank-Based Estimation for GARCH Processes Beth Andrews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Beth

    Rank-Based Estimation for GARCH Processes Beth Andrews Northwestern University September 7, 2011 Abstract We consider a rank-based technique for estimating GARCH model parameters, some of which are scale transformations of conventional GARCH parameters. The estimators are obtained by minimizing a rank-based residual

  7. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

  8. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  9. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

  10. A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor, and Wei-Ngan Chin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobor, Aquinas

    A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor a logical framework for specifying and proving asser- tions about program termination. Although termination. Here we propose to integrate termination requirements directly into our specification logic

  11. The Scale of the Energy Challenge 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons of coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    and rooftops in the United States. The total land area required by nuclear power plants is small! Ă? 20 15The Scale of the Energy Challenge Biomass Wind Nuclear Solar 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons

  12. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment of EnergyNoticeFacility Risk Ranking

  13. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agg. Ind.App &T&D Efficinecy Energy Demand Elasticity of GDPAgg. Ind.App &T&D Efficinecy Figure 14 Energy Intensity 4.1energy consumption by sector in three scenarios Historical LBNL BPS Agg. Ind.App Efficinecy

  14. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inland coastal Coal, oil and oil product, crude oil, otherCoal, oil and oil product, crude oil, other Steam, diesel,Internation al Crude oil, oil products, NG, other Gas Fuel

  15. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naphtha Feed Stock Coal Heavy oil NG biomass Electricityheat Ammonia NG Fuel Oil Heavy oil Electric ity heat CoalCoke Electricit y NG Heavy oil Coal Coke Electricity Diesel

  16. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

  17. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Recent Trends in Energy Consumption in China Between 1980trends and policy options for reducing energy consumption orenergy consumption comprises a much larger share which is also expected to be the trend

  18. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump conditionerSmall cogen Stove District heating Heat pump Centralized AC

  19. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. I.. 1996. China's Energy A forecast to 2015, U.S. DOEChina’s energy/GDP elasticity remains at 1 and economic growth unfolds as forecast,

  20. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Pump Centralized AC by NG Electric water heater Gasheater gas boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump conditioner Air conditioning Lighting Cooking and waterWater heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boiler Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pump

  1. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovemberiMid-LevelMoab Marks 6-Million-Ton CleanupAccomplishes

  2. Ranking forestry journals using the h-index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanclay, Jerome K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert ranking of forestry journals was compared with journal impact factors and h-indices computed from ISI and internet-based data. Citations reported by Google Scholar appear to offer the most efficient way to rank all journals objectively, in a manner consistent with other indicators. A ranking of 180 forestry journals is presented, on the basis of an h-index computed from data supplied by Google Scholar.

  3. Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium.

  4. Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Recht

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

  5. ALGEBRAS OF REAL RANK ZERO M. Dadarlat and G. Gong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sweeping conjecture of Elliott asserts that the simple nuclear C*-algebras ... The results available so far suggest that the nuclear C*-algebras of real rank.

  6. Optimization Online - Sufficient Conditions for Low-rank Matrix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingchen Kong

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2011 ... This class of optimization problems is $NP$-hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix ...

  7. Finding approximately rank-one submatrices with the nuclear norm ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a convex optimization formulation with the nuclear norm and l1-norm to find a large approximately rank-one submatrix of a given nonnegative matrix ...

  8. Finding approximately rank-one submatrices with the nuclear norm ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan Vinh Doan

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 8, 2010 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the nuclear norm and $\\ell_1$-norm to find a large approximately rank-one ...

  9. RECOVERING LOW-RANK AND SPARSE COMPONENTS OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 31, 2009 ... a convex relaxation problem where the widely-acknowledged nuclear norm and l1 norm are utilized to induce low-rank and sparsity.

  10. SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR LOW-RANK MATRIX RECOVERY ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2011 ... is -hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix variable. In this paper, we extend the ...

  11. SPARSE AND LOW-RANK MATRIX DECOMPOSITION VIA ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    relaxation problem where the l1 norm and the nuclear norm are utilized for being surrogates of the sparsity and low-rank. Numerically, this convex relaxation ...

  12. Lowest-rank Solutions of Continuous and Discrete Lyapunov ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziyan Luo

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 9, 2012 ... Abstract: The low-rank solutions of continuous and discrete Lyapunov equations are of great importance but generally difficult to achieve in ...

  13. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quigley, David R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  14. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quigley, David R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  15. KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR \\Lambda Eduardo D. Sontag y SYCON was identified by Kalman as one of the cen­ tral properties determining system behavior. His simple rank assumptions were needed in establishing results on optimal control. However, it was not until Kalman's work

  16. KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR Eduardo D. Sontag SYCON was identified by Kalman as one of the cen- tral properties determining system behavior. His simple rank assumptions were needed in establishing results on optimal control. However, it was not until Kalman's work

  17. Distribution of ranks of ?-decay half-lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Miguel Campanario

    2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    I studied the distribution of ranks of values of 2949 {\\beta}-decay half-lives according to an empirical beta law with two exponents. {\\beta}-decay half-life ranks showed good fit to a beta function with two exponents.

  18. A fast, constantorder, symbol ranking text Peter Fenwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenwick, Peter

    capable of efficient hardware implementation. The compressor is based on a conventional setA fast, constant­order, symbol ranking text compressor Peter Fenwick Technical Report 145 ISSN 1173, New Zealand peter­f@cs.auckland.ac.nz Abstract Recent work on ``symbol ranking'' text compressors

  19. SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN RANK-ONE PERTURBATION PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poltoratski, Alexei

    SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN RANK-ONE PERTURBATION PROBLEMS with changing boundary condition. The general question of perturbation theory can be stated as follows the effect of rank-one perturbations on the asymptotics of the so-called survival probability. This notion

  20. My years with Rutishauser By Friedrich L. Bauer, TU Munich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    My years with Rutishauser By Friedrich L. Bauer, TU Munich February 19, 1952 Heinz Rutishauser class that I became aquainted with in the fifties, he ranks in one line with Klaus Samelson (1918

  1. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  2. XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

  3. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  4. Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roppel, Thaddeus A.

    Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays the amount of data to be processed. This work is a first example in feature extraction from tin-oxide sensors element array of tin-oxide sensors is presented. Results are extrapolated to other arrays of chemical

  5. LNG to the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, S.T.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2000, about 190 MM metric-tpy of LNG will be moving in world trade, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer By the year 2000, approximately 190 million metric tons per year of LNG will be moving in worldwide trade. Production of LNG will be spread throughout most of the world, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer. LNG will be delivered only to the heavily industrialized areas of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The success of any LNG project will be dependent on its individual economics, market needs, financial planning, and governmental permit processes. We hope industry will be able to put together the LNG projects required to meet the quanitities of production forecast here for the year 2000.

  6. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  7. 26The Frequency of Large Meteor Impacts On February 14, 2013 a 10,000 ton meteor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the town of Chelyabinsk and the explosion caused major damage to the town injuring 1,000 people `discovered' for many decades afterwards, the Chelyabinsk Meteor was extensively videoed by hundreds explodes with an energy of 4.2x109 Joules. How many tons of TNT did the Chelyabinsk Meteor yield

  8. Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    analyses the global waste market, with particular reference to municipal solid waste (MSW). Key NoteGlobal MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market between growth in wealth and increase in waste -- the more affluent a society becomes, the more waste

  9. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  10. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  11. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless surface mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  12. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  13. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless surface mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  14. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless proprietary data. Based on average prices, the value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United is zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates were consumed by five titanium pigment producers

  15. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  16. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise mining operations in Florida, Georgia, and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  17. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise mining operations in Florida, Georgia, and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  18. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  19. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of TiO2 content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of TiO2 content, unless otherwise-mineral sands operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by TiO2 pigment producers

  20. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless-mineral sands operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by TiO2 pigment producers

  1. The Nature of Faint Blue Stars in the PHL and Ton Catalogues based on Digital Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andernach, H; W., W Copo Cordova; Santiago-Bautista, I del C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined accurate positions for 3000 of the "faint blue stars" in the PHL (Palomar-Haro-Luyten) and Ton/TonS catalogues. These were published from 1957 to 1962, and, aimed at finding new white dwarfs, provide approximate positions for about 10750 blue stellar objects. Some of these "stars" had become known as quasars, a type of objects unheard-of before 1963. We derived subarcsec positions from a comparison of published finding charts with images from the first-epoch Digitized Sky Survey. Numerous objects are now well known, but unfortunately neither their PHL or Ton numbers, nor their discoverers, are recognized in current databases. A comparison with modern radio, IR, UV and X-ray surveys leads us to suggest that the fraction of extragalactic objects in the PHL and Ton catalogues is at least 15 per cent. However, because we failed to locate the original PHL plates or finding charts, it may be impossible to correctly identify the remaining 7726 PHL objects.

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled of nonstockpile- grade materials, as follows: 16,400 tons of natural battery ore, 81 tons of chemical ore, and 392

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    for such nonmetallurgical purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled of nonstockpile-grade materials, as follows: 16,400 tons of natural battery ore, 81 tons of chemical ore, and 392

  4. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 tons of the material from the Department of Energy's stockpile, while the remaining 10,000 tons,700 1,800 150,000 160,000e Bolivia -- -- -- 5,400,00 Brazil 32 32 910 NA Canada 660 660 180,000 360

  5. Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Applied Physics Letters Astronomy & Astrophysics Astronomy and Astrophysics Review Astrophysical Journal European Physical Journal D. Atomic, Molecular

  6. On Equivalence Relationships Between Classification and Ranking Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    We demonstrate that there are machine learning algorithms that can achieve success for two separate tasks simultaneously, namely the tasks of classification and bipartite ranking. This means that advantages gained from ...

  7. Canada's top-ranked digestive health research institute opens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    network Canada's top-ranked digestive health research institute opens McMaster innovates the grand opening of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute. The creation of this unique

  8. Linear rank inequalities on five or more variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Randall; Zeger, Kenneth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ranks of subspaces of vector spaces satisfy all linear inequalities satisfied by entropies (including the standard Shannon inequalities) and an additional inequality due to Ingleton. It is known that the Shannon and Ingleton inequalities generate all such linear rank inequalities on up to four variables, but it has been an open question whether additional inequalities hold for the case of five or more variables. Here we give a list of 24 inequalities which, together with the Shannon and Ingleton inequalities, generate all linear rank inequalities on five variables. We also give a partial list of linear rank inequalities on six variables and general results which produce such inequalities on an arbitrary number of variables; we prove that there are essentially new inequalities at each number of variables beyond four (a result also proved recently by Kinser).

  9. Oxygen enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels Re-direct Destination: A furnace that combusts fuel, such as coal, of a given minimum energy content to obtain a stated minimum...

  10. Ranks of Elliptic Curves via Class Groups of Number Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    state-of-the art methods to compute the rank assuming there is no rational point of order ... p /? S of K, we have valuation ordp : K ?? Kp ? Z ? {?}. If L is a ...

  11. 2011-12 At A Glance RANKINGS & RECOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    " Civil Engineering"" " " 10 " Environmental Engineering" " 5 " Construction Management" " 4 " Computer Science & Engineering" 1 " Environmental Science & Engineering" 1 ALUMNI " 11,686 since 1914 FACULT Y2011-12 At A Glance RANKINGS & RECOGNITION Top Engineering Schools for Hispanics (Hispanic Business

  12. Low-rank matrix completion via preconditioned optimization on the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 20, 2015 ... Meyer et al. [28] and Absil et al. [3] propose a few quotient geometries for the manifold of fixed-rank matrices. In recent work, Mishra et al.

  13. Ranking, Labeling, and Summarizing Short Text in Social Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khabiri, Elham

    2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    to do a better research. His motivation and suggestions were always with me through the completion of my PhD. Without his continuous help and support this work would not have been possible. Many thanks to my lab-mates for their support and much... KL- divergence means more discriminative power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 5.14 Compare PageRank with available graph based methods (Mead and LexRank). Higher NDCG is more desirable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5.15 Compare the tf -idf...

  14. Evaluating ranking methods on heterogeneous digital library collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canévet, Olivier; Marian, Ludmila; Chonavel, Thierry

    In the frame of research in particle physics, CERN has been developing its own web-based software /Invenio/ to run the digital library of all the documents related to CERN and fundamental physics. The documents (articles, photos, news, thesis, ...) can be retrieved through a search engine. The results matching the query of the user can be displayed in several ways: sorted by latest first, author, title and also ranked by word similarity. The purpose of this project is to study and implement a new ranking method in Invenio: distributed-ranking (D-Rank). This method aims at aggregating several ranking scores coming from different ranking methods into a new score. In addition to query-related scores such as word similarity, the goal of the work is to take into account non-query-related scores such as citations, journal impact factor and in particular scores related to the document access frequency in the database. The idea is that for two equally query-relevant documents, if one has been more downloaded for inst...

  15. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  16. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  17. Click Efficiency: A Unified Optimal Ranking for Online Ads and Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Raju

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally the probabilistic ranking principle is used to rank the search results while the ranking based on expected profits is used for paid placement of ads. These rankings try to maximize the expected utilities based on the user click models. Recent empirical analysis on search engine logs suggests a unified click models for both ranked ads and search results. The segregated view of document and ad rankings does not consider this commonality. Further, the used models consider parameters of (i) probability of the user abandoning browsing results (ii) perceived relevance of result snippets. But how to consider them for improved ranking is unknown currently. In this paper, we propose a generalized ranking function---namely "Click Efficiency (CE)"---for documents and ads based on empirically proven user click models. The ranking considers parameters (i) and (ii) above, optimal and has the same time complexity as sorting. To exploit its generality, we examine the reduced forms of CE ranking under different ...

  18. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  19. Status of ArDM-1t: First observations from operation with a full ton-scale liquid argon target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ArDM Collaboration; J. Calvo; C. Cantini; M. Daniel; U. Degunda; S. Di Luise; L. Epprecht; A. Gendotti; S. Horikawa; L. Knecht; B. Montes; W. Mu; M. Munoz; S. Murphy; G. Natterer; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; L. Periale; C. Regenfus; L. Romero; A. Rubbia; R. Santorelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; T. Viant; S. Wu

    2015-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ArDM-1t is the first operating ton-scale liquid argon detector for direct search of Dark Matter particles. Developed at CERN as Recognized Experiment RE18, the experiment has been approved in 2010 to be installed in the Spanish underground site LSC (Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc). Under the label of LSC EXP-08-2010 the ArDM detector underwent an intensive period of technical completion and safety approval until the recent filling of the target vessel with almost 2 ton of liquid argon. This report describes the experimental achievements during commissioning of ArDM and the transition into a stage of first physics data taking in single phase operational mode. We present preliminary observations from this run. A first indication for the background discrimination power of LAr detectors at the ton-scale is shown. We present an outlook for completing the detector with the electric drift field and upgrade of the scintillation light readout system with novel detector modules based on SiPMs in order to improve the light yield.

  20. Men open with No.8 ranked Trinity Western PRINCE GEORGE, BC -The men's soccer team will open at home with CIS No.8 ranked team, the Trinity Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Men open with No.8 ranked Trinity Western PRINCE GEORGE, BC - The men's soccer team will open at home with CIS No.8 ranked team, the Trinity Western Spartans. Kickoff is set for 2:15 p.m. Sept. 22 into their first CIS home opener taking on the No.8 CIS ranked team, the Trinity Western Spartans. The stakes

  1. Using Lotkaian Informetrics for Ranking in Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaer, Philipp

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to propose the use of models, theories and laws in bibliometrics and scientometrics to enhance information retrieval processes, especially ranking. A common pattern in many man-made data sets is Lotka's Law which follows the well-known power-law distributions. These informetric distributions can be used to give an alternative order to large and scattered result sets and can be applied as a new ranking mechanism. The polyrepresentation of information in Digital Library systems is used to enhance the retrieval quality, to overcome the drawbacks of the typical term-based ranking approaches and to enable users to explore retrieved document sets from a different perspective.

  2. Accounting for the Uncertainty in the Evaluation of Percentile Ranks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent paper entitled "Inconsistencies of Recently Proposed Citation Impact Indicators and how to Avoid Them," Schreiber (2012, at arXiv:1202.3861) proposed (i) a method to assess tied ranks consistently and (ii) fractional attribution to percentile ranks in the case of relatively small samples (e.g., for n percentile rank classes used in the Science and Engineering Indicators of the U.S. National Science Board, and thus missed, in my opinion, the point that fractional attribution at the level of hundred percentiles-or equivalently quantiles as the continuous random variable-is only a linear, and therefore much less complex problem. Given the quantile-values, the non-linear a...

  3. PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Chakhmakhchyan; D. Shepelyansky

    2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks, generated by the intermittency map and the typical Chirikov map. The Ulam networks generated by these maps have certain similarities with such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW), showing an algebraic decay of the PageRank probability. We find that the opinion formation process on Ulam networks have certain similarities but also distinct features comparing to the WWW. We attribute these distinctions to internal differences in network structure of the Ulam and WWW networks. We also analyze the process of opinion formation in the frame of generalized Sznajd model which protects opinion of small communities.

  4. Enhancing Invenio Digital Library With An External Relevance Ranking Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauner, Patrick Oliver

    Invenio is a comprehensive web-based free digital library software suite originally developed at CERN. In order to improve its information retrieval and word similarity ranking capabilities, the goal of this thesis is to enhance Invenio by bridging it with modern external information retrieval systems. In the first part a comparison of various information retrieval systems such as Solr and Xapian is made. In the second part a system-independent bridge for word similarity ranking is designed and implemented. Subsequently, Solr and Xapian are integrated in Invenio via adapters to the bridge. In the third part scalability tests are performed. Finally, a future outlook is briefly discussed.

  5. Rank-ordered Multifractal Spectrum for Intermittent Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chang; Cheng-chin Wu

    2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method that is both physically explicable and quantitatively accurate in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events based on groupings of rank-ordered fluctuations. The generic nature of such rank-ordered spectrum leads it to a natural connection with the concept of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. We demonstrate this technique using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. The calculated spectrum suggests a crossover from the near Gaussian characteristics of small amplitude fluctuations to the extreme intermittent state of large rare events.

  6. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactor Among Richland Operations Office's 2014 Accomplishments Much Accomplished at Hanford in 2010: Richland Operations Office Prime Contractors Cite Past Year's Cleanup...

  7. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  8. Can we do without ranks in Burrows Wheeler transform compression?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Tony

    Wirth ¡ and Alistair Moffat ¢ Abstract: Compressors based on the Burrows Wheeler transform (BWT) convert of inefficiency. Instead of relying on symbol ranking, we examine the problem of directly encoding the symbols-based compressors. ¤ This work was supported by the Australian Research Council.¥ Department of Computer Science

  9. The blowup formula for higher rank Donaldson invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, Lucas Howard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I study the relationship between the higher rank Donaldson invariants of a smooth 4-manifold X and the invariants of its blowup X#CP2 . This relationship can be expressed in terms of a formal power series ...

  10. Professor (Open Rank) Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yi

    Professor (Open Rank) Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign The Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering-qualified candidates with background in areas related to reactor power engineering and other nuclear applications

  11. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  12. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  13. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. 3 figs.

  14. SampleRank: Training Factor Graphs with Atomic Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallum, Andrew

    a user-provided loss function to distribute stochastic gradients across an MCMC chain. As a result, parameter updates can be computed between arbitrary MCMC states. Sam- pleRank is not only faster than CD- expensive gradients between the ground-truth and samples along an MCMC chain yielding a stochastic

  15. Lignites and Low Rank Coals Conference: Proceedings 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI and the Technische Vereinigung des Grosskraftswerkbetreiber (Technical Association of Large Power Plant Operators) (VGB) jointly held a Conference on Lignites and Low Rank Coals in Wiesbaden, Germany, May 16-18, 2001. These Proceedings include the plenary papers, technical session papers, and rapporteurs' summaries from the conference.

  16. Reduced-rank Vector Generalized Linear Models Thomas W. Yee,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    . Keywords: Canonical correspondence analysis; Linear discriminant analysis; Neural networks; Non- parametric the reduced-rank regression idea has been applied to non-Gaussian errors is the MLM. This was proposed such as neural networks, projection pursuit regression, linear discriminant analysis, canonical correspondence

  17. High School Math Contest Rankings November 16, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    2013 High School Math Contest Rankings November 16, 2013 Sweepstakes Sweepstakes Points School School of Advancement Isil Nal fourth 50 Quail Valley Middle School Isil Nal Fifth 49 Whatley Home School Willaim Whatley Sixth 43 Westwood High School Zheng Chen seventh 28 LASA Sarah Harrelson Eighth 27

  18. Multiple Faculty Positions, All Ranks Materials Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Faculty Positions, All Ranks Materials Science and Engineering Texas A&M University The interdisciplinary Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University invites applications. Applicants must have an earned doctorate in materials science and engineering or an appropriate, closely

  19. Scalable K-Means by Ranked Retrieval Andrei Broder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Scalable K-Means by Ranked Retrieval Andrei Broder Google 1600 Amphitheater Parkway Mountain View@google.com Srihari Venkatesan xAd 440 North Wolfe Road Sunnyvale, CA 94085 ABSTRACT The k-means clustering algorithm, a prohibitive cost when the number of clusters is large. In this paper we show how to reduce the cost of the k-means

  20. RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION OVER NUMBER FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION OVER NUMBER FIELDS JOHAN BOSMAN, PETER BRUIN of all elliptic curves over quadratic fields with torsion subgroup T is empty, or it contains curves number fields. More explicitly, we will be interested in the following question: given a torsion group

  1. AVERAGE RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES: TENSION BETWEEN DATA AND CONJECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    curves of conductor X} converge as X tends to infinity, and if so, what is the limit P = lim X PAVERAGE RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES: TENSION BETWEEN DATA AND CONJECTURE BAUR BEKTEMIROV, BARRY MAZUR, and · to list them in order of increasing conductor, banking on the theorem that tells us that there are only

  2. Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion , Chaoqiang Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion Hui Ji , Chaoqiang Liu , Zuowei Shen video denoising algorithms assume a sin- gle statistical model of image noise, e.g. additive Gaussian white noise, which often is violated in practice. In this pa- per, we present a new patch-based video

  3. Analog Rank-Order Filter using multiple-winners-take-all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dake, Luthuli Edem

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an analog VLSI Rank Order Filter (ROF), capable of ranking a wide array of inputs. Implementation is achieved using two multiple-winners-take-all blocks that compute in parallel. Simulation and experimental results show good speed...

  4. BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy February 6, 2015 - 4:18pm Addthis...

  5. Relative risk-relative ranking in Defense and Energy Department cleanup programs: Comparison of methods, results, and role in priority setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turkeltaub, R. [Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Treichel, L.C. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Strohl, A.R. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates how the Department of Energy (DOE) enhanced their Environmental Restoration Program by modifying the Department of Defense (DoD) Cleanup Program`s Relative Risk Site Evaluation Primer in order to create their own framework, the Relative Ranking Evaluation Framework for EM-40 Release Sites, Facilities and Buildings. In addition, this paper discusses and compares the two frameworks and presents the results of relative risk/relative ranking site evaluations for both agencies through July 1996. The status of agency efforts to implement their respective frameworks also is discussed along with plans for strengthening these initiatives in the coming year.

  6. Finitely Generated Rank-Ordered Sets as a Model for Type: Dieter Spreen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spreen, Dieter

    by ESPRIT BRA 7232 1 #12;Rank-preserving functions are such that each approximation of a function value

  7. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  8. Efficient and Secure Ranked Multi-Keyword Search on Encrypted Cloud Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Efficient and Secure Ranked Multi-Keyword Search on Encrypted Cloud Data Cengiz Ă?rencik Faculty and reveal information about sensitive search terms. A related protocol, Private Information Retrieval (PIR-preserving ranked keyword search scheme based on PIR that allows multi-keyword queries with rank- ing capability

  9. Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianguo

    Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture Method Jianguo Lu Preprint submitted to Elsevier March 12, 2010 #12;Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture, Canada. email: jlu@uwindsor.ca Abstract Many deep web data sources are ranked data sources, i

  10. Elliptic curves with large torsion and positive rank over number fields of small degree and ECM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    Elliptic curves with large torsion and positive rank over number fields of small degree and ECM for construction of elliptic curves with large torsion group and positive rank over number fields of small degree). Keywords: Torsion group, rank, elliptic curves, number fields Mathematics Subject Classification (2010): 11

  11. Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Carla P.

    Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

  12. Optical ranked-order filtering using threshold decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allebach, J.P.; Ochoa, E.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid optical/electronic system performs median filtering and related ranked-order operations using threshold decomposition to encode the image. Threshold decomposition transforms the nonlinear neighborhood ranking operation into a linear space-invariant filtering step followed by a point-to-point threshold comparison step. Spatial multiplexing allows parallel processing of all the threshold components as well as recombination by a second linear, space-invariant filtering step. An incoherent optical correlation system performs the linear filtering, using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator as the input device and a computer-generated hologram in the filter plane. Thresholding is done electronically. By adjusting the value of the threshold, the same architecture is used to perform median, minimum, and maximum filtering of images. A totally optical system is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  13. Optical ranked-order filtering using threshold decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allebach, Jan P. (West Lafayette, IN); Ochoa, Ellen (Pleasanton, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (Alamo, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid optical/electronic system performs median filtering and related ranked-order operations using threshold decomposition to encode the image. Threshold decomposition transforms the nonlinear neighborhood ranking operation into a linear space-invariant filtering step followed by a point-to-point threshold comparison step. Spatial multiplexing allows parallel processing of all the threshold components as well as recombination by a second linear, space-invariant filtering step. An incoherent optical correlation system performs the linear filtering, using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator as the input device and a computer-generated hologram in the filter plane. Thresholding is done electronically. By adjusting the value of the threshold, the same architecture is used to perform median, minimum, and maximum filtering of images. A totally optical system is also disclosed.

  14. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  15. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  16. Percentile Ranks and the Integrated Impact Indicator (I3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested Rousseau's (in press) recent proposal to define percentile classes in the case of the Integrated Impact Indicator (I3) so that the largest number in a set always belongs to the highest (100th) percentile rank class. In the case a set of nine uncited papers and one with citation, however, the uncited papers would all be placed in the 90th percentile rank. A lowly-cited document set would thus be advantaged when compared with a highly-cited one. Notwithstanding our reservations, we extended the program for computing I3 in Web-of-Science data (at http://www.leydesdorff.net/software/i3) with this option; the quantiles without a correction are now the default. As Rousseau mentions, excellence indicators (e.g., the top-10%) can be considered as special cases of I3: only two percentile rank classes are distinguished for the evaluation. Both excellence and impact indicators can be tested statistically using the z-test for independent proportions.

  17. Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

  18. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  19. Ranking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou

    printers,... ­ User generated. T i bl 3D h· Trimble 3D warehouse... 3D model retrieval is essential scanners, 3D printers,... ­ User generated. T i bl 3D h· Trimble 3D warehouse... 3D model retrievalRanking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model

  20. Ranking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou

    printers,... ­ User generated. T i bl 3D h· Trimble 3D warehouse... 3D model retrieval is essentialRanking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model Retrieval Takahiko FuruyaRyutarou Ohbuchi University of Yamanashi #12;IntroductionIntroduction 3D models

  1. Low-rank-coal study national needs for resource development. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, Dr., Martin A.; Hill, George R.; Jonakin, James; Crutchfield, Paul W.; Severson, Donald E.; White, David M.; Yeager, Kurt

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-rank coals - lignite and subbituminous - are those which have been subjected to the least amount of metamorphic change during the coal-forming process. As such, they retain greater fractions of moisture and volatile matter from the original peat material, and contain less fixed carbon, than the high-rank coals - bituminous and anthracite. The primary measure used to classify the lower ranks of coal is heating value. Other important characteristics which distinguish the low-rank coals from high-rank coals are discussed in this report. Low-rank coals represent a major, and largely untapped, energy resource for this country. Very extensive deposits of lignite and subbituminous coal exist in the western states, the Gulf coast, and Alaska. Major deposits of low-rank coal are also found in many other countries, most notably the USSR, Australia, Canada, and the central and eastern European nations. Worldwide coal statistics indicate that low-rank coals account for roughly one-third of the total resource and current production tonnages. This report recommends a comprehensive national research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program to enhance the development of low-rank coals. The major conclusion of this study is that the unique properties of these coals affect the technologies for their extraction, preparation, direct use, and conversion and justify a separate focus on low-rank coals in the national RD and D efforts.

  2. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inverse of the background distribution.

  3. On the Classification of Low-Rank Braided Fusion Categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruillard, Paul Joseph

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE CLASSIFICATION OF LOW-RANK BRAIDED FUSION CATEGORIES A Dissertation by PAUL JOSEPH BRUILLARD Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...+=p . BFC Braided Fusion Category. C0 The M uger center of the category C. Cad The adjoint subcategory. Cpt The pointed subcategory. Cop Opposite (mirror) category to C. coevX Coevaluation I! X X . C2 (G;K ) 2-cochains of G with coe cients in K . C...

  4. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inversemore »of the background distribution.« less

  5. Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    to their high cellulose diet and their lack of the special enzyme that breaks down cellulose. Instead they rely on the bacteria that can be found in their stomach. This bacteria uses non-protein nitrogen in order to create short chain fatty acids or proteins. The cow regurgitates and chews its food further in order

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont. Together, these firms operated about 820 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 238 companies operated approximately 700 clay pits or quarries. The leading 20 firms

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, these firms operated approximately 739 mines. The estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays, these firms operated about 983 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1.8 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows: kaolin--55% paper, 8% kiln furniture

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 233 companies operated approximately 650 clay pits or quarries

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode clay produced was about $2.14 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 18.5% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free 11.0% ad val. Waste and scrap18 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters continued

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 760222 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11 smelters east

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, 7 companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion, prices in the aluminum scrap and secondary aluminum alloy markets fluctuated through September but closed20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    for such nonmetallurgical purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled inventories of nonstockpile-grade materials, as follows, in tons: natural battery ore, 16,800; chemical ore

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled, as follows, in tons: natural battery, 16,800, and metallurgical, 331,000. Prepared by Thomas S. Jones [(703

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

  3. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  4. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  5. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  6. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  7. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  8. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  9. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  12. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2007. Indium-containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were exported to Canada for processing. Two companies, one in New York and the other in Rhode Island gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells require approximately 50 metric tons of indium to produce 1 gigawatt of solar power. Research was underway to develop a low-cost manufacturing process for flexible CIGS solar

  13. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but growing through the recycling of lithium batteries. Import Sources (1994-97): Chile, 96%; and other, 4 lithium salts from battery recycling and lithium hydroxide monohydrate from former Department of Energy102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters continued. Most of the production decreases continued to take place in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters from 693 thousand tons at yearend 2004. World Smelter Production and Capacity: Production Yearend

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption was about $408 million as measured

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, the United States consumed about 13% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 13% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 76%; full-alloy steel, 8

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, the United States was expected to consume about 5% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2010 was $883 million as measured by the value

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, the United States was expected to consume about 7% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2008 was $1,283 million

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 14% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys, respectively. The value

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, the United States was expected to consume about 6% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production company produced chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2011 was $1

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 16% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 74%; full-alloy steel

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, the United States was expected to consume about 2% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2009 was $358 million as measured by the value

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2007 was $548 million as measured

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 12% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 68%; full-alloy steel, 8

  9. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in a significant decrease in mine production. The amount of tungsten concentrates remaining in stockpiles in China for the tungsten industry. Once the stockpiles are depleted, world mine production will have to increase to meet

  10. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  11. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  12. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2010. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2006­09): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    184 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines. Approximately 10 companies in the United States processed tungsten concentrates, ammonium paratungstate, tungsten oxide, and

  14. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2009. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2005-08): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government limited

  15. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Canada, 16%; Germany, 9 by Chinese production and exports. China's Government restricted the amounts of tungsten that could

  16. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994 of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste

  17. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994. In 2000, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 39%; Russia, 21

  18. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  19. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2011. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production (2007­10): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government regulates its

  20. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

  1. Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

  2. Structure, constitution and utilization of low rank Indian coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyengar, M.S.; Iyengar, V.A. [M.S. Iyengar and Associates, New Delhi (India)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly reviews the work done on lignite and sub-bituminous coals. Surface area and moisture adsorption dependency on functional group is described. The role of hydrogen bonding in the briquetting of lignite and of alkyl groups in inducing caking properties are discussed. The dualistic behavior of abnormal coals as both a low and high rank coal is also discussed in relation to the nature of their sulphur groups. On the utilization side, processes are described for: (1) Utilization of non-caking coal in the reduction of iron ore. Coal is first briquetted using a lime-tar binder. It is then carbonized for reducing iron ore. The bar is recovered and recycled. (2) Production of carbon black from low rank coals. In this process, coal is carbonized at high temperature in a fluidized bed. Carbon black, for tire industry, is obtained with char as by-product. (3) Utilization of flue gases of industry is also discussed. In this new approach, the flue gas is reduced to synthesis gas by additional fuel and the inevitable surplus heat. The viability of the process is illustrated by details of a recent study in a cement plant. In addition to the above, the implication of recycling flue gas in automobile engines to make them more environment friendly and cost effective, is also discussed.

  3. AN APPLICATION OF URBANSIM TO THE AUSTIN, TEXAS REGION: INTEGRATED-MODEL FORECASTS FOR THE YEAR 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    , as well as energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. This work describes the modeling of year-2030 policies significantly impact the region's future land use patterns, traffic conditions, greenhouse gas (emitting over 6 billion metric tons of CO2-equivalents annually, and accounting for 22.2% of the world

  4. ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic Zd-action is an action of Zd

  5. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  6. One-dimensional Brownian particle systems with rank dependent drifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Soumik

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study interacting systems of linear Brownian motions whose drift vector at every time point is determined by the relative ranks of the coordinate processes at that time. Our main objective has been to study the long range behavior of the spacings between the particles in increasing order. For finite systems, we characterize drifts for which the spacing system remains stable, and show its convergence to a unique stationary joint distribution given by independent exponential distributions with varying means. We also study one particular countably infinite system, where only the minimum Brownian particle gets a constant upward drift, and prove that independent and identically distributed exponential spacings remain stationary under the dynamics of such a process. Some related conjectures in this direction have also been discussed.

  7. Ranking of sabotage/tampering avoidance technology alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Tabatabai, A.S.; Powers, T.B.; Daling, P.M.; Fecht, B.A.; Gore, B.F.; Overcast, T.D.; Rankin, W.R.; Schreiber, R.E.; Tawil, J.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study to evaluate alternatives to the design and operation of nuclear power plants, emphasizing a reduction of their vulnerability to sabotage. Estimates of core melt accident frequency during normal operations and from sabotage/tampering events were used to rank the alternatives. Core melt frequency for normal operations was estimated using sensitivity analysis of results of probabilistic risk assessments. Core melt frequency for sabotage/tampering was estimated by developing a model based on probabilistic risk analyses, historic data, engineering judgment, and safeguards analyses of plant locations where core melt events could be initiated. Results indicate the most effective alternatives focus on large areas of the plant, increase safety system redundancy, and reduce reliance on single locations for mitigation of transients. Less effective options focus on specific areas of the plant, reduce reliance on some plant areas for safe shutdown, and focus on less vulnerable targets.

  8. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

  9. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. In this reporting period we revised all of the economic calculations, participated in technology transfer of project results, and began working on project closeout tasks in anticipation of the project ending December 31, 2005. In this research, we conducted five separate simulation investigations, or cases. These cases are (1) CO{sub 2} sequestration base case scenarios for 4,000-ft and 6,200-ft depth coal beds in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of east-central Texas, (2) sensitivity study of the effects of well spacing on sequestration, (3) sensitivity study of the effects of injection gas composition, (4) sensitivity study of the effects of injection rate, and (5) sensitivity study of the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection/sequestration. Results show that, in most cases, revenue from coalbed methane production does not completely offset the costs of CO{sub 2} sequestration in Texas low-rank coals, indicating that CO{sub 2} injection is not economically feasible for the ranges of gas prices and carbon credits investigated. The best economic performance is obtained with flue gas (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) injection, as compared to injection of 100% CO{sub 2} and a mixture of 50% CO{sub 2} and 50% N{sub 2}. As part of technology transfer for this project, we presented results at the West Texas Geological Society Fall Symposium in October 2005 and at the COAL-SEQ Forum in November 2005.

  10. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) determine the effects of permeability anisotropy on performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas, and (2) begin reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells. To evaluate the effects of permeability anisotropy on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds, we conducted deterministic reservoir modeling studies of 100% CO{sub 2} gas injection for the 6,200-ft depth base case (Case 1b) using the most likely values of the reservoir parameters. Simulation results show significant differences in the cumulative volumes of CH{sub 4} produced and CO{sub 2} injected due to permeability anisotropy, depending on the orientation of injection patterns relative to the orientation of permeability anisotropy. This indicates that knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of permeability anisotropy will be an important consideration in the design of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects. We continued discussions with Anadarko Petroleum regarding plans for additional coal core acquisition and laboratory work to further characterize Wilcox low-rank coals. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we submitted the paper SPE 100584 for presentation at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium to be held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on May 15-18, 2006.

  11. Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Success of the Nuclear Norm Heuristic for Rank Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recht, Ben

    Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Success of the Nuclear Norm Heuristic for Rank Minimization that yield exact solutions. A popular heuristic algorithm replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm provide accurate predictions of the heuristic's performance in non-asymptotic scenarios. I. INTRODUCTION

  12. Determining factors behind the PageRank log-log plot Yana Volkovich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    - tion through a stochastic equation inspired by the original definition of PageRank. Further, we use agreement with experimental data on three different sam- ples of the Web. Keywords PageRank, Power law, Recursive stochastic equations, Re- gular variation, Web graph MSC 2000 90B15, 68P10, 60J80 1. INTRODUCTION

  13. Tenure-Track Faculty (All Ranks) Assistant Professor/Associate Professor/Full Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenure-Track Faculty (All Ranks) Assistant Professor/Associate Professor/Full Professor Mechanical for both teaching and research are being sought. Candidates for the rank of Assistant Professor should have- and nano-systems, advanced energy technologies, bio-inspired systems and robotics, and plasma science

  14. Preference Learning using the Choquet Integral: The Case of Multipartite Ranking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hüllermeier, Eyke

    learning methods [48]. While a number of different types of ranking problems have been introducedPreference Learning using the Choquet Integral: The Case of Multipartite Ranking Ali Fallah Tehrani on Fuzzy Systems Abstract We propose a novel method for preference learning or, more specifically, learn

  15. HIGH RANK ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION GROUP OVER QUADRATIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    HIGH RANK ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION GROUP OVER QUADRATIC FIELDS JULIÁN AGUIRRE for the torsion group of elliptic curves dened over quadratic number elds. We present examples of high rank elliptic curves with given torsion group which give the current records for most of the torsion groups

  16. HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM : A METHOD FOR RANKING IMPACTS IN SMALL AND MEDIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    99-57 HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM : A METHOD FOR RANKING IMPACTS IN SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES A. Accorsi', J.P. Pineau, A. Prats l. INERIS, Vemeuil-en-Halatte, France Key words : safety management System, ranking, health, safety, environment ABSTRACT ELF ATOCHEM and INERIS have

  17. ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION HUI JI, SIBIN HUANG, ZUOWEI SHEN, AND YUHONG XU Abstract. This paper presents a new video restoration scheme based domain, we formulate the video restoration problem as a joint sparse and low-rank matrix approximation

  18. Toward a Classification of the Ranks and Border Ranks of All (3,3,3) Trilinear Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allums, Derek

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    transformations. Ng?s classification is up to this action. The first step is to move the problem of classification into projective space so we consider P(A?B?C). Note that we can also have ? ? Hom(B?,A?C) or ? ? Hom(C?,A?B) so without loss of generality only...)?b1?c1 +a3?b3?c2 +(?a3)?b2?c3. Proposition .43. R(T ) ? 7,R(T ) = 5. Proof. The naive approach yields an upper bound of 7 for the rank. 33 CHAPTER IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Building on Ng?s classification of all ? ? C3?C3?C3 up to the action...

  19. Calendar Year 2001 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year

  20. Calendar Year 2002 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year2

  1. Calendar Year 2003 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year23

  2. Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year

  3. Calendar Year 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year4

  4. Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewable Energy, U.S. DepartmentTechnology Ten Year Site Plans Ten

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, clay and shale production was reported in all States except Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; bentonite-- 25% pet waste absorbent, 21% drilling mud, 21% foundry sand bond, 15% iron ore pelletizing,300 Imports for consumption: Artificially activated clay and earth 17 18 21 27 20 Kaolin 57 63 114 158 275,980 Consumption, apparent 37,500 35,600 34,800 34,600 34,600 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 40 42 42

  6. Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 2 Aspen 3.29 250.00$ 822.50$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 3 Aspen 2.38 160.00$ 380.80$ Hard Maple Veneer Aspen 600.00$ -$ Hard Maple Birdseye Aspen 0.055 700.00$ 38

  7. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue acquisition of data pertinent to coal characterization that would help in determining the feasibility of carbon dioxide sequestration. Structural analysis and detailed correlation of coal zones are important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Evaluation of existing well logs indicates local structural complexity that complicates interpretations of continuity of the Wilcox Group coal zones. Therefore, we have begun searching for published structural maps for the areas of potential injection CO{sub 2}, near the coal-fired power plants. Preliminary evaluations of data received from Anadarko Petroleum Corporation suggest that coal properties and gas content and chemical composition vary greatly among coal seams. We are assessing the stratigraphic and geographic distributions and the weight of coal samples that Anadarko has provided to select samples for further laboratory analysis. Our goal is to perform additional isotherm analyses with various pure and/or mixed gases to enhance our characterization model. Additionally, we are evaluating opportunities for field determination of permeability with Anadarko, utilizing one of their wells.

  8. New York looks to the future of waste (10 March 2006) New York City has been investigating ways to manage its waste more sustainably in years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and the lack of sites within the urban area itself which can process it. The city produces 46,000 tons of waste City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) attempted to build a series of waste-to-energy facilities and cleaner waste-to-energy facilities in New York City four years #12;ago, the proposal was met

  9. Equation of motion for incompressible mixed fluid driven by evaporation and its application to online rankings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumiko Hattori; Tetsuya Hattori

    2008-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a unique classical solution to initial value problem for a system of partial differential equations for the densities of components of one dimensional incompressible fluid mixture driven by evaporation. Motivated by the known fact that the solution appears as an infinite particle limit of stochastic ranking processes, which is a simple stochastic model of time evolutions of e.g., Amazon Sales Ranks, we collected data from the web and performed statistical fits to our formula. The results suggest that the fluid equations and solutions may have an application in the analysis of online rankings.

  10. Empirical Evidence for the Relevance of Fractional Scoring in the Calculation of Percentile Rank Scores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractional scoring has been proposed to avoid inconsistencies in the attribution of publications to percentile rank classes. Uncertainties and ambiguities in the evaluation of percentile ranks can be demonstrated most easily with small datasets. But for larger datasets an often large number of papers with the same citation count leads to the same uncertainties and ambiguities which can be avoided by fractional scoring. This is demonstrated for four different empirical datasets with several thousand publications each which are assigned to 6 percentile rank classes. Only by utilizing fractional scoring the total score of all papers exactly reproduces the theoretical value in each case.

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [(703) 648­4978, dedelste@usgs.gov] #12;49 COPPER 80% year-on-year increase in China's net imports 975 Secondary 54 46 38 37 60 Copper from all old scrap 156 138 143 153 170 Imports for consumption 33% of the U.S. copper supply. Import Sources (2008­11): Unmanufactured: Chile, 43%; Canada, 32

  12. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to further characterize the three areas selected as potential CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Thus, we purchased 12 hardcopy well logs (in addition to 15 well logs obtained during previous quarter) from a commercial source and digitized them to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Thus, we correlated and mapped Wilcox Group subdivisions--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations, as well as the coal-bearing intervals of the Yegua and Jackson formations in well logs. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to Big Brown and Martin Lake coal mines. This quarter we also received CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses of the Sandow Mine samples, and we are assessing the results. GEM, a compositional simulator developed by the Computer Modeling Group (CMG), was selected for performing the CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CBM modeling tasks for this project. This software was used to conduct preliminary CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production simulations in a 5-spot injection pattern. We are continuing to pursue a cooperative agreement with Anadarko Petroleum, which has already acquired significant relevant data near one of our potential sequestration sites.

  13. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to further characterize the three areas selected as potential test sites, to begin assessing regional attributes of natural coal fractures (cleats), which control coalbed permeability, and to interview laboratories for coal sample testing. An additional objective was to initiate discussions with an operating company that has interests in Texas coalbed gas production and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential, to determine their interest in participation and cost sharing in this project. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Therefore, we purchased 15 well logs from a commercial source to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Log suites included gamma ray (GR), self potential (SP), resistivity, sonic, and density curves. Other properties of the coals in the selected areas were collected from published literature. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to a Jackson coal outcrop and visited Wilcox coal exposures at the Sandow surface mine. Coal samples at the Sandow mine were collected for CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses. We contacted several laboratories that specialize in analyzing coals and selected a laboratory, submitting the Sandow Wilcox coals for analysis. To address the issue of cost sharing, we had fruitful initial discussions with a petroleum corporation in Houston. We reviewed the objectives and status of this project, discussed data that they have already collected, and explored the potential for cooperative data acquisition and exchange in the future. We are pursuing a cooperative agreement with them.

  14. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to perform pressure transient testing to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. To perform permeability testing of the Wilcox coal, we worked with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in selecting the well and intervals to test and in designing the pressure transient test. Anadarko agreed to allow us to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well (Well APCT2). This well is located in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that we earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2} emissions. A service company, Pinnacle Technologies Inc. (Pinnacle) was contracted to conduct the tests in the field. Intervals tested were 2 coal beds with thicknesses of 3 and 7 feet, respectively, at approximately 4,100 ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. Analyses of pressure transient test data indicate that average values for coalbed methane reservoir permeability in the tested coals are between 1.9 and 4.2 mD. These values are in the lower end of the range of permeability used in the preliminary simulation modeling. These new coal fracture permeability data from the APCT2 well, along with the acquired gas compositional analyses and sorption capacities of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}, complete the reservoir description phase of the project. During this quarter we also continued work on reservoir and economic modeling to evaluate performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery.

  15. Multi-Pareto-Ranking Evolutionary Algorithm Wahabou Abdou, Christelle Bloch, Damien Charlet, and Francois Spies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Multi-Pareto-Ranking Evolutionary Algorithm Wahabou Abdou, Christelle Bloch, Damien Charlet to define the selection probability of each Pareto front hal-00940119,version1- #12;2 W. Abdou, C. Bloch, D

  16. Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities....

  17. ALGEBRAIC Z d ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Z d ­ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND Abstract. We of the Yale Mathematics Department. 1 #12; 2 MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic

  18. ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND Abstract. We of the Yale Mathematics Department. 1 #12;2 MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic

  19. Comparison of value-added models for school ranking and classification: a Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhongmiao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A “Value-Added” definition of school effectiveness calls for the evaluation of schools based on the unique contribution of schools to individual student academic growth. The estimates of value-added school effectiveness are usually used for ranking...

  20. Rank-1 accelerated illumination recovery in scanning diffractive imaging by transparency estimation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hau-Tieng

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Illumination retrieval in scanning diffractive imaging a.k.a. ptychography is challenging when the specimen is weakly scattering or surrounded by empty space. We describe a rank-1 acceleration method for weakly scattering or piecewise smooth specimens.

  1. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers in the quarterly technical progress report for the period April-June, 1984, of the Low-Rank Coal Research project have been entered individually into EDB and ERA (17 items). (LTN)

  2. An FPTAS for optimizing a class of low-rank functions over a polytope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Shashi

    We present a fully polynomial time approximation scheme (FPTAS) for optimizing a very general class of non-linear functions of low rank over a polytope. Our approximation scheme relies on constructing an approximate ...

  3. Tail universalities in rank distributions as an algebraic problem: the beta-like function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo G. Naumis; Germinal Cocho

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Although power laws of the Zipf type have been used by many workers to fit rank distributions in different fields like in economy, geophysics, genetics, soft-matter, networks etc., these fits usually fail at the tails. Some distributions have been proposed to solve the problem, but unfortunately they do not fit at the same time both ending tails. We show that many different data in rank laws, like in granular materials, codons, author impact in scientific journal, etc. are very well fitted by a beta-like function. Then we propose that such universality is due to the fact that a system made from many subsystems or choices, imply stretched exponential frequency-rank functions which qualitatively and quantitatively can be fitted with the proposed beta-like function distribution in the limit of many random variables. We prove this by transforming the problem into an algebraic one: finding the rank of successive products of a given set of numbers.

  4. A Low Patch-Rank Interpretation of Texture Hayden Schaeffer and Stanley Osher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    A Low Patch-Rank Interpretation of Texture Hayden Schaeffer and Stanley Osher University models have appeared in the literature, beginning with the work of Meyer [28], who first proposed

  5. Confluent KZ equations for sl_N with Poincare rank 2 at infinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Nagoya; Juanjuan Sun

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct confluent KZ equations with Poincare rank 2 at infinity for the case of sl_N and the integral representation for the solutions. Hamiltonians of these confluent KZ equations are derived from suitable quantization of dlog tau constructed in the theory of monodromy preserving deformation by Jimbo, Miwa and Ueno. Our confluent KZ equations may be viewed as a quantization of monodromy preserving deformation with Poincare rank 2 at infinity.

  6. Full Rank Rational Demand Systems Jeffrey T. LaFrance Rulon D. Pope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.

    n= = = p (1) where : ,n ik ++ :kh ++ , 1, , , 1, , .i n k K = = 3 Define the n×K ma- trix of price functions [ ]( ) ( )ik=A p p . The rank of (1) is the column rank of A(p), with nK (Gorman, 1981 of smooth demand systems are to solve the integrability problem for a set of demand equations or to use Roy

  7. CHAOTICITY OF THE STATIONARY DISTRIBUTION OF RANK-BASED INTERACTING DIFFUSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. The mean-field limit of systems of rank-based interacting diffusions is known to be described. For all n 1, consider the system of rank-based interacting diffusions, or particles, (1) i {1, . . ., n to the nonlinear (in McKean's sense) stochastic differential equation (2) dX(t) = b(Ft(X(t)))dt + dW(t), Ft(x) = P

  8. Low-rank coal research, Task 5.1. Topical report, April 1986--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a topical progress report for Low-Rank Coal Research performed April 1986 - December 1992. Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research is described for Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains, and Hot-Gas Cleanup. Advanced Research and Technology Development was conducted on Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Combustion Research is described for Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Fuels (completed 10/31/90), Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals (completed 12/31/90), Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications (completed 10/31/90), Nitrous Oxide Emission, and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion. Liquefaction Research in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction is discussed. Gasification Research was conducted in Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coals and in Sulfur Forms in Coal.

  9. Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

  10. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main tasks for this reporting period were to correlate well logs and refine coal property maps, evaluate methane content and gas composition of Wilcox Group coals, and initiate discussions concerning collection of additional, essential data with Anadarko. To assess the volume of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered and volume of methane that can be produced in the vicinity of the proposed Sam Seymour sequestration site, we used approximately 200 additional wells logs from Anadarko Petroleum Corp. to correlate and map coal properties of the 3 coal-bearing intervals of Wilcox group. Among the maps we are making are maps of the number of coal beds, number of coal beds greater than 5 ft thick, and cumulative coal thickness for each coal interval. This stratigraphic analysis validates the presence of abundant coal for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of Sam Seymour power plant. A typical wellbore in this region may penetrate 20 to 40 coal beds with cumulative coal thickness between 80 and 110 ft. Gas desorption analyses of approximately 75 coal samples from the 3 Wilcox coal intervals indicate that average methane content of Wilcox coals in this area ranges between 216 and 276 scf/t, basinward of the freshwater boundary indicated on a regional hydrologic map. Vitrinite reflectance data indicate that Wilcox coals are thermally immature for gas generation in this area. Minor amounts of biogenic gas may be present, basinward of the freshwater line, but we infer that most of the Wilcox coalbed gas in the deep coal beds is migrated thermogenic gas. Analysis based on limited data suggest that sites for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed gas recovery should be located basinward of the Wilcox freshwater contour, where methane content is high and the freshwater aquifer can be avoided.

  11. Ranked 1st among the top 100 universities under 50 years old by The Times Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jae-Hoon

    , 60Technicians, 17 Administrative Staff) · Budget US $ 31,3M (FY 2014) 4th Generation Light Source, and electronics · Scheduled to be operational in 2015 · US $ 401,9M (Total Costs for Construction) POHANG

  12. Risk-Based Ranking Experiences for Cold War Legacy Facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, a number of government agencies in the United States have faced increasing public scrutiny for their efforts to address the wide range of potential environmental issues related to Cold War legacies. Risk-based ranking was selected as a means of defining the relative importance of issues. Ambitious facility-wide risk-based ranking applications were undertaken. However, although facility-wide risk-based ranking efforts can build invaluable understanding of the potential issues related to Cold War legacies, conducting such efforts is difficult because of the potentially enormous scope and the potentially strong institutional barriers. The U.S. experience is that such efforts are worth undertaking to start building a knowledge base and infrastructure that are based on a thorough understanding of risk. In both the East and the West, the legacy of the Cold War includes a wide range of potential environmental issues associated with large industrial complexes of weapon production facilities. The responsible agencies or ministries are required to make decisions that could benefit greatly from information on the relative importance of these potential issues. Facility-wide risk-based ranking of potential health and environmental issues is one means to help these decision makers. The initial U.S. risk-based ranking applications described in this chapter were “ground-breaking” in that they defined new methodologies and approaches to meet the challenges. Many of these approaches fit the designation of a population-centred risk assessment. These U.S. activities parallel efforts that are just beginning for similar facilities in the countries of the former Soviet Union. As described below, conducting a facility-wide risk-based ranking has special challenges and potential pitfalls. Little guidance exists to conduct major risk-based rankings. For those considering undertaking such efforts, the material contained in this chapter should be useful background information.

  13. Low-rank coal study : national needs for resource development. Volume 2. Resource characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive data are presented on the quantity, quality, and distribution of low-rank coal (subbituminous and lignite) deposits in the United States. The major lignite-bearing areas are the Fort Union Region and the Gulf Lignite Region, with the predominant strippable reserves being in the states of North Dakota, Montana, and Texas. The largest subbituminous coal deposits are in the Powder River Region of Montana and Wyoming, The San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in Northern Alaska. For each of the low-rank coal-bearing regions, descriptions are provided of the geology; strippable reserves; active and planned mines; classification of identified resources by depth, seam thickness, sulfur content, and ash content; overburden characteristics; aquifers; and coal properties and characteristics. Low-rank coals are distinguished from bituminous coals by unique chemical and physical properties that affect their behavior in extraction, utilization, or conversion processes. The most characteristic properties of the organic fraction of low-rank coals are the high inherent moisture and oxygen contents, and the correspondingly low heating value. Mineral matter (ash) contents and compositions of all coals are highly variable; however, low-rank coals tend to have a higher proportion of the alkali components CaO, MgO, and Na/sub 2/O. About 90% of the reserve base of US low-rank coal has less than one percent sulfur. Water resources in the major low-rank coal-bearing regions tend to have highly seasonal availabilities. Some areas appear to have ample water resources to support major new coal projects; in other areas such as Texas, water supplies may be constraining factor on development.

  14. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. there were two main objectives for this reporting period. first, they wanted to collect wilcox coal samples from depths similar to those of probable sequestration sites, with the objective of determining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and for reservoir simulation. The second objective was to pursue opportunities for determining permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling reservoir performance during CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. In mid-summer, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to allow the authors to collect Wilcox Group coal samples from a well that was to be drilled to the Austin Chalk, which is several thousand feet below the Wilcox. In addition, they agreed to allow them to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well. Both wells are in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that they earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2}. They negotiated contracts for sidewall core collection and core analyses, and they began discussions with a service company to perform permeability testing. To collect sidewall core samples of the Wilcox coals, they made structure and isopach maps and cross sections to select coal beds and to determine their depths for coring. On September 29, 10 sidewall core samples were obtained from 3 coal beds of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group. The samples were desorbed in 4 sidewall core canisters. Desorbed gas samples were sent to a laboratory for gas compositional analyses, and the coal samples were sent to another laboratory to measure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. All analyses should be finished by the end of December. A preliminary report shows methane content values for the desorbed coal samples ranged between 330 and 388 scf/t., on ''as received'' basis. Residual gas content of the coals was not included in the analyses, which results in an approximate 5-10% underestimation of in-situ gas content. Coal maps indicate that total coal thickness is 40-70 ft in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of the Sam K. Seymour power plant. A conservative estimate indicates that methane in place for a well on 160-acre spacing is approximately 3.5 Bcf in Lower Calvert Bluff coal beds. When they receive sorption isotherm data from the laboratory, they will determine the amount of CO{sub 2} that it may be possible to sequester in Wilcox coals. In December, when the final laboratory and field test data are available, they will complete the reservoir model and begin to simulate CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CH{sub 4} production.

  15. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  16. Low rank approach to computing first and higher order derivatives using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J. A.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Utke, J. [Mathematics and Computer Science Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript outlines a new approach for increasing the efficiency of applying automatic differentiation (AD) to large scale computational models. By using the principles of the Efficient Subspace Method (ESM), low rank approximations of the derivatives for first and higher orders can be calculated using minimized computational resources. The output obtained from nuclear reactor calculations typically has a much smaller numerical rank compared to the number of inputs and outputs. This rank deficiency can be exploited to reduce the number of derivatives that need to be calculated using AD. The effective rank can be determined according to ESM by computing derivatives with AD at random inputs. Reduced or pseudo variables are then defined and new derivatives are calculated with respect to the pseudo variables. Two different AD packages are used: OpenAD and Rapsodia. OpenAD is used to determine the effective rank and the subspace that contains the derivatives. Rapsodia is then used to calculate derivatives with respect to the pseudo variables for the desired order. The overall approach is applied to two simple problems and to MATWS, a safety code for sodium cooled reactors. (authors)

  17. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moderately. Cost-cutting measures were expected to idle mining operations in Green Cove Springs, FL year of rutile. The first of two dredges was refurbished and commissioned at the Sierra Rutile mine in Sierra Leone. The second dredge is scheduled for start-up in 2007 and is expected to raise capacity

  18. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 3. Technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies applicable to the development and use of low-rank coals are analyzed in order to identify specific needs for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D). Major sections of the report address the following technologies: extraction; transportation; preparation, handling and storage; conventional combustion and environmental control technology; gasification; liquefaction; and pyrolysis. Each of these sections contains an introduction and summary of the key issues with regard to subbituminous coal and lignite; description of all relevant technology, both existing and under development; a description of related environmental control technology; an evaluation of the effects of low-rank coal properties on the technology; and summaries of current commercial status of the technology and/or current RD and D projects relevant to low-rank coals.

  19. Low-rank coal study. Volume 5. RD and D program evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A national program is recommended for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of improved technologies for the enviromentally acceptable use of low-rank coals. RD and D project recommendations are outlined in all applicable technology areas, including extraction, transportation, preparation, handling and storage, conventional combustion and environmental control technology, fluidized bed combustion, gasification, liquefaction, and pyrolysis. Basic research topics are identified separately, as well as a series of crosscutting research activities addressing environmental, economic, and regulatory issues. The recommended RD and D activities are classified into Priority I and Priority II categories, reflecting their relative urgency and potential impact on the advancement of low-rank coal development. Summaries of ongoing research projects on low-rank coals in the US are presented in an Appendix, and the relationships of these ongoing efforts to the recommended RD and D program are discussed.

  20. Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

  1. Percentile rank scores are congruous indicators of relative performance, or aren't they?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rousseau, Ronald

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Percentile ranks and the I3 indicator were introduced by Bornmann, Leydesdorff, Mutz and Opthof. These two notions are based on the concept of percentiles (or quantiles) for discrete data. As several definitions for these notions exist we propose one that we think is suitable in this context. Next we show that if the notion of relative congruous indicators is carefully defined then percentile rank scores are congruous indicators of relative performance. The I3 indicator is a strictly congruous indicator of absolute performance.

  2. Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

  3. NNSA's Cielo, Roadrunner Supercomputers Ranked as World's Most Powerful

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgendaSecurityAbout UsNationalover two years

  4. Nebraska - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year JanPipeline andNebraska

  5. Nevada - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year

  6. New Hampshire - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20YearGenerating

  7. New Jersey - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20YearGeneratingHampshireJersey

  8. Freshmen returning for their sophomore year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    in the main dining halls during final exams. 6 tons Organic waste BC Dining Services sends to a composting program operated by BC recycling vendor, Save That Stuff student life 232 Student clubs and organizations

  9. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  10. On rank 2 vector bundles on Fano manifolds Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sola Conde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhetta, Gianluca

    On rank 2 vector bundles on Fano manifolds Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sol´a~NOZ, GIANLUCA OCCHETTA, AND LUIS E. SOL´A CONDE setting of rank two vector bundles on Fano manifolds of Picard

  11. LOW-COMPLEXITY MULTIUSER DETECTION AND REDUCED-RANK WIENER FILTERS FOR ULTRA-WIDEBAND MULTIPLE ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhi "Gerry"

    LOW-COMPLEXITY MULTIUSER DETECTION AND REDUCED-RANK WIENER FILTERS FOR ULTRA-WIDEBAND MULTIPLE the large user capacity planned for ultra- wideband (UWB) systems motivates multiuser detection (MUD of chip-rate samples. This model enables low-complexity MUD, of which we ex- amine a reduced-rank Wiener

  12. Building Fuzzy Thematic Clusters and Mapping Them to Higher Ranks in a Taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirkin, Boris

    , Moscow, RF 3 Computer Science Department and Centre for Artificial Intelligence (CENTRIA), Faculdade de as a query set. To lift a query set to higher ranks of the taxonomy, we develop an original recursive a framework for representation of the activities of an organization or any other system under consideration

  13. LOW RANK SOLUTION OF LYAPUNOV EQUATIONS JING-REBECCA LI AND JACOB WHITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing-Rebecca

    @cims.nyu.edu). The research of this author was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Semiconductor Research of Technology, Room 36-817, Cam- bridge, MA 02139-4307 (white@mit.edu). 260 #12;LOW RANK SOLUTION OF LYAPUNOV

  14. Fast Kalman filtering and forward-backward smoothing via a low-rank perturbative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Fast Kalman filtering and forward-backward smoothing via a low-rank perturbative approach Eftychios A. Pnevmatikakis Kamiar Rahnama Rad Jonathan Huggins Liam Paninski October 15, 2012 Abstract Kalman implementations of the Kalman filter-smoother require O(d3) time and O(d2) space per timestep, where d

  15. Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

  16. Exploiting the Deep Web with DynaBot: Matching, Probing, and Ranking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caverlee, James

    Exploiting the Deep Web with DynaBot: Matching, Probing, and Ranking Daniel Rocco University, CA, USA critchlow1@llnl.gov ABSTRACT We present the design of Dynabot, a guided Deep Web discovery system. Dynabot's modular architecture sup- ports focused crawling of the Deep Web with an empha- sis

  17. inria-00269225,version1-2Apr2008 Using Data Compressors to Construct Rank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    inria-00269225,version1-2Apr2008 Using Data Compressors to Construct Rank Tests Daniil Ryabko, J compressors. For homogeneity testing the idea is to compress the binary string obtained by ordering the two show that such a test obtained from an ideal data compressor is valid against all alterna- tives

  18. CONTENT-ADAPTIVE SPEECH ENHANCEMENT BY A SPARSELY-ACTIVATED DICTIONARY PLUS LOW RANK DECOMPOSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    CONTENT-ADAPTIVE SPEECH ENHANCEMENT BY A SPARSELY-ACTIVATED DICTIONARY PLUS LOW RANK DECOMPOSITION.papadopoulos[at]lss.supelec.fr dpwe[at]ee.columbia.edu ABSTRACT One powerful approach to speech enhancement employs strong models, we proposed a speech enhancement model that decomposes the spectrogram into sparse activation

  19. Speech enhancement by low-rank and convolutive dictionary spectrogram decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    Speech enhancement by low-rank and convolutive dictionary spectrogram decomposition Zhuo Chen1 Computer Science Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA zc2204@columbia.edu Abstract A successful speech enhancement, performance will suffer. In previous work, we proposed a speech enhance- ment framework based on decomposing

  20. QoS-aware Optimization Strategy for Security Ranking in SSL Protocol , Zhe Tang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    QoS-aware Optimization Strategy for Security Ranking in SSL Protocol Fang Qi 1 , Zhe Tang 1 socket layer protocol (SSL) is to provide confidentiality and data integrity between two communicating entities. Since the most computationally expensive step in the SSL handshake protocol is the server's RSA

  1. AUTHORITY RANKINGS FROM HITS, PAGERANK, AND SALSA: EXISTENCE, UNIQUENESS, AND EFFECT OF INITIALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Lesley A.

    and authority weights consistent. Key words. Link analysis, web search, HITS algorithm, Kleinberg's algorithm, 15A18, 68R10. 1. Introduction. The rapid growth of the world wide web has created a need for search tools. In the past, search engines ranked pages using word frequency or similar measures. Recently, new

  2. Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  3. THE ODD MOMENTS OF RANKS AND CRANKS GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN, AND BYUNGCHAN KIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ODD MOMENTS OF RANKS AND CRANKS GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN, AND BYUNGCHAN KIM Abstract by National Security Agency, NSA grant award 101015. Song Heng Chan was partially supported by Nanyang of Education, Science and Technology (NRF2011-0009199). 1 #12;2 GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN

  4. Canonical correlation technique for rank estimation of excitation-emission matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major problems that has challenged analytical chemists for a long time is to determine the number of components in a multicomponent sample. Often the sample data occur in the form of a matrix whose rank, in the absence of noise, is equal to the number of components. The presence of random noise in the data, however, will generally cause the rank of the mixture matrix to exceed the number of components in the mixture. The problem then is to estimate what the rank would be if the noise were removed. An eigenanalysis in the form a singular value decomposition of the measured mixture matrix provides information that is useful for estimating rank. In this communication the authors report a new approach to this problem which incorporates eigenvector information without requiring prior expectations about the nature of the eigenvectors. It utilizes the multivariate statistical technique of canonical correlations. They present the methodology in the context of fluorescent mixtures and will also assume that the readers are familiar with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM).

  5. kenmerk 369.075 1 RULES FOR CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF STAFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    , a new job classification system (UFO) came into force. As a result of the introduction of UFO, old job jobs are ranked. At several levels the introduction of UFO has consequences for the classification for the application of UFO is the job. This is the `cluster of tasks to be performed by the employee based

  6. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1983-June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, Jr., G. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) gasification wastewater treatment and reuse; (2) fine coal cleaning; (3) coal-water slurry preparation; (4) low-rank coal liquefaction; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization; (8) combustion research and ash fowling; (9) fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals; (10) ash and slag characterization; (11) organic structure of coal; (12) distribution of inorganics in low-rank coals; (13) physical properties and moisture of low-rank coals; (14) supercritical solvent extraction; and (15) pyrolysis and devolatilization.

  7. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  8. Performance of low-rank coal in atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Technology transfer report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajicek, D.R.; Zobeck, B.J.; Mann, M.D.; Miller, B.G.; Ellman, R.C.; Benson, S.A.; Goblirsch, G.M.; Cooper, J.L.; Guillory, J.L.; Eklund, A.G.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents test data generated at GFETC and discusses the implications of this data in regard to the technical and economic feasibility of using low-rank coals in the AFBC. Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion offers a number of potential advantages over conventional pulverized coal combustion due to the intense turbulence in the fluidized bed and long residence times of solids in the bed without a long linear flow path. Advantages of the AFBC include flexibility to handle varying fuels, sulfur capture by limestone, high combustion efficiency, compact combustor size, lower NO/sub x/ emissions, and reduced slagging and fouling problems. Low-rank coals with high alkali-to-sulfur ratios offer a significant additional advantage: the ability to absorb significant sulfur on the alkaline ash. Results verify that AFBC is particularly well suited for the direct combustion of low-rank coals. With combustion temperatures above 1450/sup 0/F at 20% excess air or higher, the combustion efficiencies while burning low-rank coal were found to be above 98%, with efficiencies above 99% for most tests. The CO emissions were very low, typically below 0.05 lb/MMBtu or 50 ppMv. Overall heat transfer coefficients to water-cooled tubes while burning low-rank coals were comparable to those obtained with other fuels in AFBC, or 20 to 60 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. These are considerably higher than those obtained in conventional coal-fired systems which are typically 5 to 15 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. Factors influencing heat transfer included mass velocity, bed particle size, bed temperature, and ash recycle.

  9. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

  12. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  13. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed

  14. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

  15. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 80% of the primary tin consumed

  16. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  17. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  18. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

  19. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

  20. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 97% of the primary tin. The major uses

  1. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 77% of the primary tin consumed

  2. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

  3. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

  4. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  5. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

  6. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

  7. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced boron minerals, mostly sodium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proprietary data, U.S. boron production and consumption in 2010 were withheld. The leading boron producer standards with respect to heat conservation, which directly correlates to higher consumption of borates32 BORON (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic

  9. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006, approximately. Import Sources (2002-05): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products

  10. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003, approximately and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 49

  11. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005, approximately. Import Sources (2001-04): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products

  12. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 41%; Russia, 21

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 48%; Russia, 16

  14. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004, approximately (2000-03): Tungsten content of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought

  15. THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Srisuro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  16. The 10,000 Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.Srisaro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pallavi Pharkya thinks a lot about the future. Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  17. Research Councils UK The Government of India's 12th five-year plan (2012-2017) focuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    in India to align existing priorities and to scope areas of mutual research and policy interest. In doingResearch Councils UK engaging with India #12;The Government of India's 12th five-year plan (2012 in the global R&D rankings, India is clearly a partner of choice for the UK and the UK Research Councils. We

  18. Thirteenth biennial lignite symposium: technology and utilization of low-rank coals proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L. (ed.)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the collected manuscripts from the 1985 Lignite Symposium held at Bismarck, North Dakota on May 21-23, 1985. Sponsorship of the thirteenth biennial meeting was by the United States Department of Energy, the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center, and the Texas University Coal Research Consortium. Seven technical sessions plus two luncheons and a banquet were held during the two and a half day meeting. The final half day included tours of the Great Plains Gasification Plant; Basin Electric's Antelope Valley Power Station; and the Freedom Mine. Sessions covered diverse topics related to the technology and use of low-rank coals including coal development and public policy, combustion, gasification, environmental systems for low-rank coal utilization, liquefaction, beneficiation and coal mining and coal inorganics. All the papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

  19. Thirteenth biennial lignite symposium: technology and utilization of low-rank coals proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L. (ed.)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the collected manuscripts from the 1985 Lignite Symposium held at Bismarck, North Dakota on May 21-23. Sponsorship of the thirteenth biennial meeting was by the United States Department of Energy, the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center, and the Texas University Coal Research Consortium. Seven technical sessions were held during the two and a half day meeting. The final half day included tours of the Great Plains Gasification Plant; Basin Electric's Antelope Valley Power Station; and the Freedom Mine. Sessions covered diverse topics related to the technology and use of low-rank coals including coal development and public policy, combustion, gasification, environmental systems for low-rank coal utilization, liquefaction, beneficiation and coal mining and coal inorganics. Twenty-four papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  1. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

  2. Impact of cost constraints on aesthetic ranking following Target Value Design exercises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybkowski, Zofia K.; Munankami, Manish; Gottipati, Udaya; Lavy, Sarel; Fernández-Solis, Jose

    2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACT OF COST CONSTRAINTS ON AESTHETIC RANKING FOLLOWING TARGET VALUE DESIGN EXERCISES Zofia K. Rybkowski1, Manish Munankami2, Udaya Gottipati3, Jose Fernández-Solís 4, and Sarel Lavy5 PURPOSE: Target Value Design (TVD) is a project... delivery subset that shares methodologies with Target Costing and Value Engineering, but is performed within the context of lean construction. TVD has been shown to generate first cost savings of approximately 20% on case study projects. A concern voiced...

  3. Private quantum codes: introduction and connection with higher rank numerical ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Kribs; S. Plosker

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief introduction to private quantum codes, a basic notion in quantum cryptography and key distribution. Private code states are characterized by indistinguishability of their output states under the action of a quantum channel, and we show that higher rank numerical ranges can be used to describe them. We also show how this description arises naturally via conjugate channels and the bridge between quantum error correction and cryptography.

  4. Effects of age, genotype and social rank on mating proficiency of beef bulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ronald Gregg

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF AGE, GENOTYPE AND SOCIAL RANK ON MATING PROFICIENCY OF BEEF BULLS A Thesis by RONALD GREGG SMITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1994 Major Subject: Animal Science EFFECTS OF AGE, GENOTYPE AND SOCIAL ~ ON MATING PROFICIENCY OF BEEF BULLS A Thesis by RONALD GREGG SMITH Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  5. Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Shobha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

  6. Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

  7. Partner Information Sheet, Academic year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    and high- energy particle physics. Our research and education are car- ried out within all major research are particularly well trained in scientific method. If you want to contribute to a sound and sustainable future within these areas. The Faculty of Science is highly ranked both in Sweden and internationally for its

  8. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  9. Finding the largest low-rank clusters with Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan Vinh Doan

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 24, 2014 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm to fi nd k largest approximately rank-one ...

  10. Variation of Neron-Severi ranks of reductions of K3 surfaces Edgar Costa and Yuri Tschinkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschinkel, Yuri

    Variation of N´eron-Severi ranks of reductions of K3 surfaces Edgar Costa and Yuri Tschinkel EDGAR COSTA AND YURI TSCHINKEL In these extreme cases, the primes in jump(X) can be understood

  11. ON THE COMPRESSION OF LOW RANK MATRICES H. CHENG, Z. GIMBUTAS, P. G. MARTINSSON, AND V. ROKHLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    ON THE COMPRESSION OF LOW RANK MATRICES H. CHENG, Z. GIMBUTAS, P. G. MARTINSSON, AND V. ROKHLIN (martins@cs.yale.edu, rokhlin@cs.yale.edu). 1389 #12;1390 CHENG, GIMBUTAS, MARTINSSON, ROKHLIN matrices (of

  12. Rank Petroleum

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 Weekly7a.7. Petroleum and

  13. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  14. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  15. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  16. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  17. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  18. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

    1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

  19. HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Mark; Brown, Jed; Shalf, John; Straalen, Brian Van; Strohmaier, Erich; Williams, Sam

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of the benchmark ? HPGMG ? for ranking large scale general purpose computers for use on the Top500 list [8]. We provide a rationale for the need for a replacement for the current metric HPL, some background of the Top500 list and the challenges of developing such a metric; we discuss our design philosophy and methodology, and an overview of the specification of the benchmark. The primary documentation with maintained details on the specification can be found at hpgmg.org and the Wiki and benchmark code itself can be found in the repository https://bitbucket.org/hpgmg/hpgmg.

  20. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  1. Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  2. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2)storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE)risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on theassumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basiccharacteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential forprimary containment by the target formation, (2) the potential forsecondary containment if the primary formation leaks, and (3) thepotential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primaryformation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework isimplemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scoresrepresenting expert opinions or general information available frompublished materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate thethree basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites.Application of the framework to the Rio Vista Gas Field, Ventura OilField, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements andextensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or modelresults in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improvethe approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and testedby colleagues and collaborators.

  3. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  4. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2) the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks; and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scores representing expert opinions or general information available from published materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate the three basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites. Application of the framework to the Rio Visa Gas Field, Ventura Oil Field, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or model results in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improve the approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and tested by colleagues and collaborators.

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters were closed the entire year. Demolition of two smelters that had been idle for several years was started in 2010. Based: During the first half of 2010, production from domestic primary aluminum smelters had stabilized after

  6. Project {open_quotes}Kovin{close_quotes} - economics of upgraded low-rank coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ljubicic, B.; Anderson, C. [Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P. [Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stajner, K. [Electric Power of Serbia, Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Yugoslavia has large reserves of lignitic coal, some of which are in geological settings that are located below the water table, along and under the Danube River, and are difficult to mine. Since conventional strip mining in the area next to the Danube would be difficult, the Kovin lignite will be mined as course lignite-water slurry. This will be the first time that lignite coal has been mined using dredging equipment. The use of dredging technology for the recovery of multiple lignite seams is an expansion of current dredging practices used to recovery precious and other metals such as tin, as well as diamonds, sand, and gravel from alluvial deposits. The proposed lignite dredging is based on selective mining of several discrete layers. The layers consist of either waste material or lignite and can be directed to a disposal area or to further processing. It is expected that dredging will reduce the environmental impact of the mine, be highly productive since it is fully mechanized, and reduce the cost per ton of lignite. The successful operation at the Kovin mine would also enable lignite to be dredged in other reserve areas where a high water table or significant surface water is present, allowing considerable tonnages of lignite, not currently in reserves, to be moved into the minable reserve category.

  7. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks “search” a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

  8. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  9. Ranking the importance of nuclear reactions for activation and transmutation events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arter, Wayne; Relton, Samuel D; Higham, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pathways-reduced analysis is one of the techniques used by the Fispact-II nuclear activation and transmutation software to study the sensitivity of the computed inventories to uncertainties in reaction cross-sections. Although deciding which pathways are most important is very helpful in for example determining which nuclear data would benefit from further refinement, pathways-reduced analysis need not necessarily define the most critical reaction, since one reaction may contribute to several different pathways. This work examines three different techniques for ranking reactions in their order of importance in determining the final inventory, viz. a pathways based metric (PBM), the direct method and one based on the Pearson correlation coefficient. Reasons why the PBM is to be preferred are presented.

  10. Non-intrusive Low-Rank Separated Approximation of High-Dimensional Stochastic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Doostan; AbdoulAhad Validi; Gianluca Iaccarino

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a sampling-based (non-intrusive) approach within the context of low-rank separated representations to tackle the issue of curse-of-dimensionality associated with the solution of models, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, with high-dimensional random inputs. Under some conditions discussed in details, the number of random realizations of the solution, required for a successful approximation, grows linearly with respect to the number of random inputs. The construction of the separated representation is achieved via a regularized alternating least-squares regression, together with an error indicator to estimate model parameters. The computational complexity of such a construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs. The performance of the method is investigated through its application to three numerical examples including two ODE problems with high-dimensional random inputs.

  11. How Can Journal Impact Factors be Normalized across Fields of Science? An Assessment in terms of Percentile Ranks and Fractional Counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Bornmann, Lutz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the CD-ROM version of the Science Citation Index 2010 (N = 3,705 journals), we study the (combined) effects of (i) fractional counting on the impact factor (IF) and (ii) transformation of the skewed citation distributions into a distribution of 100 percentiles and six percentile rank classes (top-1%, top-5%, etc.). Do these approaches lead to field-normalized impact measures for journals? In addition to the two-year IF (IF2), we consider the five-year IF (IF5), the respective numerators of these IFs, and the number of Total Cites, counted both as integers and fractionally. These various indicators are tested against the hypothesis that the classification of journals into 11 broad fields by PatentBoard/National Science Foundation provides (statistically) significant between-field effects. Using fractional counting the between-field variance is reduced by 91.7% in the case of IF5, and by 79.2% in the case of IF2. However, the differences in citation counts are not significantly affected by fractional coun...

  12. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  13. By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    . years of apparent consumption. 25. At yearend, the estimated manganese Ironmaking and steelmaking have to reported data, the rates of consumption of manganese as ore in ironmaking and as ferroalloys and metal

  14. Simulation assessment of CO2 sequestration potential and enhanced methane recovery in low-rank coalbeds of the Wilcox Group, east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Arciniegas, Gonzalo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO2 disposal in high-rank coals. Low-rank coals in the Gulf Coastal plain, specifically in Texas, are possible targets for CO2 sequestration and enhanced methane...

  15. SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement. Existing methods have two deficiencies for applying to the open col- lections like the deep web. First query in the deep web, the agreements between theses an- swer sets are likely to be helpful in assessing

  16. SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement Tempe AZ USA 85287 rajub@asu.edu, rao@asu.edu ABSTRACT One immediate challenge in searching the deep web-similarity-based relevance assess- ment. When applied to the deep web these methods have two deficiencies. First

  17. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri, John; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Liber, Pawel; Lopez-Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the ability of advanced low rank coal gasification technology to cause a significant reduction in the COE for IGCC power plants with 90% carbon capture and sequestration compared with the COE for similarly configured IGCC plants using conventional low rank coal gasification technology. GE’s advanced low rank coal gasification technology uses the Posimetric Feed System, a new dry coal feed system based on GE’s proprietary Posimetric Feeder. In order to demonstrate the performance and economic benefits of the Posimetric Feeder in lowering the cost of low rank coal-fired IGCC power with carbon capture, two case studies were completed. In the Base Case, the gasifier was fed a dilute slurry of Montana Rosebud PRB coal using GE’s conventional slurry feed system. In the Advanced Technology Case, the slurry feed system was replaced with the Posimetric Feed system. The process configurations of both cases were kept the same, to the extent possible, in order to highlight the benefit of substituting the Posimetric Feed System for the slurry feed system.

  18. An Empirical Test of the Relationship between Sustainability and Urban Form Based on Indicator Comparisons using Sustainlane Sustainable City Rankings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Ah

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Street Network ......................................................................................... 9? Figure 5 Portland, OR City Chart ..................................................................................... 15? Figure 6 Mesa, AZ City... been not only highly simplistic characterizations of urban sprawl, but also wildly different estimates of which regions have the worst sprawl. As a result of 12 this research, Portland, Oregon, is ranked as the most compact region while Los Angeles...

  19. NYU's Chinese ACE 2005 EDR System Description Can Global Re-Ranking and Semantic Role Labeling help Chinese EDR?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NYU's Chinese ACE 2005 EDR System Description Can Global Re-Ranking and Semantic Role Labeling help Chinese EDR? Heng Ji Adam Meyers Ralph Grishman Proteus Project Department of Computer Science New York the overall architecture of the NYU Chinese ACE 2005 EDR (Entity Detection and Recognition) system, focussing

  20. Windscale pile reactors - Decommissioning progress on a fifty year legacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Richard J. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the UK, if not the world. This paper presents a summary of the 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident, its unique challenges and a new technical approach developed to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors. The reactors will be decommissioned using a top down approach that employs an array of light weight, carbon fiber, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete. This relatively conventional decommissioning approach has been made possible by a recently completed technical assessment of reactor core fire and criticality risk which concluded that these types of events are not credible if relatively simple controls are applied. This paper presents an overview of the design, manufacture and testing of equipment to remove the estimated 15 tons of fire damaged fuel and isotopes from the Pile 1 reactor. The paper also discusses recently conducted characterization activities which have allowed for a refined waste estimate and conditioning strategy. These data and an innovative approach have resulted in a significant reduction in the estimated project cost and schedule. (authors)

  1. Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, Gregory K; Sanchez, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency labeling program operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products, and currently labels more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, heating, cooling and ventilation equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with stakeholders. This report presents savings estimates from the use ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of energy, dollar, and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2009, annual forecasts for 2010 and 2011, and cumulative savings estimates for the period 1993 through 2009 and cumulative forecasts for the period 2010 through 2015. Through 2009 the program saved 9.5 Quads of primary energy and avoided the equivalent of 170 million metric tons carbon (MMTC). The forecast for the period 2009-2015 is 11.5 Quads or primary energy saved and 202 MMTC emissions avoided. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 110 MMTC and 231 MMTC (1993 to 2009) and between 130 MMTC and 285 MMTC (2010 to 2015).

  2. LLNL Underground Coal Gasification Project annual report - fiscal year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.; O'Neal, E.M. (eds.)

    1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory has been conducting an interdisciplinary underground coal gasification program since 1974 under the sponsorship of DOE and its predecessors. We completed three UCG tests at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming, during the period 1975 to 1979. Five small field experiments, the large-block tests, were completed from 1981 to 1982 at the exposed coal face in the WIDCO coal mine near Centralia, Washington. A larger test at the same location, the partial-seam CRIP test, was completed during fiscal year 1984. In conjunction with the DOE and an industrial group lead by the Gas Research Institute, we have prepared a preliminary design for a large-scale test at the WIDCO site. The planned test features dual injection and production wells, module interaction, and consumption of 20,000 tons of coal during a hundred-day steam-oxygen gasification. During fiscal year 1984, we documented the large-block excavations. The cavities were elongated, the cavity cross sections were elliptical, and the cavities contained ash and slag at the bottom, char and dried coal above that, and a void at the top. The results from the large-block tests provided enough data to allow us to construct a composite model, CAVSM. Preliminary results from the model agree well with the product-gas chemistry and cavity shape observed in the large-block tests. Other models and techniques developed during the year include a transient, moving-front code, a two-dimensional, reactive-flow code using the method of lines, and a wall-recession-rate model. In addition, we measured the rate of methane decomposition in the hot char bed and developed an engineering rate expression to estimate the magnitude of the methane-decomposition reaction. 16 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  4. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  5. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  6. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  7. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  8. 18 years experience on UF{sub 6} handling at Japanese nuclear fuel manufacturer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujinaga, H.; Yamazaki, N.; Takebe, N. [Japan Nucelar Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spring of 1991, a leading nuclear fuel manufacturing company in Japan, celebrated its 18th anniversary. Since 1973, the company has produced over 5000 metric ton of ceramic grade UO{sub 2} powder to supply to Japanese fabricators, without major accident/incident and especially with a successful safety record on UF{sub 6} handling. The company`s 18 years experience on nuclear fuel manufacturing reveals that key factors for the safe handling of UF{sub 6} are (1) installing adequate facilities, equipped with safety devices, (2) providing UF{sub 6} handling manuals and executing them strictly, and (3) repeating on and off the job training for operators. In this paper, equipment and the operation mode for UF{sub 6} processing at their facility are discussed.

  9. Increasing your U.S. News and World Report graduate school rankings: a census of public affairs schools and their strategic communications efforts to create a tradition of distinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoefelmeyer, Karla Sue

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , and resourced properly, can increase each of these areas. Specifically, this research examined the top 50 ranked schools in public affairs to determine the relationship between top ranked schools and their communications departments and each of their uses...

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, 6 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2009, 6 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were closed the entire year, and demolition of 1 smelter that had been idle since 2000 was completed in 2009. Of the operating smelters, three were temporarily idled and parts of four others were temporarily closed in 2009. Based

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2011, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were closed the entire year. One smelter that was closed in 2009 was reopened during the first quarter of 2011. Five potlines that were closed in late 2008 and early 2009 at four other smelters were also restarted in early 2011. Based

  12. An epidermal equivalent assay for identification and ranking potency of contact sensitizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Susan, E-mail: S.Gibbs@VUMC.nl [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, Dept of Oral Cell Biology, ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Corsini, Emanuela [Laboratory of Toxicology, DiSFeB, Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Spiekstra, Sander W. [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, Dept of Oral Cell Biology, ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Galbiati, Valentina [Laboratory of Toxicology, DiSFeB, Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Fuchs, Horst W. [CellSystems GmbH, Troisdorf (Germany); DeGeorge, George; Troese, Matthew [MB Research Labs, Spinnerstown, PA (United States); Hayden, Patrick; Deng, Wei [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Roggen, Erwin [3Rs Management and Consultancy (Denmark)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of combining the epidermal equivalent (EE) potency assay with the assay which assesses release of interleukin-18 (IL-18) to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizing chemicals, including chemicals of low water solubility or stability. A protocol was developed using different 3D-epidermal models including in house VUMC model, epiCS® (previously EST1000™), MatTek EpiDerm™ and SkinEthic™ RHE and also the impact of different vehicles (acetone:olive oil 4:1, 1% DMSO, ethanol, water) was investigated. Following topical exposure for 24 h to 17 contact allergens and 13 non-sensitizers a robust increase in IL-18 release was observed only after exposure to contact allergens. A putative prediction model is proposed from data obtained from two laboratories yielding 95% accuracy. Correlating the in vitro EE sensitizer potency data, which assesses the chemical concentration which results in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC{sub 50}) with human and animal data showed a superior correlation with human DSA{sub 05} (?g/cm{sup 2}) data (Spearman r = 0.8500; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0061) compared to LLNA data (Spearman r = 0.5968; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0542). DSA{sub 05} = induction dose per skin area that produces a positive response in 5% of the tested population Also a good correlation was observed for release of IL-18 (SI-2) into culture supernatants with human DSA{sub 05} data (Spearman r = 0.8333; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0154). This easily transferable human in vitro assay appears to be very promising, but additional testing of a larger chemical set with the different EE models is required to fully evaluate the utility of this assay and to establish a definitive prediction model. - Highlights: • A potential epidermal equivalent assay to label and classify sensitizers • Il-18 release distinguishes sensitizers from non sensitizers • IL-18 release can rank sensitizer potency • EC50 (chemical concentration causing 50% decrease in cell viability) ranks potency • In vitro: human DSA{sub 05} correlation is better than in vitro: LLNA correlation.

  13. SNL-NUMO collaborative : development of a deterministic site characterization tool using multi-model ranking and inference.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Matthew; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Arnold, Bill Walter; James, Scott Carlton; Gray, Genetha Anne; Ahlmann, Michael

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty in site characterization arises from a lack of data and knowledge about a site and includes uncertainty in the boundary conditions, uncertainty in the characteristics, location, and behavior of major features within an investigation area (e.g., major faults as barriers or conduits), uncertainty in the geologic structure, as well as differences in numerical implementation (e.g., 2-D versus 3-D, finite difference versus finite element, grid resolution, deterministic versus stochastic, etc.). Since the true condition at a site can never be known, selection of the best conceptual model is very difficult. In addition, limiting the understanding to a single conceptualization too early in the process, or before data can support that conceptualization, may lead to confidence in a characterization that is unwarranted as well as to data collection efforts and field investigations that are misdirected and/or redundant. Using a series of numerical modeling experiments, this project examined the application and use of information criteria within the site characterization process. The numerical experiments are based on models of varying complexity that were developed to represent one of two synthetically developed groundwater sites; (1) a fully hypothetical site that represented a complex, multi-layer, multi-faulted site, and (2) a site that was based on the Horonobe site in northern Japan. Each of the synthetic sites were modeled in detail to provide increasingly informative 'field' data over successive iterations to the representing numerical models. The representing numerical models were calibrated to the synthetic site data and then ranked and compared using several different information criteria approaches. Results show, that for the early phases of site characterization, low-parameterized models ranked highest while more complex models generally ranked lowest. In addition, predictive capabilities were also better with the low-parameterized models. For the latter iterations, when more data were available, the information criteria rankings tended to converge on the higher parameterized models. Analysis of the numerical experiments suggest that information criteria rankings can be extremely useful for site characterization, but only when the rankings are placed in context and when the contribution of each bias term is understood.

  14. Final report, BWR drywell debris transport Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leonard, M.T.; Williams, K.A.; Wolf, L.T.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a Regulatory Bulletin and accompanying Regulatory Guide (1.82, Rev. 2) which requires licensees of boiling water reactors to develop a specific plan of action (including hardware backfits, if necessary) to preclude the possibility of early emergency core cooling system strainer blockage following a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident. The postulated mechanism for strainer blockage is destruction of piping insulation in the vicinity of the break and subsequent transport of fragmented insulation to the wetwell. In the absence of more definitive information, the Regulatory Guide recommends that licensees assume a drywell debris transport fraction of 1.0. Accordingly, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research focused toward developing a technical basis to provide insights useful to regulatory oversight of licensee submittals associated with resolution of the postulated strainer blockage issue. Part of this program was directed towards experimental and analytical research leading to a more realistic specification of the debris transport through the drywell to the wetwell. To help focus this development into a cost effective effort, a panel, with broad based knowledge and experience, was formed to address the relative importance of the various phenomena that can be expected in plant response to postulated accidents that may produce strainer blockage. The resulting phenomena identification and ranking tables reported herein were used to help guide research. The phenomena occurring in boiling water reactors drywells was the specific focus of the panel, although supporting experimental data and calculations of debris transport fractions were considered.

  15. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  16. Study of the combustion of low rank coal in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, R.; Grimes, R.W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of preliminary combustion tests performed with Eagle Butte Coal in a bubbling, fluidized-bed combustion system. The system was designed for the combustion of low-rank coals and industrial wastes. The work, as proposed, was aimed at not only the evaluation of co-firing of waste material with coal, but also at developing modifications to first generation bubbling bed designs to improve the combustion performance during co-firing. However, the funding for the work was redirected and the combustion tests were suspended soon after the shakedown testing was completed. Consequently, this report describes the results of the tests completed prior to the redirection of the effort and funding. A total of 33 combustion tests were performed in a 6-inch diameter fluidized-bed combustor. Oxygen concentrations were measured at two points in the system; the vent line and at the interface between the fluid bed and the freeboard. These measurements provided a measure of the amount of conversion of coal within the fluidized bed compared to the conversion in the freeboard region. Typically, 75 to 80% of the conversion occurred within the bed. Several experiments were performed in which special bed internals were placed in the bed. The internals were designed to reduce bubble size in the bed thus increasing the surface area of the bubbles and hence promoting oxygen diffusion into the emulsion phase.

  17. Low-rank separated representation surrogates of high-dimensional stochastic functions: Application in Bayesian inference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Validi, AbdoulAhad, E-mail: validiab@msu.edu

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a non-intrusive approach in the context of low-rank separated representation to construct a surrogate of high-dimensional stochastic functions, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, in order to decrease the computational cost of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations in Bayesian inference. The surrogate model is constructed via a regularized alternative least-square regression with Tikhonov regularization using a roughening matrix computing the gradient of the solution, in conjunction with a perturbation-based error indicator to detect optimal model complexities. The model approximates a vector of a continuous solution at discrete values of a physical variable. The required number of random realizations to achieve a successful approximation linearly depends on the function dimensionality. The computational cost of the model construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs, which potentially tackles the curse of dimensionality in high-dimensional stochastic functions. Furthermore, this vector-valued separated representation-based model, in comparison to the available scalar-valued case, leads to a significant reduction in the cost of approximation by an order of magnitude equal to the vector size. The performance of the method is studied through its application to three numerical examples including a 41-dimensional elliptic PDE and a 21-dimensional cavity flow.

  18. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

  19. Ranking of four potential nuclear power plant sites in Iraq according to the collective dose criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marouf, B.A.; Al-Kateeb, G.H.; Al-Ani, D.S. [and others

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dose criterion was used to rank four potential nuclear power-plant sites. Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf. Atmospheric as well as aquatic releases of radionuclides into the environment from the VVER 440 nuclear power plant during normal operation were used to estimate the collective dose equivalents. The results indicated that the collective doses at Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf were 3.6 x 10{sup -2}, 4.7 x 10{sup -2}, 1.1 x 10{sup -1}, and 1.2 x 10{sup -1} man-Sv, respectively. Thus the order of preference is Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf. The effective dose equivalents to the highest exposed individual resulting from atmospheric as well as aquatic releases of radionuclides from the reactor at any one of the four potential nuclear power-plant sites would not exceed 2 x 10{sup -5} Sv/yr. Thus any one of the four sites is suitable for the operation of the 440 nuclear power plants. 27 refs., 1 tab.

  20. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl