Sample records for tons heavy metal

  1. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  2. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  3. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern...

  4. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  5. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

  6. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological...

  7. atmospheric heavy metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  8. aquatic heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  9. assess heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  10. airborne heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  11. avoid heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  12. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    the majority of the land and maintained a social hierarchy that created a vast wealth disparity between the peasants and the church and upper classes. The Church?s feudal ownership of the land meant that it had power over the peasants, limiting social... manifest itself in metal culture. It may further 16 be suggested that the socio-economic climate from which metal culture developed has analogous threads to 16th century French feudal society. While feudalism and capitalism differ, both French...

  13. A Fuzzy Model of Heavy Metal Loadings in Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    A Fuzzy Model of Heavy Metal Loadings in Marine Environment L.I. Kuncheva1 , J. Wrench2 , L.C. Jain model of the loadings of heavy metals for two coastal areas of the Irish Sea (Liverpool Bay, Morecambe Bay, heavy metal concentrations, index of spa- tial distribution, spatial data analysis. 1

  14. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Malcolm A. (Winterville, GA); Pellerin, Patrice J. M. (Montpellier, FR); Warrenfeltz, Dennis (Athens, GA); Vidal, Stephane (Combaillaux, FR); Darvill, Alan G. (Athens, GA); Albersheim, Peter (Athens, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  15. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  16. TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    CHAPTER 28 b TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY CHINESE the roots take up colossal amounts of a toxic metal from soils and rapidly sequester into their above-ground hyperaccumulation in the light of accumulated knowledge on heavy metal tolerance in higher plants. 1.INTRODUCTION

  17. Contamination of heavy metals in mangroves: A comparison between Cao Martn Pea and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Contamination of heavy metals in mangroves: A comparison between Caño that contamination of heavy metals in mangroves decrease their chlorophyll levels and how heavy metals contamination has affected them. The images utilized

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 18.5% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free 11.0% ad val. Waste and scrap18 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters continued

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 760222 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11 smelters east

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, 7 companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion, prices in the aluminum scrap and secondary aluminum alloy markets fluctuated through September but closed20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  3. Heavy metals emission from controlled combustion of PVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ayyoubi, Mohammed A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Malave (Mem er) G. mble Bennett (Head of Depar tment) August 1989 ABSTRACT Heavy Metals Emission from Combustion of PVC. (August 1989) Mohammed A. El-Ayyoubi, B. S. , Texas ASM University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. John P. Wagner... The primary purpose of this research paper is the identification of heavy metals and other potentially harmful smoke components emitted to the atmosphere as a result of Poly(vinyl chloride) combustion in municipal incinerators . In addition, analysis...

  4. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  5. Heavy metal geochemistry of the Pontchartrain-Maurepas estuarine complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, G.C. (Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (USA)); Isphording, W.C. (Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pontchartrain-Maurepas estuarine complex has become the focus of an intense debate concerning hydraulic shell dredging and its effects. Besides disrupting the benthic community, it has been alleged by the opponents of shell dredging that the mining process releases harmful concentrations of heavy metals into the water column. Bottom sediment heavy metal data combined with ion-site partitioning analyses provide a basis for estimating heavy metal release during dredging. The concentrations of Cu, Cr, Ni, Fe, Zn, V, Co, Pb, and Ba were determined for bottom sediment samples collected during 1987. The areal distribution of metals in the complex is controlled largely by sediment texture. As the clay content of the sediment increases, so does metal content. This observation seems to hold for most estuaries along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The concentrations of all metals except Pb were found to be positively correlated with Fe-content. Comparison of average metal contents with data from other estuaries along the Gulf Coast indicates that the complex has not been heavily impacted by anthropogenic input of metals. Because dredging disrupts redox conditions in the sediment, the potential release of metals into the water column is a real concern. However, partitioning analyses indicate that the majority of metal present in the bottom sediments is in relatively stable phases. The metal content of the exchangeable and organic phases, which are most easily affected by redox changes, was found to be minor. The rapid process of hydraulic shell mining, the positive Eh of the lake water, and the fine-grained suspended sediments result in a minor impact of dredging on water quality. Released metals are rapidly scavenged by adsorption and coprecipitation reactions.

  6. Heavy metal characterization of municipal solid waste compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worsham, Michael Craig

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chair of Committee) Emile A. Schweikert (Member) James T. P Y o (Head of Depar ment) May 1992 ABSTRA. CT Heavy Metal Characterization Of Municipal Solid Waste Compost (May 1992) Michael Craig Worsham, B. S. , S. U. N. Y. at Stony Brook Co-Chairs of Advisory... Committee: Dr. Bill Batchelor Dr. Kirk W. Brown Waste incineration and composting create solid residues which are later applied to or buried under soils. Although incinerator ash has been studied extensively for heavy metal content, much less is known...

  7. Heavy metal concentration in bay sediments of Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukue, Masaharu; Kato, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Takaaki [Tokai Univ., Shimizu (Japan); Yamasaki, Shoichi [Aoki Marine Ltd., Fukushima, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Because industry discharge wastes into the sea, marine sediments can be contaminated with various kinds of hazardous and toxic substances. This study discusses how the degree of pollution of heavy metals affects the marine sediments from Osaka Bay and Tokyo Bay. In this study, the concentrations of various metals, such as manganese, iron, aluminum, titanium, vanadium, copper, phosphorus, etc., were measured from sediment samples obtained from different sites in the bays. However, the results had to be corrected because background concentrations for each metal differ with site location and grain size characteristics. The large difference between background and individual concentrations at various soil depths indicates that the surface layers of the seabed are significantly polluted with some species of heavy metal and other elements.

  8. Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for amendment of agricultural soils/ Métaux lourds dans le compost de déchets municipaux pour application agricole Valérie Duchesneau, #4634809 EVS4904 métaux lourds des compostes de déchets municipaux? http://www.ecometiers.com/fiche/images/43.jpg La

  9. THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes occurring during waste combustion. Second, results from the bed model were taken as boundary conditions

  10. Heavy Metal Islands | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat Transfer inoperation inElementHeavy

  11. IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

  12. Situ formation of apatite for sequestering radionuclides and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for in situ formation in soil of a permeable reactive barrier or zone comprising a phosphate precipitate, such as apatite or hydroxyapatite, which is capable of selectively trapping and removing radionuclides and heavy metal contaminants from the soil, while allowing water or other compounds to pass through. A preparation of a phosphate reagent and a chelated calcium reagent is mixed aboveground and injected into the soil. Subsequently, the chelated calcium reagent biodegrades and slowly releases free calcium. The free calcium reacts with the phosphate reagent to form a phosphate precipitate. Under the proper chemical conditions, apatite or hydroxyapatite can form. Radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants, including lead, strontium, lanthanides, and uranium are then selectively sequestered by sorbing them onto the phosphate precipitate. A reducing agent can be added for reduction and selective sequestration of technetium or selenium contaminants.

  13. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman, Denis J. (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  14. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman, Denis (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  15. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman; Denis J. (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  16. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman, Denis J. (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  17. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

  18. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  19. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  20. Heavy Metals contamination in two bioluminescent bays of Puerto Rico Yadira Soto Viruet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Heavy Metals contamination in two bioluminescent bays of Puerto Rico Yadira Soto Viruet #802 characteristics. The main purpose of this research was to evaluate the presence of heavy metals of pesticides for agriculture, untreated wastewater and variety of industrial activities (power plants, oil

  1. HEAVY METALS IN THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL, CALLORHINUS URSIN US, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEAVY METALS IN THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL, CALLORHINUS URSIN US, AND HARBOR SEAL, PHOCA VITULINA Calillnnia harbor seal and 170 ppm in a fur seal taken oil the Washington coast. Concentrations of cadmium of mercury were from southern California seals. Heavy metals are persistent contaminants that ultimately end

  2. 1529-6466/00/0049-0007$10.00 Quantitative Speciation of Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1529-6466/00/0049-0007$10.00 Quantitative Speciation of Heavy Metals in Soils and Sediments sites, and the major consequence in terms of contamination by heavy metals are areas of wasteland the activities of humans (Smedley and Kinniburgh 2002). Pollution of ground and surface waters, and hence

  3. Portable X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detection System was designed and built by Ames Laboratory and the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. The system uses a C-frame inspection head with an X-ray tube mounted on one side of the frame and an imaging unit and a high purity germanium detector on the other side. the inspection head is portable and can be easily positioned around ventilation ducts and pipes up to 36 inches in diameter. Wide angle and narrow beam X-ray shots are used to identify the type of holdup material and the amount of the contaminant. Precise assay data can be obtained within minutes of the interrogation. A profile of the containerized holdup material and a permanent record of the measurement are immediately available.

  4. A study of immobilization of four heavy metals by solidification/stabilization with portland cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trussell, Susan A

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF IMMOBILIZATION OF FOUR HEAUY METALS BY SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION WITH PORTLAND CEMEhK A Thesis by SUSAN ANN TRUSSELL Submitted to Texas AdcM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... of Immobilization of Four Heavy Metals By Solidification/Stabilization with Portland Cement. (May 1994) Susan Trussell, B. S. , Baylor University; M. A. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Bill Batchelor Immobilization of four heavy metals...

  5. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

  6. Heavy metals and lead isotopes in sdB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. O'Toole; U. Heber

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed abundance analysis of high-resolution ultraviolet echelle spectra of five subdwarf B stars obtained with HST-STIS The goal of our observations was to test the hypothesis that pulsations in sdBs are correlated to the surface abundances of iron-group elements. We study two pulsators and three non-pulsators and determined abundances for 25 elements including the iron group and even heavier elements such as tin and lead using LTE spectrum synthesis techniques. We find strong enrichments of heavy elements up to 2.9dex with respect to solar which are probably caused by atomic diffusion processes. No clear-cut correlation between pulsations and metal abundances becomes apparent. Abundances for lead isotopes are derived from very high resolution spectra using an UV line of triply ionised lead. As Pb terminates the s-process sequence Pb isotopic abundance ratios yield important constraints. It is very difficult to measure them in hot stars. For the first time we were able to measure them in two subluminous B stars and conclude that the 207Pb/208Pb is solar.

  7. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, E.C.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical method is described for separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500 C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode. 3 figs.

  8. Lichens as bioindicators of aerial fallout of heavy metals in Zaria, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapu, M.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States) Ahmadu Bello Univ., Zaria (Nigeria)); Ipaye, M.M.; Ega, R.A.I.; Balarabe, M.L. (Ahmadu Bello Univ., Zaria (Nigeria)); Akanya, H.O. (Federal Univ. of Technology, Minna (Nigeria)); Schaeffer, D.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lichens and other epiphytic cryptogams possess efficient ion-exchange mechanisms which enable many species to accumulate airborne metals and which probably contribute to their tolerating metals at concentrations high enough to cause death to other plant species. A direct relationship between the distribution pattern of lichens and the trace metal content of the surrounding air has been demonstrated. The present study used lichens to assess the aerial fallout of heavy metals from traffic in Zaria, northern Nigeria.

  9. ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    397 ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES C thin evaporated foils of heavy rare earths (Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in three different chemical of high energy incident electrons (75 keV) transmitted through thin foils of yttric rare earth elements

  10. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  11. Enrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinton, John

    agrochemicals has enriched sediment metal concentrations to toxic levels which breach many accepted standards

  12. Using stable lead isotopes to trace heavy metal contamination sources in sediments of Xiangjiang and Lishui Rivers in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    Using stable lead isotopes to trace heavy metal contamination sources in sediments of Xiangjiang higher than natural values, suggesting the contaminations of heavy metals from extensive ore such as Hunan province is rich in mineral resources including non-ferrous metals (Zaw et al., 2007). Many kinds

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were closed temporarily, and Issues: In February 2013, the owner of the 270,000-ton-per-year Hannibal, OH, smelter filed for chapter in October. In June, the Sebree, KY, smelter was sold as part of a corporate restructuring. Expansion

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters continued. Most of the production decreases continued to take place in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters from 693 thousand tons at yearend 2004. World Smelter Production and Capacity: Production Yearend

  15. Method for fixating sludges and soils contaminated with mercury and other heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Broderick, Thomas E.; Roth, Rachel L.; Carlson, Allan L.

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a method, composition and apparatus for stabilizing mercury and other heavy metals present in a particulate material such that the metals will not leach from the particulate material. The method generally involves the application of a metal reagent, a sulfur-containing compound, and the addition of oxygen to the particulate material, either through agitation, sparging or the addition of an oxygen-containing compound.

  16. Process for the enhanced capture of heavy metal emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biswas, Pratim (Chesterfield, MO); Wu, Chang-Yu (Gainsville, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a process for forming a sorbent-metal complex. The process includes oxidizing a sorbent precursor and contacting the sorbent precursor with a metallic species. The process further includes chemically reacting the sorbent precursor and the metallic species, thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex. In one particular aspect of the invention, at least a portion of the sorbent precursor is transformed into sorbent particles during the oxidation step. These sorbent particles then are contacted with the metallic species and chemically reacted with the metallic species, thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex. Another aspect of the invention is directed to a process for forming a sorbent metal complex in a combustion system. The process includes introducing a sorbent precursor into a combustion system and subjecting the sorbent precursor to an elevated temperature sufficient to oxidize the sorbent precursor and transform the sorbent precursor into sorbent particles. The process further includes contacting the sorbent particles with a metallic species and exposing the sorbent particles and the metallic species to a complex-forming temperature whereby the metallic species reacts with the sorbent particles thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex under UV irradiation.

  17. A review of the global emissions, transport and effects of heavy metals in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, J.R.; Ashton, W.B.; Rapoport, R.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the sources and quantities of heavy metal emissions, their transport and fate, their potential health and environmental effects, and strategies to control them. The approach is to review the literature on this topic and to consult with experts in the field. Ongoing research activities and research needs are discussed. Estimates of global anthropogenic and natural emissions indicate that anthropogenic emissions are responsible for most of the heavy metals released into the atmosphere and that industrial activities have had a significant impact on the global cycling of trace metals. The largest anthropogenic sources of trace metals are coal combustion and the nonferrous metal industry. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which trace metals enter the environment. Atmospheric deposition varies according to the solubility of the element and the length of time it resides in the atmosphere. Evidence suggests that deposition is influenced by other chemicals in the atmosphere, such as ozone and sulfur dioxide. Trace metals also enter the environment through leaching. Existing emissions-control technologies such as electrostatic precipitators, baghouses, and scrubbers are designed to remove other particulates from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants and are only partially effective at removing heavy metals. Emerging technologies such as flue gas desulfurization, lignite coke, and fluidized bed combustion could further reduce emissions. 108 refs.

  18. Relationship between meteorological variables and total suspended and heavy metal particulates in Little Rock, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avery, Mary Gwendolyn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY NFXAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLl'N AVERY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY METAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLYN AVERY Approved...

  19. AMOUNT AND LEACHING POTENTIAL OF HEAVY METALS IN BARK MULCH AND COMPOST USED ON THE UNIVERSITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AMOUNT AND LEACHING POTENTIAL OF HEAVY METALS IN BARK MULCH AND COMPOST USED ON THE UNIVERSITY mulch and compost, determine whether or not either of these substances could be significant contributors the presence of heavy metals in fresh bark mulch, soil (used in compost mixtures) and compost being used at UBC

  20. Heavy metal distribution in sediments from Calabar River, southeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ntekim, E.E.U.; Ekwere, S.J.; Ukpong, E.E. [Univ. of Calabar (Nigeria)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentration and areal distribution of selected metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, Fe, and Cr) in the sediments of the Calabar River were studied to determine the extent of anthropogenic input and to estimate the effects of dumping industrial waste materials into the river. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu indicate relatively moderate pollution mainly on the left-hand side of the river while Ni, Cr, Co, Cd, and Fe levels are below values found to have adverse effects on the lives of marine biota. High metal contents are found close to industrial establishments and so enhanced metal concentrations are related to industrial sewage and metal leaching from garbage and solid waste dumps. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Plasma treatment of INEL soil contaminated with heavy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detering, B.A.; Batdorf, J.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INEL soil spiked with inorganic salts of chromium, lead, mercury, silver, and zinc was melted in a 150 kW plasma furnace to produce a glassy slag product. This glassy slag is an environmentally safe waste form. In order to reduce the melting temperature of the soil, sodium carbonate was added to half of the test batches. Random sample from each batch of glassy slag product were analyzed by an independent laboratory for total metals concentration and leachability of metals via the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) toxicity characterization leaching procedure (RCLP) tests. These tests showed the residual metals were very tightly bound to the slag matrix and were within EPA TCLP limits under these test conditions. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and emissions dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the vitrified soil also confirmed that the added metals present in the vitrified soil were totally contained in the crystalline phase as distinct oxide crystallites.

  2. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Actinides and Heavy Metals for Environmental Cleanup: A Process Development Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuehe; Smart, Neil G.; A. S. Gopalan, C. M. Wai, and H. K. Jacobs

    2003-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The extraction of heavy metal ions and actinide ions is demonstrated using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) containing dissolved protonated ligands, such as diketones and organophosphinic acids. High efficiency extraction is observed. The mechanism of the extraction reaction is discussed and, in particular, the effect of addition of water to the sample matrix is highlighted. In-process dissociation of metal-ligand complexes for ligand regeneration and recycle is also discussed. A general concept for a process using this technology is outlined.

  3. Metallomics of two microorganisms relevant to heavy metal bioremediation reveal fundamental differences in metal assimilation and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, Andrew [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Menon, Angeli [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Scott, Israel [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Poole, Farris [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Vaccaro, Brian [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Thorgersen, Michael P [ORNL] [ORNL; Geller, Jil [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hazen, Terry C [ORNL] [ORNL; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although as many as half of all proteins are thought to require a metal cofactor, the metalloproteomes of microorganisms remain relatively unexplored. Microorganisms from different environments are likely to vary greatly in the metals that they assimilate, not just among the metals with well-characterized roles but also those lacking any known function. Herein we investigated the metal utilization of two microorganisms that were isolated from very similar environments and are of interest because of potential roles in the immobilization of heavy metals, such as uranium and chromium. The metals assimilated and their concentrations in the cytoplasm of Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) and Enterobacter cloacae strain Hanford (EcH) varied dramatically, with a larger number of metals present in Enterobacter. For example, a total of 9 and 19 metals were assimilated into their cytoplasmic fractions, respectively, and DvH did not assimilate significant amounts of zinc or copper whereas EcH assimilated both. However, bioinformatic analysis of their genome sequences revealed a comparable number of predicted metalloproteins, 813 in DvH and 953 in EcH. These allowed some rationalization of the types of metal assimilated in some cases (Fe, Cu, Mo, W, V) but not in others (Zn, Nd, Ce, Pr, Dy, Hf and Th). It was also shown that U binds an unknown soluble protein in EcH but this incorporation was the result of extracellular U binding to cytoplasmic components after cell lysis.

  4. Characterization of sperm motility in sea bass: the effect of heavy metals and physicochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    to sperm motility in several fish species, including sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) (Fauvel et alCharacterization of sperm motility in sea bass: the effect of heavy metals and physicochemical) was used to characterize the motility of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax spermatozoa and to study the effect

  5. ADVANCES IN BIOSORPTION OF HEAVY METALS David Kratochvil and Bohumil Volesky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    exchange, and precipitation with bio- sulphide (H2S produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria), the biosorption dead biomass to sequester toxic heavy metals. It is particularly feasible to use for removal then be packed in sorption columns which are perhaps the most effective device for the continuous removal

  6. Heavy Metals in the Environment Effect of Biosolids Processing on Lead Bioavailability in an Urban Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Heavy Metals in the Environment Effect of Biosolids Processing on Lead Bioavailability in an Urban for biosolids products to reduce Pb availability in both in a soil matrix and as pure minerals, can altersoil was tested on a high Pb urban soil with biosolids from a treatment plant that used different processing

  7. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  8. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon metal and alloys (excluding semiconductor-grade silicon)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal: Brazil, 37%; South Africa, 25%; Canada, 14%; Norway, 6%; and other, 18%. Total: Brazil, 20%; China, 16%; South Africa, 13%; Canada, 12%; and other, 39%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations energy costs. Demand for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries

  10. Modeling of heavy metal transport in a contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cernik, M.; Federer, P.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Schlieren (Switzerland)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observed depth profiles in soils polluted by Zn and Cu that originate from a metal smelter are quantitatively interpreted by combining the production history of the smelter with established transport models. Using independent laboratory and field data, we were able to calculate the present depth profiles semiquantitatively by applying the pure convection model without parameter fitting. The agreement of the calculated depth profiles with the experimental data can be improved by including dispersion effects in the convection-dispersion model or the stochastic convection model. For the latter model, the depth profiles were calculated analytically. These models were used to calculate the expected depth profiles in the future and to judge possible remediation strategies. 48 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Heavy-metal contamination on training ranges at the Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Schneider, J.F.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large quantities of lead and other heavy metals are deposited in the environment of weapons ranges during training exercises. This study was conducted to determine the type, degree, and extent of heavy-metal contamination on selected handgun, rifle, and hand-grenade ranges at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany. Soil, vegetation, and surface-water samples were collected and analyzed using the inductively-coupled plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) method and the toxic characterization leaching procedure (TCLP). The ICP-AES results show that above-normal levels of lead and copper are in the surface soil at the handgun range, high concentrations of lead and copper are in the berm and soil surface at the rifle range, and elevated levels of cadmium and above-normal concentrations of arsenic, copper, and zinc are present in the surface soil at the hand-grenade range. The TCLP results show that surface soils can be considered hazardous waste because of lead content at the rifle range and because of cadmium concentration at the hand-grenade range. Vegetation at the handgun and rifle ranges has above-normal concentrations of lead. At the hand-grenade range, both vegetation and surface water have high levels of cadmium. A hand-held X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrum analyzer was used to measure lead concentrations in soils in a field test of the method. Comparison of XRF readings with ICP-AES results for lead indicate that the accuracy and precision of the hand-held XRF unit must improve before the unit can be used as more than a screening tool. Results of this study show that heavy-metal contamination at all three ranges is limited to the surface soil; heavy metals are not being leached into the soil profile or transported into adjacent areas.

  12. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  13. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  14. Uranium and other heavy metals in soil and vegetation from the Hanford environs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, K.R.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong winds that could transport contaminated dust and other materials offsite from the Hanford 300 Area typically blow from the west or southwest. Samples were collected from an offsite study area located across the Columbia River and downwind from the 300 Area to estimate the concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals in soils and vegetation. Results were compared to similar measurements collected at control sites located both on and off the Hanford Site. These comparisons were used to test hypotheses that uranium and other heavy metals had been transported offsite by wind-blown dust or other materials. The conclusion from this study was that operations at the 300 Area have not resulted in a detectable impact on the offsite environs across the river. The concentration of uranium in soil samples from the study area was statistically greater than comparable samples from control sites, but there was no evidence that the uranium in the study-area samples was other than naturally occurring. There was no statistical difference in the concentration of lead, silver, zinc or copper in soil samples from the study area as compared to the control sites. No statistically significant differences in uranium or other heavy metals were noted among vegetation samples from the various sampling sites.

  15. Utilization of a duckweed bioassay to evaluate leaching of heavy metals in smelter contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngman, A.L.; Lydy, M.J. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Williams, T.L. [Laidlaw Environmental Services, Wichita, KS (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a duckweed bioassay could be used to evaluate the downward migration of heavy metals in smelter soils. The duckweed bioassay was initially used to evaluate elutriates prepared from samples of smelter soils. These initial tests verified that the elutriates would elicit toxic responses. Elutriate testing was followed with an evaluation of leachate from untreated soil cores or soil cores that had been amended with organic matter either unplanted or planted to a grass-forb seed mixture. There was an inverse linear relationship between heavy-metal concentrations in leachate and NOEC and IC{sub 50} values expressed as percentages among all soil cores. Based on these preliminary duckweed bioassays, there were no differences between soil types or organic amended or non-amended soil, but leachate from vegetated soil cores were less toxic than were leachates from non-vegetated soil cores. Overall, the duckweed bioassays were useful in detecting heavy metal availability in elutriate and leachate samples from smelter soils.

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor-and solar-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor- and solar- grade silicon) produced in the United States in 2009 was $470 million. Four companies produced silicon materials in six plants. Of those companies, three produced ferrosilicon in four plants. Metallurgical

  17. Heavy Metal Immobilization Through Phosphate and Thermal Treatment of Dredged Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ndiba,P.; Axe, L.; Boonfueng, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of dredged sediments is expensive and poses a major challenge for harbor dredging projects. Therefore beneficial reuse of these sediments as construction material is highly desirable assuming contaminants such as heavy metals are immobilized and organics are mineralized. In this research, the effect of the addition of 2.5% phosphate, followed by thermal treatment at 700 C, was investigated for metal contaminants in dredged sediments. Specifically, Zn speciation was evaluated, using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), by applying principal component analysis (PCA), target transformation (TT), and linear combination fit (LCF) to identify the main phases and their combination from an array of reference compounds. In dredged sediments, Zn was present as smithsonite (67%) and adsorbed to hydrous manganese oxides (18%) and hydrous iron oxides (15%). Phosphate addition resulted in precipitation of hopeite (22%), while calcination induced formation of spinels, gahnite (44%), and franklinite (34%). Although calcination was previously used to agglomerate phosphate phases by sintering, we found that it formed sparingly soluble Zn phases. Results from the U.S. EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) confirmed both phosphate addition and calcination reduced leachability of heavy metals with the combined treatment achieving up to an 89% reduction.

  18. Heavy-metal toxicity phenomena in laboratory-scale ANFLOW bioreactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, A.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy-conserving wastewater treatment system was developed based on an anaerobic, upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor. Since many applications of the ANFLOW process could involve the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals, the potentially toxic effects of these metals on the biological processes occurring in ANFLOW columns (primarily acetogenesis and methanogenesis) were investigated. Both step and pulse inputs of zinc ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/L were added to synthetic wastewaters being treated in ANFLOW columns with 0.057-m/sup 3/ volumes. Column responses were used to develop descriptive models for toxicity phenomena in such systems. It was found that an inhibition function could be defined and used to modify a model based on plugflow with axial dispersion and first-order kinetics for soluble substrate removal. The inhibitory effects of zinc on soluble substrate removal were found to be predominantly associated with its sorption by biosolids. Sorption initially occurred in the lower regions of the column, but was gradually observed in higher regions as the sorption capacity of the lower regions was exhausted. Sorption phenomena could be described with the Freundlich equation. Sorption processes were accompanied by shifts of biological processes to regions higher in the columns. A regenerative process was observed when feeding of wastewaters without zinc was resumed. It was postulated that regeneration could be based on sloughing of layers of biofilms, or other biosolids involved in zinc sorption, followed by continued growth of lower layers of biofilms not involved in heavy-metal sorption.

  19. Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project, Resource Recovery Project, and Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November, 1989. OTD has begun to search out, develop, test and demonstrate technologies that can now or in the future be applied to the enormous remediation problem now facing the DOE and the United States public in general. Technology demonstration projects have been designed to attack a separate problem as defined by DOE. The Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project was conceived to test and demonstrate off-the-shelf technologies (dominantly from the mining industry) that can be brought to bear on the problem of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination in soils and sediments. The Resource Recovery Project is tasked with identifying, developing, testing, and evaluating new and innovative technologies for the remediation of metal contaminated surface and groundwater. An innovative twist on this project is the stated goal of recovering the metals, formerly disposed of as a waste, for reuse and resale, thereby transforming them into a usable resource. Finally, the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project was developed to demonstrate and remediate underground spills of hydrocarbons from formations that are (1) too deep for excavation, and/or (2) require in-situ remediation efforts of long duration. This project has already been shown effective in reducing the time for remediation by conventional methods from an estimated 200 years at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to less than one year. The savings in time and dollars from this technology alone can be immeasurable.

  20. Determination of heavy metals and halogens in plastics from electric and electronic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimitrakakis, Emmanouil [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, University Campus, 73100 Chania (Greece); Janz, Alexander; Bilitewski, Bernd [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment, Dresden University of Technology, Pratzschwitzerstrasse 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany); Gidarakos, Evangelos [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, University Campus, 73100 Chania (Greece)], E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of hazardous substances and preparations in small waste electrical and electronic equipment (sWEEE) found in the residual household waste stream of the city of Dresden, Germany has been investigated. The content of sWEEE plastics in heavy metals and halogens is determined using handheld X-ray fluorescence analysis (HXRF), elemental analysis by means of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Mean value of results for heavy metals in samples (n = 51) by AAS are 17.4 mg/kg for Pb, 5.7 mg/kg for Cd, 8.4 mg/kg for Cr. The mass fraction of an additive as shown by HXRF (n = 161) can vary over a wide range. Precise deductions as regards sWEEE plastics content in hazardous substances and preparations cannot be made. Additional research would be expedient regarding the influence of hazardous substances to recycling processes, in particular regarding the contamination of clean fractions in the exit streams of a WEEE treatment plant. Suitable standards for calibrating HXRF for use on EEE plastics or complex electr(on)ic components do not exist and should be developed.

  1. Metagenomic insights into evolution of heavy metal-contaminated groundwater microbial community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemme, C.L.; Deng, Y.; Gentry, T.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wu, L.; Barua, S.; Barry, K.; Green-Tringe, S.; Watson, D.B.; He, Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Tiedje, J.M.; Rubin, E.M.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents ({approx}50 years) has resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying {gamma}- and {beta}-proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is overabundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could have a key function in rapid response and adaptation to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  2. Metagenomic Insights into Evolution of a Heavy Metal-Contaminated Groundwater Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemme, Christopher L.; Deng, Ye; Gentry, Terry J.; Fields, Matthew W.; Wu, Liyou; Barua, Soumitra; Barry, Kerrie; Tringe, Susannah G.; Watson, David B.; He, Zhili; Hazen, Terry C.; Tiedje, James M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents (~;;50 years) have resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying ?- and ?-proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is over-abundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could be a key mechanism in rapidly responding and adapting to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  3. Treatment of Arsenic, Heavy Metals, and Acidity Using a Mixed ZVI-Compost PRB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, R.; Smyth, D; Blowes, D; Spink, L; Wilkin, R; Jewett, D; Weisener, C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-month performance evaluation of a pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI), limestone, and pea gravel was conducted at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, SC. The PRB is designed to remove heavy metals and arsenic from groundwater by promoting microbially mediated sulfate reduction and sulfide-mineral precipitation and arsenic and heavy metal sorption. Performance monitoring showed effective treatment of As, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Ni from concentrations as high as 206 mg L{sup -1}, 2.02 mg L{sup -1}, 0.324 mg L{sup -1}, 1060 mg L{sup -1}, and 2.12 mg L{sup -1}, respectively, entering the PRB, to average concentrations of <0.03 mg L{sup -1}, < 0.003 mg L{sup -1}, < 0.001 mg L{sup -1}, < 0.23 mg L{sup -1}, and <0.003 mg L{sup -1}, respectively, within the PRB. Both As(III) and As(V) were effectively removed from solution with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis of core samples indicating the presence of As(V) in oxygen-bound form and As(III) in both oxygen- and sulfur-bound forms. XANES solid phase sulfur analysis indicated decreases in the peak amplitude of intermediate oxidized sulfur species and sulfate components with increasing distance and depth within the PRB.

  4. Metagenomic insights into evolution of a heavy metal-contaminated groundwater microbial community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemme, Christopher [University of Oklahoma; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Gentry, Terry [Texas A& M University; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Barua, Soumitra [University of Oklahoma; Barry, Kerry [Joint Genome Institute; Green-Tringe, Susannah [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Watson, David B [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Rubin, Edward M. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents (~50 years) has resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying - and -proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is overabundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could have a key function in rapid response and adaptation to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  5. Synthesis of Functionalized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from a Common Precursor and their Application as Heavy Metal and Actinide Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Marvin G.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Davidson, Joseph D.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the use of a simple and versatile technique to generate a series of ligand stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles containing different ? functionalities with specificities toward heavy metals and actinides at the periphery of the stabilizing ligand shell from a common, easy to synthesize precursor nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticles are designed to contain affinity ligands that make them excellent sorbent materials for a variety of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous systems such as river water and ground water as well as actinides from clinical samples such as blood and urine. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles make ideal reagents for extraction of heavy metal and actinide contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. In addition, these engineered nanomaterials have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g) making them ideal sorbent materials for these types of applications

  6. Method and device for electroextraction of heavy metals from technological solutions and wastewater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khalemsky, Aron Mikhailov; Payusov, Sergei Abramovic; Kelner, Leonid; Jo, Jae

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic principles of the method for heavy metals electroextraction from technological solutions and wastewater includes pretreating to remove Chromium-6 and high concentrations of heavy metals and periodically treating in a six-electrode bipolar cylindrical electroreactor made of non-conducting material to achieve lower accepted levels of impurities. Six cylindrical steel electrodes form two triode stacks and are fed with three-phase alternating current of commercial frequency (50-60 Hz), which can be pulsed. Each phase of the three-phase current is connected to three electrodes of one triode stack or in parallel to two triode stacks. The parallel connection of three-phase current to two triode stacks is performed so that the same phase of the three phase current is connected in parallel with each two opposite electrodes of six electrodes located along the periphery, or with two adjacent electrodes. A bipolar stationary aluminum electrode is situated in the inter-electrode space. In one of the embodiments, the bipolar electrode is made of a perforated heat-resistant plastic container filled with secondary aluminum and duralumin scrap. In another embodiment, the bipolar electrode of aluminum or duralumin scrap may be made without a perforated container and is placed in the inter-electrode space as a bulk scrap. In this case, to prevent shorts, each of six steel electrodes is placed in isolated perforated plastic shell with holes of 5 mm in diameter. Non-ferrous metals are extracted in a form of ferrite-chromites, and aluminates as well as hydroxyl salts deposited in the inter-electrode space without electrolysis deposits on electrodes. Deposits are separated from solution by known methods of filtration.

  7. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.S.; Chen, J.J.; Li, Y.C. [University of Florida, Apopka, FL (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 {mu} g per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.

  8. Placental concentrations of heavy metals in a mother-child cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaya, E., E-mail: eamayag@ugr.es [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Gil, F. [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)] [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Freire, C. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain) [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), 21041-210 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Olmedo, P. [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)] [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Fernandez-Rodriguez, M. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)] [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Fernandez, M.F.; Olea, N. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain) [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metals are environmental contaminants with properties known to be toxic for wildlife and humans. Despite strong concerns about their harmful effects, little information is available on intrauterine exposure in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate prenatal exposure to As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, and Pb and its association with maternal factors in a population-based mother-child cohort in Southern Spain. Between 2000 and 2002, 700 pregnant women were recruited and 137 placentas from the cohort were randomly selected and analyzed for the selected metals by atomic absorption. Maternal sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were obtained by questionnaire after delivery. Bivariate analysis and multivariate linear regression were performed. Cd and Mn concentrations were detected in all placentas, while Cr, Pb, and Hg were found in 98.5%, 35.0%, and 30.7% of samples, respectively. The highest concentrations were observed for Pb (mean: 94.80 ng/g wet weight of placenta), followed by Mn (63.80 ng/g), Cr (63.70 ng/g), Cd (3.45 ng/g), and Hg (0.024 ng/g). Arsenic was not detected in any sample. Gestational age and smoking during pregnancy were associated with placental Cd concentrations, while no factor appeared to influence concentrations of Cr, Hg, Mn, or Pb. In comparison to results of European studies, these concentrations are in a low-intermediate position. Studies are required to investigate the factors contributing to early exposure to heavy metals and to determine how placental transfer of these toxic compounds may affect children's health.

  9. An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Scott Alan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

  10. Ion assisted deposition of optical and protective coatings for heavy metal fluoride glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNally, J.J.; Al-Jumaily, G.A.; McNeil, J.R.

    1986-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metal fluoride glass materials are attractive for optical applications in the near UV through IR wavelength regions. However, many compositions are relatively soft and hygroscopic and possess low softening temperature (250--300/sup 0/C). We have applied ion assisted deposition (IAD) techniques to deposit MgF/sub 2/, SiO/sub 2/, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ thin film structures on fluoride glass substrates at ambient substrate temperature (--100/sup 0/C). The coatings deposited using IAD improve the environmental durability of the fluoride glass and appear to have reasonably good optical characteristics; without application of IAD, the deposited coatings are not durable and have poor adhesion.

  11. Studies on the content of heavy metals in Aries River using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voica, Cezara, E-mail: Cezara.Voica@itim-cj.ro; Kovacs, Melinda, E-mail: Cezara.Voica@itim-cj.ro; Feher, Ioana, E-mail: Cezara.Voica@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the industrial branches, the mining industry has always been an important source of environmental pollution, both aesthetically and chemically. Through this paper results of ICP-MS characterization of Aries River Basin are reported. Mining activities from this area has resulted in contamination of environment and its surrounding biota. This is clearly evidenced in analyzed water samples, especially from Baia de Aries site where increased amount of trace elements as Cr, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Pb and U were founded. Also in this site greater amount of rare earth elements was evidenced also. Through monitoring of Aries River from other non-mining area it was observed that the quantitative content of heavy metals was below the maximum permissible levels which made us to conclude that the water table wasn't seriously affected (which possibly might be attributed to the cessation of mining activities in this area from a few years ago)

  12. INTERPRETING THE RESULTS OF SOIL TESTS FOR HEAVY METALS Vern Grubinger and Don Ross, University of Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    amounts of heavy metals to the soil, which can build up over time with repeated applications. The actual Results The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and NY Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS to guide clean-up efforts of contaminated sites; NYS DEC levels are based on removing human health risks

  13. Sedimentation and chronology of heavy metal pollution in Oslo harbor, Norway Aivo Lepland a,*, Thorbjrn J. Andersen b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alve, Elisabeth

    Sedimentation and chronology of heavy metal pollution in Oslo harbor, Norway Aivo Lepland a,d , Anders Rindby e a Geological Survey of Norway, Leiv Eirikssons vei 39, 7491 Trondheim, Norway b Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, P.O. Box 3930 Ullevål Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway d Department

  14. Sol-gel synthesis of high-quality heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dejneka, M.; Riman, R.E.; Snitzer, E. (Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Ceramics)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride glasses are excellent laser hosts and are very well suited for a broad spectrum of optical applications. However, current fluoride glass synthesis is expensive. The sol-gel method is an affordable alternative for producing high-performance, optical-quality heavy-metal fluoride glasses. The method involves forming a hydrous oxide gel of the constituent metal alkoxides and salts, polymerizing the solution to form a gel, fluorinating the gel with anhydrous HF, melting the amorphous material in an oxidizing atmosphere of SF[sub 6], and casting the melt into desired shapes. ZBLA (57ZrF[sub 4] [times] 36BaF[sub 2] [times] 4LaF[sub 3] [times] 3AlF[sub 3], in mol%) and Nd-doped (0.3 mol%) ZBLA glass rods were prepared by this process and their properties were measured. The sol-gel-based glasses had thermal and optical properties similar to those found in the literature for conventionally prepared fluorides.

  15. Sequential Extraction Versus Comprehensive Characterization of Heavy Metal Species in Brownfield Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Williamson, Connie A.; Collins, W. Keith; Dahlin, David C.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of sequential extraction as a means to determine species of heavy-metals was examined by a study on soil samples from two Superfund sites: the National Lead Company site in Pedricktown, NJ, and the Roebling Steel, Inc., site in Florence, NJ. Data from a standard sequential extraction procedure were compared to those from a comprehensive study that combined optical- and scanning-electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and chemical analyses. The study shows that larger particles of contaminants, encapsulated contaminants, and/or man-made materials such as slags, coke, metals, and plastics are subject to incasement, non-selectivity, and redistribution in the sequential extraction process. The results indicate that standard sequential extraction procedures that were developed for characterizing species of contaminants in river sediments may be unsuitable for stand-alone determinative evaluations of contaminant species in industrial-site materials. However, if employed as part of a comprehensive, site-specific characterization study, sequential extraction could be a very useful tool.

  16. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

  17. A correlation between the heavy element content of transiting extrasolar planets and the metallicity of their parent stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Guillot; Nuno C. Santos; Frédéric Pont; Nicolas Iro; Claudio Melo; Ignasi Ribas

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine extrasolar planets with masses between 110 and 430M are known to transit their star. The knowledge of their masses and radii allows an estimate of their composition, but uncertainties on equations of state, opacities and possible missing energy sources imply that only inaccurate constraints can be derived when considering each planet separately. Aims: We seek to better understand the composition of transiting extrasolar planets by considering them as an ensemble, and by comparing the obtained planetary properties to that of the parent stars. Methods: We use evolution models and constraints on the stellar ages to derive the mass of heavy elements present in the planets. Possible additional energy sources like tidal dissipation due to an inclined orbit or to downward kinetic energy transport are considered. Results: We show that the nine transiting planets discovered so far belong to a quite homogeneous ensemble that is characterized by a mass of heavy elements that is a relatively steep function of the stellar metallicity, from less than 20 earth masses of heavy elements around solar composition stars, to up to 100M for three times the solar metallicity (the precise values being model-dependant). The correlation is still to be ascertained however. Statistical tests imply a worst-case 1/3 probability of a false positive. Conclusions: Together with the observed lack of giant planets in close orbits around metal-poor stars, these results appear to imply that heavy elements play a key role in the formation of close-in giant planets. The large masses of heavy elements inferred for planets orbiting metal rich stars was not anticipated by planet formation models and shows the need for alternative theories including migration and subsequent collection of planetesimals.

  18. N, P, and heavy metal dynamics in wetlands and lakes of the Danube Delta, Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lajtha, K.; Keller, B.; Jamil, A. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)]|[Boston Univ., MA (United States)]|[Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Danube Delta stands at the interface between the Danube and the western Black Sea. Although it is assumed that such extensive wetlands can effectively filter nutrients and pollutants from surrounding waters, recent anthropogenic factors such as increased loading from upstream sources, dredging, channelization, and engineering impoundments may all serve to decrease the filtering potential of the marshes. We sampled sediments, water, and mussels from lakes, and plants and sediments from marshes along an eastward gradient as well as with distance from a main channel in the Delta to examine controls on filtering efficiency. N and P in water decreased with distance from the western gateway, although the magnitude of this decrease varied among years with changes in hydrology. Heavy metals in roots of Phragmites did not vary predictably over this gradient, although concentrations in roots from dredged channel sediments were significantly higher than in roots from natural marshes. Accumulation in mussels reflected hydrologic flow within the Delta, which may be significantly altered by channelization and dredging.

  19. Wet extraction of heavy metals and chloride from MSWI and straw combustion fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguiar del Toro, M. [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Eissendorfer Street 40, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany); Calmano, W. [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Eissendorfer Street 40, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: calmano@tuhh.de; Ecke, H. [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, SE-814 26 Alvkarleby (Sweden)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash residues from combustion often do not meet the criteria neither for reuse as construction materials nor landfilling as non-hazardous waste, mainly because of the high concentration of heavy metals and chlorides. This work aimed to technically evaluate an innovative wet treatment process for the extraction of chloride (Cl{sup -}), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from fly ashes from a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant and from a straw combustion (SC) facility. Factors investigated were liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, full carbonation (CO{sub 2} treatment), influence of pH and leaching time, using a two-level full factorial design. The most significant factor for all responses was low pH, followed by L/S ratio. Multiple linear regression models describing the variation in extraction data had R{sup 2} values ranging from 58% to 98%. An optimization of the element extraction models was performed and a set of treatment conditions is suggested.

  20. The role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of heavy metals by Salix. A preproposal for the McIntire-Stennis Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    at ESF. As part of this project, biosolids are being used as fertilizer. This raises the possibility that heavy metals present in these biosolids may enter the rhizosphere. The use of mycorrhizal biopeptides

  1. Metal-fueled HWR (heavy water reactors) severe accident issues: Differences and similarities to commercial LWRs (light water reactors)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Hyder, M.L.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Coryell, E.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences and similarities in severe accident progression and phenomena between commercial Light Water Reactors (LWR) and metal-fueled isotopic production Heavy Water Reactors (HWR) are described. It is very important to distinguish between accident progression in the two systems because each reactor type behaves in a unique manner to a fuel melting accident. Some of the lessons learned as a result of the extensive commercial severe accident research are not applicable to metal-fueled heavy water reactors. A direct application of severe accident phenomena developed from oxide-fueled LWRs to metal-fueled HWRs may lead to large errors or substantial uncertainties. In general, the application of severe accident LWR concepts to HWRs should be done with the intent to define the relevant issues, define differences, and determine areas of overlap. This paper describes the relevant differences between LWR and metal-fueled HWR severe accident phenomena. Also included in the paper is a description of the phenomena that govern the source term in HWRs, the areas where research is needed to resolve major uncertainties, and areas in which LWR technology can be directly applied with few modifications.

  2. The effect of heavy metal in CMOS on neutron induced single event upset simulated with Geant4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huan; Chen, Wei; Yang, Shan-chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local metal interconnection is widely used in modern complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The most frequently used local materials are some heavy metals, such as tungsten (W) or copper (Cu). It's well known that single event upset (SEU) could occur in a CMOS under neutron exposure. In this paper the rectangular parallelepiped (RPP) method is used to investigate the SEU response of a typical CMOS. SEU induced by 1$\\sim$14\\:MeV neutrons are simulated with Geant4 and the cross sections are calculated. The results show that only in the structure with W, secondary particle $\\alpha$ is created and SEUs are generated when the energy of neutron is less than $4$\\:MeV.

  3. MOVEMENT OF HEAVY METALS THROUGH UNDISTURBED AND HOMOGENIZED SOIL COLUMNS Vincent J. Camobreco , Brian K. Richards , Tammo S. Steenhuis , John H. Peverly , and Murray B. McBride1 1* 1 2 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    and in combination with organic-facilitated transport, can accelerate metal leaching through soils. KEYWORDS Heavy been assumed that these metals are immobile in managed agricultural soils (McBride 1995), factorsMOVEMENT OF HEAVY METALS THROUGH UNDISTURBED AND HOMOGENIZED SOIL COLUMNS Vincent J. Camobreco

  4. Heavy metal inventory and fuel sustainability of recycling TRU in FBR design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuel materials from spent fuel of light water reactors have a potential to be used for destructive devices with very huge energy release or in the same time, it can be utilized as a peaceful energy or civil applications, for generating electricity, desalination of water, medical application and others applications. Several research activities showed some recycled spent fuel can be used as additional fuel loading for increasing fuel breeding capability as well as improving intrinsic aspect of nuclear non-proliferation. The present investigation intends to evaluate the composition of heavy metals inventories and fuel breeding capability in the FBR design based on the loaded fuel of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel (SF) of 33 GWd/t with 5 years cooling time by adopting depletion code of ORIGEN. Whole core analysis of FBR design is performed by adopting and coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes. Nuclear data library, JFS-3-J-3.2R which is based on the JENDL 3.2 has been used for nuclear data analysis. JSFR design is the basis design reference which basically adopted 800 days cycle length for 4 batches system. Higher inventories of plutonium of MOX fuel and TRU fuel types at equilibrium composition than initial composition have been shown. Minor actinide (MA) inventory compositions obtain a different inventory trends at equilibrium composition for both fuel types. Higher Inventory of MA is obtained by MOX fuel and less MA inventory for TRU fuel at equilibrium composition than initial composition. Some different MA inventories can be estimated from the different inventory trend of americium (Am). Higher americium inventory for MOX fuel and less americium inventory for TRU fuel at equilibrium condition. Breeding ratio of TRU fuel is relatively higher compared with MOX fuel type. It can be estimated from relatively higher production of Pu-238 (through converted MA) in TRU fuel, and Pu-238 converts through neutron capture to produce Pu-239. Higher breeding ratio of MOX fuel and TRU fuel types at equilibrium condition are estimated from converted fertile material during reactor operation into fissile material of plutonium such as converted uranium fuel (converted U-238 into Pu-239) or additional converted fuel from MA into Pu-238 and changes into Pu-239 by capturing neutron. Loading LWR SF gives better fuel breeding capability and increase inventory of MA for doping material of MOX fuel; however, it requires more supply MA inventory for TRU fuel type.

  5. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 40% was used in the armor, chemical

  6. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was produced. In 2011, an estimated 66% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 34

  7. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon produced titanium forgings, mill products, and castings. In 1996, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  8. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 35% was used in the chemical process

  9. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon produced titanium forgings, mill products, and castings. In 1997, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  10. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2005, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal was used

  11. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 40% was used in armor, chemical processing

  12. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2004, an estimated 60% of the titanium metal was used

  13. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot to produce forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2001, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  14. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2006, an estimated 72% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  15. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was produced. In 2012, an estimated 72% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 28

  16. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Titanium ingot and castings. In 2013, an estimated 73% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  17. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2007, an estimated 76% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  18. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2002, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal used

  19. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by four operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2010, an estimated 75% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  20. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2008, an estimated 79% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  1. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2003, an estimated 55% of the titanium metal used

  2. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. A fourth, an estimated 76% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 24% was used in armor

  3. Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in soil, vegetation, and fish collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl) contents were determined in soil, vegetation (overstory and understory), and fish (rainbow trout) collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon in 1995. All heavy metal and most radionuclide contents around or within the lake, except for U in soil, vegetation, and fish, were within or just above upper limit background. Detectable levels (where the analytical result was greater than two times counting uncertainty) of U in soils, vegetation, and fish were found in slightly higher concentrations than in background samples. Overall, however, maximum total committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)(95% confidence level)--based on consumption of 46 lb of fish--from Tsicoma Lake (0.066 mrem/y) was within the maximum total CEDE from the ingestion of fish from the Mescalero National Fish Hatchery (background)(0.113 mrem/y).

  4. Radionuclides and heavy metals in rainbow trout from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De Lakes in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and TI) concentrations were determined in rainbow trout collected from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De lakes in Santa Clara Canyon in 1997. Most radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in fish collected from these four lakes were within or just above upper limit background concentrations (Abiquiu reservoir), and as a group were statistically (p < 0.05) similar in most parameters to background.

  5. The occurrence of heavy metals in the vicinity of industrial complexes in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ndiokwere, C.L.; Ezihe, C.A. (Univ. of Benin, Benin City (Nigeria))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in soils, crops, and plants as a result of industrial activities has been examined at various locations in the vicinities of steel and refinery complexes. High concentrations of the metals were recorded in all the samples from the sites close to the emission sources and the levels decreased with distance away from the sources. Considerable amounts of the metals found in the crops and plants were mainly due to aerial deposition. Soil and crop contamination by the metals was generally higher in the steel complex than the refinery. Cadmium and lead levels were particularly high in all the samples from both complexes.

  6. Proceedings of Soil Decon `93: Technology targeting radionuclides and heavy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective for convening this workshop was to exchange ideas and discuss with scientists and engineers methods for removing radionuclides and/or toxic metals from soils. Over the years there have been numerous symposia, conferences, and workshops directed at soil remediation. However, this may be the first where the scope was narrowed to the removal of radionuclides and toxic metals from soils. The intent was to focus on the separation processes controlling the removal of the radionuclide and/or metal from soil. Its purpose was not intended to be a soil washing/leaching workshop, but rather to identify a variety or combination of processes (chemical, physical, and biological) that can be used in concert with the applicable engineering approaches to decontaminate soils of radionuclides and toxic metals. Abstracts and visual aids used by the speakers of the workshop are presented in this document.

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal produced in the United States in 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .44 billion. Three companies produced silicon materials in seven plants east of the Mississippi River. Ferrosilicon and metallurgical-grade silicon metal were each produced in four plants. One company produced both and aluminum alloys and the chemical industry. The semiconductor and solar industries, which manufacture chips

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal produced in the United States in 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,400 million. Two companies produced silicon materials in seven plants east of the Mississippi River. Ferrosilicon and metallurgical-grade silicon metal were each produced in four plants. One company produced both and aluminum alloys and the chemical industry. The semiconductor and solar industries, which manufacture chips

  9. Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, total U), and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1996 were determined. Also, U and Be concentrations in soil samples collected in 1993 from within the proposed DARHT facility area are reported. Most radionuclides in soils, sediments, and vegetation were within current background and/or long-term regional statistical reference levels.

  10. MOLYBDENUM, RUTHENIUM, AND THE HEAVY r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN MODERATELY METAL-POOR MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFF STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Ruth C. [Astrophysical Advances, 607 Marion Place, Palo Alto, CA 94301 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratios of elemental abundances observed in metal-poor stars of the Galactic halo provide a unique present-day record of the nucleosynthesis products of its earliest stars. While the heaviest elements were synthesized by the r- and s-processes, dominant production mechanisms of light trans-ironic elements were obscure until recently. This work investigates further our 2011 conclusion that the low-entropy regime of a high-entropy wind (HEW) produced molybdenum and ruthenium in two moderately metal-poor turnoff stars that showed extreme overabundances of those elements with respect to iron. Only a few, rare nucleosynthesis events may have been involved. Here we determine abundances for Mo, Ru, and other trans-Fe elements for 28 similar stars by matching spectral calculations to well-exposed near-UV Keck HIRES spectra obtained for beryllium abundances. In each of the 26 turnoff stars with Mo or Ru line detections and no evidence for s-process production (therefore old), we find Mo and Ru to be three to six times overabundant. In contrast, the maximum overabundance is reduced to factors of three and two for the neighboring elements zirconium and palladium. Since the overproduction peaks sharply at Mo and Ru, a low-entropy HEW is confirmed as its origin. The overabundance level of the heavy r-process elements varies significantly, from none to a factor of four, but is uncorrelated with Mo and Ru overabundances. Despite their moderate metallicity, stars in this group trace the products of different nucleosynthetic events: possibly very few events, possibly events whose output depended on environment, metallicity, or time.

  11. Heavy metal contamination in highway soils. Comparison of Corpus Christi, Texas and Cincinnati, Ohio shows organic matter is key to mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Heavy metal contamination in highway soils. Comparison of Corpus Christi, Texas and Cincinnati and Cincinnati, Ohio was measured to as- sess the degree of contamination such soils contain and the likelihood that this contamination can be remobilized. High values of Ba, Cu, Pb, and Zn can be attributed to anthropogenic effects

  12. Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, September 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 85 -100 ACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS IN NATIVE PLANTS GROWING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Technologies of Energy, Technopark of Borj Cédria ­ University of Carthage - 2050 Hammam-Lif, Tunisia; Hassen ACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS IN NATIVE PLANTS GROWING NEAR THE PHOSPHATE TREATMENT INDUSTRY, TUNISIA Inès for phytostabilization of contaminated sites with Cd (BCF=23.51). Our study showed that native plant species growing

  13. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in our environment. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in our environment. The chief sources of exposure are from (1) Lead paint ­ commonly present in house interiors (2) Leaded gasoline ­ soils along major roadways are strongly enriched in lead

  14. Electrospun and oxidized cellulose materials for environmental remediation of heavy metals in groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Dong [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Halada, Gary P. [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Spalding, Brian Patrick [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter focuses on the use of modified cellulosic materials in the field of environmental remediation. Two different chemical methods were involved in fabricating oxidized cellulose (OC), which has shown promise as a metal ion chelator in environmental applications. Electrospinning was utilized to introduce a more porous structure into an oxidized cellulose matrix. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to study both the formation of OC and its surface complexation with metal ions. IR and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the formation of characteristic carboxylic groups in the structure of the final products and the successful formation of OC-metal complexes. Subsequent field tests at the Field Research Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory confirmed the value of OC for sorption of both U and Th ions.

  15. Heavy metals in fish from the Aleutians: Interspecific and locational differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Donio, Mark [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were to examine levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium in edible tissue of seven species of marine fish collected from several Aleutian islands (in 2004) to determine: (1) interspecific differences, (2) locational differences (among Aleutian Islands), (3) size-related differences in any metal levels within a species, and (4) potential risk to the fish or to predators on the fish, including humans. We also compared metals levels to those of three other fish species previously examined in detail, as well as examining metals in the edible tissue of octopus (Octopus dofleini). Octopus did not have the highest levels of any metal. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels among the fish species, although the differences were less than an order of magnitude, except for arsenic (mean of 19,500 ppb in Flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). Significant intraisland variation occurred among the four sites on Amchitka, but there was not a consistent pattern. There were significant interisland differences for some metals and species. Mercury levels increased significantly with size for several species; lead increased significantly for only one fish species; and cadmium and selenium decreased significantly with size for halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis). The Alaskan Department of Health and Social Services supports unrestricted consumption of most Alaskan fish species for all people, including pregnant women. Most mean metal concentrations were well below the levels known to adversely affect the fish themselves, or predators that consume them (including humans), except for mercury in three fish species (mean levels just below 0.3 ppm), and arsenic in two fish species. However, even at low mercury levels, people who consume fish almost daily will exceed guideline values from the Centers for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. - Highlights: • Cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium levels differed among 10 fish species from the Aleutians. • Mean Arsenic was as high as 19,500 ppb (flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). • Mercury levels increased significantly with fish size for several species. • Metal levels were generally below adverse effects levels for fish and their predators. • Mercury and arsenic might pose a risk to human consumers, and require further examination.

  16. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Speciation and mobility of heavy metals in mud in coastal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    reduction of the metals with time of burial observed in the reclamation site. Keywords Land reclamation Á, land reclamation has gained much popularity along coastal areas of China due to the rapid development. Before land reclamation, temporal dikes around the coastal sea area to be reclaimed were constructed

  18. HST Observations of Heavy Elements in Metal-Poor Galactic Halo Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Cowan; Christopher Sneden; Timothy C. Beers; James E. Lawler; Jennifer Simmerer; James W. Truran; Francesca Primas; Jason Collier; Scott Burles

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new abundance determinations of neutron-capture elements Ge, Zr, Os, Ir, and Pt in a sample of 11 metal-poor (-3.1 56) elements. However, the large (and correlated) scatters of [Eu,Os,Ir,Pt/Fe] suggests that the heaviest neutron-capture r-process elements are not formed in all supernovae. In contrast, the Ge abundances of all program stars track their Fe abundances, very well. An explosive process on iron-peak nuclei (e.g., the alpha-rich freeze-out in supernovae), rather than neutron capture, appears to have been the dominant synthesis mechanism for this element at low metallicities -- Ge abundances seem completely uncorrelated with Eu.

  19. Heavy metal contents of epiphytic acrocarpous mosses within inhabited sites in southwest Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onianwa, P.C.; Ajayi, S.O.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels of the metals Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, Mn, and Fe accumulated in acrocarpous mosses within inhabited parts of villages and towns in the southwest region of Nigeria were determined, and then used for a classification of the area into relative pollution zones. Ibadan City was found to be the most polluted in the study area. Other zones of low and medium polluted villages and towns were identified. The zonations based on metal levels in these mosses were to some extent similar to that already obtained in a separate study of the same area with epiphytic forest mosses. The enrichment factors show that the gradients between zones of different pollution levels were higher in mosses within the inhabited sites.

  20. Effects of asphaltene precipitation and reprecipitation on the metal-containing compounds in heavy residua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boscan vacuum residuum (VR) has been separated into isooctane insoluble asphaltenes and isooctane soluble maltenes. The asphaltenes were dissolved in a minimum of toluene and were further separated by two additional reprecipitations using isooctane as the precipitating solvent. The authors examined the fractions, including the recovered isooctane soluble material, by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy to determine the effects, if any, the reprecipitations have on the size distribution of the metal-containing compounds.

  1. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms in Nevada and Oregon. Ingot was made by the two sponge producers and by nine other firms in seven States. About 30 companies produced titanium forgings, mill

  2. Cesium and heavy metal removal from flue dusts and other matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderstrom, D.J.; May, R.; Spaulding, S. [Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Co., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Technology Applications Div.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A problem exists in the steel industry because of the generation of radioactive waste that is caused by the accidental destruction of nuclear detection instruments. The flue dust from electric Arc Furnaces (EAF) becomes contaminated with the radionuclide used. Typically the radionuclide is cesium 137. The problem is a concern to the industry since the contamination results in the generation of a mixed waste which is costly to dispose of properly. In the interest of providing a viable solution to the problem, Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies has developed a process for removal of cesium from flue dust. While removing the cesium from the treatment residue, the process also isolates the other major elements of concern and renders them innocuous, saleable, or readily disposable. However, several innovative techniques have been applied which make the process far more economical, and in addition, the changes simplify the operation and render it controllable. The process involves the dissolution of the various metallic and non-metallic constituents through the use of a mild mineral acid leach. This treatment solubilizes the majority of the constituents including the cesium.

  3. Comparative evaluation of several small mammal species as monitors of heavy metals, radionuclides, and selected organic compounds in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talmage, S.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate which small mammal species are the best monitors of specific environmental contaminants. The evaluation is based on the published literature and on an analysis of small mammals trapped at several sites on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Studies on the uptake of heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals are reviewed in Chapter II to evaluate several small mammal species for their capacity to serve as sentinels for the presence, accumulation, and effects of various contaminants. Where several species were present at a site, a comparative evaluation was made and species are ranked for their capacity to serve as monitors of specific contaminants. Food chain accumulation and food habits of the species are used to establish a relationship with suitability as a biomonitor. Tissue-specific concentration factors were noted in order to establish target tissues. Life histories, habitat, and food habits are reviewed in order to make generalizations concerning the ability of similar taxa to serve as biomonitor. Finally, the usefulness of several small mammal species as monitors of three contaminants -- benzo(a)pyrene, mercury, and strontium-90 -- present on or near the ORNL facilities was investigated. 133 refs., 5 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, Robin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Apel, William A. [Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. In addition, there are numerous sites around the world that are contaminated with a mixture of organic and inorganic contaminants. In most sites, over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals, radionuclides and other contaminants causing transport into the surrounding environment. We investigated the role of fermentative microorganisms in such sites that may control metal, radionuclide and organics migration from source zones. The project was initiated based on the following overarching hypothesis: Metals, radionuclides and other contaminants can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic acids and alcohols can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms. We demonstrated that fermentative organisms capable of affecting the fate of Cr6+, U6+ and trinitrotoluene can be isolated from organic-rich low level waste sites as well as from less organic rich subsurface environments. The mechanisms, pathways and extent of contaminant transformation depend on a variety of factors related to the type of organisms present, the aqueous chemistry as well as the geochemistry and mineralogy. This work provides observations and quantitative data across multiple scales that identify and predict the coupled effects of fermentative carbon and electron flow on the transport of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic contaminants in the subsurface; a primary concern of the DOE Environmental Remediation Science Division (ERSD) and Subsurface Geochemical Research (SBR) Program.

  5. The simulation of condensation removal of a heavy metal from exhaust gases onto sorbent particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, A.; Hall, M.J

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model BAEROSOL for solving the general dynamic equation (GDE) of aerosols is presented. The goal was to model the capture of volatilized metals by sorbents under incinerator-like conditions. The model is based on algorithms presented by Jacobson and Turco [Aerosol Science and Technology 22 (1995) 73]. A hybrid size bin was used to model growth and formation of particles from the continuum phase and the coagulation of existing particles. Condensation and evaporation growth were calculated in a moving size bin approach, where coagulation and nucleation was modeled in the fixed size bin model of the hybrid grid. To account for the thermodynamic equilibrium in the gas phase, a thermodynamic equilibrium code CET89 was implemented. The particle size distribution (PSD) calculated with the model was then compared to analytical solutions provided for growth, coagulation and both combined. Finally, experimental findings by Rodriguez and Hall [Waste Management 21 (2001) 589-607] were compared to the PSD predicted by the developed model and the applicability of the model under incineration conditions is discussed.

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the local structure of heavy metal ions incorporated into electrodeposited nickel oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasubramanian, M.; Melendres, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Mansour, A.N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.] [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of heavy metal ions into simulated corrosion films has been investigated using spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The films were formed by electrodeposition of the appropriate oxide (hydroxide) onto a graphite substrate. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the structure and composition of the host oxide film, as well as the local structure of the impurity ion. Results on the incorporation of Ce and Sr into surface films of Ni(OH){sub 2} and NiOOH are reported. Cathodically deposited Ni(OH){sub 2} was found to be mainly in the alpha form while anodically prepared NiOOH showed the presence of Ni{sup +2} and Ni{sup +4}. Cerium incorporated into Ni(OH){sub 2} exists as mixed Ce{sup +3} and Ce{sup +4} phases; a Ce{sup +4} species was found when Ce was codeposited with NiOOH. The structure of the Ce{sup +4} phase in anodic films appears similar to a Ce(OH){sub 4} standard. However, XAS, X-ray diffraction, and laser Raman measurements indicate that the latter chemical formulation is probably incorrect and that the material is really a disordered form of hydrous cerium oxide. The local structure of this material is similar to CeO{sub 2} but has much higher structural disorder. The significance of this finding on the question of the structure of Ce-based corrosion inhibitors in aluminum oxide films is pointed out. Moreover, the authors found it possible to form pure Ce oxide (hydroxide) films on graphite by both cathodic and anodic electrodeposition; their structures have also been elucidated. Strontium incorporated into nickel oxide films consists of Sr{sup +2} which is coordinated to oxygen atoms and is likely to exist as small domains of coprecipitated material.

  7. ISSN 0378-4738 = Water SA Vol. 27 No. 1 January 2001 71Available on website http://www.wrc.org.za Plant-soil interactions of sludge-borne heavy metals and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.wrc.org.za Plant-soil interactions of sludge-borne heavy metals and the effect on maize (Zea mays L.) seedling 0002, South Africa Abstract The use of sewage sludge as an organic fertiliser under South African interpreted as total metal content is limiting the agricultural use of sludge. A glasshouse experiment, which

  8. 90-Ton Triple Cylinder Jack Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, Al; /Fermilab

    1988-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The three D-Zero cryostats (2 EC and 1 CC) will rest on three carriages which in turn ride on a set of hardened ways in the center beam. A pair of Tychoway rollers will be fitted to each of the four corners of the three carriages to provide the rolling support. In the final design, the two EC cryostats will be able to roll out and away from the CC cryostat in order to provide access to the space between each cryostat for maintenance and repairs. The cryostat will be frequently accessed, about once a month. during a collider run. The heaviest cryostat weighs about 360 tons. The large roller weight in one position for such a long period of time, created a concern about the rollers dimpling the hardened ways or even suffering permanent deformations themselves. There is also the possibility that the vertical position of the cryostat will need to be adjusted to align it with the beam line or that the carriage and cryostat will have to be lifted to remove and service the rollers. A device or system was needed to (1) relieve the weight of the cryostats from the rollers and the hardened ways, and (2) minimally adjust the vertical position of the cryostats, if necessary, and/or service the rollers. Compact hydraulic jacks seemed to be the answer. The first and foremost criteria was capacity. It was desired that the jacks be rated to twice the actual load. A jack is to be placed beside each roller, giving a total of eight per cryostat. The load per jack for a 360 ton cryostat would then be 45 tons, leaving 90 tons as the required capacity. The second and equally important criteria to be met was size. After installation of the Tychoway rollers. room to mount these jacks is very limited underneath the carriage. The space surrounding the bottom of the carriage is cluttered with wiring and plumbing and thus further limits available space for the jacks. What was left was a 3.75-inch x 6.0625-inch x 12.25-inch rectangular envelope on each side of a pair of rollers (see Appendix A).

  9. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbH JumpOne MoliTON

  10. Selected heavy metals in tissues of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) stranded along thr Texas and Florida Gulf coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haubold, Elsa Maria

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bottlenose dolphins in other geographic regions. Two metal-metal correlations were examined in liver, kidney and muscle tissue. Strong positive correlations were found between mercury and selenium in the three tissues. No correlations existed between cadmium...

  11. anion heavy-atom salt: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nutrients and heavy metals in experimental salt marsh ecosystems. Environmental Pollution,effects of nutrients and heavy metals in experimental salt marsh ecosystems....

  12. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of extraction of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by chelation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uyansoy, Hakki

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or electricaHy charged. A metal-complex forming agent has to have at least two atoms which can be coordmated by the metal at the same time. Such atoms are usually oxygen, nitrogen and 11 sulfur. A further requirement is that at least one active group...

  13. Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

  14. OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62% Landfill 1080 tons / 38% Electricals 36 Landfill As of Monday 7 March 2011, no general waste generated from the Bloomsbury Campus has been sent to landfill. Through partnership between UCL Estates and Office and General, an agreement has been reached

  15. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign to minimize odor, electroplating, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood

  16. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, with an estimated total output of 2,500 tons from domestic and foreign ores and concentrates, and from old and new, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment. Silver was used for miniature antennas

  17. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    the potential for accelerated galvanic corrosion, as illustrated below. Build up of excess scale at the junction, Cu sulfate dominates. #12;Corrosion Scale Minerals The corrosion products that build up often have a heavy build-up of iron oxides, mostly goethite and magnetite with some lepidocrocite. Lead

  18. Analytical and experimental investigations of the behavior of thermal neutrons in lattices of uranium metal rods in heavy water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simms, Richard

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the intracellular distribution of the activation of foils by neutrons were made in lattices of 1/4-inch diameter, 1.03% U-235, uranium rods moderated by heavy water, with bare and cadmium-covered foils of ...

  19. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, Denise

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have spent this first part of the project preparing background material for conference participants and making arrangements for the conference itself. Material regarding state regulatory constraints to the use of bioremediation in the cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals at DOE sites around the country has been added to the Bioremediation Briefing paper for participants. The Steering Committee has been formulated and will hold their first meeting via phone conference on Monday, September 13, 2005. On the agenda is identification of conference participants, experts, and initial issues likely to be addressed. Human Subjects approval has been secured from the University. The ''pre-test'' has been developed and is ready to implement. The Consensus Conference will be held in Phoenix, AZ during January and February 2005; we are working with the Chamber of Commerce to find an appropriate site.

  20. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  1. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of extraction of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by chelation in supercritical carbon dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uyansoy, Hakki

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermodynamic model has been developed. This model predicts the system pH which is a important factor in design of metal extraction units. With the model the efficiency of the extraction with different chelating agents at different temperatures and pressures...

  2. The distribution of potentially toxic heavy metals in the sediments of San Antonio Bay and the northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trefry, John Harold

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total of 123 sediment samples from 48 locations in the northwest Gulf of Mexico, including San Antonio Bay and the Mississippi River Delta, were acid leached and analyzed for iron, manganese, lead, zinc, cadmium, copper, and nickel by atomic... of the river mouths, also showed slightly higher than expected levels of nickel, lead, and cadmium. The proposition that shell dredging operations in the bay remobilize significant quantities of toxic metals and make them available to the biota of the area...

  3. Association of the sites of heavy metals with nanoscale carbon in a Kentucky electrostatic precipitator fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Hower; Uschi M. Graham; Alan Dozier; Michael T. Tseng; Rajesh A. Khatri [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HRTEM-STEM-EELS) was used to study fly ashes produced from the combustion of an eastern Kentucky coal at a southeastern-Kentucky wall-fired pulverized coal utility boiler retrofitted for low-NOx combustion. Fly ash was collected from individual hoppers in each row of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) pollution-control system, with multiple hoppers sampled within each of the three rows. Temperatures within the ESP array range from about 200 {degree}C at the entry to the first row to <150{degree}C at the exit of the third row. HRTEM-STEM-EELS study demonstrated the presence of nanoscale (10 s nm) C agglomerates with typical soot-like appearance and others with graphitic fullerene-like nanocarbon structures. The minute carbon agglomerates are typically juxtaposed and intergrown with slightly larger aluminosilicate spheres and often form an ultrathin halo or deposit on the fly ash particles. The STEM-EELS analyses revealed that the nanocarbon agglomerates host even finer (<3 nm) metal and metal oxide particles. Elemental analysis indicated an association of Hg with the nanocarbon. Arsenic, Se, Pb, Co, and traces of Ti and Ba are often associated with Fe-rich particles within the nanocarbon deposits. 57 refs., 5 figs.

  4. In vitro profiling of epigenetic modifications underlying heavy metal toxicity of tungsten-alloy and its components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Ranjana, E-mail: Ranjana.Verma.CTR@usuhs.mil [Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Xu, Xiufen, E-mail: Xiufen.Xu.CTR@usuhs.mil [Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Jaiswal, Manoj K., E-mail: Manoj.Jaiswal.CTR@usuhs.mil [Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Olsen, Cara, E-mail: colsen@usuhs.mil [Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Mears, David, E-mail: dmears@usuhs.mil [Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Caretti, Giuseppina, E-mail: giuseppina.caretti@unimi.it [Department of Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Milan (Italy); Galdzicki, Zygmunt, E-mail: zgaldzicki@usuhs.mil [Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten-alloy has carcinogenic potential as demonstrated by cancer development in rats with intramuscular implanted tungsten-alloy pellets. This suggests a potential involvement of epigenetic events previously implicated as environmental triggers of cancer. Here, we tested metal induced cytotoxicity and epigenetic modifications including H3 acetylation, H3-Ser10 phosphorylation and H3-K4 trimethylation. We exposed human embryonic kidney (HEK293), human neuroepithelioma (SKNMC), and mouse myoblast (C2C12) cultures for 1-day and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures for 1-week to 50-200 {mu}g/ml of tungsten-alloy (91% tungsten/6% nickel/3% cobalt), tungsten, nickel, and cobalt. We also examined the potential role of intracellular calcium in metal mediated histone modifications by addition of calcium channel blockers/chelators to the metal solutions. Tungsten and its alloy showed cytotoxicity at concentrations > 50 {mu}g/ml, while we found significant toxicity with cobalt and nickel for most tested concentrations. Diverse cell-specific toxic effects were observed, with C2C12 being relatively resistant to tungsten-alloy mediated toxic impact. Tungsten-alloy, but not tungsten, caused almost complete dephosphorylation of H3-Ser10 in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with H3-hypoacetylation in C2C12. Dramatic H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was found in all cobalt treated cultures with a decrease in H3 pan-acetylation in C2C12, SKNMC and HEK293. Trimethylation of H3-K4 was not affected. Both tungsten-alloy and cobalt mediated H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation were reversed with BAPTA-AM, highlighting the role of intracellular calcium, confirmed with 2-photon calcium imaging. In summary, our results for the first time reveal epigenetic modifications triggered by tungsten-alloy exposure in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures suggesting the underlying synergistic effects of tungsten, nickel and cobalt mediated by changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis and buffering. - Highlights: > Tungsten-alloy caused H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation in C2C12 and hippocampal primary cultures. > Dramatic H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was found in all cobalt treated cultures. > C2C12 cultures exposed to tungsten-alloy or cobalt exhibited decrease in H3 pan-acetylation. > Tungsten-alloy and cobalt mediated H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was reversed with BAPTA-AM. > These epigenetic modifications were mediated by changes in calcium homeostasis and buffering.

  5. Estimation of the formation rates of polyatomic species of heavy metals in plutonium analyses using a multicollector ICP-MS with a desolvating nebulizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitroshkov, Alexandre V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olsen, Khris B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomas, Linda M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analyses of IAEA and environmental samples for Plutonium isotopic content are conducted normally at very low concentrations of Pu–usually in the range of part per trillion level and even more often at the parts per quadrillion level. To analyze such low concentrations, the interferences in the analytical solution must be reduced as much as possible. Polyatomic interferences (PIs), formed by the heavy metals (HMs) from Hf to Bi are known to create the problems for Pu isotopic analyses, because even the relatively high resolution of a modern multicollector ICP-MS is not enough to separate Pu isotopes from this PIs in most of the cases. Desolvating nebulizers (DSN) (e.g. APEX and AridusII) reduce significantly the formation of PIs compare to the use of wet plasma. The purpose of this work was to investigate the rate of formation of PIs, produced by HMs, when high resolution MC ICP-MS with desolvating nebulizer was used for Pu isotopic analyses and to estimate the influence of the metals present in the sample on the results of analyses. The NU Plasma HR Multicollector and AridusII desolvating nebulizer were used in this investigation. This investigation was done for all Pu isotopes normally analyzed by ICP-MS, including ²??Pu, with the exception of ²³?Pu, which most of the time can’t be analyzed by ICP-MS, because of the overwhelming presence of ²³?U in the solutions. The PI formation rates were determined and reported for all 12 HMs from Hf to Bi. Selected IAEA samples were scanned for the presence of HMs and the influence of HMs on the results of Pu isotopic analyses was evaluated. It was found that the implemented separation procedure provides sufficient separation of HM from Pu, although the effect of PIs on the measurement of low level isotopes like ²?¹Pu and ²?²Pu in some cases can still be observed.

  6. SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, the United States consumed about 13% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 13% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 76%; full-alloy steel, 8

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, the United States was expected to consume about 7% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2008 was $1,283 million

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 14% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys, respectively. The value

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, the United States was expected to consume about 6% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production company produced chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2011 was $1

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 16% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 74%; full-alloy steel

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 12% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 68%; full-alloy steel, 8

  19. An Estimate of the Order of Magnitude of the Explosion During a Core Meltdown-Compaction Accident for Heavy Liquid Metal Fast Reactors: A disquieting result updating the Bethe-Tait model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Francisco J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    but lasting over a timescale of milliseconds. The forms of the energy release and of the resulting struc- tural damage differ significantly between a high explosive detonation and a propellant conflagration. Considering the yield of TNT Containment Law... gravitational compaction of the 100 MWth core, the ves- sel could withstand the 60 kg TNT-equivalent explosion from a 100 $/s reactivity insertion if a bare core is as- sumed; however, allowing for the presence of the unboiled heavy liquid metal coolant...

  20. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  1. Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    for Chemical Treatment · Type 1 water: high turbidity, >100 NTU, and high alkalinity, >250 mg/L as CaCO3, CaCO3 (alkalinity may need to be added for alum or ferric chloride). · Type 3 water: low turbidity, 250 mg/L as CaCO3 (most stormwaters approach this category

  2. Coupling and Testing the Fate and Transport of Heavy Metals and Other Ionic Species in a Groundwater Setting at Oak Ridge, TN - 13498

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noosai, Nantaporn; Fuentes, Hector R. [CEE Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [CEE Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical data show that heavy metals (including mercury) were released from Y -12 National Security Complex (NSC) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to the surrounding environments during its operation in 1950's. Studies have also shown that metals accumulated in the soil, rock, and groundwater, and are, at the present time, sources of contamination to nearby rivers and creeks (e.g., East Fork Poplar Creek, Bear Creek). For instance, mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) have been found and reported on the site groundwater. The groundwater type at the site is Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3}. This paper presents a modeling application of PHREEQC, a model that simulates geochemical processes and couples them to flow and transport settings. The objective was to assess the capability of PHREEQC to simulate the transport of ionic species in groundwater at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; data were available from core holes and monitoring wells over a 736-m distance, within 60-300 m depths. First, predictions of the transport of major ionic species (i.e., Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}) in the water were made between monitoring wells and for GW-131. Second, the model was used to assess hypotheses under two scenarios of transport for Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg, in Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3} water, as influenced by the following solid-liquid interactions: a) the role of ion exchange and b) the role of both ion exchange and sorption, the latter via surface complexation with Fe(OH){sub 3}. The transport scenario with ion exchange suggests that significant ion exchange is expected to occur for Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations, with no significant impact on Hg, within the first 100 m. Predictions match the expected values of the exchange coefficients relative to Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} (e.g., K{sub Ca/Zn} = K{sub Ca/Cd} > K{sub Ca/Pb} > K{sub Ca/Hg}). The scenario with both ion exchange and sorption does affect the concentrations of Zn and Cd to a small extent within the first 100 m, but does more meaningfully reduce the concentration of Pb, within the same distance, and also decreases the concentration of Hg in between core holes. Analysis of the above results, in the light of available literature on the ions of this study, does fundamentally support the capability of PHREEQC to predict the transport of major ions in a groundwater setting; it also generally supports the hypothesized role of ion exchange and sorption. The results indicate the potential of the model as a tool in the screening, selection and monitoring of remediation technologies for contaminated groundwater sites. (authors)

  3. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the potential migration of metals and radionuclides from waste pits and trenches will require understanding the effects of carbon and electron flow through these environments. Important aspects of this flow include the physiological activity of cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microbial populations, as well as the subsequent activity of metal and radionuclide reducing bacteria. The activity of subsurface fermentative microbial populations is significantly understudied even though these organisms can affect contaminant migration by at least two mechanisms. In the first mechanism, products of the fermentation process can act as chelators for metals and radionuclides increasing their transport through underlying geological media. The second mechanism is the reduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides since some fermentative bacteria have been shown to directly reduce metals and radionuclides, while their fermentation products can provide carbon and energy for respiratory metal reducing bacteria that can also reduce oxidized metals and radionuclides.

  4. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration Field Officerelocates 18-ton machine

  5. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process industries. Salient during metal production and fabrication and was recycled by companies in Oregon and Utah. Scrap zirconium. Zirconium and hafnium metal were produced from zircon by two domestic producers, one in Oregon and the other

  6. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

  8. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentrates: Australia, 48%; South Africa, 47%; and other, 5%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France, 51%; Germany, 10%; United Kingdom, 10%; South Africa, 9%; and other, 20%. Hafnium, unwrought: France. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process

  9. Magnetic fluctuations and heavy electron superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic fluctuation self-energy based on neutron scattering data is used to calculate mass renormalizations, and superconducting critical temperatures and order parameters, for various heavy electron metals.

  10. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Defense administers a Government-wide secondary precious metals recovery program. Events, Trends Refinery: Primary 225 284 243 241 240 Secondary 153 163 152 148 150 Imports2 154 159 144 114 115 Exports2

  11. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  12. Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh, Falmouth, MA on Heavy Metals and Microbial N-Cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    in the United States is in car and industrial lead- acid batteries (Wernick & Themelis 1998). Zinc is the least is important in regulating the exchange of nitrogen through the air, soil and organic matter. In this study, the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act were passed to help combat the increase of metal contamination

  13. CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE--LOW-TECH SOLUTIONS TO THE PADUCAH SCRAP METAL REMOVAL PROJECT ARE PROVIDING SAFE, COST-EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SCRAP YARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Dan; Eyman, Jeff

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1974 and 1983, contaminated equipment was removed from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) process buildings as part of an enrichment process upgrade program. The upgrades consisted of the dismantlement, removal, and on-site storage of contaminated equipment, cell components, and scrap material (e.g., metal) from the cascade facilities. Scrap metal including other materials (e.g., drums, obsolete equipment) not related to this upgrade program have thus far accumulated in nine contiguous radiologically-contaminated and non-contaminated scrap yards covering 1.05E5 m2 (26 acres) located in the northwestern portion of the PGDP. This paper presents the sequencing of field operations and methods used to achieve the safe removal and disposition of over 47,000 tonnes (53,000 tons) of metal and miscellaneous items contained in these yards. The methods of accomplishment consist of mobilization, performing nuclear criticality safety evaluations, moving scrap metal to ground level, inspection and segregation, sampling and characterization, scrap metal sizing, packaging and disposal, and finally demobilization. Preventing the intermingling of characteristically hazardous and non-hazardous wastes promotes waste minimization, allowing for the metal and materials to be segregated into 13 separate waste streams. Low-tech solutions such as using heavy equipment to retrieve, size, and package scrap materials in conjunction with thorough planning that integrates safe work practices, commitment to teamwork, and incorporating lessons learned ensures that field operations will be conducted efficiently and safely.

  14. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2} tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class 2 packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class 1 with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum {sup 235}U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2{1/2}-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class 1 with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class 1 packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 11 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Government Stockpile: None. Events, Trends, and Issues: Domestic consumption of zirconium mineral coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy,610 1,720 Zirconium oxide1 1,520 1,600 2,260 3,340 2,270 Consumption, zirconium ores and concentrates

  16. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockpile: None. Events, Trends, and Issues: Domestic consumption of zirconium mineral concentrates coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy,830 1,910 Zirconium oxide1 1,600 2,260 3,340 2,400 3,310 Consumption, zirconium ores and concentrates

  17. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12;187 ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: Domestic consumption coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy,080 2,300 Zirconium oxide1 2,260 3,340 2,400 2,970 1,700 Consumption, zirconium ores and concentrates

  18. Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    , hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated · CO2, CO, HC, NOx, and particulates · Fuels: Diesel, gasoline, CNG, propane, LNG, LPG, ethanol · 30-ton axle capacity · 80 mph speed · Simulated road load curve · Test cycle simulation with driver

  19. 2006 Minerals Yearbook PLATINUM-GROUP METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it was shipped to the smelter. The company milled 1.29 million metric tons (Mt) of ore from the mines, slightly, the concentrates from both mines are processed first at the precious metal smelter. The concentrate, which contains treatment. The smelter has an offgas processing facility that captures more than 99.7% of the sulfur dioxide

  20. 9,997,638 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 9, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  1. 9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  2. 9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  3. 9,355,469 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 29, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  4. 9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  5. 10,045,885 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 16, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  6. 10,180,047 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of May 28, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  7. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  8. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  9. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  10. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  11. Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing Loïc Perrin Ecole sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small part of these sludge is valorized because of their important metal fickleness. Consequently

  12. aqueous single metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with water-soluble salts of heavy metals. The best results were obtained with lanthanum nitrate, uranyl acetate, and lead perchlorate. The molecules appear as filaments...

  13. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  14. 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

  15. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  16. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE The study of metal contamination in urban topsoils of Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    - politan area of Mexico City. Keywords Heavy metals Á GIS Á Mexico City Á Urban topsoils Á Pollution ÁORIGINAL ARTICLE The study of metal contamination in urban topsoils of Mexico City using GIS Mari distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Ba, Co, Cr, Ni and V) in the urban environments of Mexico City using

  18. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

  19. A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor, and Wei-Ngan Chin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobor, Aquinas

    A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor a logical framework for specifying and proving asser- tions about program termination. Although termination. Here we propose to integrate termination requirements directly into our specification logic

  20. The Scale of the Energy Challenge 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons of coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    and rooftops in the United States. The total land area required by nuclear power plants is small! Ã? 20 15The Scale of the Energy Challenge Biomass Wind Nuclear Solar 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons

  1. Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

  2. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naphtha Feed Stock Coal Heavy oil NG biomass Electricityheat Ammonia NG Fuel Oil Heavy oil Electric ity heat CoalCoke Electricit y NG Heavy oil Coal Coke Electricity Diesel

  3. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

  4. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovemberiMid-LevelMoab Marks 6-Million-Ton CleanupAccomplishes

  5. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- -- 22 Rare-earth metals, alloys 271 352 235 284 406 Cerium Exports:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- -- 3 27 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 71 44 194 329 456 Cerium compounds. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31.3% ad val

  6. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  7. Heavy electron superconductivity: From 1K to 90K to

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pethick, C.J.; Pines, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the experimental results and physical arguments which led us to conclude that in heavy electron systems the physical mechanism responsible for superconductivity is an attractive interaction between the heavy electrons which results from the virtual exchange of antiferromagnetic f-electron moment fluctuations. In these systems, then, the superconductivity is of purely electronic origin; the phonon-induced interaction between electrons which leads to superconductivity in ordinary metals plays little or no role.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Julian I. (La Jolla, CA); Antosiewicz, Danuta M. (Warsaw, PL); Schachtman, Daniel P. (Tranmere, AU); Clemens, Stephan (San Diego, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  9. ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS A. R. MACKINTOSH H. C. Mrsted Institute terres rares Ikgeres. Abstract. -The magnetic properties of the light rare earth metals are reviewed the last decade, the magnetism of the heavy rare earth metals is now rather well understood. The magnetic

  10. Developments in bioremediation of soils and sediments polluted with metals and radionuclides: 2. Field research on bioremediation of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Developments in bioremediation of soils and sediments polluted with metals and radionuclides: 2. Field research on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides Terry C. Hazen1, * & Henry H. Tabak2 1 for correspondence e-mail: tchazen@lbl.gov) Key words: heavy metal, radionuclide, field test, bioremediation

  11. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 1,2 Jacob I .RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY J I Fabrikant,

  12. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  13. Relativistic heavy ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  14. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  15. From The Boston Globe, February 22, 2008 Dance troupe is game for some heavy lifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    From The Boston Globe, February 22, 2008 Dance troupe is game for some heavy lifting From left and uses heavy steel pieces as props? A game-show story? Who are these people? "Ideally, we're a mix beyond the industry, but steel is part of the soul of the town. . . . When the metal is molten and hot

  16. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  17. 26The Frequency of Large Meteor Impacts On February 14, 2013 a 10,000 ton meteor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the town of Chelyabinsk and the explosion caused major damage to the town injuring 1,000 people `discovered' for many decades afterwards, the Chelyabinsk Meteor was extensively videoed by hundreds explodes with an energy of 4.2x109 Joules. How many tons of TNT did the Chelyabinsk Meteor yield

  18. Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    analyses the global waste market, with particular reference to municipal solid waste (MSW). Key NoteGlobal MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market between growth in wealth and increase in waste -- the more affluent a society becomes, the more waste

  19. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  20. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  1. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless surface mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  2. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  3. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless surface mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  4. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless proprietary data. Based on average prices, the value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United is zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates were consumed by five titanium pigment producers

  5. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  6. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise mining operations in Florida, Georgia, and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  7. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise mining operations in Florida, Georgia, and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  8. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  9. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of TiO2 content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of TiO2 content, unless otherwise-mineral sands operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by TiO2 pigment producers

  10. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless-mineral sands operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by TiO2 pigment producers

  11. The Nature of Faint Blue Stars in the PHL and Ton Catalogues based on Digital Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andernach, H; W., W Copo Cordova; Santiago-Bautista, I del C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined accurate positions for 3000 of the "faint blue stars" in the PHL (Palomar-Haro-Luyten) and Ton/TonS catalogues. These were published from 1957 to 1962, and, aimed at finding new white dwarfs, provide approximate positions for about 10750 blue stellar objects. Some of these "stars" had become known as quasars, a type of objects unheard-of before 1963. We derived subarcsec positions from a comparison of published finding charts with images from the first-epoch Digitized Sky Survey. Numerous objects are now well known, but unfortunately neither their PHL or Ton numbers, nor their discoverers, are recognized in current databases. A comparison with modern radio, IR, UV and X-ray surveys leads us to suggest that the fraction of extragalactic objects in the PHL and Ton catalogues is at least 15 per cent. However, because we failed to locate the original PHL plates or finding charts, it may be impossible to correctly identify the remaining 7726 PHL objects.

  12. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  13. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  14. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Government-wide secondary precious metals recovery program 1999 2000 2001e Production: Mine 362 366 341 353 350 Refinery: Primary 270 277 265 197 220 Secondary

  15. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Governmentwide secondary precious-metals recovery program 2008e Production: Mine 258 256 252 238 230 Refinery: Primary 222 195 181 176 170 Secondary (new and old

  16. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    above) and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a secondary precious metals recovery program Secondary (new and old scrap) 143 82 83 89 95 Imports2 221 223 194 217 220 Exports2 523 547 489 257 320

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled of nonstockpile- grade materials, as follows: 16,400 tons of natural battery ore, 81 tons of chemical ore, and 392

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    for such nonmetallurgical purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled of nonstockpile-grade materials, as follows: 16,400 tons of natural battery ore, 81 tons of chemical ore, and 392

  19. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2004. Two companies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    80 INDIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium-efficiency photovoltaic devices. A major manufacturer is testing indium for a new application as a heat-management material in computers, which could increase consumption by 40 metric tons per year. The estimated

  20. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 tons of the material from the Department of Energy's stockpile, while the remaining 10,000 tons,700 1,800 150,000 160,000e Bolivia -- -- -- 5,400,00 Brazil 32 32 910 NA Canada 660 660 180,000 360

  1. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  2. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  3. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  4. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  5. Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

  6. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty...

  7. Heavy Quark production at HERA and Heavy Quark contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlef Bartsch, University of Bonn on behalf of the ZEUS and H1 Collaborations · Introduction · Heavy 1500 0 100 200 300 400 electrons positrons low E HERA-1 HERA-2 Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production at HERA, Feb. 23rd 2008 3 #12;pQCD approximations Massive scheme

  8. Status of ArDM-1t: First observations from operation with a full ton-scale liquid argon target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ArDM Collaboration; J. Calvo; C. Cantini; M. Daniel; U. Degunda; S. Di Luise; L. Epprecht; A. Gendotti; S. Horikawa; L. Knecht; B. Montes; W. Mu; M. Munoz; S. Murphy; G. Natterer; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; L. Periale; C. Regenfus; L. Romero; A. Rubbia; R. Santorelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; T. Viant; S. Wu

    2015-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ArDM-1t is the first operating ton-scale liquid argon detector for direct search of Dark Matter particles. Developed at CERN as Recognized Experiment RE18, the experiment has been approved in 2010 to be installed in the Spanish underground site LSC (Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc). Under the label of LSC EXP-08-2010 the ArDM detector underwent an intensive period of technical completion and safety approval until the recent filling of the target vessel with almost 2 ton of liquid argon. This report describes the experimental achievements during commissioning of ArDM and the transition into a stage of first physics data taking in single phase operational mode. We present preliminary observations from this run. A first indication for the background discrimination power of LAr detectors at the ton-scale is shown. We present an outlook for completing the detector with the electric drift field and upgrade of the scintillation light readout system with novel detector modules based on SiPMs in order to improve the light yield.

  9. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997 1998 1999e Production: Mine 317 326 362 366 340 Refinery: Primary (2 ) (2 ) 270 277 260 Secondary above) and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Government-wide secondary precious metals recovery program. Prepared by Earle B. Amey [(703) 648-4969, eamey@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12

  10. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006e Production: Mine 298 277 258 256 260 Refinery: Primary 196 194 222 163 180 Secondary (new and old above), and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Government wide secondary precious-metals recovery program. Events, Trends, and Issues: Domestic gold mine production in 2006 was estimated to be 2

  11. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Government-wide secondary precious metals recovery program Secondary (new and old scrap) 163 143 82 83 85 Imports2 278 221 223 193 125 Exports2 522 523 547 489 165

  12. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007e Production: Mine 277 258 256 252 240 Refinery: Primary 194 222 195 181 190 Secondary (new and old above), and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Governmentwide secondary precious-metals recovery program. Events, Trends, and Issues: Domestic gold mine production in 2007 was estimated to be 6

  13. Method for mobilization of hazardous metal ions in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugan, Patrick R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pfister, Robert M. (Powell, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial process for removing heavy metals such as bismuth, cadmium, lead, thorium, uranium and other transuranics from soils and sediments, utilizing indigenous, or isolates of indigenous, microorganisms and reducing agents, such as cysteine or sodium thioglycollate, or complexing agents such as the amino acid glycine, to effect the mobilization or release of the metals from the soil particles.

  14. Metals in Municipal Landfill Leachate And Their Health Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    raw leachate contains concentrations of heavy metals in excess ofthe drinking water standards of the un- saturated zone. If municipal solid waste is placed di- rectly into ground water, or if leachateMetals in Municipal Landfill Leachate And Their Health Effects STEPHEN C. JAMES, BS, MSCE Abstract

  15. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  16. Heavy Quark Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice calculations of heavy quark systems provide very good measures of the lattice spacing, a key element in recent determinations of the strong coupling constant using lattice methods. They also provide excellent testing grounds for lattice methods in general. I review recent phenomenological and technical developments in this field.

  17. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  18. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  19. Manufacturing capabilities of high power electron beam furnaces for melting ignots to 40 tons in weight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boiko, Ju.P.; Braim, V.P.; Kormitch, A.T.; Zorin, G.V.; Kostenuk, Ju.V.; Nikitin, V.S.; Pokrovsky, S.V.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A tendency to using special technologies of melting steels and alloys to get large ingots free of macrodefects and shrinking shells used to provide defectless products, ensuring an increase of ingot-to-product yield is well known. The electron beam furnace process improves the economical efficiency of production of large ingots, slabs for rolling mills, where high quality of special purpose steels and alloys is required. Metals, made by means of electron beam melting can be used for power, nuclear and chemical machine-buildings, aircraft and automotive, instrument and bearing productions, injection moulds and moulds for cold rollings, magnetic and titanium alloys, ship shafts, propellers and high speed power turbine parts. Melting technologies, which is one of the most important stages in production of steels and alloys, predetermines a required quality of metals and alloys to get the following characteristics of remelted metals: impact strength; isotropy of properties in central and surface zones of ingots; fatigue strength and resistance under mechanical and heat loads; corrosion resistance to attack by aggressive media; and polishing properties. The furnace is equipped with five electron beam guns, type EH-1200/50 and pumps for pumping out cavities of technological equipments: melting and ingot chambers, charging devices.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  1. Uptake and Cellular Compartmentalization of Metals from the Rhizosphere by Hyperaccumulating Plants: A Real Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Uptake and Cellular Compartmentalization of Metals from the Rhizosphere by Hyperaccumulating Plants in hyperaccumulating plants. Previous attempts to establish the path of metal ingress into plant tissues have suffered-vivo response of plants to heavy metals in the rhizosphere. We first focused on characterizing the species

  2. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  3. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  4. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  5. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials: Recent Progress and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program provides enabling materials technology for the U.S. DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program is based on an industry assessment and the technology roadmap for the OHVT. A five-year program plan was published in 2000. Major efforts in the program are materials for diesel engine fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, and air handling. Additional efforts include diesel engine valve-train materials, structural components, and thermal management. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications. Selected technical issues and planned and ongoing projects as well as brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  6. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  7. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- 22 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 352 235 284 905 442 Cerium compounds 806 1:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- 3 27 -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 44 194 329 444 272 Cerium compounds.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31

  8. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- -- -- -- Imports: Thorium ore (monazite) -- 22 56 11 --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 284 905 429 529 760 Cerium 121 123 Exports: Thorium ore, monazite 27 -- -- -- --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 329 444 250 991 856 (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

  9. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- 22 56 --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 235 284 905 429 507 Cerium compounds 1 Exports: Thorium ore, monazite 3 27 -- -- --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 194 329 444 250 879 Cerium for individual rare-earth metals and compounds, with most import categories slightly behind 1996's record high

  10. Metals 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  11. Dendritic metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

  12. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  13. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most...

  16. Super Heavy Nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper Heavy

  17. Near-threshold photodetachment of heavy alkali-metal anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrim, C.; Thumm, U.; Khuskivadze, A.A.; Fabrikant, I.I. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2604 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710-10046 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2604 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0111 (United States)

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate near-threshold photodetachment cross sections for Rb{sup -}, Cs{sup -}, and Fr{sup -} using the Pauli equation method with a model potential describing the effective electron-atom interaction. Parameters of the model potential are fitted to reproduce ab initio scattering phase shifts obtained from Dirac R-matrix calculations. Special care is taken to formulate the boundary conditions near the atomic nucleus for solving the Pauli equation, based on the analytic solution of the Dirac equation for a Coulomb potential. We find a {sup 3}P{sub 1}{sup o} resonance contribution to the photodetachment cross section of Rb{sup -}, Cs{sup -}, and Fr{sup -} ions. Our calculated total photodetachment cross sections for Cs agree with experiments after tuning the resonance position by 2.4 meV. For Rb{sup -} and Fr{sup -} the resonance contribution is much smaller than for Cs. We therefore also provide angle-differential cross sections and asymmetry parameters which are much more sensitive to the resonant contribution than total cross sections.

  18. High-Level Treatment of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    2Penn State - Harrisburg, PA Water World and Environmental Resources Conference, ASCE EWRI June 2004

  19. Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for the Containment of Heavy Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    , ethanol was used as the electron donor. Representative reactions for our set-up: SO4 -2 + EtOH HS- + CO2OH, SO4 2- No Copper R2 EtOH, SO4 2- Copper Two UASB reactors for sulfate reduction using ethanol

  20. Pesticide and heavy metal residues in Louisiana river otter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Debra Lynn

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Hg pollution, and hypothesized that Hg was an important cause of the species' decline in Sweden since 1950. There has been no comparable work in North America, but two studies have provided information on tissue levels of contaminants in otter...

  1. Heavy Metals in Glass Beads Used in Pavement Markings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangalgiri, Kiranmayi

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Pavement markings are vital for safely navigating roadways. The nighttime visibility of pavement markings is enhanced by addition of retroreflective glass beads, most of which are made from recycled glass. Concern has been raised over the presence...

  2. Micellar enhanced ultrafiltration of heavy metals using lecithin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmadi, Saman Nameghi

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus. 10 14 16 17 6. Water Flux at Different Pressures, T=30'C, Agitation=420 rpm. . . . . 31 7. Flux at Various Lecithin Concentrations, T='30 C, P=552 kPa, Agitation=220 rpm. . 8. Pure Water Flux, T=30'C, P=690 kPa, Agitation=250 rpm.... . . . . . . . 9. Mixture Flux. . . 32 33 34 10. Flux with Various Lecithins, T=30'C, P=690 kPa, Agitation=250 rpm. 11. Pure Water Flux through Various Membranes, T=30'C, P=690 kPa, Agitation=250 rpm. . 12. Permeate Flux at Varying Lecithin Concentrations...

  3. United abominations: Density functional studies of heavy metal chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoendorff, George

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonyl and nitrile addition to uranyl (UO{sup 2}{sup 2+}) are studied. The competition between nitrile and water ligands in the formation of uranyl complexes is investigated. The possibility of hypercoordinated uranyl with acetone ligands is examined. Uranyl is studied with diactone alcohol ligands as a means to explain the apparent hypercoordinated uranyl. A discussion of the formation of mesityl oxide ligands is also included. A joint theory/experimental study of reactions of zwitterionic boratoiridium(I) complexes with oxazoline-based scorpionate ligands is reported. A computational study was done of the catalytic hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes with zirconium-based catalysts. Techniques are surveyed for programming for graphical processing units (GPUs) using Fortran.

  4. Micellar enhanced ultrafiltration of heavy metals using lecithin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmadi, Saman Nameghi

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    unit operations with significant water use are electroplating, electroless plating, etching, cleaning, grinding, heat treating, welding, painting, and mechanical plating (2). Wastewaters generated from the above processes contain pollutants... such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Lecithin, a natural surfactant, is inexpensive, non-toxic, and biodegradable. In this project the binding characteristics of lecithin to cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and lead were examined. The process parameters of a...

  5. Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to ultrasen- sitive detection has been described by Alivisatos and co- workers.2 They retain the fluorescence

  6. SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONSReduce Waste and link

  7. Method and device for electroextraction of heavy metals from technological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRodMIT-Harvard

  8. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 56 11 -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 429 529 953 1,780 2,370 Cerium compounds 3,180 1,810 4,940 3 metals, alloys 250 991 724 1,600 1,830 Cerium compounds 6,100 5,890 4,640 3,960 3,870 Other rare-earth-99): Monazite: Australia, 67%; France, 33%; Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 71%; France, 23%; Japan

  9. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Mountain Pass were further processed into rare-earth compounds and metal products. The United States,980 3,770 2,840 5,800 Rare-earth metals, alloy 226 525 468 240 390 Exports: 2 Cerium compounds 840 1,350 1,640 992 730 Rare-earth metals, alloys 4,930 1,380 3,030 2,080 1,000 Other rare-earth compounds 455

  10. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) -- -- -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 1,420 1,450 1,130 804 945 Cerium compounds 3,850 2,540 2,630 1,880 2,210 Mixed, compounds 9,150 7,260 10,900 11,400 9,800 Ferrocerium, alloys 118 89 111 105 142 Exports:2 Rare-earth metals-04): Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 76%; France, 14%; Japan, 6%; Austria, 2%; and other, 2

  11. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Mountain Pass, CA, were further processed into rare-earth compounds and metal products. The United States -- -- -- -- 7,000 Exports: 2 Cerium compounds 1,380 840 1,350 1,640 1,100 Rare-earth metals, alloys 1,390 4,980 3,770 2,700 Rare-earth metals, alloy 679 226 525 468 280 Thorium ore (monazite or various thorium

  12. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10,000 e 5,000 5,000 Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) 22 56 11 -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 905,720 5,600 Ferrocerium, alloys 78 107 121 117 122 Exports:3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 444 250 991 724 1%; Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 75%; France, 19%; Japan, 3%; United Kingdom, 1%; and other

  13. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,DepartmentEnergyMetalMetal

  14. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  15. A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Empl, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

  16. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

  17. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

  18. Safeguards for Uranium Extraction (UREX) +1a Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feener, Jessica S.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of nuclear material accountancy (MA), containment and surveillance (C/S) and solution monitoring (SM). Facility information was developed for a hypothesized UREX+1a plant with a throughput of 1000 Metric Tons Heavy Metal (MTHM) per year. Safeguard goals...

  19. Multiyear Program Plan: Reducing Friction and Wear in Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.R. Fessler; G.R. Fenske

    1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As described in its multiyear program plan for 1998-2000, the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) envisions the development of a fuel-flexible, energy-efficient, near-zero-emissions, heavy-duty U.S. diesel engine technology devolving into all truck classes as a real and viable strategy for reducing energy requirements for commercial transport services and the rapidly growing multipurpose vehicle market (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles). Implementation of the OHVT program plan will have significant national benefits in energy savings, cleaner air, more jobs, and increased gross domestic product (GDP). Successful implementation will reduce the petroleum consumption of Class 1-8 trucks by 1.4 million barrels of oil per day by 2020 and over 1.8 million by 2030, amounting to a reduction in highway petroleum consumption of 13.2% and 18.6%, respectively. All types of regulated emissions will be reduced, that is, 20% drop in PM10 emissions (41,000 metric tons per year) by 203 0, 17% reduction in CO2 greenhouse gases (205 million metric tons per year), 7% reduction in NOx, 20% reduction in NMHC, and 30% reduction in CO. An increase of 15,000 jobs by 2020 is expected, as is an increase of $24 billion in GDP. The strategy of OHVT is to focus primarily on the diesel engine since it has numerous advantages. It has the highest efficiency of any engine today, 45% versus 30% for production gasoline engines; and it can be made more efficient at least to 55% and possibly up to 63%. It is the engine of choice for heavy vehicles (trucks), because it offers power, efficiency, durability, and reliability and is used extensively in rail, marine, and off-road applications. Its emission can be ultra-low to near zero, and the production infrastructure is already in place. The primary goals of OHVT are as follows: (1) Develop by 2002 the diesel-engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of light trucks, achieving a 35% fuel efficiency improvement over equivalent gasoline-fueled trucks. (2) Develop by 2004 the enabling technology for a Class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) that will meet prevailing emission standards, using either diesel or a liquid alternative fuel. (3) Develop by 2006 diesel engines with fuel flexibility and a thermal efficiency of 55% with liquid alternative fuels, and a thermal efficiency of 55% with dedicated gaseous fuels. (4) Develop a methodology for analyzing and evaluating the operation of a heavy vehicle as an integrated system, considering such factors as engine efficiency; emissions; rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; friction, wear, and lubrication effects; auxiliary power units; material substitutions for reducing weight; and other sources of parasitic energy losses. Overarching these considerations is the need to preserve system functionality, cost, competitiveness, reliability, durability, and safety.

  20. Method for mobilization of hazardous metal ions in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugan, P.R.; Pfister, R.M.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial process is revealed for removing heavy metals such as bismuth, cadmium, lead, thorium, uranium and other transuranics from soils and sediments. The method utilizes indigenous, or isolates of indigenous, microorganisms and reducing agents, such as cysteine or sodium thioglycollate, or complexing agents such as the amino acid glycine, to effect the mobilization or release of the metals from the soil particles. 5 figs.

  1. Metal Enrichment in the Intra-Cluster Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabine Schindler

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The enrichment of the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) with heavy elements is reviewed. There is now good observational evidence for enrichment including abundance ratios and metallicity distributions. Various processes involved in the enrichment process -- ram-pressure stripping, galactic winds, galaxy-galaxy interactions, AGN outflows and intra-cluster supernovae -- are described. Simulations of the ICM evolution taking into account metal enrichment are presented.

  2. Heavy Flavour in a Nutshell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Lambert

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Moriond QCD brings together particle physicists of varied interests. This review and introduction to heavy flavour physics is aimed at those not in the heavy-flavour field to describe the motivation and methodology of precision flavour physics, and introduce the most tantalising searches for new physics. The LHC experiments are expected to make great inroads into constraining the new physics parameter space and discover the new physics which I will argue \\emph{must} be present to describe our observed universe.

  3. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  4. Systematics of cross sections for target K-vacancy production in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yong

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections for K-shell ionization by heavy ions have been determined from the measurements of target K x-ray yields. The measurements were performed with Ar, Kr, and Xe ions at energies from 2.5 to 25 MeV/amu and self-supported metallic foil...

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont. Together, these firms operated about 820 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 238 companies operated approximately 700 clay pits or quarries. The leading 20 firms

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, these firms operated approximately 739 mines. The estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays, these firms operated about 983 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1.8 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows: kaolin--55% paper, 8% kiln furniture

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 233 companies operated approximately 650 clay pits or quarries

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode clay produced was about $2.14 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    for such nonmetallurgical purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled inventories of nonstockpile-grade materials, as follows, in tons: natural battery ore, 16,800; chemical ore

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled, as follows, in tons: natural battery, 16,800, and metallurgical, 331,000. Prepared by Thomas S. Jones [(703

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

  15. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  16. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  17. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  18. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  19. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  20. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  1. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  4. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2007. Indium-containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were exported to Canada for processing. Two companies, one in New York and the other in Rhode Island gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells require approximately 50 metric tons of indium to produce 1 gigawatt of solar power. Research was underway to develop a low-cost manufacturing process for flexible CIGS solar

  5. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but growing through the recycling of lithium batteries. Import Sources (1994-97): Chile, 96%; and other, 4 lithium salts from battery recycling and lithium hydroxide monohydrate from former Department of Energy102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption was about $408 million as measured

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, the United States was expected to consume about 5% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2010 was $883 million as measured by the value

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, the United States was expected to consume about 2% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2009 was $358 million as measured by the value

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2007 was $548 million as measured

  10. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in a significant decrease in mine production. The amount of tungsten concentrates remaining in stockpiles in China for the tungsten industry. Once the stockpiles are depleted, world mine production will have to increase to meet

  11. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  12. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2010. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2006­09): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China

  14. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    184 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines. Approximately 10 companies in the United States processed tungsten concentrates, ammonium paratungstate, tungsten oxide, and

  15. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2009. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2005-08): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government limited

  16. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Canada, 16%; Germany, 9 by Chinese production and exports. China's Government restricted the amounts of tungsten that could

  17. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994 of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste

  18. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994. In 2000, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 39%; Russia, 21

  19. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  20. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2011. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production (2007­10): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government regulates its

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 26%; building, 16%; electrical, 8%; consumer durables, 8%; and other, 10%. Salient Statistics, yearend 168 16 14 12 10 Employment, primary reduction, number 18,800 17,800 17,800 18,200 18,000 Net%; Venezuela, 5%; Mexico, 3%; and other, 12%. Tariff: Item Number Most favored nation (MFN) Non-MFN4 12

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, 13 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; building, 14%; electrical, 8%; consumer durables, 7%; and other, 10%. Salient Statistics--United States, yearend 16 14 12 ( ) --2 Employment, primary reduction, number 17,800 17,800 18,200 18,000 18,300 Net%; Venezuela, 6%; Mexico, 3%; and other, 12%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations (NTR) Non-NTR5 12

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2002, 11 companies operated 16 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2002, 11 companies operated 16 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters were temporarily idled. The 11 smelters east of the Mississippi River accounted for 75% of the production; whereas the remaining 11 smelters, which included the 9 Pacific Northwest smelters, accounted for only 25%. Based upon

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, 6 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2009, 6 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were closed the entire year, and demolition of 1 smelter that had been idle since 2000 was completed in 2009. Of the operating smelters, three were temporarily idled and parts of four others were temporarily closed in 2009. Based

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2008, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were temporarily idled primary aluminum production increased substantially owing to smelter restarts after new power contracts, production was curtailed at two smelters owing to high electricity prices, power supply issues, and a sharp

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2012, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were closed temporarily quarter of 2012, the leading U.S. aluminum producer announced that its smelter in Alcoa, TN, which had potlines at its Rockdale, TX, smelter also would be permanently closed. Failure to obtain favorable power

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Issues: Domestic primary aluminum production decreased owing in large part to the smelter production cutbacks caused by increased energy costs, particularly in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters aluminum smelter in Hawesville, KY. The acquisition was subject to the completion of a labor agreement

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2006, 5 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 6 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2006, 5 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 6 smelters were temporarily idled. Domestic smelters operated at about 62% of rated or engineered capacity. Imports for consumption increased Smelter Production and Capacity: Production Yearend capacity 2005 2006e 2005 2006e United States 2,481 2

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters were closed the entire year. Demolition of two smelters that had been idle for several years was started in 2010. Based: During the first half of 2010, production from domestic primary aluminum smelters had stabilized after

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2007, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were temporarily idled primary aluminum production increased substantially owing to smelter restarts after new power contracts were obtained by producers. Domestic smelters operated at about 69% of rated or engineered capacity

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2011, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were closed the entire year. One smelter that was closed in 2009 was reopened during the first quarter of 2011. Five potlines that were closed in late 2008 and early 2009 at four other smelters were also restarted in early 2011. Based

  12. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,380 840 1,350 1,400 Rare-earth metals, alloys 1,470 1,390 4,920 1,380 3,400 Other rare-earth compounds 1,750 5,480 2,300 Rare-earth oxides, compounds 9,900 8,820 5,130 3,980 3,700 Rare-earth metals, alloy 784 scrap. Import Sources (2007­10): Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 79%; France, 6%; Estonia, 4

  13. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. The Center has gotten off to a fast start. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-12 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer software, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, produce pollution prevention information and documentation, manage their materials inventory, produce independent government estimates, and implement sale/service contracts. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrap yard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums. Members of the Center look forward to working with all DOE sites, regulatory authorities, the private sector, and other stakeholders to achieve the metals recycle goals.

  14. Humus forms and metal pollution in soil S. GILLET & J.F. PONGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : Humus forms and metal pollution Summary Smelters in northern France are a serious source of soil pollution by heavy metals. We have studied a poplar plantation downwind of an active zinc smelter. Three humus profiles were sampled at increasing distance from the smelter, and the thickness of topsoil

  15. Benefits of recycling galvanized steel scrap for recovery of high-quality steel and zinc metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1991-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Metal Recovery Industries, Inc. (MRII), in cost-sharing collaboration, have developed an electrolytic process to separate and recover steel and zinc from galvanized steel scrap. This work has been supported by the US DOE. An assessment of available dezinc technology was begun in 1987 which (1) screened process concepts for separating and recovering zinc and steel from galvanized ferrous scrap, (2) selected electrochemical stripping in hot caustic as the most promising process, (3) evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of the selected process on the basis of fundamental electrochemical studies, (4) experimentally verified the technical and economic feasibility of the process in a phased evaluation from bench-scale controlled experiments through batch tests of actual scrap up to six ton lots, and (5) concluded that the process has technical and economic merit and requires larger- scale evaluation in a continuous mode as the final phase of process development. This work has attracted worldwide interest. Preliminary economic analysis indicates that the cost of the recovered ferrous scrap would be about $150/ton (at a base cost of $110/ton for galvanized scrap), including credit for the co-product zinc. Concentrations of zinc, lead, cadmium and other coating constituents on loose scrap are reduced by a minimum of 98%, with zinc, in particular, reduced to below 0.1%. Removal efficiencies on baled scrap with bulk densities between 60 and 245 pounds per cubic foot range from 80 to 90%. About 1000 tons of galvanized scrap bales have been treated in batch operation at MRII in Hamilton, Ontario. A pilot plant for continuous treatment of 40 ton/day of loose scrap is being built by MRII in East Chicago, Indiana, with operation starting in early 1992. 9 refs.

  16. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  17. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  18. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

  19. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 AEC001: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  20. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 AEC001: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  1. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  2. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  3. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  4. Heavy flavour production at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Grelli; Andre Mischke

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will open a new era in high energy physics. The expected large cross section for heavy flavour production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV will allow detailed studies of the production mechanisms and an extensive test of Quantum Chromodynamics. Since charm and beauty has been proposed as a good probe to study hot and dense QCD matter, the understanding of the production mechanisms in elementary proton-proton collisions is of primary importance as a reference for studies in heavy-ion collisions. In the early phase of LHC operation the experiments will focus on the investigation of the heavy flavour production mechanisms.

  5. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  6. Reaction sequence of metallopetroporphyrins during heavy residuum upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R.; Bezman, S.A.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed the metallopetroporphyrins and the metallo-nonporphyrins during thermal and catalytic upgrading of heavy residua. By size exclusion chromatography with element specific detection (SEC-HPLC-ICP), they found thermal treatment reduces the size of the remaining metal-containing compounds, while catalytic treatment preferentially removes the metal-containing molecules in the size range of the catalyst pore. In both cases the metallopetroporphyrins process easily. By applying column chromatography and UV-vis spectroscopy, we have been able to detect and quantitate some of the probable intermediates of the demetallation sequence for vanadyl petroporphyrins. These results show the demetallation pathway is probably through the reduction of the porphyrins to chlorins and other reduced species. These results are in agreement with metalloporphyrin model compound work seen in the literature.

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2006 rose to more than 1.2 million tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 49%; electric, and metal exchanges 1,030 657 134 66 115 Employment, mine and mill, thousandse 7.0 6.8 7.0 7.0 7.2 Net

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2001 declined to 1.34 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at about $2.2 billion. The principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico%; electric and electronic products, 28%; transportation equipment, 11%; industrial machinery and equipment, and metal exchanges 314 532 565 334 800 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.2 13.0 11.6 10.2 10 Net

  9. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  10. XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

  11. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  12. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, clay and shale production was reported in all States except Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; bentonite-- 25% pet waste absorbent, 21% drilling mud, 21% foundry sand bond, 15% iron ore pelletizing,300 Imports for consumption: Artificially activated clay and earth 17 18 21 27 20 Kaolin 57 63 114 158 275,980 Consumption, apparent 37,500 35,600 34,800 34,600 34,600 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 40 42 42

  14. Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 2 Aspen 3.29 250.00$ 822.50$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 3 Aspen 2.38 160.00$ 380.80$ Hard Maple Veneer Aspen 600.00$ -$ Hard Maple Birdseye Aspen 0.055 700.00$ 38

  15. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  16. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  17. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  18. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , was as follows: chemical catalysts, 22%; metallurgical applications and alloys, 21%; petroleum refining catalysts, and importer of rare-earth products in 2010. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United) -- -- -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 867 784 564 188 250 Cerium compounds 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,500 1,400 Mixed REOs

  19. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalytic converters, 9%; glass polishing and ceramics, 6%; permanent magnets, 5%; petroleum refining, and importer of rare-earth products in 2009. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United) -- -- -- -- 20 Rare-earth metals, alloy 880 867 784 679 210 Cerium compounds 2,170 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,190 Mixed

  20. NO HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 ({<=}0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.

  1. Equilibrium metal concentration at zero net sorption (EMC{sub 0}): A new concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, G.; Lavkulich, L.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Soil Sciences

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metals in soils and waters are of environmental concerns. Since total concentration of a metal in soil is not directly related to its bioavailability, soil tests rely on measurement of extractable or labile fractions of metals. However, reagents used in the measurements are significantly different from natural waters entering soils in terms of ionic strength, acidity, and heavy metal concentration, making the direct interpretation of test results difficult if correlation between chemical test data and plant response in the field is not available. It is suggested that EMC{sub 0} be used as an indicator of heavy metal status in soils. EMC{sub 0} can be determined as follows: solutions with various metal concentrations (C{sub 0}) in 0.005 M CaCl{sub 2} matrix are added to soil samples at a fixed soil/solution ratio. The suspensions are shaken 24 hrs to achieve equilibrium, and centrifuged. Metal concentrations in supernatants are analyzed and plotted against C{sub 0}. A regression line based on plotted data an da 1:1 line are drawn. The X-axis value corresponding t the intersection of the liens is EMC{sub 0}. At the intersection, metal concentration at equilibrium equals that in the initial solution; indicating net sorption of the metal is zero. A EMC{sub 0} value of 0.27 mg/kg Zn was determined in a soil sample from the Fraser Valley in British Columbia. The soil received heavy applications of poultry manure.This value is much greater than water soluble Zn (0.06 mg/kg) of the sample. The significance of EMC{sub 0} is when concentrations of a metal in natural waters are less than EMC{sub 0}, soil will release the metal to soil solution. EMC{sub 0} may be useful in comparing relative degrees of contamination in contaminated soils.

  2. 3, 37453768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3745­3768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract/3745/ © European Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Heavy hydrogen Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  3. Light-Quark Decays in Heavy Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faller, Sven

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. Theses decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays are interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  4. Metal Hydrides - Science Needs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with traditions in metal hydride research Metal and Ceramic Sciences Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry Chemical and Biological Sciences Located on campus of Tier...

  5. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  7. Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumikawa, Chiaki [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)] [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-bearing wastes have to be carefully treated because heavy metals could be leached out under uncontrolled conditions when disposed of in a landfill. Consequently, heavy metals should be principally recovered and recycled forever. From this standpoint, the author has been trying to develop a technology to recover heavy metals from toxic vitrification fly ash for recycling to smelters. After a number of laboratory-scale experiments, pilot plant tests were successfully carried out and the developed process has been proven to be commercially realized. The main features of the process are that it recovers almost 100% of the heavy metals, simultaneously separating the metals which are recovered in a lead smelter from those in a zinc smelter, and that the output of the process are only metallurgical products recyclable for smelters and the effluent water which can be released into the environment. The process is considered an ideal one for the treatment of toxic fly ash from the viewpoint of not only natural resources but also environmental conservation.

  8. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The approximate distribution in 2002 by end use was as follows: petroleum refining catalysts, 27%; glass polishing. The estimated value of refined rare earths consumed in the United States was more than $1 billion-earth metals, alloy 1,780 2,470 1,420 1,450 1,130 Cerium compounds 3,990 4,310 3,850 2,540 2,630 Mixed REOs 5

  9. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , televisions, computer monitors, radar, and X-ray intensifying film, 10%; petroleum refining catalysts, 8 continued to be a major exporter and consumer of rare-earth products in 2006. The estimated value of refined-earth metals, alloy 1,450 1,130 804 880 947 Cerium compounds 2,540 2,630 1,880 2,170 2,530 Mixed REOs 1,040 2

  10. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths by end use was as follows: automotive catalytic converters, 25%; petroleum refining, and consumer of rare-earth products in 2007. The estimated value of refined rare earths consumed in the United -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 1,130 804 880 867 831 Cerium compounds 2,630 1,880 2,170 2,590 3,090 Mixed

  11. Pyroprocessing of IFR Metal Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laidler, J.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle features the use of an innovative reprocessing method, known as {open_quotes}pyroprocessing{close_quotes} featuring fused-salt electrofining of the spent fuel. Electrofining of IFR spent fuel involves uranium recovery by electro-transport to a solid steel cathode. The thermodynamics of the system preclude plutonium recovery in the same way, so a liquid cadmium cathode located in the electrolyte salt phase is utilized. The deposition of Pu, Am, Np, and Cm takes place at the liquid cadmium cathode in the form of cadmium intermetallic compounds (e.g, PuCd{sub 6}), and uranium deposits as the pure metal when cadmium saturation is reached. A small amount of rare earth fission products deposit together with the heavy metals at both the solid and liquid cadmium cathodes, providing a significant degree of self-protection. A full scope demonstration of the IFR fuel cycle will begin in 1993, using fuel irradiated in EBR-II.

  12. SOVENT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY FOR IN-SITU UPGRADING OF HEAVY OIL SANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munroe, Norman

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO2. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO2 density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the precipitate readily enables removal of asphaltenes. Thus, an upgraded crude low in heavy metal, sulfur and nitrogen is more conducive for further purification.

  13. Metal behavior during fluidized bed thermal treatment of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T.C.; Lee, H.T.; Shiao, C.C.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Bostick, W.D. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superfund dumpsites are frequently composed of soils contaminated with hazardous organic constituents and toxic heavy metals. While thermal treatment is an effective method of remediating the contaminated soils, the major environmental concerns are the emissions of toxic metal fumes during the treatment and the leaching of metals from the treated soil. The US EPA has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified cancer risks from waste incineration systems. Research leading to better understanding of their behavior and better controlling of their emissions is urgently needed. In this study, the behavior of metals during the fluidized bed thermal treatment of artificially prepared metal-contaminated clay was experimentally and theoretically investigated. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on metal volatilization and metal leachability associated with the process. Metal experiments were carried out in a well instrumented 76 mm (3 inch) i.d. fluidized bed incinerator. The metals involved were compounds of lead and cadmium and the operating parameters included metal concentration, air flow rate, treatment temperature and treatment duration. The observed results indicated that metal volatilization is mainly a function of treatment temperature and treatment duration. The degree of volatilization was observed to range from 5 to 40% depending on the operating conditions. Cadmium leachability was observed to be relatively high compared to that of lead. In addition to the experimental study, a theoretical model based on the laws of heat and mass transfer operations and reaction kinetics was derived to simulate the metal volatilization process. The derived model was found to predict reasonably well the experimental observations.

  14. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY

  15. Cadmium, copper, and lead in soils and garden produce near a metal smelter at Flin Flon, Manitoba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pip, E. (Univ. of Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towns in the vicinity of base metal smelters are subject to contamination from atmospheric fallout containing heavy metals. Many smelters have been in operation for decades, and have resulted in substantial accumulation of metals in the surrounding soils. Metal contamination of edible vegetation near mines and smelters has been the source of health concerns in a number of countries. One smelter that has operated for more than half a century is located at Flin Flon, Manitoba. Many Flin Flon residents utilize home vegetable gardens year after year. However little is known regarding heavy metal contamination of locally grown garden produce. Since food can contribute as much as 90% of total body uptake of metals it is important to identify any sources which may account for the disproportionate share. The objective of the present study was to examine concentrations of cadmium, copper and lead in soils and garden produce in the vicinity of the Flin Flon smelter.

  16. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  17. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  18. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

  19. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  20. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace01musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  1. Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out...

  2. Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  3. Heavy flavor production in the STAR experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Trzeciak; for the STAR Collaboration

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, recent STAR heavy flavor measurements in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions are highlighted. We report studies of open charm mesons, reconstructed directly from hadronic decay products, and studies of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons. We also present J/$\\psi$ measurements via the di-electron decay channel at various collision systems and energies. In Au+Au collisions the energy dependence of J/$\\psi$ production measured at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV is shown. Finally, prospects of heavy flavor measurements with the STAR detector upgrades are discussed.

  4. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a future in which vehicle automation technologies are ableto support the heavy vehicle automation including PrecisionCommittee on Vehicle-Highway Automation, and the attendees

  5. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Guo, Feng-Kun; /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.; Hanhart, Christoph; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  6. Metal speciation in landfill leachates with a focus on the influence of organic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claret, Francis, E-mail: f.claret@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Tournassat, Christophe; Crouzet, Catherine; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Schaefer, Thorsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Hydrogeology Group, D-12249 Berlin (Germany); Braibant, Gilles; Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. > Most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while Pb, Cu and Cd are associated with larger particles. > Metal complexation with OM is not sufficient to explain apparent supersaturation of metals with sulphide minerals. - Abstract: This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

  7. Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3 HanfordHarry S.Heat PumpsHeavy

  8. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY ION

  9. Heavy Actinides | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat Transfer inoperation in timeHeavy

  10. Pollution prevention and waste minimization in metal finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimetz, C.J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was done to identify pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities in the general plating department and the printed circuit board processing department. Recommendations for certain recycle and recovery technologies were mad in order to reduce usage of acids and the volume of heavy metal sludge that is formed at the industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility (IWPF). Some of these technologies discussed were acid purification, electrowinning, and ion exchange. Specific technologies are prescribed for specific processes. Those plating processes where the metals can be recovered are copper, nickel, gold, cadmium, tin, lead, and rhodium.

  11. Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project of accounting for real-world driving performance within heavy truck analyses. The Program is being led by Oak to collect 104 channels of information at 100Hz. Another industry partner, Michelin Tires, was interested

  12. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , describes R&D needs for heavy-ion accelerator, target and chamber R&D. 44 pages. Defines goals and criteria tasks) - ion accelerator technologies - chamber and maintenance technologies - pulsed power technologiesThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan

  13. Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism And Predictions Of Super-Heavy Elements Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism And Predictions Of Super-Heavy Elements Production Yasuhisa Abea University, Omsk, RU-644077, Russia Abstract. Fusion process is shown to firstly form largely deformed mono-ion Fusion; Fusion hindrance; Super-heavy elements; Cross section. PACS: 25.70, Jj, 25.70. Lm, 27.90. +b

  14. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  15. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  16. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Bishai

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy quark production cross-sections, correlations and polarizations have been measured at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) using 118 pb{sup -1} of data collected from the 1992 to 1995 Run I of the Fermilab Tevatron. There is still disagreement between theoretical predictions of bottom and charm hadro-production cross-sections and the Run I results. The observed transverse momentum spectrum of the prompt J/{psi} production polarization is still not understood. Run II of the Tevatron began in July of 2001 and the CDF Run II detector [11] has collected 70 pb{sup -1} of physics quality data since January 2002. Large statistics of onia states have been collected. Exclusive B meson decay modes have been reconstructed and the SVT level 2 displaced track trigger has produced large samples of D mesons. The prompt charm and b {yields} cX fractions in both charmonium and D meson samples have been measured. Run II is now poised to greatly enhance the knowledge of heavy quark production dynamics well beyond the reach of the Run I detector.

  17. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Borissov

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy $b$- and $c$-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays $B^0, B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in $B_s \\to J\\psi \\phi$ decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the $B_s \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  18. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  19. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  20. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  1. The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delahaye, F; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (seismic data. Models constructed with the proposed new low abundance scale are strongly disfavored, disagreeing at the 15 \\sigma level. We then use the sensitivity of the seismic properties to abundance changes to invert the problem and infer a seismic solar heavy element abundance mix with two components: meteoritic abundances, and th...

  2. Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 Heavy-fermion systems are...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  4. Simulation of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M.et al. , “Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion,”et al. , "Chamber Transport of `Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ion

  5. Composition and process for organic and metal contaminant fixation in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwitzgebel, Klaus (7507 Chimney Corners, Austin, TX 78731)

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and compositions using a first ferrous iron containing solution with the iron concentration in excess of theoretical requirements to treat a contaminated site to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium and coprecipitate trivalent chromium with other heavy metals and using a second solution of silicate containing a destabilizing salt to form a relatively impermeable gel in the contaminated site thereby fixing metals and organics to the extent that there should be no detectable ground water contamination.

  6. The performance of 3500 MWth homogeneous and heterogeneous metal fueled core designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turski, R.; Yang, Shi-tien

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance parameters are calculated for a representative 3500 MWth homogeneous and a heterogeneous metal fueled reactor design. The equilibrium cycle neutronic characteristics, safety coefficients, control system requirements, and control rod worths are evaluated. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both configurations are also compared. The heavy metal fuel loading requirements and neutronic performance characteristics are also evaluated for the uranium startup option. 14 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  7. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  8. Relativistic heavy ion research. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  9. Heavy ion, recirculating linac, design optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Godlove, T.F. (FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax Station, VA (United States))

    1991-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost optimization is important to the development of high-current, heavy-ion accelerators for power production based on inertial confinement fusion. Two heavy-ion, recirculating linac configurations are examined that eliminate the necessity to provide reset pulses for the cores used in the linac induction accelerating modules. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Innovative Structural and Joining Concepts for Lightweight Design of Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacky C. Prucz; Samir N. Shoukry; Gergis W. William

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the area of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) have brought these materials to a maturity stage where the technology is ready for transition to large-volume production and commercialization. The new materials seem to allow the fabrication of higher quality parts at less than 50 percent of the weight as compared to steel, especially when they are selectively reinforced with carbon, silicon carbide, or aluminum oxide fibers. Most of the developments in the MMC materials have been spurred, mainly by applications that require high structural performance at elevated temperatures, the heavy vehicle industry could also benefit from this emerging technology. Increasing requirements of weight savings and extended durability are the main drivers for potential insertion of MMC technology into the heavy vehicle market. Critical elements of a typical tractor-trailer combination, such as highly loaded sections of the structure, engine components, brakes, suspensions, joints and bearings could be improved through judicious use of MMC materials. Such an outcome would promote the DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing the fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles and reducing their life cycle costs and pollution levels. However, significant technical and economical barriers are likely to hinder or even prevent broad applications of MMC materials in heavy vehicles. The tradeoffs between such expected benefits (lower weights and longer durability) and penalties (higher costs, brittle behavior, and difficult to machine) must be thoroughly investigated both from the performance and cost viewpoints, before the transfer of MMC technology to heavy vehicle systems can be properly assessed and implemented. MMC materials are considered to form one element of the comprehensive, multi-faceted strategy pursued by the High Strength/Weight Reduction (HS/WR) Materials program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for structural weight savings and quality enhancements in heavy vehicles. The research work planed for the first year of this project (June 1, 2003 through May 30, 2004) focused on a theoretical investigation of weight benefits and structural performance tradeoffs associated with the design, fabrication, and joining of MMC components for heavy-duty vehicles. This early research work conducted at West Virginia University yielded the development of integrated material-structural models that predicted marginal benefits and significant barriers to MMC applications in heavy trailers. The results also indicated that potential applications of MMC materials in heavy vehicles are limited to components identified as critical for either loadings or weight savings. Therefore, the scope of the project was expanded in the following year (June 1, 2004 through May 30, 2005) focused on expanding the lightweight material-structural design concepts for heavy vehicles from the component to the system level. Thus, the following objectives were set: (1) Devise and evaluate lightweight structural configurations for heavy vehicles. (2) Study the feasibility of using Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for critical structural components and joints in heavy vehicles. (3) Develop analysis tools, methods, and validated test data for comparative assessments of innovative design and joining concepts. (4) Develop analytical models and software for durability predictions of typical heavy vehicle components made of particulate MMC or fiber-reinforced composites. This report summarizes the results of the research work conducted during the past two years in this projects.

  11. Induced biochemical interactions in immature and biodegraded heavy crude oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Shelenkova, L.; Zhou, W.M.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

  12. INDUCED BIOCHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN IMMATURE AND BIODEGRADED HEAVY CRUDE OILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; SHELENKOVA,L.; ZHOU,W.M.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

  13. Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

    1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ``Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting demonstration, an investigation of commercial markets for RSM, and refinement of methods to quantify isotopic elements.

  14. Heavy photon search experiment at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanyan, S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Collaboration: HPS Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab will search for new heavy vector boson(s), aka 'heavy photons', in the mass range of 20 MeV/c{sup 2} to 1000 MeV/c{sup 2} using the scattering of high energy, high intensity electron beams off a high Z target. The proposed measurements will cover the region of parameter space favored by the muon g-2 anomaly, and will explore a significant region of parameter space, not only at large couplings (??/? > 10{sup ?7}), but also in the regions of small couplings, down to ??/??10{sup ?10}. The excellent vertexing capability of the Si-tracker uniquely enables HPS to cover the small coupling region. Also, HPS will search for heavy photons in an alternative to the e{sup +}e{sup ?} decay mode, in the heavy photon's decay to ?{sup +}??.

  15. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  16. The metal enrichment of elliptical galaxies in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Nagashima; Cedric G. Lacey; Takashi Okamoto; Carlton M. Baugh; Carlos S. Frenk; Shaun Cole

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the metal enrichment of elliptical galaxies in the framework of hierarchical models of galaxy formation. The semi-analytical model we use in this Letter, which has been used to study the metal enrichment of the intracluster medium (ICM) by Nagashima et al., includes the effects of flows of gas and metals both into and out of galaxies and the processes of metal enrichment due to both type Ia and type II supernovae. We adopt a solar neighbourhood IMF for star formation in discs, but consider models in which starbursts have either a solar neighbourhood IMF or a top-heavy IMF. We find that the alpha-element abundance in ellipticals is consistent with observed values only if the top-heavy IMF is used. This result is consistent with our previous study on the metal enrichment of the ICM. We also discuss the abundance ratio of alpha elements to iron as a function of velocity dispersion and metallicity. We find that models with a top-heavy IMF match the alpha/Fe ratios observed in typical L_* ellipticals, but none of the models reproduce the observed increase of alpha/Fe with velocity dispersion.

  17. Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Heavy-fermion systems are characterized by electrons with extremely large effective masses. The corresponding...

  18. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  20. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

  1. Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Poster presentation at the...

  2. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

  3. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ALTERNATIVE. EVERY Advanced Natural Gas Engine Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Dr. Mostafa M Kamel Dr. Mostafa M...

  4. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for...

  5. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  6. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  7. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles with Control Technologies for Reduced Diesel Exhaust Emissions Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty...

  8. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  9. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  10. Heavy quark physics from SLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers preliminary measurements from SLD on heavy quark production at the Z{sup 0}, using 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays accumulated during the 1993-1995 runs. A measurement of R{sub b} with a lifetime double tag is presented. The high electron beam polarization of the SLC is employed in the direct measurement of the parity-violating parameters A{sub b} and A{sub c} by use of the left-right forward-backward asymmetry. The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured by two analyses. The first identifies semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p,p{sub t}) leptons; the second analysis isolates a sample of B meson decays with a two-dimensional impact parameter tag and reconstructs the decay length and charge using a topological vertex reconstruction method.

  11. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  12. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    tons Aluminium 7,000 tons Steel-scrap 47,000 tons Steel-structural, 225,000 tons Nickel 6,400 tons Recyclable Metals at PORTS (by material type) Asset Recycle & Reuse Total...

  13. METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides J. J. Rhyne and G. E on the rare earth site. The rare earth spins disorder at a temperature lower than the bulk Tc in ErFe2 H3 5 per formula unit assuming complete occupation of 3 tetrahedral sites. The heavy rare earth (RFe2

  14. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    December 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal combustion by products Fly ash Heavy metals Leaching road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater is produced in the United States as a by-product of burning coal in electric power plants (ACAA, 2009

  15. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  16. Collisional energy loss of heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Meistrenko; Andre Peshier; Jan Uphoff; Carsten Greiner

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a transport approach for heavy quarks in a quark-gluon plasma, which is based on improved binary collision rates taking into account quantum statistics, the running of the QCD coupling and an effective screening mass adjusted to hard-thermal loop calculations. We quantify the effects of in-medium collisions by calculating the heavy flavor nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow for RHIC energies, which are comparable to radiative effects. We also derive an analytic formula for the mean collisional energy loss of an energetic heavy quark in a streaming quark gluon plasma.

  17. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %. Three primary and eight secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial grade in 1999. Of zinc metal,500 Smelter primary, numbere 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 Net import reliance3 as a percent of apparent. The planned tripling of refinery capacity at the Clarksville, TN, smelter was suspended by Pasminco Ltd

  19. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -heavy oil, and oil shale. Tremendous amounts of heavy oil resources are available in the world. Fig. 1.1 shows the total world oil reserves, and indicates that heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen make up about 70% of the world?s total oil resources...

  20. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  1. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  2. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    progress with more modest near-term budgets. #12;Slide 5 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National requirement: modest growth of HIFS-VNL budget from present 7.7 M$/yr to ~16M$/yr, including suppo

  3. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

  4. HEAVY-ION IMAGING APPLIED TO MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy particles rat h er than the vax~at1.on 1n t h e x-rayprograms on the a PDPll-34 and VAX- 780 computers. The image

  5. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    line- of-sight damage from target debris, neutron and gamma radiation. · Target injection: Heavy ions-liquid-protected target chambers with 30 yr lifetimes. · Robust final optics: Focusing magnets for ion beams avoid direct

  6. Hydrotreating Uinta Basin bitumen-derived heavy oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longstaff, D.C.; Balaji, G.V.; Kim, J.W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy oils derived from Uinta Basin bitumens have been hydrotreated under varying conditions. The process variables investigated included total reactor pressure (11.0-16.9 MPa), reactor temperature (616-711 K), feed rate (0.29-1.38 WHSV), and catalyst composition. The extent of heteroatom removal and residuum conversion were determined by the feed molecular weight and catalyst selection. Catalytic activity for heteroatom conversion removal was primarily influenced by metal loading. The heteroatom removal activity of the catalysts studied were ranked HDN catalysts > HDM catalysts > HDN-support. Catalytic activity for residuum conversion was influenced by both metal loading and catalyst surface area. The residuum conversion activity of HDN catalysts were always higher than the activity of HDM catalysts and HDN supports. The residuum conversion activity of HDN-supports surpassed the activity of HDM catalyst at higher temperatures. The conversions achieved with HDN catalysts relative to the HDM catalysts indicated that the low metals contents of the Uinta Basin bitumens obviate the need for hydrodemetallation as an initial upgrading step with these bitumens. The upgrading of Uinta Basin bitumens for integration into refinery feed slates should emphasize molecular weight and boiling range reduction first, followed by hydrotreating of the total liquid product produced in the pyrolysis process. Kinetics of residuum conversion can be modeled by invoking a consecutive-parallel mechanism in which native residuum in the feed is rapidly converted to volatile products and to product residuum. Deep conversion of residuum is only achieved when the more refractory product residuum is converted to volatile products.

  7. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  8. ? Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Zhou; Nu Xu; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the {\\Upsilon} production in heavy ion collisions at LHC energy in the frame of a dynamical transport approach. Both the initial production and in-medium regeneration and both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects are included in the calculations. In comparison with the ground state {\\Upsilon}(1s), the excited state {\\Upsilon}(2s) is much more sensitive to the heavy quark potential at finite temperature.

  9. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; Y. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; A. W. Steiner

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  10. Lead and other metals in dried fish from Nigerian markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okoye, C.O.B. (Univ. of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nigerian economy had remarkable industrial growth between 1970 and 1980 and industrialization and urbanization have been sustained albeit at a slower rate. Nevertheless, waste management remains grossly underdeveloped. Environmental concern is only a recent phenomenon, resulting thus far in the launching of a monthly clean-up campaign in 1984 and the establishment of the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) in 1988. The level of public awareness has not been encouraging. The indiscriminate discharge of largely untreated factory and urban effluents has continued. Streets and home surroundings become littered soon after clean-up exercises. Inadequate facilities contribute to the unwholesome situation. Refuse collecting centers are mostly without any holding containers, and solid wastes, the focus of the monthly clean-up, are left on the bare ground. Heavy automobile traffic and high lead content of the local automobile fuels have not helped matters. Heavy metals in the human environment are of global concern. In developed countries, limits of concentrations in fish and other foods have been set to safeguard public health, but Nigeria has yet to set any standards because of lack of baseline data. Within the last decade, scientists have been reporting on heavy metal levels in fish from the aquatic environment of Nigeria. Among the metals, lead was the most prominent, with a mean value comparable to the set limits in Great Britain and New Zealand. The present study was aimed at further establishing the levels of contamination in fish by lead and other metals in the Nigerian aquatic systems. Smoke-dried fish, being the most consumed by the local population, was chosen for the survey on the levels of cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, lead and zinc. Possible surface contamination arising from observed poor handling practices was also investigated. 18 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Determination of toxic elements in the ecological evaluation of metalliferous deposits of heavy oil and natural bitumens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, I.S.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Elements such as vanadium, nickel, zinc, arsenic, selenium, and mercury are present in highly toxic compounds in many workable deposits of heavy oil and natural bitumens. Refining this raw material and, especially, using the heavy residues as furnace fuel and as binding material for road paving, can lead to contamination of the environment unless measures are taken to remove the metals. Various investigations of the rare and disseminated elements in heavy oil and natural bitumens have encompassed a broad range of problems: (1) In refining, assessing the role of rare elements in technological processes in order to choose the optimal schemes for refining and improving the quality of petroleum products. (2) In protecting the environment and, in particular, identifying toxic compounds in fuel oils which, when burned at power stations, emit a substantial number of harmful substances into the atmosphere. (3) In determining commercial by-products, such as vanadium and nickel, in the petroleum and bitumen raw material.

  12. Transition Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism in Metal Oxide Nanoparticles. Transition Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism in Metal Oxide Nanoparticles....

  13. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit between the roof and the attic. · Apply modifications to traditional roofing assembly and roofing roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  14. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  15. Metal Speciation in Landfill Leachates with a Focus on the Influence of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F Claret; C Tournassat; C Crouzet; E Gaucher; T Schäfer; G Braibant; D Guyonnet

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

  16. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  17. Molecular characterization of vanadyl and nickel non-porphyrin compounds in heavy crude petroleums and residua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R.; Fetzer, J.C.; Gallegos, E.J.; Fish, R.H.; Komlenic, J.J.; Wines, B.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular characterization of vanadium and nickel compounds in heavy crude petroleums has been the subject of current research. Arabian Heavy, Maya, Boscan, Cerro Negro, Prudhoe Bay, Wilmington Beta, Kern River, and Morichal crude petroleums have been examined. Fractions from D 2007 separations, porphyrin extractions, and solvent selective extraction with reversed phase column separations of these petroleums have been studied thoroughly by EPR. Important structural aspects are emerging from the presented data: (1) There are non-porphyrin metal complexes in the crude petroleums. (2) They appear to be smaller molecules with MW < 400 which are liberated when the tertiary structure of the large asphaltics is denatured. (3) The first coordination spheres of this class of compounds are possibly 4N, N O 2S, and 4S. 10 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

  19. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  20. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed