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1

Alaska has 4. 0 trillion tons of low-sulfur coal: Is there a future for this resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demand for and use of low-sulfur coal may increase because of concern with acid rain. Alaska's low-sulfur coal resources can only be described as enormous: 4.0 trillion tons of hypothetical onshore coal. Mean total sulfur content is 0.34% (range 0.06-6.6%, n = 262) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. There are 50 coal fields in Alaska; the bulk of the resources are in six major fields or regions: Nenana, Cook Inlet, Matanuska, Chignik-Herendeen Bay, North Slope, and Bering River. For comparison, Carboniferous coals in the Appalachian region and Interior Province have a mean total sulfur content of 2.3% (range 0.1-19.0%, n = 5,497) with a mean apparent rank of high-volatile A bituminous coal, and Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains Cretaceous and Tertiary coals have a mean total sulfur content of 0.86% (range 0.02-19.0%, n = 2,754) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. Alaskan coal has two-fifths the total sulfur of western US coals and one-sixth that of Carboniferous US coals. Even though Alaska has large resources of low-sulfur coal, these resources have not been developed because of (1) remote locations and little infrastructure, (2) inhospitable climate, and (3) long distances to potential markets. These resources will not be used in the near future unless there are some major, and probably violent, changes in the world energy picture.

Stricker, G.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Trillion Particles,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trillion Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned from a Hero I/O Run on Hopper Surendra Byna ∗ , Andrew Uselton ∗ , Prabhat ∗ , David Knaak † , and Yun (Helen) He ∗ ∗ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA. Email: {sbyna, acuselton, prabhat, yhe}@lbl.gov † Cray Inc., USA. Email: knaak@cray.com Abstract-Modern petascale applications can present a variety of configuration, runtime, and data management challenges when run at scale. In this paper, we describe our experiences in running VPIC, a large-scale plasma physics simulation, on the NERSC production Cray XE6 system Hopper. The simulation ran on 120,000 cores using ∼80% of computing resources, 90% of the available memory on each node and 50% of the Lustre scratch file system. Over two trillion particles were simulated for 23,000 timesteps, and 10 one-trillion particle dumps, each ranging between

3

BTU Accounting for Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convert utility bills to BTUs? All fuels can be measured in terms of BTU content. Natural gas has a million BTUs per thousand cubic feet; propane - 92,000 BTUs per gallon; fuel oil - 140,000 BTUs per gallon; electricity - 3,413 BTUs per KW hour... BTU ACCOUNTING FOR INDUSTRY Robert O. Redd-CPA Seidman & Seidman Grand Rapids, Michigan Today, as never before, American industry needs to identify and control their most criti cal resources. One of these is energy. In 1973 and again in 1976...

Redd, R. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations April 15, 2011 - 5:31pm Addthis Blood flow visualization | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Blood flow visualization | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Argonne's supercomputer is using its superpowers to map the movement of red blood cells -- which will hopefully lead to better diagnoses and treatments for patients with blood flow complications. With the power of 500 trillion calculations per second, a team of scientists from the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brown University are mapping the movement of red blood cells -- hoping this will lead to better diagnoses and treatments for patients with

6

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

7

Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 4 6 8 10 0 50 100 150 200 250 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1980 1985 1990 1995 1975 2000 Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use is classified as industrial use. In 1995 and earlier years, agricultural use was classified as commercial use. Sources: 1930-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1996: Form EIA- 176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report." 23. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1930-1996 Figure

8

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

9

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Steam is the most transferring heat from But most steam systems LOWEST PRESSURE STEAM SAVES MORE BTU'S THAN YOU THINK Stafford J. Vallery Armstrong Machine Works Three Rivers, Michigan steam to do the process heating rather than...

Vallery, S. J.

10

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

11

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

12

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

13

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

14

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

15

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification-assessment program for potential users in New Jersey. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burns and Roe Industrial Services Corporation and Public Service Electric and Gas in association with Scientific Design Company have completed a technical and economic evaluation of coal gasification. The evaluation also addressed the regulatory, institutional, and environmental issues of coal gasification. Two uses of coal-derived medium Btu (MBU) gas were explored: (1) substitute boiler fuel for electric generation and (2) substitute fuel for industrial customers using natural gas. The summary and conclusions of his evaluation are: The Sewaren Generating Station was selected as potentially the most suitable site for the coal gasification plant. The Texaco process was selected because it offered the best combination of efficiency and pilot plant experience; in addition, it is a pressurized process which is advantageous if gas is to be supplied to industrial customers via a pipeline. Several large industrial gas customers within the vicinities of Sewaren and Hudson Generating Stations indicated that MBG would be considered as an alternate fuel provided that its use was economically justified. The capital cost estimates for a 2000 tons/day and a 1000 tons/day gasification plant installed at Sewaren Generating Station are $115.6 million and $73.8 million, in 1980 dollars, respectively. The cost of supplying MBG to industrial customers is competitive with existing pipeline natural gas on a Btu heating value basis for gasifier capacity factors of 35% or higher.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

17

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

18

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

19

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

20

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

22

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

23

A 150-Ton Universal Structure Testing Machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 150-ton universal structure testing machine for Short Bros, and Harland, Ltd. (Engineer, December 26, pp. 594596). ...

C. F. TIPPER

1948-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

25

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method for producing low and medium BTU gas from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing low and medium BTU gas from carbonizable material is described which comprises: partly devolatizing the material and forming hot incandescent coke therefrom by passing a bed of the same part way through a hot furnace chamber on a first horizontally moving grate while supplying a sub-stoichiometric quantity of air to the same and driving the reactions: C + O/sub 2/ = CO/sub 2/; 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO discharging the hot incandescent coke from the end of the first grate run onto a second horizontally moving grate run below the first grate run in the same furnace chamber so as to form a bed thereon, the bed formed on the second grate run being considerably thicker than the bed formed on the first grate run, passing the hot incandescent coke bed on the second grate run further through the furnace chamber in a substantially horizontal direction while feeding air and stream thereto so as to fully burn the coke and in ratio of steam to air driving the following reactions: 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO; C + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO; C + 2H/sub 2/O = 2H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/; CO + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ taking off the ash residue of the burned coke and taking off the gaseous products of the reactions.

Mansfield, V.; Francoeur, C.M.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

28

Toxicological characterization of the process stream from an experimental low Btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples were obtained from selected positions in the process stream of an experimental low Btu gasifier using a five-stage multicyclone train and...Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay) and forin vit...

J. M. Benson; J. O. Hill; C. E. Mitchell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Mutagenicity of potential effluents from an experimental low btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential waste effluents produced by an experimental low Btu coal gasifier were assessed for mutagenic activity inSalmonella...strain TA98. Cyclone dust, tar and water effluents were mutagenic, but only followin...

J. M. Benson; C. E. Mitchell; R. E. Royer

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

31

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

32

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

33

"Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

34

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

35

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

36

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

37

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

38

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

39

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

40

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 75,407 2 4 567 2 8 * 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 16,479 * * 119 Q 6 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

42

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

43

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one-tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 2.16 MM Scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per Scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $26,680,000 - September 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood prices represent the cost of unchipped wood delivered to the plant site. For utility financing, the gas production costs are, respectively, $14.34, $14.83, $15.86, and $17.84 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $18.76, $19.26, $20.28, and $22.31 per MM Btu for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for char is 57.4%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

45

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

46

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

47

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

48

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

49

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

50

An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the production of low-BTU gas from a coal gasification reactor for combustion before introduction to the topping cycle gas turbine (Minchener, 1990). Most low-BTU gases are heavily loaded with sulfur-containing compounds which appear to be a major problem... with direct combustion of coal and low-BTU gases (Caraway, 1995). Environmental standards require the removal of these compounds which can be expensive and hazardous when removed from coal in post-combustion processes. However, gasification of coal results...

Carney, Christopher Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

52

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

53

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

54

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

55

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 to 90 tons of silver that is reclaimed and recycled annually from photographic wastewater. Import in photographic wastewater may be recycled. Silver demand for use in coins, electronics, industrial applications Recycling: In 2010, approximately 1,600 tons of silver was recovered from old and new scrap. This includes

57

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives for this summer research were to: 1.) determine how much heavy metal pollution has accumulatedTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

58

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

'Billion-Ton' Study 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock potential nationwide. The report examines the nation's capacity to produce a billion dry tons of biomass resources annually for energy uses without impacting other vital U.S. farm and forest products, such as food, feed, and fiber crops. The study provides industry, policymakers, and the agricultural community with county-level data and includes analyses of

59

The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... ? Flammability limit data for three actual samples of low-BTU gas obtained from an in-situ coal gasification experiment (Heffington, 1981). The HHC are higher LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd) PAGE hydrocarbons orimarily C H and C H . ----- 34 I 2 6 3 8' TABLE 5...

Gaines, William Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)" "End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

62

Operational and maintenance manual, 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100 ton hydraulic trailer is used to remove the mitigation pump from Tank 241SY101. This manual explains how to inspect, operate, and maintain the trailer in a state of readiness.

Koons, B.M.

1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

65

Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6 0 * 1 Q 0 0 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 * * 1 * 0 0 * 3115 Dairy Products Q 0 * * * 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

66

table2.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * * 7 0 0 * * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 *

67

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

68

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

69

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

70

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

71

(Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combined production accounted for nearly 80% of the U.S. total. The trend for recent U.S. gold exploration68 GOLD (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Gold was recovered as a byproduct of processing base metals, chiefly copper. Twenty-five lode mines yielded

72

Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

Aftanas, B.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1997-2000): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 7%; United Kingdom, 2%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12 Stockpile, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

74

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Import Sources (1995-98): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 53%; Australia, 45%; and other Kingdom, 4%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/99 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a supply

75

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1998-2001): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 8%; United Kingdom, 3%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12,838 short tons) of zirconium ore (baddeleyite) during fiscal year 2002. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE

76

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insignificant. Import Sources (1996-99): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 56%; Australia, 41, 4%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/00 Zirconium ores.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a stockpile

77

Part-Per-Trillion Level SF6 Detection Using a Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy-Based Sensor with Single-Mode Fiber-Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser Excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 m and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-infrared fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor . The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and micro-resonator tubes. SF6 was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7x10-10 Wcm-1/Hz1/2.

Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area -...

79

(Data in metric tons1 of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This includes 60 to 90 tons of silver that are reclaimed and recycled annually from photographic wastewater 53 61 65 Recycling: Approximately 1,000 tons of silver was recovered from old and new scrap in 2006

80

Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets April 11, 2014 - 1:32pm Addthis The cyclotron, invented by Ernest Lawrence in the 1930s, is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d = standard deviation INTRODUCTION The United States' vast lignite reserves' energy po- tential, while not commanding the public interest as much as the more "exotic" forms of energy conversion (solar, geothermal, wave energy, etc. ), has been... viewed with in- creasing interest by the technical community. Although a tremendous amount of energy is totalled in this country' s lignite coal reserves (Texas deposits alone are estimated at 100 billion tons [1] ), the energy is low-grade; i. e...

Blacksmith, James Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

84

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

85

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

86

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

87

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

88

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

89

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel...

91

Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 VPIC1.jpg After querying a dataset of approximately 114,875,956,837 particles for those with Energy values less than...

92

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpassing that goal. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds More Documents & Publications EIS-0355: Record of Decision EIS-0355: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0355: Final Environmental Impact Statement

93

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) October 8, 2013 - 2:22pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER - Existing Heating Efficiency * COP - Existing IPLV Efficiency * IPLV - New Capacity ton 10 tons New Cooling Efficiency EER 10.1 EER New Heating Efficiency COP 3.2 COP New IPLV Efficiency IPLV 10.4 IPLV Energy Cost $ per kWh $0.06 per kWh

94

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An update to the 2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply"

95

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production .................................................. million Btu per short ton 20.136 Consumption .............................................. million Btu per short ton 19.810 Coke plants ............................................. million Btu per short ton 26.304 Industrial .................................................. million Btu per short ton 23.651 Residential and commercial .................... million Btu per short ton 20.698 Electric power sector ............................... million Btu per short ton 19.370

96

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) - a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site - has achieved a major cleanup milestone. Since beginning operations in 1996, workers supporting the Richland

98

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

99

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? With continued developments in biorefinery capacity and technology, the feedstock resources identified in the report could produce about 85 billion gallons of biofuels -- enough to replace approximately 30 percent

100

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

102

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

103

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reached another milestone today for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, having shipped 5 million tons of tailings from the massive pile located in Moab, Utah, to the engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The pile comprised an estimated 16 million tons total when DOE's Remedial

104

DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration

105

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpass- ing that goal. "Although shipping 2 million tons was the original Recovery Act goal, we are planning to exceed this goal by shipping about 300,000 tons more using savings resulting from efficiencies we've gained in our first 2 years of moving tailings," Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler said. The project is using $108 million from the Recovery Act to move the tailings from the banks of the Colorado River by rail to a permanent

106

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and Grand County Council Vice Chair Lynn Jackson is on the right. At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab's uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal

107

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

108

DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

(Grand Junction, CO) ? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has safely moved another million tons of uranium mill tailings from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

109

9,248,559 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 16, 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOEs Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

110

Experimental studies of 1 ton/day coal slurry feed type oxygen blown, entrained flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Studies of a 1 Ton/Day coal slurry feed type oxygen blown, entrained flow gasifier have been performed with the slurry concentration and gasifier temperature at 65% and above 1,300...2.../coal feed r...

Young-Chan Choi; Tae-Jun Park; Jae-Ho Kim

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

112

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GW. 1986. Biomass production from herbaceous plant. In biomass energy development. WH Smith (ed.). Plenum Press, New York, NY. pp. 163-175. 165 U.S. BILLION-TON UPDATE: BIOMASS...

113

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

114

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 767,378 25,574 241,960 3 517 270,125 2,790,567 - 59 111 - 1990 774,213 14,956 181,231 17 1,008 201,246 2,794,110 (s) 87 162 - 1995 832,928 16,169 86,584 133 1,082 108,297 3,287,571 (s)

115

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

44 44 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 639 120 1,471 1 - 1,591 81,670 3 24 6 1 1990 1,266 173 1,630 2 - 1,805 97,330 5 23 8 (s) 1991 1,221 104 995 1 - 1,101 99,868 5 21 11 1 1992 1,704 154 1,045 10 4 1,229 122,908 6 21 10 2 1993 1,794 290 1,074 27 40 1,591 128,743 4 21 10 2 1994 2,241

116

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 10,079 * * 80 * * 0 1 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 226 17,545 1 1 141 * 0 0 12 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 107

117

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin February 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the Michigan Basin near Gaylord, Mich., in a deep saline formation, the Silurian-age Bass Island dolomite. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships

118

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.800 Coke Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 26.327 Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.911 Residential and Commercial . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.284 Electric Power Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.536 Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton

119

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

120

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removes More Than One Ton of Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ... NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food Posted By Office of Public Affairs Contributing to DOE/NNSA's efforts to support the Office of Personnel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: News Release - DOE Regional Partnerships Find Up To 3.5 Billion Tons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 DOE Regional Partnerships Find More Than 3,500 Billion Tons of Possible CO2 Storage Capacity Atlas Details Stationary Sources and Geologic Reservoirs in U.S. and Canada WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships have identified the powerplant and other stationary sources of more than 3.8 billion tons a year of the greenhouse gas CO2 in the United States and Canada and companion candidate storage capacity for more than 3,500 billion tons. The results are detailed in the new Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada which became available online today. MORE INFO Link to NETL's Carbon Sequestration Atlas web page Link to the Interactive Carbon Sequestration Atlas Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program

122

In-field remediation of tons of heavy metal-rich waste by Joule heating vitrification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An in-field remediation method of tons of Pb and Zn-rich ceramic waste based on Joule heating vitrification is presented. The progressive heating up to about 1850C led to the complete melting of the waste material and the rapid cooling of the melt formed a monolithic glass of 55tons. The obtained glass was chemically and morphologically homogeneous and immobilized the heavy metals and non-volatile inorganic compounds. The occurrence of crystalline phases such as zircon and cordierite was observed in the lowermost part of the monolith due to the different cooling rate. Leaching tests showed that the vitrified monolith presented a high chemical resistance and metal ions were immobilized into the glass matrix. The presented in-field vitrification process was highly effective in the remediation of tons of heavy metal-rich materials and can be exploited further for remediation of large amounts of soils and asbestos-based materials.

Francesco Dellisanti; Piermaria L. Rossi; Giovanni Valdr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet July 11, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons -- a type of subatomic particle -- traveling at the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001. In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 50-ton device by truck requires meticulous precision -- just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.

124

Engineering safety evaluation for 22 ton steel disposal box lifting bail design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to design and analyze the lifting bail of the 22 Ton Steel Waste Disposal Box (SWDB). The new design takes the original lifting bail and adds a hinge allowing the top portion of the bail to fold over towards the lid.

BOEHNKE, W.M.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

126

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually. Emissions. (fertilizers that use nitric acid or ammonium bicarbonate result in emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous oxide, ammonia and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.) ~Indirect: Phosphorus in excess causes eutrophication

Toohey, Darin W.

127

Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of President Obamas all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today that its Illinois Basin-Decatur Project successfully captured and stored one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) and injected it into a deep saline formation.

128

TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stockpile Center continued to solicit offers for the sale of titanium sponge held in the Government-grade sponge. For fiscal year 2001, 4,540 tons of titanium sponge is being offered for sale. Stockpile Status for disposal FY 2000 FY 2000 Titanium sponge 19,100 3,390 19,100 4,540 4,240 Ev

129

Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON Following the one year mark since the release of the Presidents Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - in partnership with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. today announced a major milestone, successfully capturing more than one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the hydrogen-production facility in Port Arthur, Texas.

130

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered in Alaska

131

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons order of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered

132

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered in Idaho

133

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

134

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than 120 manufacturers that are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve their bottom lines. Through the Department's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better Plants), over 1,750 plants across the United States have saved about $1 billion in energy costs and

135

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954, Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov Emerald Laija, EPA (509) 376-4919, Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, recently cleaned up 77 waste sites at Hanford to meet two Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones before the end of 2011. The waste sites were located in the D and H Reactor Areas at Hanford along

136

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 Project Helping Further CCS Technology and Meeting G-8 Goals for Deployment Washington, D.C. -A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Link to SECARB web site The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern

137

table7.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.5 0.9 1.5 0.8 0.6 1.1 311 Food 1,082 W 2 3 566 1 9 * 40 8.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 220 W * * 59 * 6 0 9 1.1 31131 Sugar 71 733 * * 22 * 2 * 3 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0 0 1 12.6

138

table4.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 68,230 2 3 560 1 8 * 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 7,098 * * 59 * 5 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 733 * * 22 * 2 * 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0

139

(Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 240  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

million tons. The 49 million tons probably includes crude clay production tonnages which contain E Recycling: Insignificant. Import Sources (2000-03): Brazil, 68%; Mexico, 9%; United Kingdom, 8 probably includes crude clay production which contains significant water content. Compensating

140

Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

only by electrical lighting (481 trillion BTU vs. 1340only by electrical lighting (141 billion kWh vs. 393 billion

Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Innovative Process and Materials Technologies | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

110 trillion Btu per year. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets (Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Cambridge, MA) A...

142

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

143

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

144

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square...

145

New Jersey Industrial Energy Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

452.1 trillion British thermal units (Btu). As part of an initiative to reduce the energy intensity of the American manufacturing sector, the United States Department of...

146

Leading the Way in Energy Best Practices | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

fleet efficiency, which ultimately saves taxpayers money. This year's Federal Energy and Water Management Award winners saved a total of 1.9 trillion British thermal units (Btu)...

147

NICE3: Industrial Refrigeration System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Concepts has developed an absorption-augmented system as a cost-effective means of achieving more cooling capacity with a substantial reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for industrial refrigeration. It cuts fuel consumption by 30% by combining an internal combustion engine with a mechanical compression refrigeration system and an absorption refrigeration system. The absorption system is powered by engine waste heat. Conventional industrial refrigeration uses mechanical vapor compression, powered by electric motors, which results in higher energy costs. By the year 2010, the new system could cut fuel consumption by 19 trillion Btu and greenhouse emissions by more than 1 million tons per year.

Simon, P.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

148

First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. December 3, 2014 Simulation of the cosmic web of the dark matter mass distribution. This region represents about 110,000 of the...

149

Options for Determining Equivalent MHTM (Metric Tons of Heavy Metal) for DOE High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 114(d) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), limits the overall capacity of the first repository to 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM). Current DOE policy is to allocate DOE spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) at 10 percent of the total, or 7,000 MTHM. For planning purposes, 4,667 MTHM will be allocated for HLW. While the NWPA provides a technical basis for determining the MTHM equivalence of HLW, it does not address the significant technical differences between DOE HLW and commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Although more than 170,000 MTHM of DOE fuel has been reprocessed to produce the inventory of HLW, the amount of radioactive waste generated per metric ton of DOE fuel is only a few percent of that in a metric ton of commercial fuel. This study compares the results of four methods for determining the MTHM equivalence of DOE HLW. These methods include (1) using the actual weight of heavy metal in reprocessed DOE fuel, (2) assuming the historical equivalence of 0.5 MTHM/canister of vitrified DOE HLW, (3) comparing the total radioactivity in DOE HLW to the radioactivity of commercial SNF, and (4) comparing the total radiotoxicity of DOE HLW, as defined for those radionuclides identified in 10 CFR 20, with SNF at 1,000 and 10,000 years. This study concludes that either of the last two options would meet Congresss stated purposes of the NWPA, which are to (1) provide "reasonable assurance that the public and the environment will be adequately protected from the hazards posed by high-level radioactive waste and such spent nuclear fuel as may be disposed of in a repository", and (2) to "define Federal policy for the disposal of such waste and spent fuel".

Knecht, Dieter August; Valentine, James Henry; Luptak, Alan Jay; Staiger, Merle Daniel; Loo, Henry Hung Yiu; Wichmann, Thomas Leonard

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Questions and Answers - How many atoms would it take to create a ton?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

there in the world? there in the world? Previous Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Could you please explain density?) Could you please explain density? How many atoms would it take to create a ton? There's a lot more to this question than first appears. There are many types of atoms and each of them has its own mass, so the answer varies depending on which atom you are talking about. Since even a tiny bit of matter has many atoms, it has become customary to use the unit "mole" to signify a standard number of atoms, namely, it is Avogadro's number which (almost) equals 6*1023, or 600,000 billion billon. If you look up the periodic table of elements, one of the numbers usually listed is the atomic mass which is the mass (in grams) of one mole of those atoms. Let's use

151

Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The ArDM - a ton-scale liquid argon experiment for direct Dark Matter Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ArDM is a ton-scale double phase detector for the direct search of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) as Dark Matter candidates. The detector is based on a liquid Argon (LAr) target. The present goal is to assemble, fully characterize the detector on the surface and then operate it at an underground facility. The scintillation light and ionization charge produced by recoiling nuclei in WIMP-Ar collision can be measured independently. The discrimination of the WIMP induced nuclear recoils from the electron/gamma background is done using the pulse discrimination technique and the ratio between the produced light and charge. The experiment and the last results from the detector commissioning are presented.

Otyugova, Polina [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011 Fiscal Year 7 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 1 Natural Gas 2 Coal 3 Total Fossil Fuels 4 Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Trillion Cubic Feet Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Short Tons Quadrillion Btu Percent Quadrillion Btu Percent 2003 R 689 R 4.00 R 33.3 R 94 R 0.35 R 14.9 R 7.08 R 7.81 R 35.5 R 466 R 9.58 R 43.3 R 21.74 R 37.2 2004 R 680 R 3.94 R 33.8 R 105 R .39 R 16.0 R 6.68 R 7.38 R 34.0 R 484 R 9.89 R 43.9 R 21.60 R 37.0

155

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2003 declined to 1.12 million tons and was valued at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although copper-electrowinning facilities operated during the year. Refined copper and direct melt scrap were consumed at about 30 brass

156

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2007 declined nominally to 1.19 million tons, but its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in two other States. Although copper was recovered at 26 mines operating in the United

157

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2009 declined by about 9% to 1.2 million tons and its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also was recovered at mines in Idaho and Missouri. Although copper was recovered at 29 mines operating in the United

159

table5.5_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 0 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6 2,105 2 35 -- 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use -- 2,496 12 4 1,271 2 11 -- 5.6

160

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons of zirconium oxide (ZrO ) equivalent, unless otherwise noted)2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and concentrates: Australia, 51%; South Africa, 48%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, wrought, unwrought, waste and scrap: France, 69%; Australia, 21%; Germany, 8%; and United Kingdom, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 7.3c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.3a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 417 953 28 15 10,740 13,103 517 104 335 16 36 1995 Total .................... 569 649 43 21 12,171 12,265 601 114 373 13 40 2000 Total .................... 514 823 37 26 11,706 10,459 640 107 369 10 45 2001 Total .................... 532 1,023 36 15 10,636 10,530 654 88 370 7 44 2002 Total .................... 477 834 33 18 11,855 11,608 685 106 464 15 43 2003 Total

162

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.4c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.4a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 1,191 2,056 46 28 27,781 36,159 1,055 275 1,125 41 86 1995 Total .................... 1,419 1,245 78 40 29,363 34,448 1,258 290 1,255 38 95 2000 Total .................... 1,547 1,615 85 47 28,031 30,520 1,386 331 1,244 35 108 2001 Total .................... 1,448 1,832 79 25 25,755 26,817 1,310 248 1,054 27 101 2002 Total ....................

163

High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

1000ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 7.4a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.4b and 7.4c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759 5,412 69,862 NA NA 75,274 1,153 NA 3 NA NA 1960 Total .................... 176,685 3,824 84,371 NA NA 88,195 1,725 NA 2 NA NA 1965 Total ....................

166

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.3b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.3a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759

167

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Studies of a three-stage dark matter and neutrino observatory based on multi-ton combinations of liquid xenon and liquid argon detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a three stage dark matter and neutrino observatory based on multi-ton two-phase liquid Xe and Ar detectors with sufficiently low backgrounds to be sensitive to WIMP dark matter interaction cross sections down to 10E-47 cm^2, and to provide both identification and two independent measurements of the WIMP mass through the use of the two target elements in a 5:1 mass ratio, giving an expected similarity of event numbers. The same detection systems will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum, the neutrino flux and temperature from a Galactic supernova, and neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe to the lifetime level of 10E27 - 10E28 y corresponding to the Majorana mass predicted from current neutrino oscillation data. The proposed scheme would be operated in three stages G2, G3, G4, beginning with fiducial masses 1-ton Xe + 5-ton Ar (G2), progressing to 10-ton Xe + 50-ton Ar (G3) then, dependent on results and performance of the latter, expandable to 100-ton Xe + 500-ton Ar (G4). This ...

Arisaka, K; Smith, P F; Beltrame, P; Ghag, C; Lung, K; Teymourian, A; Wang, H; Cline, D B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; primary aluminum production, 6%; continuous casting, 4%; rubber and thermoplastics, 4%; pharmaceuticals, 294 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production resources, reported production and value of production were withheld from publication to avoid disclosing

170

7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to be determined. Assumptions 1 The computers are operated by 4 adult men. 2 The computers consume 40 percent to the amount of electrical energy they consume. Therefore, AC Outside Computer room 4000 Btu/h ( ( ) ( Q Q Q Q. Analysis The unit that will cost less during its lifetime is a better buy. The total cost of a system

Bahrami, Majid

171

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

172

Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Production of low BTU gas from biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transported with little difficulty. It was decided to use a fluidized bed reactor for the gasification. Fluidized bed reactors offer many advantages when utilized as a medium for gasifi- cation of solid fuels. Some of them are excellent mixing... carbon and graphite. The results showed the equilibrium constant to be a function of temperature alone, independent of carbon source, particle size and other physical properties of the carbon. Brink (1976) studied the pyrolysis and gasifi- cation...

Lee, Yung N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nationwide: EERE Program Leads to U.S. Manufacturers Saving ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

190 trillion British thermal units-equivalent to about 11 million metric tons of CO2 emissions. Across the United States, manufacturers spend more than 200 billion each...

176

(Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use% kiln furniture, 6% fiberglass, 4% paint, and 3% rubber; ball clay--25% floor and wall tile, 21 Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 19961 e Production, mine: Kaolin 8,740 8,830 8,770 9,480 9

177

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1995 1996 1997 1998100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production States, Russia, and Argentina, in descending order of production. Australia and Canada were major

178

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1997, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production: Mine, recoverable 488 570 614 600 6071 Primary slab zinc 240 217

179

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 199598 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production worldwide. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1996. Two

180

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2001, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

182

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2000, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major

183

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Production: Mine, recoverable1 614 600 605 722 775 Primary slab zinc 232 226

184

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

185

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

186

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

187

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

188

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, the United States, and Argentina, in descending order of production. Australia and Canada were major

189

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and synthetic rubber production. Salient Statistics--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1995. Two companies

190

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

191

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2005, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for 86% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

192

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1998, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

192 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Production: Mine, recoverable 570 614 598 605 6551 Primary slab zinc

193

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

194

(Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters were closed on published market prices, the value of primary metal production was $3.99 billion. Aluminum consumption

195

(Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2007. Indium-containing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were exported to Canada for processing. Two companies, one in New York and the other in Rhode Island for the recycling industry to handle because of large capital costs, environmental restrictions, and storage space gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells require approximately 50 metric tons of indium to produce 1 gigawatt

196

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

197

Army Energy Initiatives Task Force  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Kathy Ahsing Director, Planning and Development UNCLASSIFIED 2 Perfect Storm UNCLASSIFIED 3 U.S. Army Energy Consumption, 2010 23% 77% 42% 58%  Facilities  Vehicles & Equipment (Tactical and Non-tactical) Sources: Energy Information Agency, 2010 Annual Energy Review; Agency Annual Energy Management Data Reports submitted to DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (Preliminary FY 2010) 32% 68% DoD 80% Army 21% Federal Gov 1% Federal Government United States Department of Defense U.S. = 98,079 Trillion Btu DoD = 889 Trillion Btu Fed Gov = 1,108 Trillion Btu U.S. Army = 189 Trillion Btu FY10 Highlights - $2.5+B Operational Energy Costs - $1.2 B Facility Energy Costs

198

Wisconsin Save Energy Now Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Among Wisconsins economic sectors, the industrial sector represents the highest level of energy consumption. In 2007, this sector consumed approximately 623.5 trillion British thermal units (Btu)....

199

CA is particularly vulnerable to the costs associated with unmitigated climate change. A warming climate would generate more smoggy days, ozone, and foster more large brush  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-acid-methyl-ester (FAME)) · Renewable diesel and gasoline (e.g., "drop-in" fuels or hydrocarbons, biomass-to-liquid (BTL% Forestry, 242 TBtu, 41% Agriculture, 137 TBtu, 24% Potential Feedstock Energy in Biomass 507 Trillion Btu

California at Davis, University of

200

How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Much Energy Does Each State Produce? How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1...

202

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

203

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace...

204

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

205

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

206

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

207

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

208

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 Federal Agency Progress Toward the Renewable Energy Goal (Trillion Btu) (1) Total Renewable Energy Usage DOD EPA (2) DOE GSA NASA DOI Others All Agencies Note(s): Source(s):...

209

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting December 18, 2009 - 2:43pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Metal casting was identified as one of the top 10 energy users in manufacturing. The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent fewer materials than traditional processes. One example of this technology is being used by General Motors to make lightweight engine blocks for the fuel-efficient vehicles they manufacture. A government-funded effort to support development of foam metal casting helped reduce an estimated 9.4 million tons of solid waste between 1994 and 2005, which saved industry an estimated 3 trillion Btu.

210

Presentation to the Plastics Developers Association North America Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in in Dow Chemical 26 May 2010, Beijing Ningke Peng About Dow A diversified chemical company, harnessing the power of science and technology to improve living daily  founded in Midland, Michigan in 1897  annual sales of $58 billion  52,000 employees  3,900+ in China and growing daily  supplies more than 5,000 products  serve customers in 160 countries  a company committed to sustainability  24 sites and offices in China Dow's Energy Use Dow is among the largest Industrial Energy Consumers  Annual Energy Consumption Globally ≈ 600 Trillion Btu's (22 million tons of coal equivalent)  The Cost of Energy in 2009 Approached US $2.5 Billion Globally (~17 billion RMB)

211

(Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3), unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was centered in southern California. The largest producer operated an open-pit tincal and kernite mine domestic producer continued mining and processing ore at its open pit mine. The production of boron, sodium year to 60,000 tons per year by 2002. Turkey is building a 274,000-ton-per-year pyrite-burning sulfuric

212

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million tons--Arizona, Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also

213

Plutonium by the Ton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N reactor at the Hanford Reservation in Senator...was in just such a meeting between senators...discuss the issue in public for fear ofviolating...and forth in secret meetings, a private group...through the year 2000. The databook reports...by the Washington Public Power Supply System...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Future market for ceramics in vehicle engines and their impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic engine components have potential to improve vehicle fuel economy. Some recent tests have also shown their environmental benefits, particularly in reducing particulate emissions in heavy-duty diesel engines. The authors used the data from a survey of the US vehicle engine and component manufacturers relating to ceramic engine components to develop a set of market penetration models. The survey identified promising ceramic components and provided data on the timing of achieving introductory shares in light and heavy-duty markets. Some ceramic components will penetrate the market when the pilot-scale costs are reduced to one-fifth of their current values, and many more will enter the market when the costs are reduced to one-tenth of the current values. An ongoing ceramics research program sponsored by the US Department of Energy has the goal of achieving such price reductions. The size and value of the future ceramic components market and the impacts of this market in terms of fuel savings, reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, and potential reduction in other criteria pollutants are presented. The future ceramic components market will be 9 million components worth $29 million within 5 years of introduction and will expand to 692 million components worth $3,484 million within 20 years. The projected annual energy savings are 3.8 trillion Btu by 5 years, increasing to 526 trillion Btu during the twentieth year. These energy savings will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 41 million tons during the twentieth year. Ceramic components will help reduce particulate emissions by 100 million tons in 2030 and save the nation`s urban areas $152 million. The paper presents the analytical approach and discusses other economic impacts.

Vyas, A.; Hanson, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11002: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

02 Date: January 5, 2011 02 Date: January 5, 2011 Title: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year Originator: Andrea Chew & Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: January 25, 2011 A conventional mid-size gasoline car emits 0.45 kg of greenhouse gases (GHG) per mile. 1 One hundred (100) metric tons (t) of GHG per year are equivalent to emissions from 17 conventional gasoline cars. Item: The GHG emissions cited above are from an analysis record prepared by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Programs on life-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases and petroleum use for several light-duty vehicles. 1 For cars that are between 1 and 5 years old, the average mileage is approximately 13,000,

216

Demonstration and evaluation of the 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system, Eldorado Resources, Ltd. , Port Hope, Ontario, September 3-4, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 3 and 4, 1986, the prototype 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system (LCBWS) developed by the US Enrichment Safeguards Program (ESP) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., was field tested at the Eldorado Resources, Ltd., (ERL) facility in Port Hope, Ontario. The 20-ton-capacity LCBWS has been designed and fabricated for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verifying the masses of large-capacity UF/sub 6/ cylinders during IAEA safeguards inspections at UF/sub 6/ handling facilities. The purpose of the Canadian field test was to demonstrate and to evaluate with IAEA inspectorates and with UF/sub 6/ bulk handling facility operators at Eldorado the principles, procedures, and hardware associated with using the 20-ton-capacity LCBWS as a portable means for verifying the masses of 10- and 14-ton UF/sub 6/ cylinders. Session participants included representatives from the IAEA, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Eldorado Resources, Ltd., the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), and the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Appendix A presents the list of participants and their organization affiliation. The two-day field test involved a formal briefing by ESP staff, two cylinder weighing sessions, IAEA critiques of the LCBWS hardware and software, and concluding discussions on the field performance of the system. Appendix B cites the meeting agenda. Summarized in this report are (1) the technical information presented by the system developers, (2) results from the weighing sessions, and (3) observations, suggestions, and concluding statements from meeting participants.

Cooley, J.N.; Huxford, T.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chinese Rural Vehicles: An Explanatory Analysis of Technology, Economics, Industrial Organization, Energy Use, Emissions, and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel fuel consumption in 2000 was 69.5 million metric tons (MMT) 79 (see Table 9-1) or 2.96 quadrillion BTU.

Sperling, Dan; Lin, Zhenhong; Hamilton, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production ... million Btu per short ton 20.136 Consumption...

219

The Hobbling of Coal: Policy and Regulatory Uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...use coal and that, after 1 January 1990, gas use...arid then providing tax rebates equal to the amount of...reduction that is set at $1.05 in 1979, falls to...Those us-ing less than 500 billion Btu would be ex-empt...larger users and those using 1.5 trillion Btu or more...

Richard L. Gordon

1978-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

222

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2012, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

223

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: For the first time in history, Chile surpassed the United States as the largest producer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production W W W W W Imports98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production for domestic consumption as well as for export to other countries; reported production and value of production

224

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

225

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2010, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

226

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2011, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

227

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1996 was about $800 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production: Mine, recoverable 523 488 570 614 6201 Primary slab zinc

228

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

229

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2009, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

184 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

230

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1997 was essentially unchanged at 1.9 million metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

52 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 98% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in six other States. While copper was recovered at about 35 mines operating in the United States, 15

231

CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

Mickalonis, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

233

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

234

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

235

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

236

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

237

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

238

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

239

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

240

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

242

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

243

Fumigation of a diesel engine with low Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 0.5 liter single-cylinder, indirect-injection diesel engine has been fumigated with producer gas. Measurements of power, efficiency, cylinder pressure, and emissions were made. At each operating condition, engine load was held constant, and the gas-to-diesel fuel ratio was increased until abnormal combustion was encountered. This determined the maximum fraction of the input energy supplied by the gas, E/sub MAX/, which was found to be dependent upon injection timing and load. At light loads, E/sub MAX/ was limited by severe efficiency loss and missfire, while at heavy loads it was limited by knock or preignition. Fumigation generally increased ignition delay and heat release rates, but peak pressures were not strongly influenced. Efficiency was slightly decreased by fumigation as were NO/sub X/ and particle emissions while CO emissions were increased.

Ahmadi, M.; Kittelson, D.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Electrical Generation Using Non-Salable Low BTU Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating costs are a significant problem for independent operators throughout the U.S. Often, decisions to temporarily idle or abandon a well or lease are dictated by these cost considerations, which are often seen as unavoidable. Options for continuing operations on a marginal basis are limited, but must include non-conventional approaches to problem solving, such as the use of alternative sources of lease power, and scrupulous reduction of non-productive operating techniques and costs. The loss of access to marginal oil and gas productive reservoirs is of major concern to the DOE. The twin difficulties of high operating costs and low or marginal hydrocarbon production often force independent operators to temporarily or permanently abandon existing lease facilities, including producing wells. Producing well preservation, through continued economical operation of marginal wells, must be maintained. Reduced well and lease operating costs are expected to improve oil recovery of the Schaben field, in Ness County, Kansas, by several hundred thousands of barrels of oil. Appropriate technology demonstrated by American Warrior, allows the extension of producing well life and has application for many operators throughout the area.

Scott Corsair

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,025 1,025 1,023 2010's 1,028 1,025 1,026 1,024...

246

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,033 1,023 1,024 2010's 1,015 1,021 1,022 1,016...

247

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,010 1,010 1,007 2010's 1,006 1,009 1,014 1,029...

248

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,024 1,023 1,022 2010's 1,021 1,017 1,015 1,022...

249

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,024 1,024 1,025 1,027 1,026 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 2014 1,027 1,022 1,028 1,026 1,029 1,032 1,033...

250

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,050 1,049 1,047 1,048 1,048 1,046 1,041 1,044 1,043 1,045 1,044 2014 1,044 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,038 1,036 1,038...

251

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005...

252

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043...

253

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025...

254

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,037 1,040 1,041 2010's 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,037...

255

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,034 1,033 1,033 1,035 1,035 1,038 1,037 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,043 1,044 2014 1,044 1,042 1,041 1,050 1,047 1,048 1,053...

256

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,064 1,062 1,046 2010's 1,044 1,047 1,032 1,028...

257

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,032 1,039 1,031 2010's 1,033 1,024 1,029 1,034...

258

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001 1,002 1,003 1,003 1,002 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,000 2014 1,002 1,004 1,001 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001...

259

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031...

260

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,018...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,006 1,006 1,005 2010's 1,005 1,013 1,012...

262

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,039 1,037 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,031 1,033 1,039 1,032 1,029 1,034 2014 1,033 1,033 1,032 1,034 1,032 1,033 1,033...

263

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,010 1,012 1,011 1,017 1,020 1,020 1,023 1,021 1,014 1,013 1,013 2014 1,013 1,012 1,010 1,034 1,041 1,044 1,029...

264

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,052 1,059 1,044 2010's 1,045 1,038 1,043 1,046...

265

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

266

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

267

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

269

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

report year's response, explain the change in short tons Part 6 What is the average heat (Btu) content for all coal mined at this mine during the reporting year? Btulb....

270

Energy Resources Available to the United States, 1985 to 2000  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a point, we can substitute mon-ey in the...4 a ton, and natural gas at /$0.16 a...world petroleum and gas produc-tion has...Btu's); and Syngas he United States...Btu's. Alaskan natural gas will cost $4 to...

Earl T. Hayes

1979-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

272

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

273

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

274

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

275

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

276

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

277

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

278

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

279

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

280

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," "," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","Pulping","Wood Chips,","And Waste","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

282

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

283

Table E1.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

284

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

285

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," "," ",,,," "," ",,," ",," ",," ",,"Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke and"," ",,"of Energy Sources"

286

Table 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

287

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

288

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

289

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

290

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 10.4 Biodiesel Overview, 2001-2011 Year Feedstock 1 Losses and Co-products 2 Production Trade Stocks, End of Year Stock Change 4 Balancing Item 5 Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports 3 Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Thousand Barrels Million Gallons Trillion Btu Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Million Gallons Trillion Btu 2001 1 (s) 204 9 1 78 39 39 NA NA NA 243 10 1 2002 1 (s) 250 10 1 191 56 135 NA NA NA 385 16 2 2003 2 (s) 338 14 2 94 110 -16 NA NA NA 322 14 2 2004 4 (s) 666 28 4 97 124 -26 NA NA NA 640 27 3 2005 12 (s) 2,162 91 12 207 206 1 NA NA NA 2,163 91 12 2006 32 (s) 5,963 250 32 1,069 828 242 NA NA NA 6,204 261 33 2007 63 1 11,662 490 62 3,342 6,477 -3,135 NA NA NA 8,528 358 46 2008 88 1 16,145 678 87 7,502 16,128 -8,626 NA NA NA 7,519

291

Cool energy savings opportunities in commercial refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consumes over 13 quads of primary energy annually. Most of this consumption (two-thirds) meets the energy needs of lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. The largest consuming group of the remaining one-third is commercial refrigeration at about one quad annually (990 trillion Btu), valued at over $7 billion per year to the commercial sector consumer. Potential energy savings are estimated to be about 266 trillion Btu, with consumer savings valued at about $2 billion. This study provides the first known estimates of these values using a bottom-up approach. The authors evaluated numerous self-contained and engineered commercial refrigeration systems in this study, such as: supermarket central systems, beverage merchandisers, ice machines, and vending machines. Typical physical characteristics of each equipment type were identified at the component level for energy consumption. This information was used to form a detailed database from which they arrived at the estimate of 990 trillion Btu energy consumption for the major equipment types used in commercial refrigeration. Based on the implementation of the most cost-effective technology improvements for the seven major equipment types, they estimated an annual potential energy savings of 266 trillion Btu. Much of the savings can be realized with the implementation of high-efficiency fan motors and compressors. In many cases, payback can be realized within three years.

Westphalen, D.; Brodrick, J.; Zogg, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and furnaces or to generate electricity for electrical space and water heating systems that provide served those electric space and water heating systems. After netting out the 21 trillion BTU decrease away from electric resistance where natural gas is already in the home for space heating. However

293

Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

294

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

295

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources"

296

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

297

Table 1.2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

298

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

299

Commercial progress and impacts of inventions and innovations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the survey results from the 1997 inventions and innovations evaluation questionnaire. The evaluation impacts are based on responses from 136 out of 334 inventors sent the questionnaire. In 1996, there were 67 inventions identified that currently have direct, licensed, or spinoff sales. In total, the number of inventions and innovations with current sales and past sales (now retired from the market) is 144. This represents a commercial success rate of over 27%. For these grant-receiving inventions, the following performance metrics are of interest: (1) total cumulative direct and licensed sales through 1996 were $700 million (1995$), in addition, cumulative spinoff sales and royalties were $90 million and $20 million (1995$) through 1996, respectively; (2) employment sustained by direct and licensed sales was 1,189 full-time equivalents in 1996, employment attributable to technologies with no sales was 90 full-time equivalents, and the annual federal income taxes collected as a result of this employment was in excess of $6 million; and (3) energy savings attribute to supported inventions and innovations were estimated at 78 trillion Btu in 1996 with an estimated value of nearly $190 million (1995$), the associated reduction in carbon emissions was over 1.5 million metric tons. In terms of future commercialization progress and impacts, the 1997 survey revealed that 60% of the respondents are actively pursuing their invention, and nearly 50% of the inventions are in the prototype development, pre-production prototype testing, and pre-production development stages.

Perlack, R.D.; Rizy, C.G.; Franchuk, C.A.; Cohn, S.M.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 Btu/KWh, 10,173 Btu/KWh, and 9,919 Btu/KWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. and Monthly Energy Review November 2005, and September 2009 DOE/EIA-0035(2005, 2009),Table A6. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Discussion Of Scenario ResultsDiscussion Of Scenario Results Michael Schilmoeller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Btu/kWh) tons CO2/MWh RPM & Genesys (%) Council's Carbon Footprint paper Boardman 601.0 84% 504 $100/ton CO2 Policy No RPS Close Existing Coal Plants Dam Removal Low Conservation High Conservation-risk plan for each NPV study cost and TailVaR90 risk Average CO2 emission rate (MMt/year) over futures, 2030

302

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

304

c13a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Electricity Expenditures Primary Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings .................................... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559 1,043 82,783 Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) Table C13A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Site Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 836 11,300 13.5 1,412 468 137 10,479 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,185 18,549 15.7 2,621 868 254 19,181 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 670 12,374 18.5 1,947 645

305

c13a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 2006 Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Electricity Expenditures Primary Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings .................................... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559 1,043 82,783 Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) Table C13A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Site Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 836 11,300 13.5 1,412 468 137 10,479 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,185 18,549 15.7 2,621 868 254 19,181 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 670 12,374 18.5 1,947 645

306

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.5 By Further Classification of "Other" Energy Sources XLS PDF Energy Used as a Nonfuel (Feedstock) Table 2.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF Table 2.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF Table 2.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category XLS PDF Energy Consumption as a Fuel Table 3.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF

307

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 By End Use By Principal Building Activity 64 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1,340 481 436 381 167 156 88 69 24 418 Lighting Cooling Ventilation Refrigeration Space Computers Water Office Cooking Other¹ 0 500 1,000 1,500 Trillion Btu Heating Heating Equipment and Storage Assembly 733 719 371 248 244 235 217 208 167 149 267 Mercantile Office Education Health Care Warehouse Lodging Food Service Food Sales Public Service Other² 0 200 400 600 800 Trillion Btu (Cumulative) All Other End Uses Cooling Lighting 1 Examples of "other" include medical, electronic, and testing equipment; conveyors, wrappers, hoists, and compactors; washers, disposals, dryers, and cleaning equipment; escalators, eleva- tors, dumb waiters, and window washers; shop tools and electronic testing equipment; sign

308

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 2 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms all tables + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values RSE Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed for All Purpose XLSPDF Table 1.5 By Further Classification of "Other" Energy Sources XLS PDF Energy Used as a Nonfuel (Feedstock) Values RSE Table 2.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 2.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 2.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category XLS PDF

309

Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project are due to: i) a reduced number of process shutdowns to change hardware or lining material, ii) reduced need to produce new hardware or lining material, iii) improved product quality leads to reduced need to remake product or manufacturing of new product, iv) reduction in contamination of melt from degradation of refractory and metallic components, v) elimination of worn hardware will increase efficiency of process, vi) reduced refractory lining deterioration or formation of a less insulating phase, would result in decreased heat loss through the walls. Projected 2015 benefits for the U.S. aluminum industry, assuming 21% market penetration of improved refractory materials, are energy savings of approximately 0.2 trillion BTU/year, cost savings of $2.3 billion/year and carbon reductions of approximately 1.4 billion tons/year. The carbon reduction benefit of the project for the hot-dip galvanize and aluminum industries combined is projected to be approximately 2.2 billion tons/year in 2015. Pathways from research to commercialization were based on structure of the projects industrial partnerships. These partnerships included suppliers, industrial associations, and end users. All parties were involved in conducting the project including planning and critiquing the trials. Supplier companies such as Pyrotech Metaullics, Stoody, and Duraloy have commercialized products and processes developed on the project.

Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

" by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",," ",,,,,,," "," "," " ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE"

311

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

312

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

313

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "

314

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)",,"NGL(d)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

315

Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

316

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

317

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

318

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

319

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009" August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,,"Furnace/Coke",,,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Oven Gases","Waste Gas",,"Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

320

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

322

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

323

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food ................................................................................. 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products ..................................... 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107

324

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;" .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," " " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",1328 "Natural Gas",5725 "Net Electricity",2437 " Purchases",2510 " Transfers In",33 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",7

325

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

326

" Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, Presence of"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" 4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, Presence of" " General Technologies, and Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected" " Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.3

327

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

328

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

329

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

330

Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," "," ",,,,,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "

331

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

332

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

333

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

334

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste" " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

335

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

336

Table 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

337

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

338

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and"," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related"

339

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

340

Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) June 2010 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2008 2008 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2008 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural

342

Awarded ESPC Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Since the inception of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) in 1998, 325 DOE ESPC projects have been awarded. More than $3.41 billion has been invested in Federal energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. These improvements have resulted in more than 398 trillion Btu life cycle energy savings and more than $8.53 billion of cumulative energy cost savings for the Federal Government.

343

Terry Sharp, P.E. Building Performance Benchmarking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source energy use in trillion Btu) R2 = 0.7816 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 5 10 15 20 25 Gross Square Feet (millionsTerry Sharp, P.E. Building Performance Benchmarking 3rd U.S. Army Energy Workshop January 25-26, 2007 EPA Energy Star Program and Energy Data Normalization Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;Why You

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

344

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

345

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

346

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

347

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

348

" by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE",," " "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

349

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

350

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

351

Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the companys global facility environmental footprint.

Mighton, Steven, J.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

352

43Exploring the Cosmos with Supercomputers Supercomputers can do trillions of calculations each second, and follow the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chicago used supercomputer simulations to investigate how dark matter. Dark matter is an invisible matter. Astrophysicists believe that dark matter may have herded luminous matter in the universe from its initial smooth state into the cosmic web of galaxies and galaxy clusters that populate the universe today

353

Location Efficiency as the Missing Piece of The Energy Puzzle: How Smart Growth Can Unlock Trillion Dollar Consumer Cost Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a comparable magnitude after ten years to other major building energy efficiency policies, such as construction in Section II. We discuss in Section III a methodology for applying these results towards the evaluation. We apply this methodology in Section IV to real world examples of smart growth that are being

Kammen, Daniel M.

354

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Statistics - Units Close Window Energy Equivalent Conversions Million Btu (British thermal units) Giga (10^9) Joules TOE (Metric Tons of Oil Equivalent) TCE (Metric Tons of Coal Equivalent) Million Btu (British thermal units) 1.00000 0.94782 39.68320 27.77824 Giga (10^9) Joules 1.05506 1.00000 41.86800 29.30760 TOE (Metric Tons of Oil Equivalent) 0.02520 0.02388 1.00000 0.70000 TCE (Metric Tons of Coal Equivalent) 0.03600 0.03412 1.42857 1.00000 Mass Equivalent Conversions Short Tons Kilograms Metric Tons Long Tons Pounds Short Tons 1.00000 0.00110 1.10231 1.12000 0.00050 Kilograms 907.18470 1.00000 1000.00000 1016.04700 0.45359 Metric Tons 0.90718 0.00100 1.00000 1.01605 0.00045 Long Tons 0.89286 0.00098 0.98421 1.00000

355

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sulfidation-oxidation of advanced metallic materials in simulated low-Btu coal-gasifier environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of structural alloys in complex multicomponent gas environments is of considerable interest for their effective utilization in coal conversion schemes. Little understanding...

T. C. Tiearney Jr.; K. Natesan

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Policy: Independence by 1985 My Be Unreachable Without Btu Tax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...domestic oil production and the diffi-culties...Countries (OPEC). The decontrol...the Earth Day move-ment...indeed-high enough per-haps to...about by OPEC in late 1973 and early...of oil a day less than...18 miles per gallon by...of oil a day (mbd...consumption in 1973. The added...domestic production of energy...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1976-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...

Phillips, J. N.

360

c3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

trillion trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 70.4 759 5,901 83.8 90.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 138.8 934 14,300 103.0 80.3 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 289.0 725 29,189 101.0 105.3 Over 500,000 ....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) XLS Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Estimates in Barrels per Day) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS

362

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................ 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45

363

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the MECS About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based on preliminary estimates released from the 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This decline continues the downward trend in manufacturing energy use since the 1998 MECS report.

364

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Glossary › FAQS › Overview Industrial Commercial Industrial Transportation Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data 2006 Analysis & Reports Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based on preliminary estimates released from the 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This decline continues the downward trend in manufacturing energy use since the 1998 MECS report. figure data The decrease in energy consumption in the manufacturing sector was also

365

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.6 State-Level Energy Consumption, Expenditure, and Price Estimates, 2010 Rank Consumption Consumption per Capita Expenditures 1 Expenditures 1 per Capita Prices 1 Trillion Btu Million Btu Million Dollars 2 Dollars 2 Dollars 2 per Million Btu 1 Texas 11,769.9 Wyoming 948.1 Texas 137,532 Alaska 8,807 Hawaii 30.75 2 California 7,825.7 Alaska 898.5 California 117,003 Louisiana 8,661 District of Columbia 26.19 3 Florida 4,381.9 Louisiana 894.4 New York 61,619 Wyoming 7,904 Connecticut 25.63 4 Louisiana 4,065.4 North Dakota 712.6 Florida 60,172 North Dakota 6,740 Vermont 24.20 5 Illinois 3,936.7 Iowa 489.3 Pennsylvania 48,701 Texas 5,446 New Hampshire

366

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of cooling lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5" from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program with die lubricants and technical support. Experiments conducted with these lubricants demonstrated good protection of the substrate steel. Graphite and boron nitride used as benchmarks are capable of completely eliminating soldering and washout. However, because of cost and environmental considerations these materials are not widely used in industry. The best water-based die lubricants evaluated in this program were capable of providing similar protection from soldering and washout. In addition to improved part quality and higher production rates, improving die casting processes to preserve the life of the inserts will result in energy savings and a reduction in environmental wastes. Improving die life by means of optimized cooling line placement, baffles and bubblers in the die will allow for reduced die temperatures during processing, saving energy associated with production. The utilization of optimized die lubricants will also reduce heat requirements in addition to reducing waste associated with soldering and washout. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 1.1 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on commercial introduction in 2010, a market penetration of 70% by 2020 is 1.26 trillion BTU's/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.025 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes Ali Raissi Florida Solar Energy Center;Advantages of Ammonia Costs about $150 per short ton or less than $6.25 per million BTU of H2 contained and utilization Stores 30% more energy by liquid volume than LH2 Easily reformed using 16% of the energy

368

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Comparisons of coal projections, 2011-2040 (million short tons, except where noted) Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a ICF b IHSGI INFORUM IEA Exxon- Mobil c (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2025 Production 1,096 1,113 22.54 958 1,104 1,107 1,061 -- -- East of the Mississippi 456 447 -- 402 445 -- -- -- -- West of the Mississippi 639 666 -- 556 659 -- -- -- -- Consumption Electric power 929 929 17.66 786 939 864 -- -- 13 Coke plants 21 22 0.58 22 15 19 -- -- -- Coal-to-liquids -- 6 -- -- 36 -- -- -- -- Other industrial/buildings 49 53 1.69 d 29 72 44 1.96 d -- -- Total consumption (quadrillion Btu) 19.66 -- 19.35 -- -- 18.34 -- -- 13 Total consumption (million short tons) 999 1,010 -- 836 1,061 927 1,015 e -- -- Net coal exports (million short tons) 96 124 -- 118 43 181 46 -- --

370

Linear Extrusion 400 Tons/Day Dry Solids Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine experience to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. The PWR gasifier concept uses a compact and highly efficient (>50%) dry solids pump that has excellent availability (>99.5%). PWR is currently developing this dry solids pump under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement. The conceptual design on two dry solids pumps were completed under this agreement and one pump concept was selected for preliminary design. A preliminary design review (PDR) of the selected pump was presented on September 20, 2007 to PWR management and numerous technical specialists. Feedback from the PDR review team has been factored into the design and a Delta-PDR was held on April 9, 2008.

Kenneth Sprouse; David Matthews

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

8 a.m. and by lunchtime that day, it was in place at the NSC. The machine will undergo laser alignment and build test parts around mid-June. It will be ready for production again...

372

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 37%; China, 3%; Canada, 1%; and other, 2%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy Kingdom, 5%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-08 Zirconium ores

373

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources (2002-05): Zirconium ores and concentrates: Australia, 57%; South Africa, 35%; China, 4%; Canada consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process industries. Salient%; Japan, 4%; and other, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-06 Zirconium ores

374

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates: South Africa, 52%; Australia, 43%; and other, 5%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: Japan. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process, 58%; Australia, 24%; Germany, 11%; other, 7%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12

375

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 46%; China, 3%; Russia, 1%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy, 21%; Canada, 8%; United Kingdom, 6%; and other, 5%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12

376

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insignificant. Import Sources (2008­11): Zirconium mineral concentrates: Australia, 52%; South Africa, 42. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12­31­12 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.10.0000 Free

377

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates: Australia, 49%; South Africa, 44%; and other, 7%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: Germany. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process, 17%; United Kingdom, 5%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-11 Zirconium

378

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 32%; China, 4%; Canada, 2%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy, 2%; Austria, 1%; and other, 1%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-07 Zirconium ores

379

The BosTon College COMING UP@BC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with warmth and energy for 35 years, and is a world-renowned ethics scholar. We are fortunate to have him- enne Andry's. Raised in the Commonwealth Housing Development (CHD), a low-income Brighton public and government ethics who has taught at the school for more than three decades, is the inaugural holder

Huang, Jianyu

380

Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is used to stabilise temperatures within conventional Energy from Waste incineration plants as well materials and to produce a combustible product. This involves the removal of inert and compostable materials

Guillas, Serge

382

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in photographic wastewater may be recycled. Silver demand for use in photographic applications, jewelry reliance 7 as a percentage of apparent consumption 61 58 65 64 57 Recycling: In 2012, approximately 1

383

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

biomass resources identified in the report could be used to produce clean, renewable biofuels, biopower, or bioproducts. For example, with continued developments in biorefinery...

384

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and hundreds of support structures. McCormick and Washington Closure President Carol Johnson praised a large group of Hanford workers. "We have an exceptional workforce committed...

385

The BosTon College Chronicle summer 2009 edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halls to enable BC to meet 100 percent of demand for undergraduate hous- ing. In addition provided advice and sup- port during the various phases of the IMP process," said University President of time, energy and resources will result in a stronger Boston College and an enhanced neighborhood." Jack

Huang, Jianyu

386

Transportation of a 451 ton generator stator and a 234 ton generator rotor from Hartsville, TN, to Los Alamos, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1430 MVA steam turbine generator was acquired from a cancelled nuclear power plant in Tennessee to be used as the pulsed power and energy storage unit for the Confinement Physics Research Facility being built at Los Alamos, NM. The transportation from Hartsville, near Nashville, TN, to Los Alamos, NM, of the two largest single pieces of the generator, a 451 t stator and a 234 t rotor presented a special challenge. Details of the move, by barge from Hartsville to Catoosa, near Tulsa, OK, by rail from Catoosa to Lamy, near Santa Fe, NM, and by road from Lamy to Los Alamos are described. The greatest difficulty of the successful move was the crossing of the Rio Grande river on an existing reinforced concrete bridge. The two-lane wide road transporters for the stator and rotor were fitted with outriggers to provide a four-lane wide vehicle, thus spreading the load over the entire bridge width and meeting acceptable load distribution and bridge safety factors. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Boenig, H.J.; Rogers, J.D.; McLelland, G.R.; Pelts, C.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); McLelland Engineering, Dallas, TX (USA); Reliance Crane and Rigging, Inc., Phoenix, AZ (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will operate; collect data; and market the energy savings and capital costs of a recently commissioned chiller geothermal heat pump project to promote the wide-spread adoption of this mature technology.

388

Microsoft Word - Summary_FEIS_Final for GPO.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Summary Cover photos courtesy of (left to right): Southeast Renewable Fuels, LLC DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Public domain CONVERSION FACTORS Metric to English English to Metric Multiply by To get Multiply by To get Area Square kilometers 247.1 Acres Acres 0.0040469 Square kilometers Square kilometers 0.3861 Square miles Square miles 2.59 Square kilometers Square meters 10.764 Square feet Square feet 0.092903 Square meters Concentration Kilograms/sq. meter 0.16667 Tons/acre Tons/acre 0.5999 Kilograms/sq. meter Milligrams/liter 1 a Parts/million Parts/million 1 a Milligrams/liter Micrograms/liter 1 a Parts/billion Parts/billion 1 a Micrograms/liter Micrograms/cu. meter 1 a Parts/trillion Parts/trillion 1 a Micrograms/cu. meter

389

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

390

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

391

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

392

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type" Type" " and End Use, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"Net Demand","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","for Electricity(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",3132,441,152,6141,99,1198,2.4

393

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.4,1.5,1,0.9,1,1

394

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

395

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

396

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu) End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other 1 Total All Buildings .................................... 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 3,559 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 371 Food Sales ................................... 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 208 Food Service ................................ 10 28 24 10 42 13 70 2 2 15 217

397

Table N1.3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," " " "," ","RSE" ,"Total","Row" "Energy Source","First Use","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",1814,3 "Natural Gas",7426,1 "Net Electricity",3035,1 " Purchases",3044,1

398

Table A39. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" 9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation and Net Demand for Electricity by Fuel Type, Census" " Region, and End Use, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding","RSE" ,"for","Residual","and",,,"Coal Coke","Row" "End-Use Categories","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6

399

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

400

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,"Net Demand","Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"for Electri-","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code","End-Use Categories","city(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",2799,414,139,5506,105,1184,3 ,"Boiler Fuel",32,296,40,2098,18,859,3.6 ,"Total Process Uses",2244,109,34,2578,64,314,4.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

402

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

403

Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

INDUST: An Industrial Data Base  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5% of the natural gas consump tion, 98.1% of the fuel oil consumption, 99.2% of the coal/coke consumption, and 99.7% of a class of fuels called "other" fuels. Within these 13 indus try groups, INDUST addresses a wide variety of energy-intense industries... the manufac turing sector, Table 1 shows the latest EIA pro visional estimate of energy consumption (in trillion Btu) for 1985. The EIA reports fuel consumption according to five categories: electricity, fuel oil, natural gas, coal and coke, and other...

Wilfert, G. L.; Moore, N. L.

405

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

406

Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," " " "," ","RSE" ,"Total","Row" "Energy Source","First Use","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",1959,10 "Natural Gas",6468,1.3 "Net Electricity",2840,1.4 " Purchases",2882,1.4

407

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

408

" by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,,,,,"Census Division",,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,,,,,,"Middle","East North","West North","South","East South","West South",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","New England","Atlantic","Central","Central","Atlantic","Central","Central","Mountain","Pacific","Factors"

409

Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.5,1.5,1,0.9,0.9,0.9 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1193,119,207,265,285,195,122,6

410

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

411

" Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A49. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A49. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs" ,,,,,"(1992 through 1994)" ,," " ,,,,,,"Federal, State, or" ,,"No Energy",,"Electric Utility",,"Local Government","Third Party","RSE" "SIC",,"Management","Any Type of","Sponsored","Self-Sponsored","Sponsored","Sponsored","Row"

412

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

413

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

414

Released: October 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",1433 "Natural Gas",5911 "Net Electricity",2851 " Purchases",2894 " Transfers In",20 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",4 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",67

415

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

416

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

417

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values SIC RSE Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu XLS XLS

418

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

419

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

420

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Classes of compounds responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in tars and oils formed during low BTU gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI), in cooperation with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has completed toxicity screening of vapors, liquids and solids formed during operation of an experimental pressurized, stirred-bed, coal gasifier at METC. Vapors collected from the cooled process stream on Tenax resins had no mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella assay. Dichloromethane extracts of liquids and solids collected from the effluent or process streams were fractionated by gel chromatography into fractions containing mostly aliphatic compounds; neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); polar (PAH) and heterocyclic compounds; and salts. The polar fraction was partitioned into acids, bases, water soluble compounds and phenols. Bacterial mutagenic activity was highest in the basic fraction with additional activity in the neutral PAHs. Highest cytotoxicity toward both the bacteria and canine alveolar macrophages was in the phenolic fraction. Treatment of the gasifier tars by nitrosation or by acetylation to remove primary aromatic amines (PAA) reduced the bacterial mutagenicity by 50-60%, indicating that some, but not all, of the mutagenicity was due to PAA.

Henderson, R.F.; Bechtold, W.F.; Benson, J.M.; Newton, G.J.; Hanson, R.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Dutcher, J.S.; Royer, R.E.; Hobbs, C.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Coal in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): framework geology and resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North Slope of Alaska contains huge resources of coal, much of which lies within NPRA. The main coal-bearing units, the Corwin and Chandler Formations of the Nanushuk Group (Lower and Upper Cretaceous), underlie about 20,000 mi/sup 2/ (51,800 km/sup 2/) of NPRA. They contain low-sulfur, low-ash, and probable coking-quality coal in gently dipping beds as thick as 20 ft (6.1 m) within stratigraphic intervals as thick as 4500 ft (1370 m). Lesser coal potential occurs in other Upper Cretaceous units and in Lower Mississippian and Tertiary strata. The river-dominated Corwin and Umiat deltas controlled the distribution of Nanushuk Group coal-forming environments. Most organic deposits formed on delta plains; fewer formed in alluvial plain or delta-front environments. Most NPRA coal beds are expected to be lenticular and irregular, as they probably accumulated in interdistributary basins, infilled bays, or inland flood basins, whereas some blanket beds may have formed on broad, slowly sinking, delta lobes. The major controls of coal rank and degree of deformation were depth of burial and subsequent tectonism. Nanushuk Group coal resources in NPRA are estimated to be as much as 2.75 trillion short tons. This value is the sum of 1.42 trillion short tons of near-surface (< 500 ft or 150 m of overburden) bituminous coal, 1.25 trillion short tons of near-surface subbituminous coal, and 0.08 trillion shorts tons of more deeply buried subbituminous coal. These estimates indicate that the North Slope may contain as much as one-third of the United States coal potential.

Sable, E.G.; Stricker, G.D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Missouri Ordnance Works Becomes Bureau ot Mines Demonstration Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines estimates that the United States has about 3 trillion tons of coal reservesenough to supply the nation with both solid and liquid fuels for at least 1,000 years. ... The Bureau of Mines will take over the Missouri Ordnance Works, near Louisiana, Mo., a $17,500,000 plant that made synthetic ammonia during the war, and convert it into a demonstration plant for the production of gasoline and oil from coal and lignite. ...

1946-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Natural Gas Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for . Natural Gas Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ....................... 1,928 1,316 332 142 137 44.3 30.3 7.6 3.3 3.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................ 250 155 35 41 18 81.1 50.4 11.5 13.4 5.9 5,001 to 10,000 ...................... 209 143 32 30 Q 56.5 38.8 8.7 8.2 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .................... 309 248 32 22 8 43.9 35.1 4.6 3.1 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 .................... 258 188 41 12 Q 42.7 31.1 6.8 2.0 Q

426

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. District Heat Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 1A. District Heat Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ......................... 636 580 46 1 Q 114.0 103.9 8.3 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

427

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Natural Gas Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for A. Natural Gas Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ......................... 2,100 1,420 348 164 168 43.3 29.3 7.2 3.4 3.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 257 161 36 42 18 81.0 50.6 11.3 13.3 5.8 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 224 152 33 32 7 56.5 38.3 8.4 8.1 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 353 273 35 26 19 45.2 34.9 4.5 3.3 2.4 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 278 202 43 14 Q 42.2 30.6 6.5 2.1 3.0

428

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ......................... 228 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 56.9 52.2 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 49.4 44.7 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 28 25 1 (*) Q 26.7 23.8 1.4 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 17 16 Q (*) 1 19.1 17.8 Q (*) 0.6 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 29 26 1 Q 1 15.6 14.1 0.7 Q 0.5

429

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

430

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for . Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................ 222 194 17 Q 10 14.7 12.8 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 57.4 52.7 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 50.6 45.8 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 27 25 1 (*) Q 28.2 25.4 1.5 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 16 15 Q (*) 1 19.7 18.8 Q (*) 0.7 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 26 23 1 Q 1 15.0 13.3 0.8 Q 0.6

431

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Energy Consumption Energy Consumption per Capita Energy Expenditures 1 Energy Expenditures 1 per Capita Gross Output 3 Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of Gross Output 3 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of GDP Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2 per Real Dollar of GDP Quadrillion Btu Million Btu Million Nominal Dollars 4 Nominal Dollars 4 Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Real (2005) Dollars 5 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar 5 Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide per Million Real (2005) Dollars 5 1949 31.982 214 NA NA NA NA 267.2 NA R 1,843.1 R 17.35 R 1,197 1950 34.616 227 NA NA NA NA

432

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Consumption 125 A P P E N D I X A ABICB Aviation gasoline blending components Billion Btu ABICBZZ = ABTCBZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICBUS = ABTCBUS ABICP Aviation gasoline blending components Thousand barrels ABICPZZ = ABTCPZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICPUS = ABTCPUS ABTCB Aviation gasoline blending components total Billion Btu ABTCBZZ = ABTCPZZ * 5.048 consumed. ABTCBUS = SABTCBZZ ABTCP Aviation gasoline blending components total Thousand barrels ABTCPZZ = (COCAPZZ / COCAPUS) * ABTCPUS consumed. ABTCPUS is independent. AICAP Aluminum ingot production capacity. Short tons AICAPZZ is independent. AICAPUS = SAICAPZZ ARICB Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Billion Btu ARICBZZ = ARICPZZ * 6.636 industrial sector. ARICBUS = SARICBZZ ARICP Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Thousand barrels ARICPZZ = ASICPZZ + RDICPZZ industrial

433

ConsumTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Consumption 125 A P P E N D I X A ABICB Aviation gasoline blending components Billion Btu ABICBZZ = ABTCBZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICBUS = ABTCBUS ABICP Aviation gasoline blending components Thousand barrels ABICPZZ = ABTCPZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICPUS = ABTCPUS ABTCB Aviation gasoline blending components total Billion Btu ABTCBZZ = ABTCPZZ * 5.048 consumed. ABTCBUS = SABTCBZZ ABTCP Aviation gasoline blending components total Thousand barrels ABTCPZZ = (COCAPZZ / COCAPUS) * ABTCPUS consumed. ABTCPUS is independent. AICAP Aluminum ingot production capacity. Short tons AICAPZZ is independent. AICAPUS = SAICAPZZ ARICB Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Billion Btu ARICBZZ = ARICPZZ * 6.636 industrial sector. ARICBUS = SARICBZZ ARICP Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Thousand barrels ARICPZZ = ASICPZZ + RDICPZZ industrial sector.

434

Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

Sparrow, F.T.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2

437

P3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P3. Energy Production and Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 P3. Energy Production and Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 Alabama 1,401 1,931 530 Alaska 1,642 638 -1,004 Arizona 618 1,431 814 Arkansas 1,390 1,117 -273 California 2,625 7,858 5,234 Colorado 2,747 1,481 -1,266 Connecticut 197 742 545 Delaware 4 272 268 District of Columbia 0 180 180 Florida 524 4,217 3,693 Georgia 544 3,002 2,458 Hawaii 19 286 267 Idaho 180 526 345 Illinois 2,200 3,978 1,777 Indiana 1,063 2,869 1,806 Iowa 701 1,513 812 Kansas 780 1,162 382 Kentucky 2,841 1,911 -929 Louisiana 3,976 4,055 79 Maine 154 413 258 Maryland 273 1,426 1,153 Massachusetts 101 1,395 1,294 Michigan 673 2,803 2,130 Minnesota 429 1,867 1,438 Mississippi 441 1,163 723 Missouri 200 1,878 1,678 Montana 1,105 398 -707 Nebraska 397 871 475 Nevada 54 633 579 New Hampshire 130 292 162 New Jersey 387 2,438 2,052 New Mexico 2,261 688 -1,573 New York 873 3,615 2,742 North Carolina

438

P5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P5. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ranked by State, 2011 P5. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank State State State State United States 22,057.2 United States d 26,489.9 United States e 11,965.0 United States 8,268.7 1 Wyoming 7,591.7 Texas 8,047.4 Texas 3,082.8 Illinois 1,002.7 2 West Virginia 3,321.1 Louisiana 3,240.2 Alaska 1,188.0 Pennsylvania 796.8 3 Kentucky 2,623.8 Wyoming 2,384.4 California 1,123.4 South Carolina 553.6 4 Pennsylvania 1,511.5 Oklahoma 2,163.4 North Dakota 887.3 New York 446.8 5 Illinois 864.2 Colorado 1,831.2 Oklahoma 444.8 North Carolina 424.1 6 Indiana 841.0 New Mexico 1,405.2 New Mexico 413.4 Texas 414.9 7 Montana 746.7 Pennsylvania 1,375.6 Louisiana 400.1 Alabama 411.8 8 Ohio 679.2 Arkansas 1,090.9 Wyoming 317.3 California 383.6 9 Texas 605.3 Utah 498.0 Kansas 240.7 New Jersey 351.7 10 Colorado 586.8 West Virginia 442.4 Colorado 226.9

439

sup2kd.PDF  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trillion Btu) (1 of 2) Trillion Btu) (1 of 2) 1998- 1998 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2020 Energy Use by Mode Highway Light-Duty Vehicles 14641 15288 15666 16010 16279 16641 16966 17303 17632 17928 18234 18537 18795 19034 19299 19590 19867 20103 20324 20556 20781 21027 1.7% Automobiles 7948 7784 7758 7707 7615 7573 7516 7473 7435 7389 7355 7336 7296 7265 7259 7262 7276 7290 7302 7326 7351 7394 -0.3% Light Trucks 6670 7482 7889 8282 8641 9045 9429 9812 10176 10519 10858 11181 11478 11748 12019 12308 12570 12791 13000 13209 13409 13611 3.3% Motorcycles 22.8 22.4 22.3 22.1 21.9 21.8 21.6 21.5 21.4 21.2 21.1 21.1 21.0 20.9 20.8 20.9 20.9 20.9 21.0 21.0 21.1 21.2 -0.3% Commercial Light Trucks 1/ 612.8 623.5 631.4 642.3 652.3 662.8 673.1 681.6 690.2 698.5 705.6 714.0 720.0 727.5 736.7 747.2 757.4 762.9 769.7 777.1

440

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency 1 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency Total and U.S. Department of Defense, Fiscal Years U.S. Department of Defense and Non-Defense Agencies, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 1975-2011 Non-Defense Agencies, Fiscal Year 2011 24 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 General Services Administration. 2 Health and Human Services. 3 National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 4 See Table 1.11 for list of agencies. Note: The U.S. Government's fiscal year was October 1 through September 30, except in 1975 and 1976 when it was July 1 through June 30. Source: Table 1.11. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 Trillion Btu Non-Defense Non-Defense Defense 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 Trillion Btu Defense

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total 3 17 16 13 Net Electricity 4 2 2 2 Natural Gas 5 5 4 Coal 7 6 4 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil or coal.

442

An Analysis of Efficiency Improvements in Residential Sized Heat Pumps, Final Report, May 1986  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS ORNL OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY PLF PART LOAD FACTOR SAI SCIENCE APPLICATION INCORPORATED SEER SEASONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY RATIO SF SQUARE FEET SHF SENSIBLE HEATING FACTOR TDB DRY BULB TEMPERATURE TON 12000 BTU/HR TXV THERMAL... Systems 6-13 5 Ton Package Systems 6-22 References 6-22 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 7-1 iii APPENDIX * PAGE A ORNL MODEL OUTPUT A-1 B SEASONAL PERFORMANCE MODEL DESCRIPTION B-1 C OPTIMIZATION PROCEDURE C-1 iv CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION The National Energy...

O'Neal, D. L.; Murphy, W. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS"

444

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type and End Use," Type and End Use," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors"

445

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................ 5,820 2,203 431 384 448 1,143 167 354 64 148 478 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 672 207 45 18 48 93 48 137 8 12 55 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 516 198 36 17 40 83 35 56 6 9 39 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 776 324 47 44 43 151 25 53 9 19 62 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 673 262 57 50 55 121 13 34 7 16 58 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 759 293 59 65 55 158 11 29 6 18 64

446

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 A. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ......................... 6,523 2,365 516 436 501 1,340 190 381 69 156 569 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 685 213 46 18 49 96 49 138 8 12 56 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 563 212 39 18 43 95 37 57 6 10 46 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 899 357 57 52 51 184 29 57 10 20 83 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 742 281 63 55 60 140 16 37 7 17 66 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 913 325 79 78 67 202 17 35 7 20 83

447

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ......................... 3,559 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 392 19 44 18 11 96 7 138 8 12 39 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 293 18 38 18 8 95 4 57 6 10 39 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 485 26 55 52 14 184 3 57 10 20 63 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 397 18 62 55 12 140 2 37 7 17 48 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 523 28 77 78 15 202 3 35 7 20 59

448

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

449

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

450

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

451

Preliminary resource assessment of coalbed methane in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results of the DOE Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project reveal that many of the coal regions in the United States have significant volumes of coalbed methane. These results show that 45 cooperative wells drilled to date have helped to update the estimates of methane in the various coal regions. The most promising coal region is in the Green River Basin where preliminary estimates show that the methane potential may be over 23 trillion cubic feet. Another area of considerable interest is in the Arkoma Basin where the methane content of coal samples ranged from 200 to 400 cubic feet per ton (cf/ton) of coal. The methane estimte in this basin is between 1.6 to 3.6 trillion cubic feet. The Piceance Creek coal region is an area presently generating considerable interest and industry activity. The methane content of the coal samples extracted from this basin averaged over 100 cf/ton. The Northern Appalachian region also shows considerable promise.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

In-Situ, Real-Time Measurement of Melt Constituents in the Aluminum, Glass, and Steel Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Research Company (ERCo), with support from DOEs Industrial Technologies Program, Sensors and Automation has developed a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) probe to measure, in real time and in-situ, the composition of an aluminum melt in a furnace at an industrial plant. The compositional data is provided to the operator continuously allowing the operator to adjust the melt composition, saving energy, increasing production, and maintaining tighter compositional tolerances than has been previously possible. The overall objectives of this project were to: -- design, develop, fabricate, test and project future costs of the LIBS probe on bench-size experiments; - test the unit in a pilot-scaled aluminum furnace under varying operating conditions of temperature and melt constituents; -- determine the instruments needed for use in industrial environment; -- compare LIBS Probe data to readings traditionally taken on the furnace; -- get full-scale data to resolve if, and how, the LIBS Probe design should be modified for operator acceptance. Extensive laboratory tests have proven the concept feasibility. Elemental concentrations below 0.1% wt. have been accurately measured. Further, the LIBS system has now been installed and is operating at a Commonwealth Aluminum plant in Ohio. The technology is crosscutting as it can be used in a wide variety of applications. In the Sensors and Automation Program the application was for the secondary aluminum industry. However, this project spawned a number of other applications, which are also reported here for completeness. The project was effective in that two commercial systems are now operating; one at Commonwealth Aluminum and another at a PPG fiberglass plant. Other commercial installations are being negotiated as of this writing. This project led to the following conclusions: 1. The LIBS System has been developed for industrial applications. This is the first time this has been accomplished. In addition, two commercial installations have been completed; one at Commonwealth and another at PPG. 2. The system is easy to operate and requires no operator training. Calibration is not required. It is certified as eye safe. 3. The system is crosscutting and ERCo is evaluating seven applications, as reported in this report, and other applications to be reported later. 4. A business plan is being completed for each of the near term markets. ERCo is committed to achieving continued commercial success with the LIBS System. 5. A world wide patent has been issued. 6. The energy savings is substantial. The annual energy savings, by 2010, for each industry is estimated as follows: o Secondary Aluminum 1.44 trillion Btus o Glass 17 to 45 trillion Btus o Steel Up to 26 trillion Btus

Robert De Saro

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 psi. ~Butanol is an alcohol that can be but does not have to be blended with fossil fuels. ~Butanol existing pipelines and filling stations. ~Hydrogen generated during the butanol fermentation process is expected to increase dramatically if green butanol can be produced economically from low cost biomass

Toohey, Darin W.

455

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 a Exact conversion. b Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. c The Btu used in this table is the International Table Btu adopted by the Fifth International Conference on Properties of Steam, London, 1956. d To convert degrees Fahrenheit (ºF) to degrees Celsius (ºC) exactly, subtract 32, then multiply by 5/9. Notes: * Spaces have been inserted after every third digit to the right of the decimal for ease of reading. * Most metric units belong to the International System of Units (SI), and the liter, hectare, and metric ton are accepted for use with the SI units. For more information about the SI units, see http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/index.html.

456

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook LDV Light-duty vehicle AEO2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 LED Light emitting diode AEO20014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 LNG Liquefied natural gas ATRA American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 LPG Liquefied petroleum gases bbl Barrels LRG Liquefied refinery gases Btu British thermal units MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy MECS Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule MMbbl/d Million barrels per day CO2 Carbon dioxide MMBtu Million Btu CTL Coal-to-liquids MMst Million short tons DOE U.S. Department of Energy NEMS National Energy Modeling System E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol NGL Natural gas liquids

457

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Trillion Btu) Hydro- electric Power a Geo- thermal b Solar/PV c Wind d Biomass Total Wood e Waste f Total 1950 Total .................... 1,346 NA NA NA 5 NA 5 1,351 1955 Total .................... 1,322 NA NA NA 3 NA 3 1,325 1960 Total .................... 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 NA 2 1,571 1965 Total .................... 2,026 2 NA NA 3 NA 3 2,031 1970 Total .................... 2,600 6 NA NA 1 2 4 2,609 1975 Total .................... 3,122 34 NA NA (s) 2 2 3,158 1980 Total .................... 2,867 53 NA NA 3 2 4 2,925 1985 Total .................... 2,937 97 (s) (s)

459

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

460

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

462

Compare All CBECS Activities: District Heat Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Heat Use District Heat Use Compare Activities by ... District Heat Use Total District Heat Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 433 trillion Btu of district heat (district steam or district hot water) in 1999. There were only five building types with statistically significant district heat consumption; education buildings used the most total district heat. Figure showing total district heat consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. District Heat Consumption per Building by Building Type Health care buildings used the most district heat per building. Figure showing district heat consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

463

Awarded ESPC Projects | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Funding » Energy Savings Performance Contracts » Awarded Project Funding » Energy Savings Performance Contracts » Awarded ESPC Projects Awarded ESPC Projects October 7, 2013 - 1:47pm Addthis Photovoltaic panels were installed on the Harold Washington Social Security Center in Chicago as part of an ESPC. Photovoltaic panels were installed on the Harold Washington Social Security Center in Chicago as part of an ESPC. Since the inception of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) in 1998, 300 DOE ESPC projects have been awarded. More than $3.08 billion has been invested in Federal energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. These improvements have resulted in more than 371 trillion Btu life cycle energy savings and more than $7.6 billion of cumulative energy cost savings for the Federal

464

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 451 15,157 34 222 1,602 1,776 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 209 600 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 99 716 7 36 261 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 61 966 16 27 196 232 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 22 825 38 16 117 127 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 23 1,740 76 26 188 203

465

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 10.2b Renewable Energy Consumption: Industrial and Transportation Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Industrial Sector 1 Transportation Sector Hydro- electric Power 2 Geo- thermal 3 Solar/PV 4 Wind 5 Biomass Total Biomass Wood 6 Waste 7 Fuel Ethanol 8 Losses and Co-products 9 Total Fuel Ethanol 10 Biodiesel Total 1949 76 NA NA NA 468 NA NA NA 468 544 NA NA NA 1950 69 NA NA NA 532 NA NA NA 532 602 NA NA NA 1955 38 NA NA NA 631 NA NA NA 631 669 NA NA NA 1960 39 NA NA NA 680 NA NA NA 680 719 NA NA NA 1965 33 NA NA NA 855 NA NA NA 855

466

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

467

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

468

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

469

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 7. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 67 5,443 81 634 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

470

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

471

Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards November 6, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The Energy Department today recognized 25 winners across the federal government as recipients of the 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. These annual awards highlight federal agencies' commitments to lead the nation in implementing efficiency measures to improve energy, water, and vehicle fleet management that save taxpayer money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through their innovative efforts, winners, including staff serving the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy; the Departments of Agriculture, Energy, Homeland Security, Interior, and Veterans Affairs; and the General Services Administration, saved a total of 1.9 trillion Btu of energy,

472

Department of Energy Recognizes Winners of 2011 Federal Energy and Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Winners of 2011 Federal Energy and Winners of 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Department of Energy Recognizes Winners of 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards October 13, 2011 - 1:18pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the winners of the 30th annual Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. These awards recognize the commitment by Federal agencies to invest in efficiency measures that save money for taxpayers, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and create a stronger economy for the American people. Over the past 30 years, winners have saved almost $16 billion and an estimated 770 trillion Btu of energy. This is enough energy to provide all the energy needs of Federal government facilities for two years. In 2011, 29 individuals, teams, and organizations across the Federal

473

Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,328 Natural Gas 5,725 Net Electricity 2,437 Purchases 2,510 Transfers In 33 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 7 Sales and Transfers Offsite 113 Coke and Breeze 374 Residual Fuel Oil 170 Distillate Fuel Oil 135 Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids 2,057 Other 7,381 Asphalt and Road Oil (a) 946 Lubricants (a) 386

474

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A24. A24. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of Energy- Management Program, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 285 SIC Management Any Type of Sponsored Self-Sponsored Sponsored Sponsored Code Industry Group and Industry Program Sponsorship Involvement Involvement Involvement Involvement a No Energy Electric Utility Government Third Party Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs (1992 through 1994) RSE Row Factors Federal, State, or Local RSE Column Factors: 0.7 1.1 1.0 0.7 1.9 0.9 20-39 ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs . .

475

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 3.8a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline b Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1950 Total ........................ 829 347 146 1,322 262 47 39 100 NA 424 872 1955 Total ........................ 1,194 371 202 1,767 377 51 54 133 NA 480 1,095 1960 Total ........................ 1,568 354 305 2,227 494 48

476

table1.5_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; 5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE Total Row Energy Source First Use Factors Total United States RSE Column Factor: 1.0 Coal 1,959 10.0 Natural Gas 6,468 1.3 Net Electricity 2,840 1.4 Purchases 2,882 1.4 Transfers In 35 2.6 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 8 1.5 Sales and Transfers Offsite 86 0.7 Coke and Breeze 385 1.7 Residual Fuel Oil 255 2.3 Distillate Fuel Oil 151 5.6 Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids 3,070 0.6

477

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of

478

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1 8 3 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 1 * 313 Textile Mills 2 1 0 314 Textile Product Mills 1 * 0 315 Apparel * 0 0 316 Leather and Allied Products * * 0 321 Wood Products 6 4 0 322 Paper 2 1 1 323 Printing and Related Support * * * 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,748 3,689 3,572 325 Chemicals 2,772 3,750 2,812 326 Plastics and Rubber Products * Q Q 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 10 7 12 331 Primary Metals 758 646 529 332 Fabricated Metal Products 3 1 1 333 Machinery Q 2 * 334 Computer and Electronic Products * 1 1 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 27 69 21 336 Transportation Equipment

479

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity 3 NA 185 175 Natural Gas NA 388 326 Coal NA 36 14 Residual Fuel NA 1 19 Coke and Breeze NA 313 186 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2.'Total' includes all energy sources listed below and all other energy that was purchased or transferred in. 3.'Electricity' consists of quantities of electricity that were purchased or transferred in, and is equivalent

480

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 3.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy, 1998 and 2002 > Table 3 Energy Efficiency > Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy, 1998 and 2002 > Table 3 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity3 NA 185 175 Natural Gas NA 388 326 Coal NA 36 14 Residual Fuel NA 1 19 Coke and Breeze NA 313 186 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons trillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" 2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","Over","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2,2.1,1,0.7,0.7,0.9 "One or More General Technologies Present",14601,387,781,2054,2728,3189,5462,3.1 " Computer Control of Building Environment (b)",5079,64,116,510,802,1227,2361,5

482

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

483

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009 August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 0 * 0 0 4 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food Q 0 * 0 0 0 Q 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * 0 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 1 0 1 0 0 * * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

484

Home Energy Score: Frequently Asked Questions for Partners | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 13, 2011 October 13, 2011 Department of Energy Recognizes Winners of 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the winners of the 30th annual Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. These awards recognize the commitment by Federal agencies to invest in efficiency measures that save money for taxpayers, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and create a stronger economy for the American people. Over the past 30 years, winners have saved almost $16 billion and an estimated 770 trillion Btu of energy. This is enough energy to provide all the energy needs of Federal government facilities for two years. October 4, 2011 Department of Energy Announces First Entry for Market- Driven High-Efficiency Commercial Air Conditioners Challenge

485

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2 15 - - - 18 - - - 63 1995 12 4 44 - 60 - 1 1 21 - - - 23 (s) - - 83 1996 14 4 44 (s) 62 - 1 1 31 - - - 33 (s) - - 95 1997 14 5 40 (s) 59 - 1 1 34 - - - 35 (s) - - 94 1998 11 5 42 (s) 57 - 1 1 32 - - - 34 - - - 91 1999 12 6 40 (s) 57 - 1 (s) 33 - - - 35 (s) - - 92 2000

486

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2a. First Use for All Purposes (Primary a  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,579 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 157 164 313 Textile Mills 459 377 304 314 Textile Product Mills 86 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 652 520 625 322 Paper 3,224 2,805 2,825 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,571 7,051 7,125 325 Chemicals 7,211 7,499 6,135 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 692 710 684 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,245 1,338 1,394

487

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

488

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

489

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 6 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms 2006 Data Tables Revision notice (November 2009): Tables 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.5, 4.1 and 4.2 have been slightly revised due to further editing. The revisions in XLS are indicated with a value of "R" in an adjacent column. In the PDF versions, the revised values are superscripted with an "R". No further revisions are anticipated for these tables. all tables + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values RSE Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF XLS

490

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

491

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 0 * 0 * 0 0 0 3121 Beverages * 0 * 0 0 0 0 0 3122 Tobacco * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0

492

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

493

Energy conservation in distillation: a technology applications manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distillation is the most widely practiced technique for separating mixtures of chemical species, but it is an energy intensive process. A 10% reduction in distillation energy consumption would effect a significant savings. On a national basis this would be an annual savings of 200 trillion Btu, or the equivalent of 36.5 million barrels of oil per year. Technology to achieve these savings in distillation energy is available and measures are presented to assist process engineers in technical and economic analysis of the energy conservation measures most suitable for particular distillation applications. The manual catalogs all of the energy conservation options applicable to distillation and the options by the investment required; describes in detail the options having a significant potential to reduce distillation energy requirements economically; provides guidelines that will allow the plant engineer to quickly screen each option for his application; and provides short-cut calculation procedures for use in a preliminary economic analysis of promising options.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacturing sector, about 26% is electricity, 58% is natural gas, 10% is coal (excluding coal coke and breeze) and the remainder is from liquid fuels. 1 AdaptedfromTableE6.4. EndUsesofFuelConsumption,1998(URL: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov/pub/consumption/industry/d98...FuelConsumptionbyEnd-UseforallMECSIndustries,1998,trillionBTU Electricity Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal (excluding Coal Cokeand Breeze) Total BoilerFuel 29 308 2,538 770 3,645 ProcessHeating 363 185 3,187 331 4,066 ProcessCoolingand Refrigeration 209 2 22 233 MachineDrive 1,881 25 99 7 2...

Sinha, P.; Wise, M.; Smith, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) consumed 36 percent of energy for space heating and 21 percent for lighting (Figure 2) The CBECS is a national-level sample survey conducted quadrennially of buildings greater than 1,000 square feet in size that devote more than 50

496

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

497

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2a Renewable Energy Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV c Biomass Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV f Wind g Biomass Total Wood d Wood d Waste h Fuel Ethanol i Total 1950 Total .................... NA NA 1,006 1,006 NA NA NA NA 19 NA NA 19 19 1955 Total .................... NA NA 775 775 NA NA NA NA 15 NA NA 15 15 1960 Total .................... NA NA 627 627 NA NA NA NA 12 NA NA 12 12 1965 Total .................... NA NA 468 468 NA NA NA NA 9 NA NA 9 9 1970 Total

498

CX-001651: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

651: Categorical Exclusion Determination 651: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001651: Categorical Exclusion Determination Commercial and Industrial Building Energy Efficiency CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/09/2010 Location(s): Saint Paul, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The City of Saint Paul would sub grant Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funds to the Saint Paul Port Authority's (the industrial economic redevelopment arm of the City of Saint Paul) Trillion British Thermal Unit (BTU) Energy Efficiency Improvement Program. The Port Authority would use the funds to design, finance, and install energy efficient improvements in commercial and industrial facilities. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001651.pdf More Documents & Publications

499

Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Energy and Water Management Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards November 6, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The Energy Department today recognized 25 winners across the federal government as recipients of the 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. These annual awards highlight federal agencies' commitments to lead the nation in implementing efficiency measures to improve energy, water, and vehicle fleet management that save taxpayer money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through their innovative efforts, winners, including staff serving the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy; the Departments of Agriculture, Energy, Homeland Security, Interior, and Veterans Affairs; and the General Services Administration, saved a total of 1.9 trillion Btu of energy,

500

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 3.8b Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption: Industrial Sector (Trillion Btu) Industrial Sector a Asphalt and Road Oil Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Lubricants Motor Gasoline b Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other c Total 1950 Total ........................ 435 698 274 156 94 251 90 1,416 546 3,960 1955 Total ........................ 615 991 241 323 103 332 147 1,573 798 5,123 1960 Total ........................ 734 1,016 161 507 107 381 328 1,584 947 5,766 1965 Total ........................ 890 1,150 165 712 137 342 444 1,582 1,390 6,813 1970 Total ........................ 1,082 1,226 185 953 155