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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 600 - - - 600 Illinois River 203 - 13 - 217 Indiana River 180 - - - 180 Kentucky Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Kentucky (West) Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Utah Railroad 18 - - -

2

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Colorado Railroad 575 - - - 575 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 241 - - - 241 Kentucky Railroad 827 - 12 - 839 Kentucky (East) Railroad 76 - - - 76 Kentucky (West) Railroad

3

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Colorado Railroad 514 - - - 514 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 172 - - - 172 Kentucky Railroad 635 - 11 - 647 Kentucky (East) Railroad 45 - - - 45 Kentucky (West)

4

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Colorado Railroad 385 - - - 385 Illinois River 15 - - - 15 Indiana Railroad 1 - - - 1 Indiana River 350 - - - 350 Indiana Total 351 - - - 351 Kentucky Railroad 682 - 2 - 685 Kentucky (East)

5

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Colorado Railroad 640 - - - 640 Illinois River 123 - - - 123 Indiana River 312 - - - 312 Kentucky Railroad 622 - 36 - 658 Kentucky (East) Railroad 96 - 36 - 132 Kentucky (West)

6

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Colorado Total 468 - - - 468 Colorado Railroad 468 - - - 468 Illinois Total 90 - 26 - 116 Illinois River 90 - 26 - 116 Indiana Total 181 - - - 181 Indiana River 181 -

7

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Colorado Total 82 - - - 82 Colorado Railroad 82 - - - 82 Illinois Total 149 - 14 - 163 Illinois Railroad 44 - - - 44 Illinois River 105 - 14 - 119 Indiana Total 99 - - - 99

8

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,486 155 328 - 1,970 Alabama Railroad 1,020 - 75 - 1,095 Alabama River 417 - - - 417 Alabama Truck 49 155 253 - 458 Colorado Total 195 - - - 195 Colorado Railroad 195 - - - 195 Illinois Total 127 - 18 - 145 Illinois Railroad 20 - - - 20 Illinois River 107 - 18 - 125 Indiana Total

9

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Colorado Total 621 2 - - 623 Colorado Railroad 621 2 - - 623 Illinois Total 113 - 11 - 123 Illinois River 113 - 11 - 123 Indiana Total 265 - - - 265 Indiana Railroad

10

By Coal Destination State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Colorado Total 2,113 - - - 2,113 Colorado Railroad 2,113 - - - 2,113 Illinois Total 336 - - - 336 Illinois River 336 - - - 336 Indiana Total 1,076

11

EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination Glossary Home > Coal> Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination Release Date: January 2006 Next Release Date: 2006 Distribution of U.S Coal by Destination Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2004 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: ALASKA State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alaska 460 - - 497 957 Railroad 256 - - 497 753 Truck 204 - - * 204 State Total 460 - - 497 957 Railroad 256 - - 497 753 Truck 204 - - * 204 EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination

12

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 64 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Arkansas Railroad - 6 - - 6 Colorado Railroad 279 - - - 279 Illinois Railroad 11 - - - 11 Illinois River 109 - - - 109 Illinois Total 119 - - - 119 Indiana River 197 - - - 197 Kentucky Railroad 442 - 28 - 471 Kentucky Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky Total 442 - 31 - 473 Kentucky (East) Railroad 357 - 28 - 385 Kentucky (East) Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky (East)

13

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 123 - - - 123 Illinois River 145 - - - 145 Indiana River 246 - - - 246 Indiana Truck 37 - - - 37 Indiana Total 283 - - - 283 Kentucky Railroad 426 - 30 - 457 Kentucky (East) Railroad 172 - 30 - 202 Kentucky (West) Railroad 255 - - - 255 Oklahoma Railroad - 6 - - 6 Utah Railroad 30 - - - 30 Virginia Railroad - 14 - - 14 West Virginia Railroad - 75 - -

14

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 (Thousand Short Tons) " " Coal-Exporting State and Destination ",,"Metallurgical ","Steam ","Total "," " "Alabama ",,3977,"-",3977," " ," Argentina ",225,"-",225," " ," Belgium ",437,"-",437," " ," Brazil ",1468,"-",1468," " ," Bulgaria ",75,"-",75," " ," Egypt ",363,"-",363," " ," Germany ",71,"-",71," " ," Italy ",61,"-",61," " ," Netherlands ",219,"-",219," " ," Spain ",415,"-",415," " ," Turkey ",362,"-",362," "

15

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "(Thousand Short Tons)" "Coal-Exporting State and Destination ",,"Metallurgical ","Steam ","Total " "Alabama ",,5156,"-",5156 ,"Argentina ",345,"-",345 ,"Belgium ",387,"-",387 ,"Brazil ",1825,"-",1825 ,"Bulgaria ",363,"-",363 ,"Egypt ",477,"-",477 ,"Germany ",167,"-",167 ,"Italy ",87,"-",87 ,"Netherlands ",399,"-",399 ,"Spain ",198,"-",198 ,"Turkey ",551,"-",551 ,"United Kingdom ",359,"-",359 "Kentucky ",,1449,"-",1449 ,"Canada ",566,"-",566

16

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year: Production 1: Waste Coal Supplied 2: Trade: Stock Change 4,5: Losses and

17

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 2008 Final May 2010 2008 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-exporting State. This Final 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the Preliminary 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report contains actual annual data instead of imputed data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the

18

Coal distribution, January-June 1985. [USA; January-June; 1981 to 1985; producing district; destination; transport means  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Information Administration (EIA) report continues the quarterly series on coal distribution started in 1957 by the Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, as a Mineral Industry Survey, Distribution of Bituminous Coal and Lignite Shipments. The publication provides volume data on coal distribution by coal-producing district of origin, consumer use, method of transportation, and State of destination necessary for EIA to fulfill its data colletion functions as authorized by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974. All data for 1985 in this report are preliminary. Data for 1981-1984 are final. Coal shipments from mines in Appalachia were 10.2% lower, while shipments from western mines were up by 13.7%, reaching a record 6-month high. Export shipments moved ahead of their 1984 pace by 9.2% despite a 27.0% decline in shipments to Canada. Texas expanded its lead as the Nation's top State to receive coal, and North Dakota experienced an upsurge in coal receipts due to the startup of the Great Plains coal gasification project. Coal production and purchases totaled 438.4 million short tons, 2.2% below last year's level. 6 figs., 33 tabs.

McNair, M.B.

1985-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Most U.S. coal exports went to European and Asian markets in 2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Korea (10 million short tons) ranked in the top 10 destinations for both U.S. metallurgical coal exports and steam coal exports. In fact, ...

20

Figure 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nether- Brazil United Japan Canada Italy Germany 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Million Short Tons Kingdom Total Europe 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17. 5 tons/day of methanol  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17.5 tons/day of methanol in addition to 125 million cu ft/day of pipeline-quality substitute natural gas (SNG), making the facility the first commercial producer of methanol-from-coal in the United States, according to the consortium building the $1.5 billion facility in Beulah, North Dakota. As originally conceived, the plant would have used 17 tons/day of purchased methanol to clean the raw-gas product stream of impurities, primarily sulfur. But based on the cost of transporting methanol to the plant site and storing it for use, the consortium decided it was more economical to produce its own methanol from lignite. The construction started in July 1980, and the facility is to come on stream in 1984.

Not Available

1980-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State, 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke)...

23

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Origin State, 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke)...

24

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke)...

25

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 1st Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Colorado Total 204 - - - 204 Colorado Railroad

26

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

dividing total production by total labor hours worked by all mine employees except office workers; beginning in ... 1978 and Coal—Pennsylvania Anthracite 1977; ...

27

Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. E=Estimate. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: Prices are free-on-board (F.O.B.) rail/barge prices, which are the F.O.B. prices of coal at the point

28

Europe and Asia are the leading destinations for U.S. coal exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

High natural gas prices in Europe have contributed to increased imports of U.S. steam coal. Source: ...

29

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\ICR\My%20Documents\Coal\Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data For: 2002 Data For: 2002 Next Release Date: Summer 2004 Home > Coal > Annual Coal Distribution > Coal Destination Map > Domestic Distribution by Destination: Alaska Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2002 (Thousand Short Tons) State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Destination: Alaska Alaska 376 - - 471 847 Railroad 376 - - 471 847 Truck - - - * * State Total 376 - - 471 847 Railroad 376 - - 471 847 Truck - - - * * See footnotes at end of table. EIA Home Page 1 of 1 Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transpo... Data For: 2002 Next Release Date: Summer 2004

30

Year","Quarter","Destination State","Origin State","Consumer Type","Transportati  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination State","Origin State","Consumer Type","Transportation Mode","Coal Volume (short tons)" Destination State","Origin State","Consumer Type","Transportation Mode","Coal Volume (short tons)" 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",25445 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",141202 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",1051202 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","River",729969 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Truck",56130 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Railroad",10029

31

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,837 167 196 - 2,200 Alabama Railroad 1,051 25 10 - 1,087 Alabama River 730 - - - 730 Alabama Truck 56 141 186 - 384 Colorado Total 456 - 16 - 472

32

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 6,982 679 1,278 - 8,939 Alabama Railroad 4,400 20 286 - 4,706 Alabama River 1,885 - - - 1,885 Alabama Truck 696 659 992 - 2,347 Colorado Total 1,884 2 - - 1,885 Colorado Railroad

33

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,714 158 238 - 2,110 Alabama Railroad 1,056 12 45 - 1,113 Alabama River 464 - - - 464 Alabama Truck 194 146 193 - 532 Colorado Total 275 - - - 275

34

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,066 210 301 - 1,577 Alabama Railroad 495 116 26 - 638 Alabama River 512 - 2 - 513 Alabama Truck 59 94 273 - 426 Colorado Total 97 - - - 97 Colorado

35

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 4th Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,226 162 274 - 1,662 Alabama Railroad 803 17 22 - 842 Alabama River 384 - - - 384 Alabama Truck 39 144 252 - 436 Colorado Total 301 - 25 - 326 Colorado

36

Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | Revision/Correction The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for 2012 are final, and this report supersedes the 2012 quarterly coal distribution reports. Highlights for 2012: Total coal distributions for 2012 were 1,003.1 million short tons (mmst), a decrease of 7.9% compared to 2011. Distributions to domestic destinations were 877.3 mmst, a decrease of 104.1 mmst (i.e. 10.6% decrease) compared to 2011. Distributions to

37

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

38

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $4.31 $4.36 $5.01 7.9 15.0 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $11.08 $12.65 $13.27 9.4 4.9 Colorado Indiana $6.29 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $13.15 $14.28 W 8.6

39

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $7.51 $4.74 $3.37 -33.0 -28.8 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $21.73 $20.23 $13.30 -21.8 -34.3 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

40

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

42

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $3.97 $3.97 $4.52 6.7 13.7 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $10.21 $11.53 $11.95 8.2 3.7 Colorado Indiana $5.79 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $11.99 $12.87 W 7.3

43

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $8.16 $5.20 $3.75 -32.2 -27.9 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $23.60 $22.20 $14.77 -20.9 -33.5 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

44

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Georgia Railroad 23 - - - 23 Georgia Truck s - - - s Georgia Total 23 - - - 23 Indiana Railroad - 115 - - 115 Indiana Truck - 71 - - 71 Indiana Total - 186 - - 186 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Tennessee Truck

45

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Georgia Total s - s - s Georgia Truck s - s - s Indiana Total - 98 - - 98 Indiana Railroad - 98 - - 98 Kentucky Total - - 12 - 12 Kentucky Truck - - 12 - 12 Ohio Total - 30 - - 30 Ohio

46

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total - 72 - - 72 Indiana Railroad - 72 - - 72 Tennessee Total - - 7 - 7 Tennessee Truck - - 7 - 7 Origin State Total 1,896

47

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011 By Coal Destination State ...

48

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

49

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $13.29 $12.39 $13.93 2.4 12.5 Alabama Georgia $17.62 $17.84 $20.09 6.8 12.6 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $31.79 $27.66 $24.93 -11.5 -9.9 Colorado Arizona $25.97 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $34.20 $46.22 - 35.1 Colorado Colorado $13.04 $7.72 $8.13 -21.1 5.3

50

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

51

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $14.43 $13.59 $15.46 3.5 13.8 Alabama Georgia $19.13 $19.58 $22.30 8.0 13.9 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $34.52 $30.35 $27.67 -10.5 -8.8 Colorado Arizona $28.20 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $37.53 $51.30 - 36.7 Colorado Colorado $14.16 $8.47 $9.02 -20.2 6.6

52

By Coal Origin State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Florida Total - - 15 - 15 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Total 196 - 15 - 211 Georgia Railroad 189 - 1 - 190 Georgia Truck

53

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: October 01, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 3, 2014 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. Quarterly data for all years are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the second quarter 2013: Total domestic coal distribution was an estimated 205.8 million short tons (mmst) in the second quarter 2013. This value is 0.7 mmst (i.e. 0.3 percent) higher than the previous quarter and 6.3 mmst (i.e. 3.1 percent) higher than the second quarter of 2012 estimates.

54

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of ...

55

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of ...

56

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2001 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: Alabama State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alabama 7,212 375 6,032 3 13,622 Railroad 2,613 170 4,607 - 7,390 River 3,867 - - - 3,867 Truck 732 205 1,424 3 2,365 Illinois 1,458 - - * 1,458 Railroad 167 - - - 167 River 1,291 - - - 1,291 Truck - - - * * Kentucky Total 2,277 - 262 - 2,539 Railroad 1,928 - 165 - 2,093 River 349 - 83 - 432 Truck - - 14 - 14 Eastern 843 - 262 - 1,105 Railroad 843 - 165 - 1,008 River - - 83 - 83 Truck - - 14 - 14 Western 1,435 - - - 1,435 Railroad 1,086 - - - 1,086 River 349 - - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 242 - 62 - 304 Great Lakes - - 60 - 60 Railroad - - * - * River 242 - -

57

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Georgia Railroad 52 - - - 52 Georgia Truck s - 5 - 5 Georgia Total 52 - 5 - 57 Indiana Railroad - 65 - - 65 Origin State Total 1,855 304 313 - 2,472 Railroad 996 81 89 - 1,165

58

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Railroad 105 - 1 - 106 Georgia Truck s - 4 - 4 Georgia Total 105 - 5 - 110 Indiana Railroad - 106 - - 106 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,065 259 321 - 2,644

59

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Georgia Railroad 9 - - - 9 Georgia Truck 7 - 5 - 12 Georgia Total 16 - 5 - 21 Indiana Railroad - 126 - - 126 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,320 353 325 - 2,998 Railroad 848 137 83 - 1,068

60

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Georgia Total s - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck s - 3 - 3 Ohio Total - 3 - - 3 Ohio River - 3 - - 3 Origin State Total 1,942 163 338 - 2,443 Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 River 741 3 - - 745 Truck 52 160

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Georgia Truck s - 2 - 2 Indiana Railroad - 148 - - 148 Ohio Railroad - 25 - - 25 Ohio River - 18 - - 18 Ohio Total - 43 - - 43 Origin State Total 1,760 373 305 - 2,438 Railroad 1,040 191 80 - 1,311 River

62

Coal distribution, January-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal producers and distributors shipped 665.3 million short tons of coal to domestic and foreign destinations from January through September 1986, 2.8 million short tons more than the amount shipped during the same time period of 1985. Nearly all (99.9%) of the coal that was produced and purchased during the first 9 months of 1986 was shipped. In contrast, shipments exceeded production and purchases by 1.6 million short tons during the comparable period of 1985 as producers and distributors drew from their stockpiles to help meet the demand. During January through September 1986: (1) Coal production was 0.7% higher and coal shipments were 0.4% higher than during the same time period of 1985. (2) Producers and distributors held stockpiles of 33.7 million short tons on September 30, 1986, 1.8% more than their stocks at the end of 1985. (3) Shipments for export were 7.8% less than they were 1 year earlier. (4) Domestic shipments to electric utilities and other industrial plants were higher while those to coke plants were lower, compared to the same time period of 1985. This issue contained a review article on Pennsylvania anthracite. 6 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Coal Mining Tax Credit (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Mining Tax Credit provides an income or insurance premium tax credit of $2.00 per ton of coal mined, produced or extracted on each ton of coal mined in Arkansas in a tax year. An...

64

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,714 158 238 - 2,110 Alabama Railroad 1,056 12 45 - 1,113 Alabama River 464 - - - 464 Alabama Truck 194 146 193 - 532 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s

65

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 4th Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,226 162 274 - 1,662 Alabama Railroad 803 17 22 - 842 Alabama River 384 - - - 384 Alabama Truck 39 144 252 - 436 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total

66

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 3rd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,198 151 353 - 1,702 Alabama Railroad 796 26 20 - 842 Alabama River 307 - 3 - 310 Alabama Truck 96 125 330 - 551 Georgia Total - - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck - - 3 - 3 Indiana Total

67

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 6,982 679 1,278 - 8,939 Alabama Railroad 4,400 20 286 - 4,706 Alabama River 1,885 - - - 1,885 Alabama Truck 696 659 992 - 2,347 Georgia Total s - 5 - 5 Georgia Truck s - 5 - 5 Indiana Total - 221 -

68

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,066 210 301 - 1,577 Alabama Railroad 495 116 26 - 638 Alabama River 512 - 2 - 513 Alabama Truck 59 94 273 - 426 Georgia Total - - 2 - 2 Georgia Truck - - 2 - 2 Indiana Total

69

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 1st Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Indiana Total - 164 - - 164 Indiana Railroad - 164 - - 164

70

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

71

Table 6. Coal production and number of mines by State and coal...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing State and...

72

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credit Extra Fuel Oil Coal to gasifier Na cost· Na processoiL Replace res. with coal as gasifier feed. 543 ton/day @$

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

current Coal Distribution Report current Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: November 7, 2012 | Next Release Date: November 2013 | full report Archive Domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, method of transportation; foreign coal distribution by major coal-exporting state and method of transportation; and domestic and foreign coal distribution by origin state. Year Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin Foreign distribution of U.S. coal by major coal-exporting States and destination Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by origin State, consumer, destination and method of transportation1 Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by destination State, consumer, destination and method of transportation1

74

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q2 by Origin State: Alabama Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Florida Railroad - - 8 - 8 Georgia Railroad 118 - - - 118 Georgia Truck s - 15 - 15 Georgia Total 118 - 15 - 133 Indiana Railroad - 83 - - 83 Indiana Truck 17 34 - - 50 Indiana Total 17 116 - - 133 Kentucky Railroad 83 - - - 83 Pennsylvania Railroad 95 - - - 95 Origin State Total 2,197 212 285 - 2,695 Railroad 1,171 95 40 - 1,305 River 855 - - - 855 Truck 171 118 245 - 534 2 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alaska

75

Table 10. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB dat  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" ,,"Real Dollars per Ton",,,,,,,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Basin","Destination State",2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,," 2001-2009"," 2008-2009" "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," W"," $16.45"," $14.29"," W"," -"," W"," W"," -",," -"," -" "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," $21.45"," W"," W"," W"," W"," $28.57"," W"," W"," W",," W"," W"

76

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation Home > Coal > Annual Coal Distribution > Coal Origin Map > Domestic Distribution by Origin: Alaska Data For: 2002...

77

Table 7. U.S. Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports U.S. Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 7. U.S. Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 3,122,664 2,010,882 3,565,711 5,133,546 5,327,583 -3.6 Canada* 1,773,644 943,061 2,101,534 2,716,705 3,176,066 -14.5 Dominican Republic 51,792 211,736 124,720 263,528 312,741 -15.7 Honduras - 41,664 34,161 41,664 68,124 -38.8 Jamaica 25 36,311 - 36,336 33,585 8.2 Mexico 1,244,972 777,750 1,268,077 2,022,722 1,698,391 19.1 Other** 52,231 360 37,219 52,591 38,676 36.0 South America Total 2,945,181 3,368,119

78

Coal transportation risks for fuel switching decisions  

SciTech Connect

Coal switching costs are generally expected to be the single largest cost factor associated with switching coals to low-sulfur sources. This report analyzes the principal issues and risks involved in moving Powder River Basin coal to eastern destinations and in moving increased amounts of Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal along the Ohio River. The railroad infrastructure for Powder River Basin coal is essentially optimized for current levels of traffic, yet estimated shipments will expand by 100 million tons over the next ten years. A critical issue is the magnitude and timing of investments in the railroad system required to maintain quality of service. Costs for rail and barge transport are comparable at present, yet they have different abilities to handle increased traffic. Negotiated rates will not be uniform and will change with the dynamics of investments and the clarification of utility compliance plans. Coal traffic patterns on inland waterways will change in order to handle barge movements for both Powder River Basin and Central Appalachian low-sulfur coals. Docks serving Central Appalachian coal fields have ample capacity, but originations will take place increasingly far from the rivers. Potential bottlenecks at specific locks and dams along the Ohio River have been identified. With the barge industry coming out of a slump, future barge rates will depend critically on the Corps of Engineers' schedule to upgrade key facilities. 30 figs., 14 tabs.

Toth, S. (Fieldston Co., Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

80

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive capacity of coal mines by State, 2011, 2010 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 11. Productive capacity of coal...

82

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

83

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlook’s Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

84

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

85

Saving Tons at the Register  

SciTech Connect

Duct losses have a significant effect on the efficiency of delivering space cooling to U.S. homes. This effect is especially dramatic during peak demand periods where half of the cooling equipment's output can be wasted. Improving the efficiency of a duct system can save energy, but can also allow for downsizing of cooling equipment without sacrificing comfort conditions. Comfort, and hence occupant acceptability, is determined not only by steady-state temperatures, but by how long it takes to pull down the temperature during cooling start-up, such as when the occupants come home on a hot summer afternoon. Thus the delivered tons of cooling at the register during start-up conditions are critical to customer acceptance of equipment downsizing strategies. We have developed a simulation technique which takes into account such things as weather, heat-transfer (including hot attic conditions), airflow, duct tightness, duct location and insulation, and cooling equipment performance to determine the net tons of cooling delivered to occupied space. Capacity at the register has been developed as an improvement over equipment tonnage as a system sizing measure. We use this concept to demonstrate that improved ducts and better system installation is as important as equipment size, with analysis of pull-down capability as a proxy for comfort. The simulations indicate that an improved system installation including tight ducts can eliminate the need for almost a ton of rated equipment capacity in a typical new 2,000 square foot house in Sacramento, California. Our results have also shown that a good duct system can reduce capacity requirements and still provide equivalent cooling at start-up and at peak conditions.

Brown, Karl; Seigel, Jeff; Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

"Weekly U.S. Coal Production Overview"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" "Report Released: August 15, 2013" "Next Release Date: August 22, 2013" "Weekly U.S. Coal Production Overview" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing","Week...

87

Practice of Internet Marketing in Destination Branding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study provides information about destination branding and the effect of Internet marketing on tourism. Tourism branding generates interest in a destination as well as,… (more)

Duong, Linh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

89

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other FAQs about Conversion & Equivalents. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? How do I compare heating fuels?

90

Table 9. U.S. Steam Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports U.S. Steam Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 9. U.S. Steam Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 1,619,502 1,246,181 2,153,814 2,865,683 3,065,683 -6.5 Canada* 797,861 599,752 841,061 1,397,613 1,280,803 9.1 Dominican Republic 51,698 160,672 124,720 212,370 312,741 -32.1 Honduras - 41,664 34,161 41,664 68,124 -38.8 Jamaica 25 36,311 - 36,336 33,585 8.2 Mexico 717,687 407,422 1,116,653 1,125,109 1,331,754 -15.5 Other** 52,231 360 37,219 52,591 38,676 36.0 South America Total 853,693 806,347

91

Table 8. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 8. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 78.29 77.25 102.62 77.88 105.14 -25.9 Canada* 81.61 80.70 110.67 81.30 112.16 -27.5 Dominican Republic 78.54 75.09 73.89 75.77 76.61 -1.1 Honduras - 54.58 54.43 54.58 54.43 0.3 Jamaica 480.00 54.43 - 54.72 55.42 -1.3 Mexico 73.45 75.81 94.36 74.35 100.95 -26.3 Other** 80.33 389.30 70.37 82.45 76.10 8.3 South America Total 107.72 108.02 149.99 107.88

92

Table 11. U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 11. U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 1,503,162 764,701 1,411,897 2,267,863 2,261,900 0.3 Canada* 975,783 343,309 1,260,473 1,319,092 1,895,263 -30.4 Dominican Republic 94 51,064 - 51,158 - - Mexico 527,285 370,328 151,424 897,613 366,637 144.8 South America Total 2,091,488 2,561,772 2,389,018 4,653,260 4,543,747 2.4 Argentina 104,745 155,806 203,569 260,551 253,841 2.6 Brazil 1,921,144 2,352,098 2,185,449 4,273,242

93

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination State, Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

94

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q1 by Origin State: Alabama Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Florida Railroad - - 22 - 22 Georgia Railroad 45 - - - 45 Georgia Truck s - 20 - 21 Georgia Total 45 - 20 - 65 Hawaii Ocean Vessel s - - - s Indiana Railroad - 78 - - 78 Indiana Truck - 32 - - 32 Indiana Total - 110 - - 110 South Carolina Truck - - 2 - 2 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Texas Railroad 72 - - - 72 Origin State Total 2,213 284 378 - 2,875 Ocean Vessel s - - - s Railroad 1,066 82 106 - 1,255 River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Truck 37 202 272 - 511 2 / 58

95

U.S. coal exports on record pace in 2012, fueled by steam coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. 2012 coal exports, supported by rising steam coal exports, are expected to break their previous record level of almost 113 million tons, set in ...

96

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

97

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

98

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

99

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million tons of coal in 2030, up from about 1,150 million2030 .Figure 42: Projected annual tonnage flows in 2030, Scenario

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 6....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

file://J:\\mydocs\\Coal\\Distribution\\2003\\distable4.HTML  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

311 252 1,506 3 2,072 See footnotes at end of table. Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2003...

102

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and number of mines by State, County, and mine type, 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 2. Coal production...

103

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal production capacities and coal prices. Coal Productionalso be affected by higher coal prices. II "Current Factors$/year Change in Clean Coal Price, $/ton (FOB Plant) Cost of

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Table 10. Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 10. Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 65.10 63.67 73.81 64.48 78.90 -18.3 Canada* 59.34 55.22 63.02 57.57 73.63 -21.8 Dominican Republic 78.47 74.41 73.89 75.40 76.61 -1.6 Honduras - 54.58 54.43 54.58 54.43 0.3 Jamaica 480.00 54.43 - 54.72 55.42 -1.3 Mexico 69.42 73.33 82.64 70.83 86.44 -18.1 Other** 80.33 389.30 70.37 82.45 76.10 8.3 South America Total 79.44 77.85 70.55

107

Table 12. Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 12. Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 92.50 99.40 146.56 94.82 140.70 -32.6 Canada* 99.83 125.20 142.46 106.43 138.19 -23.0 Dominican Republic 114.60 77.21 - 77.27 - - Mexico 78.93 78.54 180.76 78.77 153.65 -48.7 South America Total 119.26 117.51 167.05 118.30 168.12 -29.6 Argentina 146.70 131.08 182.47 137.36 196.37 -30.1 Brazil 119.21 117.38 165.61 118.20

108

MS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL America has more coal than any other fossil fuel resource. Th e United States also has more coal reserves than any other single country in the world. In fact, 1/4 of all the known coal in the world is in the United States. Th e United States has more energy in coal that can be mined than the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. Currently, coal is mined in 25 of the 50 states. Coal is used primarily in the United States to generate electricity. In fact, it is burned in power plants to produce nearly half of the electricity we use. A stove uses about half a ton of coal a year. A water heater uses about two tons of coal a year. And a refrigerator, that's another half-ton a year. Even though you

109

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success...

110

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Stocks. Total coal stocks at the end of 2010 were 224.3 million short tons, a decrease of 8.7 million short tons from 2009 when end-of-year ...

111

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

113

STEO November 2012 - coal supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach record high in 2012. While U.S. coal production is down 7 percent this year due in part to utilities switching to low-priced natural gas to generate electricity, American coal is still finding plenty of buyers in overseas markets. U.S. coal exports are expected to hit a record 125 million tons in 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says in its new monthly short-term energy outlook. Coal exports are expected to decline in 2013, primarily because of continuing economic weakness in Europe, lower international coal prices, and higher coal production in Asia. However, U.S. coal exports next year are still expected to top 100 million tons for the third year in a row

114

Comparison of coal and iron requirements between bituminous coal hydrogenation and low temperature carbonization (L. T. C. ) followed by hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

Plants producing 100,000 tons/yr aviation gasoline and 25,000 tons/yr of liquid petroleum gasoline (L.P.G.) by hydrogenation of coal and 100,000 tons/yr of aviation gasoline, 15,000 tons/yr L.P.G., and 912,000 tons/yr of excess L.T.C. coke by L.T.C. followed by hydrogenation of the L.T.C. tar are considered. Specific data are included on L.T.C., specific data for L.T.C. tar hydrogenation, and total coal requirement for L.T.C. of coal and hydrogenation of the L.T.C. tar. Information is also included on hydrogenation of bituminous coal and iron requirements. Three charts show differences between various bituminous coal conversion processes. The iron requirements for L.T.C. and tar hydrogenation was 100,500 tons and for bituminous coal hydrogenation it was 123,300 tons. An input of 1,480,000 tons of L.T.C. coal was calculated. The power coal requirement for L.T.C. and hydrogenation was 1,612,000 tons. The coal requirement for tar hydrogenation was 482,000 tons and 1,130,000 tons for surplus coke and gas. Therefore about 30% of the total coal was used for aviation gasoline and L.P.G. and about 70% for surplus coke and gas.

1943-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Asia leads growth in global coal production since 1980 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal production was up about 3.8 billion short tons (91%) from 1980 through 2010. China spearheaded overall growth in coal production, increasing 415% over the ...

116

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-1. U.S. Coal Summary...

117

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 6. Coal production and...

118

Table 13. U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coal Exports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 13. U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District...

119

file://G:\mydocs\Coal\Distribution\2003\distable2.HTML  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 (Thousand Short Tons) Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alabama 5,156 - 5,156 Argentina 345 - 345 Belgium 387 - 387 Brazil 1,825 - 1,825 Bulgaria 363 - 363 Egypt 477 - 477 Germany 167 - 167 Italy 87 - 87 Netherlands 399 - 399 Spain 198 - 198 Turkey 551 - 551 United Kingdom 359 - 359 Kentucky 1,449 - 1,449 Canada 566 - 566 France 104 - 104 Iceland 53 - 53 Italy 139 - 139 Netherlands 268 - 268 Norway 14 - 14 United Kingdom 304 - 304 Pennsylvania 476 8,251 8,820 Australia - 81 81 Belgium - 188 188 Brazil 85 - 87 Canada 203 6,622 6,893 Costa Rica - 40 40 Denmark - 184 184 Dominican Republic - 19 20 France - 193 193 Germany 89 - 89 Ireland - 148 148 Jamaica - 36 36 Morocco - 172 172 Netherlands 99 248 355 Peru - - 12 Portugal - 321 321 Venezuela - - 2 Virginia 4,786

120

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin State, Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Conversion Calculators. Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors. Last reviewed: September 13, 2013. Other FAQs about Coal.

122

Coal sector profile  

SciTech Connect

Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Use of English Coal in the Netherlands in the 17th and 18th Centuries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Rise of the British Coal Industry. Hamden, Connecticut:increasing amounts of coal being shipped to Holland, around14, p. 42]. Fig. 4: English coal exports (tons). [14, p.

Swain, Gregory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Which states produce the most coal? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Which states produce the most coal? The five largest coal producing states, with production in million short tons, and share of total U.S. coal production, for 2012:

125

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\ICR\My%20Documents\Coal\Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 (Thousand Short Tons) Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alabama 3,977 - 3,977 Argentina 225 - 225 Belgium 437 - 437 Brazil 1,468 - 1,468 Bulgaria 75 - 75 Egypt 363 - 363 Germany 71 - 71 Italy 61 - 61 Netherlands 219 - 219 Spain 415 - 415 Turkey 362 - 362 United Kingdom 282 - 282 Kentucky 1,404 - 1,404 Canada 433 - 433 Italy 227 - 227 Netherlands 468 - 468 United Kingdom 276 - 276 Pennsylvania 391 10,295 10,867 Belgium - 251 251 Brazil 187 - 189 Canada 50 8,548 8,766 France - 307 307 Germany 153 195 348 Ireland - 383 383 Jamaica - 87 87 Morocco - 134 134 Netherlands - 269 269 Norway - - 5 Peru - - 6 Portugal - 121 121 Utah - 917 917 Japan - 917 917 Virginia 2,787 - 2,787 Belgium 288 - 288 Brazil 792 - 792 Bulgaria 70 - 70 Canada 138 - 138

127

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average sales price of U.S. coal by State and disposition, 2011 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 33. Average sales...

128

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

stocks by sector, by census division and State, 2011, 2010 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 27. Year-end coal stocks...

129

Ton père et autre débris ; suivi de Entretien.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ce mémoire en création littéraire est constitué de deux parties. La première, Ton père et autres débris, est un récit composé de vingt-quatre tableaux divisés… (more)

Grenier, Jacques

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

131

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4Q 2009 4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by transportation mode. The data sources beginning with the 2008 Coal Distribution Report

132

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

133

Weak economy and politics worry US coal operators  

SciTech Connect

A potential decrease in demand, a new administration, and production constraints have coal operators worried about prospects for 2009. This and other interesting facts are revealed in this 2009 forecast by the journal Coal Age. Results are presented of the survey answered by 69 of the 646 executives contacted, on such questions about expected coal production, coal use, attitude in the coal industry, capital expenditure on types of equipment and productive capacity. Coal Age forecasts a 2.3% decline in coal production in 2009, down to 1.145 billion tons from 1.172 billion tons. 8 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with industries. Paper, woolen, flour, and cotton mills, starch factories, slaughterhouses, distilleriesTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

135

Coal production: 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal production and related data are reported for the year 1980, with similar data for 1979 given for comparison. The data here collected on Form EIA-7A, coal production report, from 3969 US mines that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1980. Among the items covered are production, prices, employment, productivity, stocks, and recoverable reserves. Data are reported by state, county, coal producing district, type of mining, and by type of coal (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite). Also included are a glossary of coal terms used, a map of the coal producing disricts, and form EIA-7A with instructions. 14 figures, 63 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

137

U.S. coal outlook in Asia  

SciTech Connect

Coal exports from the US to Asia are declining over time as a result of (1) increased competition from coal suppliers within the Asia-Pacific region, (2) changing steel making technologies, (3) decreased emphasis on security of coal supplies, and (4) deregulation of the energy industry--particularly electric utilities. There are no major changes on the horizon that are likely to alter the role of the US as a modest coal supplier to the Asia-Pacific region. The downward trend in US coal exports to Asia is expected to continue over the 1997--2010 period. But economic and policy changes underway in Asia are likely to result in periodic coal shortages, lasting a few months to a year, and short term increased export opportunities for US coal. US coal exports to Asia are projected to fluctuate within the following ranges over the 2000--2010 period: 10--17 million tons in total exports, 6--12 million tons in thermal coal exports, and 4--9 million tons in coking coal exports. The most important role for US coal, from the perspective of Asian coal importing countries, is to ensure a major alternative source of coal supplies that can be turned to in the event of unforeseen disruptions in coal supplies from the Asia-Pacific region or South Africa. However, the willingness of consumers to pay a premium to ensure US export capacity is declining, with increased emphasis on obtaining the lowest cost coal supplies.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Billion-Ton' Study 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock potential nationwide. The report examines the nation's capacity to produce a billion dry tons of biomass resources annually for energy uses without impacting other vital U.S. farm and forest products, such as food, feed, and fiber crops. The study provides industry, policymakers, and the agricultural community with county-level data and includes analyses of

139

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Market Share of Western Coal Continues To Increase U.S. coal production has remained near 1,100 million tons annually since 1996. In the AEO2006 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 1.1 percent per year from 2004 to 2015, when total production is 1,272 million tons. The growth in coal production is even stronger thereafter, averaging 2.0 percent per year from 2015 to 2030, as substantial amounts of new coal-fired generating capacity are added, and several CTL plants are brought on line. Figure 97. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

140

Revised market guide for coal exports from the United States  

SciTech Connect

The world market for steam coal is assessed. In recent years, much has changed in the world coal markets and in the expected opportunities for coal exports from the US. As an example, the overseas steam coal exports climbed from about 2 million tons in 1979 to about 35 million tons in 1981. Since then the overseas steam coal exports have fallen to 27 million tons in 1982 and to 17 million tons in 1983. In addition, metallurgical coal exports to overseas customers dropped from 60 million tons in 1982 to 43 million tons in 1983. This market guide is divided into four sections: Section one contains a review of the most frequently asked questions by individuals interested in the overseas coal markets and the role of US producers in this market; Section two contains an overview of the market for US steam and metallurgical coal exports, including forecasts of import demands, potential US market share, and the factors affecting this market share; Section three contains an outline of the current structure of the steam coal export trade in the US and the potential developments that will influence its future, and Section four contains a review of the important data on the nature of the energy-using industries, utilities and power plants, cement plants, coal quality requirements, and ports of the major steam and metallurgical coal importing countries. 14 figures, 45 tables.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

142

U.S. monthly coal production increases  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. coal production in July totaled 88.9 million short tons, the highest level since August 2012, according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information...

143

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

144

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report supports the conclusion of the original 2005 Billion-Ton Study with added in-depth production and costs analyses and sustainability studies. The 2011 report uses more...

145

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

146

Table 7.9 Coal Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 215 Table 7.9 Coal Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)

147

U.S. coal exports set monthly record - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... Coal exports from the United States in March 2013 totaled 13.6 million short tons, ...

148

EIA projects little change in U.S. coal production in 2013 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... Coal production for the first three quarters (January-September) of 2012 was 46 million short tons ...

149

Table 7.6 Coal Stocks by Sector, End of Year 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7.6 Coal Stocks by Sector, End of Year 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year: Producers and Distributors: Consumers: Total: Residential

150

U.S. coal stockpile levels at electric power plants approach five ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total coal stockpile levels at U.S. electric power plants were 139 million tons in August 2011—the lowest total level for August since 2006.

151

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Coal Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Markets Coal Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 5: World Coal Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles from 2003 to 2030, with the non-OECD countries accounting for 81 percent of the increase. CoalÂ’s share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 27 percent in 2030. Figure 48. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Short Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 49. Coal Share of World energy Consumption by Sector 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 10. World Recoverable Coal Reserves (Billion Short Tons) Printer friendly version

152

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

153

Coal resources of the Southwestern District, Kentucky: Bell, Clay, Clinton, Estill, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Madison, McCreary, Owsley, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Wayne, and Whitley counties  

SciTech Connect

The Southwestern District contains an estimated 7.43 billion short tons of original coal resources. Remaining coal resources total an estimated 6.85 billion short tons as of January 1, 1981. The coal resources are tabulated by standard U. S. Geological Survey resource classes for 25 of the coal beds that occur in the district. Clay County contains an estimated 1.54 billion tons, or 21 percent of the district total, followed by Knox, which contains 1.38 billion tons, or 19 percent of the district total. Bell County contains an estimated 1.03 billion tons, or 14 percent, and Whitley County contains 975 million tons, or 13 percent of the district total. Remaining coal resources in the other 11 counties range from 70 thousand tons in Madison County to nearly 574 million tons in Owsley County.

Brant, R.A.; Smith, G.E.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Visual Representations of Puerto Rico in Destination Marketing Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last thirty years, a large number of studies have researched the destination image that visitors, travel industry representatives, students, and general consumers have of tourist destinations. However, few studies have analyzed the perceptions that local residents have of their own countries as tourist destinations. Local residents can provide valuable information about their countries as tourism destinations and can help tourism marketers determine how to represent local culture in more authentic and sustainable ways. Local residents can also provide valuable information about how to improve tourism development based on their experiences living in the area. Residents can further provide information and services to visitors and are themselves an integral part of tourism at a destination. This study focused on understanding how destination marketing portrays the people and places of a destination and how residents perceive the visuals used in destination marketing and promotion. Using a visual qualitative approach, the study analyzed the images of recent promotional campaigns employed by the Puerto Rico Tourism Company. The study then interviewed Puerto Rican residents regarding their attitudes toward tourism development in general and toward the specific imagery used in the campaigns. Overall, residents had rather positive opinions of tourism in Puerto Rico. They also had largely positive attitudes toward the visual imagery used to market the destination. However, they felt the portrayal was incomplete and did not reflect the modern way of Puerto Rican daily life.

Davila Rodriguez, Mary Ann

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination, 2001 Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alaska - 761 761 South Korea - 761 761 Alabama 4,667 167 4,834 Argentina 155 - 155 Belgium 989 - 989 Brazil 1,104 - 1,104 Bulgaria 82 - 82 Egypt 518 - 518 Italy 115 - 115 Netherlands 56 83 139 Spain 412 84 496 Turkey 581 - 581 United Kingdom 654 - 654 Kentucky 2,130 - 2,130 Canada 920 - 920 France 22 - 22 Iceland 9 - 9 Italy 430 - 430 Netherlands 417 - 417 Spain 9 - 9 United Kingdom 323 - 323 Pennsylvania 1,086 14,326 15,722 Belgium - 203 203 Brazil 372 - 373 Canada - 12,141 12,418 France - 84 84 Germany 495 165 661 Ireland - 136 136 Netherlands 219 879 1,097 Norway - - 7 Peru - - 21 Portugal - 634 634 United Kingdom - 85 85 Venezuela - - 3 Utah - 1,420 1,420 Japan - 1,334 1,334 Taiwan - 86 86 Virginia 4,531

157

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8. U.S. coal export and imports, 2000-2010 (million short tons) Figure 8. U.S. Coal Export and Imports, 2000-2009 Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census,...

158

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

159

Powder River Basin Coal Supply and Suitability: EPRI Report Series on Low-Sulfur Coal Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility use of subbituminous coals from the Powder River Basin is expected to increase 100 million tons by the year 2000, with much of the growth coming from units designed for high-sulfur bituminous coal. This report addresses whether Powder River Basin coal suppliers will be able to command a premium for their product and documents the recent and rapid improvements utilities have made in using subbituminous coals.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is expected to continue. Although 1999 world consumption, at 4.7 billion short tons,9 was 15 percent higher than coal use in 1980, it was lower than in any year since 1984 (Figure 51). The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 1999 and 2020, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, but with considerable variation among regions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A coal export simulation model  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty of future energy supplies has forced industrial nations to diversify both their energy mix and their energy sources of supply. As a result, U.S. coal exports have grown substantially during the past several years. Projected long-term worldwide economic growth suggests that a well-established trend has been set for increased foreign demand for U.S. coal. As export volumes increase the need for careful planning to prevent bottlenecks and to provide for the uninterrupted flow of coal increases. It also will place increased emphasis on identifying the most economic transportation alternatives. These planning and evaluation functions are greatly facilitated if a systematic method is available for modeling the complex interactions of a coal export system. One such model, developed by the Anaconda Minerals Company, is the Coal Export model. This model simulates the movement of coal by transportation equipment (trains, ships, barges, etc.) from an originating mine site to a destination port via an intermediate port facility. Stockpile sizing and the selection of transportation equipment can be optimized with the aid of this model. Also, the impact of various operating policies for ship and train scheduling and for administering stockpiles can be predicted. Evaluating these issues can help to determine the most economic way to move a desired amount of coal from the originating mine site to the destination port.

Bydlon, T.J.; Tyber, H.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coal distribution, January--September 1990. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This issue presents information for January through September 1990. Coal distribution data are shown by coal-producing state of origin, consumer use, method of transportation, and state of destination. All data in this report for 1990 are preliminary. Data for previous years are final. 6 figs., 34 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Release Date: November 16, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" ,,"Nominal dollars per ton-mile",,,"Annual percent change" "Basin","Destination...

164

Quantifying Brand Values Perception in Destination Websites: a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Options ... This paper presents a framework for systematically evaluating the short-term brand values perception of content-intensive destination ... Proceedings from ENTER 2006: International Conference in Lausanne, Switzerland.

165

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program DOE has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. January 4, 2011 DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration A novel technology that could help release some of the currently unusable energy in an estimated 2 billion tons of U.S. coal waste has been successfully demonstrated by a Department of Energy supported project. December 16, 2010 Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology

168

Weekly Coal Production by State - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For the week ended October 12, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 6.7 percent higher than ...

169

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

170

Wyoming dominates sales of coal produced from federal and Indian ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual sales of coal produced from federal and Indian lands in the United States ranged between 458 million and 509 million short tons from fiscal year (FY) 2003 to ...

171

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

at producing U.S. mines by mine production range and mine type, 2011 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 17. Recoverable...

172

Weekly Coal Production by State - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For the week ended November 02, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 19.3 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 0.1 percent higher than ...

173

SustainableCoal_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is a vital energy resource, is a vital energy resource, not only for the United States, but also for many developed and developing economies around the world. Finding ways to use coal cleanly and more efficiently at lower costs is a major research and development (R&D) challenge, and an ongoing focus of activities by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). According to a Congressional Research Service analysis, coal represents 93 percent of total U.S. - and over half of world - fossil fuel reserves (expressed in barrels of oil equivalent). Based on recent rates of domestic consumption (averaging 1 billion tons annually, 2000-2010), estimated U.S. recoverable coal reserves of nearly 261 billion short tons are sufficient to last more than 2½ centuries.

174

Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dilution Refrigeration of Multi-Ton Cold Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilution refrigeration is the only means to provide continuous cooling at temperatures below 250 mK. Future experiments featuring multi-ton cold masses require a new generation of dilution refrigeration systems, capable of providing a heat sink below 10 mK at cooling powers which exceed the performance of present systems considerably. This thesis presents some advances towards dilution refrigeration of multi-ton masses in this temperature range. A new method using numerical simulation to predict the cooling power of a dilution refrigerator of a given design has been developed in the framework of this thesis project. This method does not only allow to take into account the differences between an actual and an ideal continuous heat exchanger, but also to quantify the impact of an additional heat load on an intermediate section of the dilute stream. In addition, transient behavior can be simulated. The numerical model has been experimentally verified with a dilution refrigeration system which has been designed, ...

Wikus, P; CERN. Geneva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report Annual Coal Report Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report Previous Annual Coal / Coal Industry Annual Reports historical data (PDF): 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 before 2001 Industry Annual 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2012 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2012: U.S. coal production decreased 7.2 percent from 2011, driven by lower electric power sector demand, to roughly 1.02 billion short tons. Productive capacity of U.S. coal mines decreased 3.5 percent to 1.28

177

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

178

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly...

179

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors January 23, 2002 Washington, DC DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for...

180

Coal flows | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal flows Coal flows Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 142, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into steam coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal flows countries EIA exporting importing Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries- Reference Case (xls, 103.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 7.3 Coal Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 35,229,270 [7] 33,847,730 : 33,847,730 : 85,620,000 [8] 98,248,000 : 98,248,000 : 183,868,000 : 18,614,000 : 118,384,671 : na : 118,384,671 : ...

182

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 420,789,000 : na : 205,000: 33,892,000-33,687,000-10,922,816 [r] 8,081,145 [r] 389,943,671 : 1955. 490,838,000 : na : 337,000: ...

183

Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 4.54 [4] 27.82 [4,r] [4] [4] 2.43 : 14.89 [r] 8.76 : 53.67 [r] 4.81 : 29.47 [r] 1955. 4.51 [4] 27.17 [4,r] [4] [4] 2.38 : 14.34 [r] 8.00 : 48.19 ...

184

Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 391,706,000 [2] [2] 29,083,000 : 305,964,000 : 114,825,000 : 395,413,000 : 25,376,000 : 420,789,000 : 1955. 464,633,000 [2] [2] 26,205,000 : ...

185

Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. ... 1 Beginning in 2001, includes a small amount of refuse recovery.

186

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

anthracite, were originally ... in 1998, the calculation also includes office workers. R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. 2 Beginning in 2001, ...

187

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Western Interior Appalachian Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review 1 Figure 1. Coal-Producing Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Coal Industry Annual 1996, DOE/EIA-0584(96) (Washington, DC, November 1997). U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review by B.D. Hong Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Overview U.S. coal production totaled a record high of 1,088.6 million short tons in 1997, up by 2.3 percent over the 1996 production level, according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1). The electric power industry (utilities and independent power producers)-the dominant coal consumer-used a record 922.0 million short tons, up by 2.8 percent over 1996. The increase in coal use for

188

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coal distribution, January--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal Distribution report provides information on coal production, distribution, and stocks in the United States to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data in this report are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275, Sections 5 and 13, as amended). This issue presents information for January through June 1991. Coal distribution data are shown (in Tables 1--34) by coal-producing Sate of origin, consumer use, method of transportation, and State of destination. All data in this report were collected by the EIA on Form EIA-6, Coal Distribution Report.'' A copy of the form and the instructions for filing appear in Appendix B. All data in this report for 1991 are preliminary. Data for previous years are final. 6 figs., 34 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

191

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Destin, FL Destin, FL FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL October 7, 2013 - 2:56pm Addthis Going coastal for energy efficiency. FUPWG. April 15-16, 2008, Destin, Florida Gulf Power: A Southern Company FEMP logo April 15-16, 2008 Hosted by Gulf Power Monday, April 14, 2008 6:30 pm Steering Committee Meeting & Networking Dinner Ocean Club 8955 US Highway 98 W Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Tuesday, April 15, 2008 7:45 - 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 8:45 am Gulf Power Welcome P. Bernard Jacob, Customer Operations Vice President 8:45 - 9:15 am FEMP Welcome David McAndrew, FEMP 9:15 - 10:00 am Washington Update David McAndrew, FEMP 10:00 - 10:30 am Technology Update Paul Kistler 10:30 - 11:00 am Networking Break & New Member Mentor Introductions 11:00 - 11:30 am Gulf Power Success Story - NAS Chiller Replacement

192

Origin/Destination-estimation Using Cellular Network Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today there are more than 600 billion geo special transactions every day in the US alone [1], and most of this data is passing through carriers networks. Hence, the carriers are sitting on a huge pile of potential knowledge which they could make more ... Keywords: Origin-destination estimation, mobility, privacy, location, Hadoop, geospatial

Erik Mellegard; Simon Moritz; Mohamed Zahoor

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A study for destination of solid wastes from vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Everyday humans around the globe perform a series of activities that, in addition to the final product concerned, results in a significant number of solid waste, commonly called "junk." These solid wastes not treated to an appropriate final destination ... Keywords: monitoring, oceanic pollution, scanning, solid waste management, tracking

Carla M. Maccagnan Fontana; Maria Lídia Dias; Eduardo Mario Dias; Sérgio Luiz Pereira

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Index (click to jump links) Coal Production and Prices Coal Mining Labor Productivity Coal Consumption Coal Production and Prices Emissions Caps Lead to More Use of Low-Sulfur Coal From Western Mines Continued improvements in mine productivity (which have averaged 5.9 percent per year since 1980) are projected to cause falling real minemouth prices throughout the forecast relative to historical levels. Higher electricity demand and lower prices, in turn, are projected to yield increasing coal demand, but the demand is subject to the overall sulfur emissions cap in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which encourages progressively greater reliance on the lowest sulfur coals (from Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Utah). Figure 106. Coal production by region, 1970-2025 (million short tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

196

Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM ANAHEIM, Calif., March 29 (UPI) -- Fly ash, a byproduct of coal-burning electric power plants, could save billions. More than 450 coal-burning electric power plants in the United States produce about 130 million tons

Belogay, Eugene A.

197

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

198

Application guide for 25-ton solar system (unitized)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arkla has developed a unitary solar system for air conditioning, heating and service hot water loads in commercial buildings of up to 25 tons cooling requirement. A semi-exploded view shows the basic elements of the Arkla system. These elements, listed below, are described in individual sections of the guide in sufficient detail to enable a competent designer to duplicate the Arkla unitary system in a site built system. The elements are: (1) collectors with summary procedure guide; (2) storage/receiver; (3) pumps/piping/valves; (4) controls; (5) chiller; (6) cooling tower; (7) gas boiler back-up; (8) central air handling unit; and (9) service and DHW. Any successful solar HVAC system requires careful analysis of the integration of the elements. This is particularly true due to the large year-round variation in the temperature of the solar HW available. Several items of this nature are discussed in the element sections. Consequently, the designer should review this entire guide before proceeding to individual elements particularly A and B. This guide presumes that the monthly (and design) hot water loads have been determined for the heating, cooling, and service-DHW water Btu requirements. In addition to these normal calculations, an hourly profile for a typical day each month should be made. The hourly profile is necessary to maximize the solar fraction for a given amount of collector surface in conjunction with the size of the storage system; that is, the coincidence, or lack of, sunshine to the instantaneous demands.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fuel Industry Response to Power Industry Environmental Pressures: An Analysis of Risk and Investment in the Coal Supply Chain and Na tural Gas Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the question of how mounting environmental pressures on coal-fired generation will impact investment in fuel supply and transportation. If destined for demise, are coal companies cutting back investments or exiting the business? Alternatively, are natural gas companies gearing up for a financial boom? The study specifically investigates a "clean coal" case of greatly tightened NOx and SO2 limits as well as a "low coal" case of much reduced coal use to meet CO2 control objectives.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 1,313 1,177 1,326 -1.0 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 2,500 2,207 2,295 8.9 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants.'

202

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 13. Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Alabama w w - - w w 14,594 85.99 Arkansas w w - - - - w w Colorado w w - - w w w w Illinois 24,811 76.45 - - 35,506 67.22 60,317 71.02 Indiana 16,445 94.65 - - - -

203

Nomogram calculates power plant coal use  

SciTech Connect

The number of tons of coal burned annually by a generating unit can be calculated by the following formula: Q = 43.8 (MW) (HR) (CF/HV)/10/sup 6/ where: Q = Annual usage, million tons MW = Unit capacity, MW HR = Unit heat rate, Btu/kWh CF = Annual unit capacity factor, % HV = Heating value of coal, Btu/lb The nomogram solves this equation and permits annual coal usage to be estimated quickly for various combinations of the other variables. The nomogram also can be used in reverse to determine such things as the annual capacity factor that a certain coal usage could sustain. Example: An 840-MW unit has an average heat rate of 10,000 Btu/kWh and burns coal with a heating value of 8600 Btu/lb. The annual capacity factor is 60%. Calculate the annual coal usage. Solution: (A) Align 840 on MW scale with 8600 on HV scale and mark intersection with CF scale; (B) align this marked point with 10,000 on HR scale and mark intersection with Reference Line; (C) align this point with 60 on CF scale and extend to Q scale. Read answer as approximately 2.6 million tons/year.

McAlister, J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpassing that goal. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds More Documents & Publications EIS-0355: Record of Decision EIS-0355: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0355: Final Environmental Impact Statement

205

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) October 8, 2013 - 2:22pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER - Existing Heating Efficiency * COP - Existing IPLV Efficiency * IPLV - New Capacity ton 10 tons New Cooling Efficiency EER 10.1 EER New Heating Efficiency COP 3.2 COP New IPLV Efficiency IPLV 10.4 IPLV Energy Cost $ per kWh $0.06 per kWh

206

Optimal Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks with Multiple Destinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the trade-off between delivery delay and energy consumption in a delay tolerant network in which a message (or a file) has to be delivered to each of several destinations by epidemic relaying. In addition to the destinations, there are several other nodes in the network that can assist in relaying the message. We first assume that, at every instant, all the nodes know the number of relays carrying the packet and the number of destinations that have received the packet. We formulate the problem as a controlled continuous time Markov chain and derive the optimal closed loop control (i.e., forwarding policy). However, in practice, the intermittent connectivity in the network implies that the nodes may not have the required perfect knowledge of the system state. To address this issue, we obtain an ODE (i.e., a deterministic fluid) approximation for the optimally controlled Markov chain. This fluid approximation also yields an asymptotically optimal open loop policy. Finally, we evaluate the performance o...

Singh, Chandramani; Kumar, Anurag; Sundaresan, Rajesh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Highwall miners extract coal cost effectively  

SciTech Connect

Contour Mining Corp's Powellton site in West Virginia has produced over 60,000 tons of coal per month using the Terex Highwall Mining System (HWM). The HWM can use a lower or high-seam cutter module. MTS Systems' Sensors Division provides mobile hydraulic magnetostrictive sensors for the HWM system, to increase the accuracy and reliability of linear positioning. 1 photo.

NONE

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 32. Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Underground Surface Total Over 1,000 58.86 19.50 31.70 Over 500 to 1,000 84.65 66.80 74.74 Over 200 to 500 95.31 73.29 84.14 Over 100 to 200 98.00 68.97 82.69 Over 50 to 100 81.53 75.99 78.61 50 or Under 92.87 63.12 73.78 U.S. Total 66.56 26.43 39.95 Note: An average sales price is calculated by dividing the total free on board (f.o.b) rail/barge value of the coal sold by the total coal sold. Excludes mines producing less than 25,000 short tons, which are not

209

Estimation of Coal Reserves for UCG in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the prospective methods of coal utilization, especially in case of coal resources which are not mineable by means of conventional methods, is underground coal gasification (UCG). This technology allows recovery of coal energy 'in situ' and thus avoid the health and safety risks related to people which are inseparable from traditional coal extraction techniques.In Poland most mining areas are characterized by numerous coal beds where extraction was ceased on account of technical and economic reasons or safety issues. This article presents estimates of Polish hard coal resources, broken down into individual mines, that can constitute the basis of raw materials for the gasification process. Five mines, representing more than 4 thousand tons, appear to be UCG candidates.

Bialecka, Barbara [Central Mining Institute (Poland)], E-mail: sixbb@gig.katowice.pl

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Project Turns Coal Waste Into...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the 28 million tons is reused from so-called "wet scrubbers." Currently, 21 U.S. coal-fired power plants use spray dryer systems to reduce the emission of sulfur...

211

Soviets welcome advanced coal mining technology  

SciTech Connect

The coal production target for the Soviet Union for 1985 is 770 - 800 million tonnes. In 1981, surface mining provided 38% of output, this should increase to 40% by 1985. Soviet coal reserves are quoted as 8.6 x 10/sup 12/ tons, of which 90% are in the east. Many of the deposits are in areas where climate and transportation pose major problems. The location of the principal coal deposits is shown and their reserves are indicated. The emphasis in future production will be on surface mining, in very large units.

Swiss, M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

213

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

214

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

215

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reached another milestone today for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, having shipped 5 million tons of tailings from the massive pile located in Moab, Utah, to the engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The pile comprised an estimated 16 million tons total when DOE's Remedial

216

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) - a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site - has achieved a major cleanup milestone. Since beginning operations in 1996, workers supporting the Richland

217

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

218

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? With continued developments in biorefinery capacity and technology, the feedstock resources identified in the report could produce about 85 billion gallons of biofuels -- enough to replace approximately 30 percent

219

Reducing the moisture content of clean coals  

SciTech Connect

Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

Kehoe, D. (CQ, Inc., Homer City, PA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: News Release - DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2011 4, 2011 DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration Novel Centrifuge Paves Way to Recover Tons of Waste Coal for Energy Use Washington, DC -- A novel technology that could help release some of the currently unusable energy in an estimated 2 billion tons of U.S. coal waste has been successfully demonstrated by a Department of Energy (DOE) supported project. The full-scale test of the advanced hyperbaric centrifuge technology at a Jim Walter Resources Inc. coal-cleaning plant in Alabama resulted in the successful reduction of moisture from ultrafine coal waste. The test builds on an eight-year cooperative effort between the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) to use the patented process to effectively remove water from very fine coal "slurries," or mixture of waste coal "fines" and water.

222

The place of hard coal in energy supply pattern of Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignite and hard coal are the major sources of domestic energy sources of Turkey. Hard coal is produced at only one district in the country. Zonguldak Hard Coal Basin is the major power for development of the Turkish steel-making industry. It is the only hard coal basin in the country and it has, to date, supplied approximately 400 million tons of run-of-mine hard coal. This article investigates the potential of hard coal as an energy source and discusses the measures to activate the region for the future energy supply objectives of the country.

Yilmaz, A.O.; Aydiner, K. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mass Balance Results for Pricetown I Underground Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect

A mass balance model was applied to the Pricetown I test data. This model gave the values of various parameters such as water influx, percent devolatilization, percent gasification, amount of coal affected, thermal efficiency, etc., for the various phases of the test. Both hourly and daily values of the test data were used. At certain times, there was air loss to the coal seam or air gain from the coal seam as related to the underground reactor. Mass balances are modified accordingly. Realistic pyrolysis temperatures have been chosen for the different phases of the test based on the thermocouple responses. The nitrogen and argon balances gave similar results. The mass balance results showed that approximately 702 tons of coal was affected during the test. Approximately 232 tons of coal was completely gasified. The reverse combustion linkage through the virgin coal seam was dominated by the devolatilization and accounted for approximately 80% devoltilization whereas the same accounted for only 26% devolatilization during the gasification phase. During the enhanced linkage phase, the percent devolatilization ranged between that observed for the RCL and gasification phase. There was net influx of water and amounted to 0.59 barrels per ton of coal affected. The percent energy recovery for the gasification phase was 72% based on gas chromatographic data, and accounting the sensible heat of the gas and the latent heat of the water vapor in the gas.

Agarwal, A. K.; Seabaugh, P. W.; Zielinski, R. E.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpass- ing that goal. "Although shipping 2 million tons was the original Recovery Act goal, we are planning to exceed this goal by shipping about 300,000 tons more using savings resulting from efficiencies we've gained in our first 2 years of moving tailings," Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler said. The project is using $108 million from the Recovery Act to move the tailings from the banks of the Colorado River by rail to a permanent

225

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and Grand County Council Vice Chair Lynn Jackson is on the right. At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab's uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal

226

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

227

A Concept for a Scalable 2 kTon Liquid Argon TPC Detector for Astroparticle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-module configuration and to its large liquid nitrogen consumption (~1 liquid m3 /hour), the 300-ton geometry purity (UHP) liquefied noble gas and for coping with the engineering and safety issues related

McDonald, Kirk

228

DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration

229

Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama Alabama W $13.59 W $63.63 21.4% 3,612 W 100.0% Alabama Georgia W $19.58 W $82.89 23.6% 538 W 99.9% Alabama Illinois W - - - - - - - Alabama Kentucky - W - W W W - W Alabama Pennsylvania - W - W W W - W Arizona Arizona - W - W W W - W Colorado Alabama W $30.35 W $70.84 42.8% 905 W 95.3% Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W Colorado California W $37.53 W $83.78 44.8% 64 W 100.0%

230

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Table 15. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 15. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Underground - Minable Coal Surface - Minable Coal Total Coal-Resource State Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base

232

Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky) Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky) Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit provides for a property tax credit for new clean coal facilities constructed at a cost exceeding $150 million and used for the purposes of generating electricity. Before the credit is given, the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet must certify that a facility is reducing emissions of pollutants released during electric generation through the use of clean coal equipment and technologies. The amount of the allowable credit is $2 per ton of eligible coal purchased that is used to

233

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Figure DataU.S. coal production increased slightly in 2010 by 1.0 percent to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons (Figure 1 and (Table 1), 10.4 million short tons more than the 2009 production total. Exclusive of refuse production, the Interior and Western Regions had increases in their production levels in 2010 of 7.4 percent and 1.1 percent respectively, while the Appalachian Region had a decrease of 2.1 percent (Figure 2 and (Table 2). The increase in Interior production was anchored by a 6.5 million short ton increase in Texas production. The decrease in the Appalachian Region production was 7.1 million short tons, while the increases in Interior Region and Western Region production in 2010 was 10.8 million short tons and 6.6 million short tons, respectively.

234

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intercity Trucks Coal, oil, coke, other Freight water localmetal min prod petroleum, coke, & nuke smelting & rolling ofElectricity heat Coal and coke Coal Electr icity heat

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 31. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Anthracite Total Alabama 106.57 - - - 106.57 Alaska - w - - w Arizona w - - - w Arkansas w - - - w Colorado w w - - 37.54 Illinois 53.08 - - - 53.08 Indiana 52.01 - - - 52.01 Kentucky Total 63.12 - - - 63.12 Kentucky (East) 75.62 - - - 75.62 Kentucky (West) 48.67 - - - 48.67 Louisiana - - w - w Maryland 55.67 - - - 55.67 Mississippi - - w - w Missouri w - - - w Montana w 17.60 w - 18.11 New Mexico w w - - 36.74 North Dakota - - 17.40 - 17.40 Ohio 47.80 - - - 47.80 Oklahoma 59.63 - - - 59.63 Pennsylvania Total 72.57

236

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011 Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 14. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Percent Change Recoverable Coal Reserves Alabama 265 53.63 306 55.39 -13.2 Alaska w w w w w Arizona w w w w w Arkansas w w w w w Colorado 300 69.62 225 68.47 33.5 Illinois 2,215 58.06 2,311 61.23 -4.1 Indiana 600 68.59 654 66.42 -8.3 Kansas - - w w w Kentucky Total 1,263 57.70 1,419 54.84 -11.0

237

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

238

Present coal potential of Turkey and coal usage in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Total coal reserve (hard coal + lignite) in the world is 984 billion tons. While hard coal constitutes 52% of the total reserve, lignite constitutes 48% of it. Turkey has only 0.1% of world hard coal reserve and 1.5% of world lignite reserves. Turkey has 9th order in lignite reserve, 8th order in lignite production, and 12th order in total coal (hard coal and lignite) consumption. While hard coal production meets only 13% of its consumption, lignite production meets lignite consumption in Turkey. Sixty-five percent of produced hard coal and 78% of produced lignite are used for electricity generation. Lignites are generally used for electricity generation due to their low quality. As of 2003, total installed capacity of Turkey was 35,587 MW, 19% (6,774 MW) of which is produced from coal-based thermal power plants. Recently, use of natural gas in electricity generation has increased. While the share of coal in electricity generation was about 50% for 1986, it is replaced by natural gas today.

Yilmaz, A.O. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal 101 Lesson 1: Cleaning Up Coal Clean Coal COAL is our most abundant fossil fuel. The United States has more coal than the rest of the world has oil. There is still...

240

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See all Coal Reports U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Consumption Preliminary data shows that total coal consumption rebounded in 2010, increasing by 5.1 percent from the 2009 level. Total U.S. coal consumption was 1,048.3 million short tons, an increase of 50.8 million short tons, with all coal-consuming sectors, except commercial and institutional users, having higher consumption for the year. The 2010 increase in consumption, over 2009, restored about 40 percent of the previous drop in consumption in 2009 from 2008 levels. The electric power sector (electric utilities and independent power producers), which consumes about 93 percent of all coal

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241

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin February 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the Michigan Basin near Gaylord, Mich., in a deep saline formation, the Silurian-age Bass Island dolomite. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships

242

Quarterly coal report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Table 20. Coal Imports by Customs District  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Imports by Customs District Coal Imports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 20. Coal Imports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Customs District April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Eastern Total 469,878 331,008 156,004 800,886 350,124 128.7 Baltimore, MD - - 106,118 - 154,318 - Boston, MA 373,985 154,438 - 528,423 51,185 NM Buffalo, NY 44 - - 44 - - New York City, NY 1,373 1,402 487 2,775 507 447.3 Norfolk, VA - 68,891 - 68,891 35,856 92.1 Ogdensburg, NY - 1 12 1 12 -91.7 Portland, ME 42,428 44,547 - 86,975 - - Providence, RI 52,028 61,729 49,387 113,757 108,226 5.1 St. Albans, VT 20

245

Table A57. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" 7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991 " " (Estimates in Thousand Short Tons)" " "," "," ", " "," "," Coal",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" " "," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other","Factors"

246

Coal distribution, January-March 1985. [By district; 1981 to 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal distribution to domestic and foreign markets totaled 210.8 million short tons in the first quarter of 1985. This was 5.1% below coal shipments in the first quarter of 1984, but 10.7% above the depressed levels of the comparable period in 1983. Coal shipments to various regions of the United States and abroad showed mixed trends during the first 3 months of 1985. This is attributable primarily to large inventory buildups by eastern and midwestern consumers during the first 9 months of 1984 in preparation for a possible strike by the United Mine Workers of America in October of last year. Coal inventories at producers and distributors rose by 3.1% during the first quarter of 1985, reaching 35.2 million short tons on March 31, 1985, compared to 34.1 million short tons on December 31, 1984. Compared with the first quarter of 1984: Coal shipments from mines in Appalachia were 12.6% lower, while shipments from western mines were up by 9.7%, reaching another record first-quarter high. Export shipments moved ahead of their 1984 pace by 9.9% despite a 30.0% decline in shipments to Canada. Major markets in the West continued to enlarge their coal requirements as eastern markets curtailed shipments while working off excess stocks. Texas expanded its lead as the Nation's top state to receive coal, and North Dakota experienced an upsurge in coal receipts due to the startup of the Great Plains coal gasification project. Coal production and purchases were 211.5 million short tons, 5.0% below last year's level. The reduction in shipments reflected a substantial decline in coal originating in the Appalachian Region, notably District 8, and to a lesser extent in the Interior Region. In contrast, shipments of coal from the Western Region reached another first-quarter high. 5 figs., 33 tabs.

McNair, M.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NETL: News Release - DOE Regional Partnerships Find Up To 3.5 Billion Tons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 DOE Regional Partnerships Find More Than 3,500 Billion Tons of Possible CO2 Storage Capacity Atlas Details Stationary Sources and Geologic Reservoirs in U.S. and Canada WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships have identified the powerplant and other stationary sources of more than 3.8 billion tons a year of the greenhouse gas CO2 in the United States and Canada and companion candidate storage capacity for more than 3,500 billion tons. The results are detailed in the new Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada which became available online today. MORE INFO Link to NETL's Carbon Sequestration Atlas web page Link to the Interactive Carbon Sequestration Atlas Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program

248

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

249

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removes More Than One Ton of Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ... NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food Posted By Office of Public Affairs Contributing to DOE/NNSA's efforts to support the Office of Personnel

250

EIA - Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal...

251

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year and Quarter Coal Receipts Average Price of Coal Receipts (dollars per short ton) Coal Used Coal Stocks 1 2012 January - March 2,151 27.47 1,756 771 April - June 3,844 25.42 3,688 825 July - September 5,399 24.32 5,286 812 October - December 4,919 24.55 4,680 787 Total 16,313 25.06 15,410 2013 January - March 5,067 24.60 4,989 793 April - June 4,015 25.24 3,754 756 Total 9,082 24.88 8,744 1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter.

252

DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration January 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel technology that could help release some of the currently unusable energy in an estimated 2 billion tons of U.S. coal waste has been successfully demonstrated by a Department of Energy (DOE) supported project. The full-scale test of the advanced hyperbaric centrifuge technology at a Jim Walter Resources Inc. coal-cleaning plant in Alabama resulted in the successful reduction of moisture from ultrafine coal waste. The test builds on an eight-year cooperative effort between the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Virginia

253

Concentration in U.S. air transportation : an analysis of origin-destination markets since deregulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis examined the effects on competition of deregulation in the airline industry by analyzing changes in concentration over the ten-year period 1979-1989 in two sets of origin-destination city-pair markets: the top ...

Van Acker, Jan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Arabidopsis TRM1TON1 Interaction Reveals a Recruitment Network Common to Plant Cortical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microtubules via its C-terminal TON1 interaction motif. Interestingly, three motifs of TRMs are found in CAP350, a human centrosomal protein interacting with FOP, and the C-terminal M2 motif of CAP350 is responsible., 2006). CAP350 has also been proposed to specifically stabilize Golgi-associated microtubules

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet July 11, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons -- a type of subatomic particle -- traveling at the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001. In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 50-ton device by truck requires meticulous precision -- just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.

256

2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

257

HANDLING AND CO-FIRING OF SHREDDED MUNICIPAL REFUSE AND COAL IN A SPREADER-STOKER BOILER*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HANDLING AND CO-FIRING OF SHREDDED MUNICIPAL REFUSE AND COAL IN A SPREADER-STOKER BOILER* D. A for handling up to 120 tons/day of municipal refuse has been developed for co-firing with coal in a spreader-tube metals; and (3) environmental effects of the co-firing, with respect to emissions and ash residues. Co-firing

Columbia University

258

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Topical report 5, Process analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of converting coal to ethanol by a biological process is quite attractive. When processing 1500 tons of coal per day, the plant generates 85 million gallons of ethanol per year. The return on investment for the process is 110 percent and the payout is 0.9 years.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Optimization of Oxygen Purity for Coal Conversion Energy Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of coal into gaseous and liquid fuels and chemical feedstock will require large quantities of oxygen. This oxygen will be produced in large multi-train air separation plants which will consume about 350 kilowatt hours of energy for each ton of coal processed. Thus, the oxygen plants in a commercial coal conversion facility may require 150 megawatts. Design of the oxygen plants will require close attention to energy consumption. Many coal conversion processes can accept oxygen at less than the historical 99.5% purity with significant savings in energy and cost. The air separation process is reviewed with emphasis on optimum oxygen purity. An energy reduction of 8.4% can be achieved when oxygen purity is reduced from 99.5% to 95%. Oxygen is a major tonnage chemical which is also highly energy intensive. The current United States capacity of about 80 thousand tons per day places it in the top five of basic chemicals, and its energy requirement of 350 to 450 kilowatt hours per ton makes it a major energy consumer. The growing synfuels industry -- conversion of coal into hydrocarbon fuels and chemical feed-stocks -- will greatly increase the production of oxygen and presents major opportunities for energy conservation.

Baker, C. R.; Pike, R. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanest Coal Technology Clean Coal 101 Lesson 5: The Cleanest Coal Technology-A Real Gas Don't think of coal as a solid black rock. Think of it as a mass of atoms. Most of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin, 2010 (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 10,679.56 9,223.70 408.00 9,631.70 20,311.26 Alaska 920.68 1,080.60 88.05 1,168.65 2,089.33 Arizona 7,761.18 - - - 7,761.18 Arkansas 0.43 - - - 0.43 Colorado 21,831.81 748.98 1,446.25 2,195.23 24,027.04 Illinois 33,176.21 2,505.51

263

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See all Coal Reports U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Exports and Imports Exports Total U.S. coal exports for 2010 increased by 38.3 percent to 81.7 million short tons (Figure 8). Figure Data This increase was largely due to two factors. First, heavy rains and flooding in Australia, Indonesia, and Colombia reduced world coal supply and forced many coal importing nations to look elsewhere, primarily to the United States, to fulfill their coal needs. In addition, the shortage of their own domestic coal in relation to growing needs, namely for China and India, provided ample opportunities for U.S. coal producers to export to these markets.

264

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Table 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination, Selected Years, 1960-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Canada Brazil Europe Japan Other 3 Total Belgium 1 Denmark France Germany 2...

265

Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide: WHAT IS COAL? Coal looks like a shiny black rock. Coal has lots of energy in it. When it is burned, coal makes heat and light energy. Th e cave men used coal for...

266

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative "Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy...

267

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 Project Helping Further CCS Technology and Meeting G-8 Goals for Deployment Washington, D.C. -A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Link to SECARB web site The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern

268

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than 120 manufacturers that are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve their bottom lines. Through the Department's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better Plants), over 1,750 plants across the United States have saved about $1 billion in energy costs and

269

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954, Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov Emerald Laija, EPA (509) 376-4919, Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, recently cleaned up 77 waste sites at Hanford to meet two Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones before the end of 2011. The waste sites were located in the D and H Reactor Areas at Hanford along

270

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal, oil and oil product, crude oil, other Coal, oiland oil product, crude oil, other Steam, diesel, electricityDomestic Internation al Crude oil, oil products, NG, other

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

target to • +1% in coal fired plant efficiency • -1% in T&Dincludes increasing coal-fired power plant efficiency by 1

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Conceptual flow sheets development for coal conversion plant coal handling-preparation and ash/slag removal operations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents 14 conceptual flow sheets and major equipment lists for coal handling and preparation operations that could be required for future, commercial coal conversion plants. These flow sheets are based on converting 50,000 tons per day of clean coal representative of the Pittsburgh and Kentucky No. 9 coal seams. Flow sheets were used by Union Carbide Corporation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in a survey of coal handling/preparation equipment requirements for future coal conversion plants. Operations covered in this report include run-of-mine coal breaking, coarse coal cleaning, fine coal cleaning, live storage and blending, fine crushing (crushing to top sizes ranging from 1/4-inch to 20 mesh), drying, and grinding (70 percent minus 200 mesh). Two conceptual flow sheets and major equipment lists are also presented for handling ash or granulated slag and other solid wastes produced by nine leading coal conversion processes. These flow sheets provide for solid wastes transport to an environmentally acceptable disposal site as either dry solids or as a water slurry.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pressure coal gasification experience in Czechoslovakia  

SciTech Connect

Czechoslovakia's large deposits of brown coal supply the country's three operating pressure gasification plants. The gas produced is suitable for further treatment to provide fuel for household and industrial consumers. Coal gasification is not new to the energy planners in Czechoslovakia. Since 1948, 56 gasifiers have been installed in the three pressure gasification plants currently in operation. The newest and biggest of these plants is at Vresova. The plant processes 5,000 tons of brown coal per day. The locally mined coal used for feed at the Vresova plant has a calorific value of 12 to 14 megajoules per kilogram (52 to 60 Btu's per pound). The gasifiers produce up to 13,000 cubic meters (459,000 cubic feet) per hour of crude gas per gasifier. Gasification technology has been under development in Czechoslovakia since 1945. The country has virtually no oil or natural gas reserves, a fact that emphasizes the importance of coal-based energy. Production of gas from coal in Czechoslovak gasifiers is based on gasification in the fixed bed of a gasifier.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Survey and evaluation of current and potential coal beneficiation processes  

SciTech Connect

Coal beneficiation is a generic term used for processes that prepare run-of-mine coal for specific end uses. It is also referred to as coal preparation or coal cleaning and is a means of reducing the sulfur and the ash contents of coal. Information is presented regarding current and potential coal beneficiation processes. Several of the processes reviewed, though not yet commercial, are at various stages of experimental development. Process descriptions are provided for these processes commensurate with the extent of information and time available to perform the evaluation of these processes. Conceptual process designs, preliminary cost estimates, and economic evaluations are provided for the more advanced (from a process development hierarchy viewpoint) processes based on production levels of 1500 and 15,000 tons/day (maf) of cleaned product coal. Economic evaluations of the coal preparation plants are conducted for several project financing schemes and at 12 and 15% annual after-tax rates of return on equity capital. A 9% annual interest rate is used on the debt fraction of the plant capital. Cleaned product coal prices are determined using the discounted cash flow procedure. The study is intended to provide information on publicly known coal beneficiation processes and to indicate the relative costs of various coal beneficiation processes. Because of severe timeconstraints, several potential coal beneficiation processes are not evaluated in great detail. It is recommended that an additional study be conducted to complement this study and to more fully appreciate the potentially significant role of coal beneficiation in the clean burning of coal.

Singh, S. P.N.; Peterson, G. R.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Spontaneous combustion prediction of coal by C80 and ARC techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many coal fires were caused by spontaneous combustion in coal mines or coal storehouses, which resulted in a great loss and energy wastage. To identify and evaluate the hazardous degree of coal stockpile, a C80 microcalorimeter and accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) were employed in this work. The coal samples undergo an exothermal process start at 80 {sup o}C with heat generation of -75.1 J g{sup -1} (mean value) detected by C80 experiment. The activation energies of the first exothermal process were calculated for the three experiments, and the mean value is 80.76 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is lower than that of obtained from the ARC result, 127.0 kJ mol{sup -1}. For a 300 tons coal stockpile, the self-heating oxidation temperatures (SHOT) were calculated as 164, 60, 90, and 68{sup o}C based on the ARC experiment and three C80 experiments, respectively. Further research on the mass effect on SHOT shows that if the coal mass is less than 12 tons, the danger of thermal spontaneous combustion is less. However, if the mass amount is more than 12000 tons, the danger of thermal spontaneous combustion is difficult to avoid even at ambient temperature if no special measures are taken. 38 refs., 9 figs.

Qingsong Wang; Song Guo; Jinhua Sun [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). State Key Laboratory of Fire Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 3. Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 139 20 12,410 12,570 Arkansas 96 - - 96 Colorado 757 - 22,889 23,646 Illinois 18,969 - 23,868 42,837 Indiana 15,565 - - 15,565 Kentucky Total 56,179 2,018 - 58,198 Kentucky (East) 22,090 2,010 - 24,100 Kentucky (West) 34,089 9 - 34,098 Maryland 797 - - 797 Montana - - 5,708 5,708 New Mexico - - 4,960 4,960 Ohio 3,903 7 14,214 18,125 Oklahoma 349 - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 11,367 52 33,623 45,041 Pennsylvania (Anthracite)

277

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 30. Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and County Number of Mines Sales (thousand short tons) Average Sales Price (dollars per short ton) Alabama 39 19,021 106.57 Bibb 1 w w Blount 2 w w Fayette 1 w w Franklin 1 w w Jackson 2 w w Jefferson 11 4,298 146.04 Marion 1 w w Tuscaloosa 7 8,599 111.55 Walker 11 2,370 81.88 Winston 2 w w Alaska 1 w w Yukon-Koyukuk 1 w w Arizona 1 w w Navajo 1 w w Arkansas 1 w w Sebastian 1 w w Colorado 12 28,856 37.54 Delta 1 w w Gunnison 2 w w La Plata

278

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 29. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Alabama w - w 107.73 Arkansas w - - w Colorado w - 37.18 w Illinois 48.08 - 59.51 54.18 Indiana 52.94 - - 52.94 Kentucky Total w w - 62.24 Kentucky (East) w w - 79.23 Kentucky (West) 50.18 - - 50.18 Maryland w - - w Montana - - w w New Mexico - - w w Ohio w - w 49.39 Oklahoma w - - w Pennsylvania Total 94.53 w 65.01 w Pennsylvania (Anthracite) w w - 82.71 Pennsylvania (Bituminous) w - w 72.67 Tennessee w - - w Utah w - 34.99

279

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012 Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 4. Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal Thickness (inches) Underground Surface Total Under 7 - 17 17 7 - Under 13 - 2,108 2,108 13 - Under 19 429 6,688 7,117 19 - Under 25 111 14,107 14,217 25 - Under 31 4,147 12,913 17,060 31 - Under 37 15,128 19,022 34,150 37 - Under 43 23,868 17,285 41,153 43 - Under 49 26,035 15,597 41,632 49 - Under 55 18,909 22,544 41,453 55 - Under 61 36,946 11,285 48,231 61 - Under 67 43,146 15,074 58,220 67 - Under 73 40,983 8,783 49,766 73 - Under 79 32,914 10,193 43,107 79 - Under 85 27,011 3,554 30,565 85 - Under 91 11,997

280

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Disposition by State, 2012 Coal Disposition by State, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 8. Coal Disposition by State, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Open Market Sales 1 Captive Sales / Transactions 2 Exports 3 Total Alabama 8,688 - 10,333 19,021 Alaska w - 968 w Arizona w - - w Arkansas w - - w Colorado 20,836 4,552 3,468 28,856 Illinois 29,252 5,113 12,341 46,705 Indiana 17,127 18,404 375 35,906 Kentucky Total 76,602 6,884 5,668 89,154 Kentucky (East) 37,324 6,884 3,588 47,796 Kentucky (West) 39,277 - 2,081 41,358 Louisiana w - - w Maryland 2,024 - 262 2,286 Mississippi w - - w Missouri w - - w Montana w w - 36,823 New Mexico w w 22,881 North Dakota w w - 27,799 Ohio w w - 26,617 Oklahoma 1,071 - - 1,071 Pennsylvania Total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,051 2,997 3,092 6,048 6,156 -1.8 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,471 5,280 5,296 10,751 10,579 1.6 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

282

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 22. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 0.71 - 1.69 1.66 Arkansas 0.59 - - 0.59 Colorado 1.90 - 6.38 5.93 Illinois 3.65 - 6.60 4.86 Indiana 3.25 - - 3.25 Kentucky Total 2.43 1.77 - 2.39 Kentucky (East) 1.61 1.77 - 1.62 Kentucky (West) 3.61 - - 3.56 Maryland 1.80 - - 1.80 Montana - - 7.47 7.47 New Mexico - - 5.19 5.19 Ohio 2.44 - 4.96 4.02 Oklahoma 2.37 - - 2.37 Pennsylvania Total 2.25 0.92 3.79

283

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 1. Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Percent Change Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Alabama 46 19,321 52 19,071 -11.5 1.3 Underground 8 12,570 9 10,879 -11.1 15.5 Surface 38 6,752 43 8,192 -11.6 -17.6 Alaska 1 2,052 1 2,149 - -4.5 Surface 1 2,052 1 2,149 - -4.5 Arizona 1 7,493 1 8,111 - -7.6 Surface 1 7,493 1 8,111 - -7.6 Arkansas 2 98 2 133 - -26.4 Underground 1 96 1 127 - -24.0 Surface 1 2 1 7 - -71.4 Colorado

284

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 7. Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Union Nonunion Total Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 12,410 - 139 6,669 12,549 6,669 Alaska - 2,052 - - - 2,052 Arizona - 7,493 - - - 7,493 Arkansas - - 96 - 96 - Colorado 1,673 2,655 21,955 2,265 23,628 4,920 Illinois 2,897 - 39,939 5,649 42,837 5,649 Indiana - - 15,558 21,156 15,558 21,156 Kentucky Total 3,951 552 53,891 31,507 57,842 32,059 Kentucky (East) - 552 23,753 23,572 23,753 24,124 Kentucky (West) 3,951 - 30,138 7,935 34,089 7,935 Louisiana

285

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 28. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Percent Change Coal-Producing State Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Alabama 107.73 104.51 106.57 100.17 108.71 102.69 7.6 -3.9 3.8 Alaska - w w - w w - w w Arizona - w w - w w - w w Arkansas w - w w - w w - w Colorado w w 37.54 w w 39.88 w w -5.9 Illinois 54.18 45.12 53.08 51.43 46.60 50.80 5.4 -3.2 4.5 Indiana 52.94 51.33 52.01 51.77 44.91 47.96 2.3 14.3 8.4 Kansas - - - - w w - w w Kentucky Total 62.24 64.70 63.12 63.38 64.01 63.63 -1.8 1.1 -0.8 Kentucky (East) 79.23 72.04 75.62

286

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 24. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Union Nonunion Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 1.69 - 0.66 1.80 Alaska - 5.98 - - Arizona - 7.38 - - Arkansas - - 0.59 - Colorado 4.90 6.09 6.02 4.45 Illinois 2.09 - 5.34 4.70 Indiana - - 3.23 5.41 Kentucky Total 3.02 2.45 2.36 3.06 Kentucky (East) - 2.45 1.64 2.65 Kentucky (West) 3.27 - 3.60 5.58 Louisiana - - - 6.86 Maryland - - 1.80 2.80 Mississippi - - - 6.73 Missouri - - - 6.73 Montana - 11.20 7.47 31.69 New Mexico

287

EIA Energy Kids - Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sometimes, coal-fired electric power plants are built near coal mines to lower ... industries and businesses with their own power plants use coal to generate ...

288

Coal industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Assessing the methane hazard of gassy coals in storage silos. Report of investigations  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines investigated coal storage silos to determine how gassy coal must be for methane accumulations in a silo to become hazardous and where such accumulations are likely to occur. Methane concentrations were measured in the open space above the stored coal pile, in the pile, and in the reclaiming area. No methane layering was found in closed-top silos. Reclaiming areas were as gassy as the top part of the silos. Coal samples were collected from the conveyors entering the silos in order to assess the gassiness of the coal. No simple correlation was found between the gassiness of the coal stored and the measured methane concentrations. However, at mines where the average 24-hour gas emissions from the conveyor belt samples was 14 cubic feet/ton of more, fans or open tops were used. It appears that a large fraction of the methane released during storage remains in the void space between the coal particles.

LaScola, J.C.; Matta, J.E.; Kissell, F.N.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

291

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

292

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knocking the NOx Out of Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 3: Knocking the NOx Out of Coal How NOx Forms NOx Formation Air is mostly nitrogen molecules (green in the above diagram) and...

293

Coal and bituminous reserves  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 5 of this book contains sections entitled: other coal processes; underground processing of coal; and other important energy sources.

NONE

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Coal Production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

03 03 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279603 Varnish cache server Coal Production Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

295

Multicriteria analysis of natural gas destination in Brazil: An application of the TODIM method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article approaches the problem of selecting the best option for the destination of the natural gas reserves recently discovered in the Mexilhao field in the Santos basin, Brazil. The aims of the study reported here were: (1) to create a mechanism ... Keywords: Energy resources in Brazil, Multicriteria decisions, Natural gas reserves, Prospect Theory, Strategic analysis

Luiz Flavio Autran Monteiro Gomes; Luis Alberto Duncan Rangel; Francisco José Coelho MaranhãO

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Persuading people in a remote destination to sing by beaming there  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We built a Collaborative Virtual Environment (CVE) allowing one person, the 'visitor' to be digitally transported to a remote destination to interact with local people there. This included full body tracking, vibrotactile feedback and voice. This allowed ... Keywords: collaborative virtual environments, embodiment, haptic interaction, presence, social touch

Pierre Bourdin; Josep Maria Tomàs Sanahuja; Carlota Crusafon Moya; Patrick Haggard; Mel Slater

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

LANNDD -A line of liquid argon TPC detectors scalable in mass from 200 Tons to 100 KTons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to its large liquid nitrogen consumption (~1 liquid m3/hour), the 300-ton geometry and construction required for a detector based on an ultra high purity (UHP) liquefied noble gas and for coping

McDonald, Kirk

298

Coal bed methane global market potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide increases in energy prices, as well as the increased potential for project financing derived from emissions credits, have renewed focus on coal bed methane (CBM) and coal mine methane (CMM) projects in coal-producing countries around the world. Globally, CBM utilization projects (in the operational, development, or planning stages) capture and utilize methane from gassy underground coal mines in at least 13 countries. The total methane emission reductions that could be achieved by these projects are approximately 135 billion cubic feet per year (equal to 14.8 million tons of carbon equivalent per year). This global activity level reflects a growing awareness of the technological practicality and the economic attractiveness of coal mine methane recovery and use. This report outlines the potential of the global CBM market. Contents: An overview of CBM; Challenges and issues; Technologies to generate power from CAM; Global CBM/CMM utilization; Country highlights; Ranking of countries with the largest CMM development potential (Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, USA, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Africa); Planning CBM/CMM projects; Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies; Demonstration projects; Development plan and application process; Equity and debt; Carbon financing; Government sponsors; Private sponsors; Project risk reduction support; Examples of integrated project financing; Glossary.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume III. Coal resource depletion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While US coal resources are known to be vast, their rate of depletion in a future based predominantly on coal has not been examined analytically heretofore. The Coal Depletion Model inventories the coal resource on a regional basis and calculates the cost of coal extraction by three technologies - strip and underground mining and in-situ combustion. A plausible coal demand scenario extending from 1975 to the year 2050 is used as a basis in applying the model. In the year 2050, plants in operation include 285 syncrude plants, each producing 100,000 B/D; 312 SNG plants, each producing 250 million SCF/D and 722 coal-fired electric power plants, each of 1000 MW capacity. In addition, there is 890 million tons per year of industrial coal consumption. Such a high level of coal use would deplete US coal resources much more rapidly than most people appreciate. Of course, the actual amount of US coal is unknown, and if the coal in the hypothetical reliability category is included, depletion is delayed. Coal in this category, however, has not been mapped; it is only presumed to exist on the basis of geological theory. The coal resource depletion model shows that unilateral imposition of a severance tax by a state tends to shift production to other coal producing regions. Boom and bust cycles are both delayed and reduced in their magnitude. When several states simultaneously impose severance taxes, the effect of each is weakened.Key policy issues that emerge from this analysis concern the need to reduce the uncertainty of the magnitude and geographic distribution of the US coal resource and the need to stimulate interaction among the parties at interest to work out equitable and acceptable coal conversion plant location strategies capable of coping with the challenges of a high-coal future.

Dickson, E.M.; Yabroff, I.W.; Kroll, C.A.; White, R.K.; Walton, B.L.; Ivory, M.E.; Fullen, R.E.; Weisbecker, L.W.; Hays, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Potential for thermal coal and Clean Coal Technology (CCT) in the Asia-Pacific  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Project was able to make considerable progress in understanding the evolving energy situation in Asia and the future role of coal and Clean Coal Technologies. It is clear that there will be major growth in consumption of coal in Asia over the next two decades -- we estimate an increase of 1.2 billion metric tons. Second, all governments are concerned about the environmental impacts of increased coal use, however enforcement of regulations appears to be quite variable among Asian countries. There is general caution of the part of Asian utilities with respect to the introduction of CCT's. However, there appears to be potential for introduction of CCT's in a few countries by the turn of the century. It is important to emphasize that it will be a long term effort to succeed in getting CCT's introduced to Asia. The Coal Project recommends that the US CCT program be expanded to allow the early introduction of CCT's in a number of countries.

Johnson, C.J.; Long, S.

1991-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Repowering a small coal-fired power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arkansas River Power Authority (ARPA) Lamar Repowering Project is moving forward. The new generator, capable of producing 18 MW of electricity, is scheduled to be online in June 2008 bringing the total generation to 43 MW. New coal handling equipment, with infrared fire detectors, is almost complete. The new 18 MW steam turbine will be cooled by an air-cooled condenser. Coal will be delivered in a railroad spur to an unloading site then be unloaded onto a conveyor under the tracks and conveyed to two storage domes each holding 6000 tons of coal. It will be drawn out of these through an underground conveyor system, brought into a crusher, conveyed through overhead conveyors and fed into the new coal- fired fluidized bed boilers. 1 photo.

Miell, R.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Burning: Total 5: 1980. 3.06: 4.42: NA: 0.28: 0.45: 8.20: 10.52: 0.52: 11.04: 5.47: 2.87: 0.48: 0.04: 8.86: ... 4 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and ...

304

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011 Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 34. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Annual Percent Change Census Division and State Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional New England 88.32 165.17 - - 87.62 w - - 0.80 w - - Connecticut 80.11 - - - 69.29 - - - 15.62 - - - Maine 189.84 w - - 162.19 w - - 17.05 13.93 - - Massachusetts 75.71 w - - 87.17

306

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 26. U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Total Census Division and State Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional 2012 2011 Percent Change New England 1,920 81 - - 3,025 w - - 2,001 w w Connecticut 415 - - - 325 - - - 415 325 27.5 Maine 32 w - - 38 w - - w w -16.4 Massachusetts 954 w - - 1,763 w - - w w -44.4 New Hampshire 520 - - - 898 - - - 520 898 -42.2 Middle Atlantic 44,838 2,440 w w 53,970 2,926 w w 52,750

307

Table 14. Steam Coal Exports by Customs District  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Steam Coal Exports by Customs District Steam Coal Exports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 14. Steam Coal Exports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Customs District April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Eastern Total 4,951,041 5,566,950 6,554,494 10,517,991 11,407,664 -7.8 Baltimore, MD 1,275,530 831,976 1,715,016 2,107,506 2,852,092 -26.1 Boston, MA 7 - 12 7 24 -70.8 Buffalo, NY 1,180 1,516 2,826 2,696 5,257 -48.7 New York City, NY 3,088 2,664 2,168 5,752 6,106 -5.8 Norfolk, VA 3,578,715 4,697,769 4,760,354 8,276,484 8,443,756 -2.0 Ogdensburg, NY 36,894 3,610 3,090 40,504 6,838 492.3 Philadelphia, PA

308

Table 19. Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Imports Price of U.S. Coal Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 19. Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 147.86 138.39 191.01 144.86 197.96 -26.8 Canada 147.86 138.39 191.00 144.86 197.95 -26.8 Mexico - - 286.23 - 286.23 - South America Total 75.29 80.74 86.52 77.20 87.17 -11.4 Argentina - - 504.70 - 504.70 - Colombia 74.87 80.74 83.03 76.96 85.25 -9.7 Peru 87.09 - - 87.09 - - Venezuela 91.81 - 122.01 91.81 112.61 -18.5 Europe Total - 136.50 137.33 136.50 146.31 -6.7

309

Table 15. Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 15. Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Customs District April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Eastern Total 11,716,074 14,136,513 15,167,377 25,852,587 27,578,514 -6.3 Baltimore, MD 2,736,470 4,225,450 5,123,600 6,961,920 9,037,970 -23.0 Boston, MA - - - - 28,873 - Buffalo, NY 247,714 121,347 524,040 369,061 725,698 -49.1 Norfolk, VA 8,730,257 9,784,866 9,519,119 18,515,123 17,784,479 4.1 Ogdensburg, NY 1,633 4,850 618 6,483 1,494 333.9 Southern Total 3,551,564 3,824,484

310

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Crosscutting Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal...

311

O A L Section 2. Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 2. Coal Coal prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports.

312

Questions and Answers - How many atoms would it take to create a ton?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there in the world? there in the world? Previous Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Could you please explain density?) Could you please explain density? How many atoms would it take to create a ton? There's a lot more to this question than first appears. There are many types of atoms and each of them has its own mass, so the answer varies depending on which atom you are talking about. Since even a tiny bit of matter has many atoms, it has become customary to use the unit "mole" to signify a standard number of atoms, namely, it is Avogadro's number which (almost) equals 6*1023, or 600,000 billion billon. If you look up the periodic table of elements, one of the numbers usually listed is the atomic mass which is the mass (in grams) of one mole of those atoms. Let's use

313

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Background studies for a ton-scale argon dark matter detector (ArDM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ArDM project aims at operating a large noble liquid detector to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the universe. Background sources relevant to ton-scale liquid and gaseous argon detectors, such as neutrons from detector components, muon-induced neutrons and neutrons caused by radioactivity of rock, as well as the internal $^{39}Ar$ background, are studied with simulations. These background radiations are addressed with the design of an appropriate shielding as well as with different background rejection potentialities. Among them the project relies on event topology recognition, event localization, density ionization discrimination and pulse shape discrimination. Background rates, energy spectra, characteristics of the background-induced nuclear recoils in liquid argon, as well as the shielding performance and rejection performance of the detector are described.

L. Kaufmann; A. Rubbia

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Table 10. Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 10. Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Rank Controlling Company Name Production (thousand short tons) Percent of Total Production 1 Peabody Energy Corp 192,563 18.9 2 Arch Coal Inc 136,992 13.5 3 Alpha Natural Resources LLC 104,306 10.3 4 Cloud Peak Energy 90,721 8.9 5 CONSOL Energy Inc 55,752 5.5 6 Alliance Resource Operating Partners LP 35,406 3.5 7 Energy Future Holdings Corp 31,032 3.1 8 Murray Energy Corp 29,216 2.9 9 NACCO Industries Inc 28,207 2.8 10 Patriot Coal Corp 23,946 2.4 11 Peter Kiewit Sons Inc 22,725 2.2 12 Westmoreland Coal Co 22,215 2.2 13 BHP Billiton Ltd 12,580 1.2 14 Walter Energy Inc 11,220 1.1 15 Cline Group (The) 9,230

316

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

317

Coal Minemouth Prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minemouth Prices Minemouth Prices Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 141, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons and the US Dollar. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Minemouth Prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Minemouth Prices by Region and Type- Reference Case (xls, 121.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

318

Co-conversion of coal/waste plastic mixtures under various pyrolysis and liquefaction conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For strategic and economic reasons the conversion of coal to liquid fuels has been a constant goal of the coal science community. Although the economics of coal liquefaction are primarily governed by the price of crude oil, other factors such as the need for large quantities of hydrogen gas, play an important role. If methods could be found that reduce the amount of hydrogen gas required for liquefaction, considerable benefits would be realized. To explore this possibility the use of waste plastics as materials capable of upgrading coal into liquid fuel products has been investigated. The use of waste plastics for this purpose could become possible because over 30 million tons of synthetic polymer material is produced in the United States every year. In this study, several pyrolysis and liquefaction experiment were performed on an Illinois No. 6 coal and coal/plastic blends.

Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.; Tandon, D.; Blankenship, M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mercury emission control for coal fired power plants using coal and biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a leading concern among the air toxic metals addressed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) because of its volatility, persistence, and bioaccumulation as methylmercury in the environment and its neurological health impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports for 2001 shows that total mercury emissions from all sources in USA is about 145 tons per annum, of which coal fired power plants contribute around 33% of it, about 48 tons per annum. Unlike other trace metals that are emitted in particulate form, mercury is released in vapor phase in elemental (Hg0) or oxidized (Hg2+, mainly HgCl2) form. To date, there is no post combustion treatment which can effectively capture elemental mercury vapor, but the oxidized form of mercury can be captured in traditional emission control devices such as wet flue gas defulrization (WFGD) units, since oxidized mercury (HgCl2) is soluble in water. The chlorine concentration present during coal combustion plays a major role in mercury oxidation, which is evident from the fact that plants burning coal having high chlorine content have less elemental mercury emissions. A novel method of co-firing blends of low chlorine content coal with high chlorine content cattle manure/biomass was used in order to study its effect on mercury oxidation. For Texas Lignite and Wyoming coal the concentrations of chlorine are 139 ppm and 309 ppm on dry ash free basis, while for Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass it is 2,691 ppm. Co-firing experiments were performed in a 100,000 BTU/hr (29.3 kWt) Boiler Burner facility located in the Coal and Biomass Energy laboratory (CBEL); coal and biomass blends in proportions of 80:20, 90:10, 95:5 and 100:0 were investigated as fuels. The percentage reduction of Hg with 95:5, 90:10 and 80:20 blends were measured to be 28- 50%, 42-62% and 71-75% respectively. Though cattle biomass serves as an additive to coal, to increase the chlorine concentration, it leads to higher ash loading. Low Ash and High Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass have 164% and 962% more ash than Wyoming coal respectively. As the fraction of cattle biomass in blend increases in proportion, ash loading problems increase simultaneously. An optimum blend ratio is arrived and suggested as 90:10 blend with good reduction in mercury emissions without any compromise on ash loading.

Arcot Vijayasarathy, Udayasarathy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard series of two staged gas generators (GG) has been developed in the United States for producing gas with a combustion heat from 4,700 to 7,600 kilojoules per cubic meter from coal (U). The diameter of the gas generators is from 1.4 to 3.65 meters and the thermal capacity based on purified cold gas is from 12.5 to 89 million kilojoules per hour. Certain standard sized gas generators have undergone experimental industrial tests which showed that it is most expedient to feed the coal into the gas generators pneumatically. This reduces the dimensions of the charging device, makes it possible to use more common grades of structural steels and reduces the cost of the gas. A double valve reliably prevents ejections of the gasification product and promotes the best distribution of the coal in the gas generator. The gas generators may successfully operate on high moisture (up to 36 percent) brown coal. Blasting with oxygen enriched to 38 percent made it possible to produce a gas with a combustion heat of 9,350 kilojoules per cubic meter. This supports a combustion temperature of 1,700C.

Rainey, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Coal-Mac, Inc. Phoenix No. 1 mine provides wildlife haven. 2007 Wildlife West Virginia Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Mac, Inc.'s Harless Wood Industrial Park off Holden 22 Mines Road in Logan Country, West Virginia is an award-winning reclamation site in the mountains frequented by geese, wild turkey, deer and black bears. Orchard grass and rye is a temporary cover for the timothy, clover and other seedlings. The area was mined several years ago. Some 40,000-50,000 tons of coal per month are surfaced mined with the current permit that takes in 1,500-2,000 acres. After removing the coal, valleys are backfilled as part of the mining and reclamation plan. 10 photos.

Skinner, A.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Note: 2005 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Note: 2005 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources" Note: 2005 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources" "Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2005 (Thousand Short Tons)" "State / Region","Domestic*","Foreign*","Total" "Alabama",5432,4214,9646 "Alaska",899,503,1402 "Arizona",12806,"- ",12806 "Arkansas",2,"- ",2 "Colorado",35766,706,36472 "Illinois",26664,284,26949 "Indiana",24074,11,24086 "Kansas",170,"- ",170 "Kentucky Total",100152,3148,103300 "East",77397,3127,80524 "West",22754,22,22776 "Louisiana",3970,"- ",3970 "Maryland",5252,754,6007

325

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 2: Run 248  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 248 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run began on 8 February 1985 and continued through 5 May 1985. A total of 170 tons of Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was fed in 1,904 hours of operation. The primary run objectives included the demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal with the low-contact time (LCT) reactor in place at the thermal liquefaction unit (TLU) in both the Double Integrated T...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Does the presence of pseudovitrinite indicate gas-saturated coals? Some interesting observations from the Gething coals in Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of pseudovitrinite at a depth of 1,000 m in the very gassy (up to 862 scf/ton total gas content, as-received basis) but low absolute permeability (0.5 mD), low-volatile bituminous Gething coals in the Canadian Foothills has been documented. Because oxidation is unlikely to occur at such depth, it is reasonable to expect that pseudovitrinite formed as a result of desiccation in a gas-saturated environment prior to the coals being uplifted to their present day depth. This raises the possibility that a coal that contains pseudovitrinite may have moisture content that is below its equilibrium moisture, which leads to higher methane adsorptive capacity compared with the same coal that has normal vitrinite (collotelinite). The presence of inertinite macerals in the coal, derived from wood fibers and charred remnants, has aided in the development and preservation of phyteral porosity and in the formation of interconnected microcavities, which should result in higher micropermeability and aid the flow of gas locally within the coal seam and surrounding strata. The Gething coals in the Highhat corehole share some of these characteristics, which may have important implications on the dynamics of coal-bed methane production. Volumetric strain (matrix shrinkage) of these gassy coals during production is conservatively estimated to be 0.5-0.75%, which may result in an absolute permeability increase of between 5 to 12 times, based on studies on coals of similar rank and gas content in United States basins. Although observations made in this preliminary study do not constitute a proof, they leave open the possibility of using pseudovitrinite, under certain circumstances, as an indicator of improved gas sorptive capacity and enhanced permeability in deep coals.

Gentzis, T. [Petron Resources LP, Frisco, TX (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A 2-Dimensional Cellular Automaton for Agents Moving from Origins to Destinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) as a simple model for agents moving from origins to destinations. Each agent moves towards an empty neighbor site corresponding to the minimal distance to its destination. The stochasticity or noise ($p$) is introduced in the model dynamics, through the uncertainty in estimating the distance from the destination. The friction parameter $"\\mu"$ is also introduced to control the probability that the movement of all agents involved to the same site (conflict) is denied at one time step. This model displays two states; namely the freely moving and the jamming state. If $\\mu$ is large and $p$ is low, the system is in the jamming state even if the density is low. However, if $\\mu$ is large and $p$ is high, a freely moving state takes place whenever the density is low. The cluster size and the travel time distributions in the two states are studied in detail. We find that only very small clusters are present in the freely moving state while the jamming state displ...

Moussa, N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Coal resource estimation in the Bayir field, Yatagan-Mugla, SW Turkey  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on some coal properties and calculation of coal resources with two classical (isopach and polygon) methods in the Bayir field, Yatagan-Mugla, which is located in southwestern Anatolia. This field has not been mined because it is still in the exploration stage. A productive coal seam of Early (?)-Middle Miocene age has a mineable coal thickness of 1.25 m to 18.01 m. Proximate analysis results indicated that this coal seam contains high moisture, ash, volatile matter, total sulphur content, and net calorific values. The weighted average mineable coal thickness calculated from the isopachs is 7.52 m and 7.82 m from polygonal methods. The in situ tonnages with isopach and polygonal methods were calculated to be 122.8 Mt and 130 Mt, respectively. The average value of the two methods shows 126.4 Mt in situ coal tonnages. Total amount of the in situ mineable coal resources is 77.7 Mt, which indicates an important coal potential in the Bayir field. The overburden thickness ranges from 72 m to 493 m in the Bayir field, averaging 257 m, indicating a deep coal mine. The overburden ratio averages 37 m{sup 3}/ton, indicating an underground coal mine to feed a power plant in near future.

Inaner, H.; Nakoman, E.; Karayigit, A.I. [Dokuz Eylul University, Buca Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Geological Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,189 2,679 3,225 5,867 5,993 -2.1 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,770 4,962 5,370 10,732 10,440 2.8 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

333

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 37. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Coal Consumers Last Day of Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants Other Industrial 2 Commercial and Institutional Users Total Coal Producers and Distributors Total 2007 March 31 141,389 2,444 5,756 - 149,588 34,007 183,595 June 30 154,812 2,364 5,672 - 162,849 32,484 195,333 September 30 142,666 1,972 5,811 - 150,448 30,090 180,538 December 31 151,221 1,936 5,624 - 158,781 33,977 192,758 2008 March 31 146,497 1,462 4,818 448 153,225 34,876 188,101 June 30 152,542 1,756 4,983 478 159,760 32,086 191,846

334

Report to the United States Congress clean coal technology export markets and financing mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to a Congressional Conference Report that requests that $625,000 in funding provided will be used by the Department to identify potential markets for clean coal technologies in developing countries and countries with economies in transition from nonmarket economies and to identify existing, or new, financial mechanisms or financial support to be provided by the Federal government that will enhance the ability of US industry to participate in these markets. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects world coal consumption to increase by 30 percent between 1990 and 2010, from 5.1 to 6.5 billion short tons. Five regions stand out as major foreign markets for the export of US clean coal technologies: China; The Pacific Rim (other than China); South Asia (primarily India); Transitional Economies (Central Europe and the Newly Independent States); and Other Markets (the Americas and Southern Africa). Nearly two-thirds of the expected worldwide growth in coal utilization will occur in China, one quarter in the United States. EIA forecasts nearly a billion tons per year of additional coal consumption in China between 1990 and 2010, a virtual doubling of that country`s coal consumption. A 30-percent increase in coal consumption is projected in other developing countries over that same period. This increase in coal consumption will be accompanied by an increase in demand for technologies for burning coal cost-effectively, efficiently and cleanly. In the Pacific Rim and South Asia, rapid economic growth coupled with substantial indigenous coal supplies combine to create a large potential market for CCTS. In Central Europe and the Newly Independent States, the challenge will be to correct the damage of decades of environmental neglect without adding to already-considerable economic disruption. Though the situation varies, all these countries share the basic need to use indigenous low-quality coal cleanly and efficiently.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Coal-bed methane potential of Vancouver Island coalfields  

SciTech Connect

Commercially attractive quantities of coal-bed methane gas on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, are indicated from recent studies by the provincial Geological Survey Branch and independent consultants. Coal mining activity began in 1847, which provides large amount of data concerning drilling, mining, quality, and reserves. Presence of methane is corroborated by documented accounts of coal mine disasters. Coal measures are part of the Upper Cretaceous Nanaimo Group, which covers approximately 800 mi{sup 2} and are divided into two subbasins. Cretaceous strata rest unconformably on predominantly volcanic basement rocks and are controlled in their distribution by paleotopography. Maximum aggregate coal thickness in the Nanaimo subbasin is 30-60 ft in the Comox subbasin, greater than 40 ft. Post-Cretaceous faulting strongly influences the area. Tertiary intrusives have effected coal quality to some extent. Sampling of coal seams is currently underway to determine levels of thermal maturation. Vitrinite reflectance ranges from 0.59 to 3.21 (R{sub o} max). The majority of coals are of high-volatile B to A bituminous rank, with local variations near Tertiary intrusions. Test-well desorption data have indicated that coals can contain as much as 380 ft{sup 3} of methane per ton of coal. Gas samples taken were pipeline quality, about 95% methane, 4.5% heavier hydrocarbons, and 0.5% carbon dioxide. A conservative estimate of in-place methane resource is 800 bcf. Plans are currently underway to construct a natural gas pipeline from the mainland to service Vancouver Island. This would provide the necessary infrastructure to make extraction of the methane resource economic.

Kenyon, C. (Ministry of Energy, Mines, Petroleum Resources, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)); Murray, D.K. (D. Keith Murray and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

2014 Coal Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has begun the process of re-clearing the coal survey ...

338

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

339

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices (updated December 27, 2006) This report summarizes spot coal prices for the business weeks ended December 1, 8, and 15.

340

Annual Coal Report 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0584 (2001) Annual Coal Report 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Metallurgical coal markets became volatile when the thriving Chinese steel industry in late 2003 and 2004 made outsized demands for coking coal and met coke, ...

342

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

343

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 25. Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Commodity April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Coke - - - - - - Sales 1,969 1,936 1,996 3,905 3,987 -2.1 Average Price 331.26 364.97 388.87 347.97 395.78 -12.1 Breeze - - - - - - Sales 89 110 158 199 309 -35.7 Average Price 196.05 145.86 103.62 168.27 101.14 66.4 Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report -

344

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. The Mulled Coal circuit was installed in an empty bay at the Chetopa Preparation Plant. Equipment has been installed to divert a 2.7 tonnes/hr (3 tons/hr) slipstream of the froth concentrate to a dewatering centrifuge. The concentrated wet coal fines from the centrifuge dropped through a chute directly into a surge hopper and feed system for the Mulled Coal circuit. The Mulled Coal product was gravity discharged from the circuit to a truck or product discharge area from which it will be hauled to a stockpile located at the edge of the clean coal stockpile area. During the 3-month operating period, the facility produced 870 tonnes (966 tons) of the Muffed Coal for evaluation in various storage, handling, and transportation equipment and operations. Immediately following the production demonstration, the circuit was disassembled and the facility was decommissioned.

1996-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum Dallas, Texas May 17-19, 2004 Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Presentation Outline * Background * Power plant-water issues * DOE/NETL R&D program * Conclusion/future plans ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Global Water Availability Ocean 97% Fresh Water 2.5% 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ice Groundwater Lakes and Rivers ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Freshwater Withdrawals and Consumption Mgal / Day Irrigation 81,300 Irrigation 81,300 Thermoelectric 3,310 Consumption Sources: "Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1995," USGS Circular 1200, 1998

346

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Biomass to Liquids Hydrogen-from-Coal RD&D ENERGY ANALYSIS About Us Search Products Contacts SMART GRID ANALYSIS BASELINE STUDIES QUALITY GUIDELINES NETL-RUA About NETL-RUA...

347

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal 101 Lesson 2: The Clean Coal Technology Program The Clean Coal Technology Program began in 1985 when the United States and Canada decided that something had to be done about the "acid rain" that was believed to be damaging rivers, lakes, forests, and buildings in both countries. Since many of the pollutants that formed "acid rain" were coming from big coal-burning power plants in the United States, the U.S. Government took the lead in finding a solution. One of the steps taken by the U.S. Department of Energy was to create a partnership program between the Government, several States, and private companies to test new methods developed by scientists to make coal burning much cleaner. This became the "Clean Coal Technology Program."

348

AEO2011: World Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 143, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into Metallurgical coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Metallurgical Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries- Reference Case (xls, 103.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

349

AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 144, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into total coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries - Reference Case (xls, 104 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

350

AEO2011: World Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 142, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into steam coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal flows countries EIA exporting importing Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries- Reference Case (xls, 103.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

351

EIA - Future role of the United States in world coal trade  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Future role of the United States in world coal trade Future role of the United States in world coal trade International Energy Outlook 2010 Future role of the United States in world coal trade U.S. coal exports increased each year from 2002 to 2008 at an average annual rate of 12.8 percent, to 82 million tons in 2008. Some analysts have viewed the sharp increase in U.S. exports as an indication of the growing importance of the United States as a world coal supplier. There has also been speculation that China's growing demand for coal will support this trend in the future. However, U.S. coal is a relatively high-cost supply source when shipped to Asian markets, and in the long term U.S. coal will be competing in the Chinese market with lower cost suppliers, notably Australia and Indonesia among others. U.S. exports compete most strongly in European markets and then only when less expensive options are unavailable. In IEO2010, the United States remains a marginal coal supplier over the long term, responding to short-term disruptions or spikes in demand rather than significantly expanding its market share of world coal trade.

352

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

353

Clean Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal to Liquids Major Demonstrations Crosscutting Research Carbon Capture and...

354

Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fairlawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Coal Tar and Bedrock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of bedrock groundwater and coal tar impacts is one of the most complicated tasks associated with managing manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This report provides an overview of the fate and transport of coal tar in bedrock and the methods available to investigate coal tar at particular sites and discusses how to develop a decision-making framework for coal tar investigations.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

Subbituminous and bituminous coal dominate U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While almost all coal consumed in the United States is used to generate electricity (90% in 2010), coal is not entirely homogeneous. Coal is ...

358

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Alternate Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Alternate Hydrogen Production In the Alternate Production technology pathway, clean syngas from coal is converted to high-hydrogen-content liquid...

359

The Effect of Circulating Coal Slurry Water Hardness on Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the effect of gypsum on flotation and coal slurry settling during coal slurry recirculation, the water hardness and proton conductivity of coal ...

360

3.5 D temperature model of a coal stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overproduced coal mines that are not sold should remain in coal stock sites. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stock yards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research, a coal stock which was 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m in height, with a weight of 120 tons, was monitored to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over the two layers in the stockpile. Temperatures measured by a specially designed mechanism were then stored into a computer every 3 h for a period of 3 months. Afterward, this dataset was used to delineate 3.5 D temporal temperature distribution models for these two levels, and they were used to analyze and interpret what was seen in these models to derive some conclusions. It was openly seen, followed, and analyzed that internal temperature changes in the stockpile went up to 31{sup o}C by 3.5 D models created for this research.

Ozdeniz, A.H.; Corumluoglu, O.; Kalayci, I.; Sensogut, C. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 21. Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Number of Mining Operations 2 Number of Employees 3 Average Production per Employee Hour (short tons) 4 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type 2012 2011 Percent Change 2012 2011 Percent Change 2012 2011 Percent Change Alabama 54 62 -12.9 5,041 4,756 6.0 1.68 1.66 0.7 Underground 11 12 -8.3 3,190 3,138 1.7 1.64 1.45 13.2 Surface 43 50 -14.0 1,851 1,618 14.4 1.75 2.08 -15.8 Alaska 1 1 - 143 136 5.1 5.98 6.48 -7.7 Surface 1 1 - 143 136 5.1 5.98 6.48 -7.7 Arizona 1 1 - 432 419 3.1 7.38 8.44 -12.6 Surface 1 1 - 432 419 3.1 7.38 8.44 -12.6 Arkansas 2 2 - 73 70 4.3 0.58 0.70

362

Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.69 2.50 1.95 1.72 1.83 0.69 0.55 1.68 Underground 1.73 - - - 1.08 0.31 - 1.64 Surface 1.36 2.50 1.95 1.72 2.11 1.19 0.55 1.75 Alaska 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Surface 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Arizona 7.38 - - - - - - 7.38 Surface

363

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

364

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

365

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A "Bed" for Burning Coal A "Bed" for Burning Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 4: A "Bed" for Burning Coal? It was a wet, chilly day in Washington DC in 1979 when a few scientists and engineers joined with government and college officials on the campus of Georgetown University to celebrate the completion of one of the world's most advanced coal combustors. It was a small coal burner by today's standards, but large enough to provide heat and steam for much of the university campus. But the new boiler built beside the campus tennis courts was unlike most other boilers in the world. A Fluidized Bed Boiler A Fluidized Bed Boiler In a fluidized bed boiler, upward blowing jets of air suspend burning coal, allowing it to mix with limestone that absorbs sulfur pollutants.

366

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 1. U.S. Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year January - March April - June July - September October - December Total 2007 286,041 285,687 286,035 288,872 1,146,635 2008 289,015 284,331 298,911 299,552 1,171,809 2009 282,772 263,017 269,339 259,796 1,074,923 2010 265,702 264,982 277,505 276,180 1,084,368 2011 273,478 264,291 275,006 282,853 1,095,628 2012 267,071 241,205 258,956 249,591 1,016,822 2013 245,058 243,105 - - 488,163 - = No data reported. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production Report.'

367

Potential for thermal coal and Clean Coal Technology (CCT) in the Asia-Pacific. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Project was able to make considerable progress in understanding the evolving energy situation in Asia and the future role of coal and Clean Coal Technologies. It is clear that there will be major growth in consumption of coal in Asia over the next two decades -- we estimate an increase of 1.2 billion metric tons. Second, all governments are concerned about the environmental impacts of increased coal use, however enforcement of regulations appears to be quite variable among Asian countries. There is general caution of the part of Asian utilities with respect to the introduction of CCT`s. However, there appears to be potential for introduction of CCT`s in a few countries by the turn of the century. It is important to emphasize that it will be a long term effort to succeed in getting CCT`s introduced to Asia. The Coal Project recommends that the US CCT program be expanded to allow the early introduction of CCT`s in a number of countries.

Johnson, C.J.; Long, S.

1991-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Prebaked Anode from Coal Extract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We previously reported that the coal extract prepared from non-hydrogenative extraction of thermal coals using two-ring-aromatic solvent (Hyper-coal) is suitable ...

369

Coal desulfurization with sodium hypochlorite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wet desulfurization of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Illinois No. 6 coal were conducted with sodium hypochlorite in the laboratory. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was… (more)

Li, Wei, M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Coal data: A reference  

SciTech Connect

This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

EIA - Weekly U.S. Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Production U.S. Coal Production Report No.: DOE/EIA 0218/50 Report Released: December 19, 2013 Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 Week Ended Year-To-Date1 52 Weeks Ended Coal-Producing Region and State (thousand short tons) 12/14/2013 12/7/2013 12/15/2012 12/14/2013 12/14/2012 Percent Change 12/14/2013 12/15/2012 Percent Change Alabama 355 351 338 17,644 18,754 -5.9 18,343 19,394 -5.4 Alaska 42 41 45 1,675 1,964 -14.7 1,764 2,045 -13.7 Arizona 151 149 141 7,328 7,226 1.4 7,596 7,513 1.1 Arkansas 1 1 3 37 92 -59.3 44 96 -54.6 Colorado 487 473 419 22,198 27,630 -19.7 23,090 28,655 -19.4 Illinois 997 983 890 50,272 46,828 7.4 52,170 48,271 8.1 Indiana 737 728 693 36,141 35,248 2.5 37,590 36,686 2.5

372

Biomass Cofiring with Coal at Seward, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first test under the EPRI/FETC biomass cofiring process was at GPU Genco`s 32-MW{sub e} pulverized coal boiler at Seward, Pennsylvania. The unit used in the test (Boiler 12) is a wall-fired boiler built by Babcock & Wilcox, and has a nominal steaming capacity of 300,000 lb/hr of 675 psig/850 F stream. The furnace of Boiler 12 has a volume of 20,000 ft{sup 3} and has a volume in the primary combustion area of 12,700 ft{sup 3}. The boiler has two rows of burners, with three burners installed on each row. Typically it consumes coal at about 14 ton/hr when firing at 100 percent of capacity. This boiler, along with Boiler 14, supply steam to a 64 MW{sub e} Westinghouse turbine. The net station heat rate (NSHR) for Boilers 12 and 14, and the associated turbine, is 14,200 Btu/kWh. Boiler 14 has been used to test coal water slurry (CWS), and that experience contributed to the design and execution of this cofiring test, where sawdust was the biomass fuel.

Huges, E.; Battista, J. [GPU Genco (United States); Tillman, D [Foster Wheeler Environmental (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Coal combustion products: trash or treasure?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion by-products can be a valuable resource to various industries. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) collects data on production and uses of coal combustion products (CCPs). 122.5 million tons of CCPs were produced in 2004. The article discusses the results of the ACCA's 2004 survey. Fly ash is predominantly used as a substitute for Portland cement; bottom ash for structural fill, embankments and paved road cases. Synthetic gypsum from the FGD process is commonly used in wallboard. Plant owners are only likely to have a buyer for a portion of their CCPs. Although sale of hot water (from Antelope Valley Station) from condensers for use in a fish farm to raise tilapia proved unviable, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant which manufactures natural gas from lignite produces a wide range of products including anhydrous ammonia, phenol, krypton, carbon dioxide (for enhanced oil recovery), tar oils and liquid nitrogen. ACCA's goal is to educate people about CCPs and how to make them into useful products, and market them, in order to reduce waste disposal and enhance revenue. The article lists members of the ACCA. 2 photos., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

NETL: Coal & Power Systems - Brief History of Coal Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Coal Coal & Power Systems Brief History of Coal Use Steam Locomotive In the 1800s, one of the primary uses of coal was to fuel steam engines used to power locomotives....

375

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Closely Aligned Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > C&CBTL > Closely Aligned Programs Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Closely Aligned Programs The Department of Energy's (DOE) Coal & CoalBiomass to Liquids...

376

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Steam Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 46.96 39.34 39.76 66.29 70.83 70.95 82.81 150.58 NA Denmark 40.78 31.65 50.27 56.29 61.84 59.15 75.20 113.34 NA Finland 40.83 37.08 39.99 58.45 62.80 67.65 72.64 134.21 NA France 45.36 42.59 42.63 64.08 75.23 72.92 84.49 135.53 NA Germany 41.46 36.80 39.00 61.22 72.48 70.12 81.49 138.84 NA Ireland3 45.25 47.88 50.08 80.90 74.91 101.78 125.15 143.08 NA Italy 44.83 41.25 42.45 63.54 73.20 69.16 86.00 143.68 NA Japan 37.95 36.95 34.93 51.48 62.73 63.33 70.92 125.42 NA Netherlands 40.09 35.81 37.27 55.09 68.86 68.57 79.12 133.50 NA

378

An Evaluation of the image of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in the British and Swedish markets and the implications for marketing the country as a tourism destination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tourism image is critical to the success of any destination, but few image studies to date have focused specifically on either Jordan or the UK… (more)

Harahsheh, Salem Salameh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

380

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

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381

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial (point sources) Coal Oil Other Area sourcesSource Stationary fuel combugtion Electric utilities Coal Oil

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Coal Severance Tax (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Severance Tax is imposed on all coal severed for sale or industrial purposes, except coal used for heating buildings in the state, coal used by the state or any political subdivision of...

383

Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney [Research & Development Solutions, LLC (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

Baxter, L.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coal feed lock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal feed lock is provided for dispensing coal to a high pressure gas producer with nominal loss of high pressure gas. The coal feed lock comprises a rotor member with a diametral bore therethrough. A hydraulically activated piston is slidably mounted in the bore. With the feed lock in a charging position, coal is delivered to the bore and then the rotor member is rotated to a discharging position so as to communicate with the gas producer. The piston pushes the coal into the gas producer. The rotor member is then rotated to the charging position to receive the next load of coal.

Pinkel, I. Irving (Fairview Park, OH)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every 500 tons fired. The application of foam requires less than 10% of the moisture usually required for wet suppression. In addition, foam is a much more effective dust suppressant, especially on respirable dust (particle with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns). To achieve maximum benefit from foam dust control, efficient on-site production of dry, stable foam is required. This paper discusses the basics of foam production and the many variables affecting foam expansion ratios. Successful applications of foam are also described.

Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Pelletization of fine coals  

SciTech Connect

The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

Sastry, K.V.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

International perspectives on coal preparation  

SciTech Connect

The report consists of the vugraphs from the presentations which covered the following topics: Summaries of the US Department of Energy`s coal preparation research programs; Preparation trends in Russia; South African coal preparation developments; Trends in hard coal preparation in Germany; Application of coal preparation technology to oil sands extraction; Developments in coal preparation in China; and Coal preparation in Australia.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012 Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 5. Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Production (thousand short tons) Thickness (inches) Coalbed ID Number 1 Coalbed Name Underground Surface Total Average 2 Low High 1699 Wyodak - 351,188 351,188 778 160 913 0036 Pittsburgh 52,476 3,871 56,348 74 18 138 0489 No. 9 42,193 12,181 54,374 61 24 74 0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6) 48,526 1,910 50,436 71 46 89 0212 Pittsburgh 27,355 76 27,431 75 27 98 1701 Smith - 23,847 23,847 822 745 912 1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2 - 18,992 18,992 932 660 960 0084 Lower Kittanning 8,196 7,268 15,464

392

A Physicochemical Evaluation of the HQ-1 Core from the Pricetown I, Underground Coal Gasification Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Core samples of coal and rock were obtained from the HQ-1 environmental test well at the Pricetown I, Underground Coal Gasification Test Site. A comprehensive analytical program was performed to characterize the coal samples. The rocks associated with the coals are composed of clay size material containing low amounts of organic matter and hydrocarbon gas relative to the coal seams. The fine grained sediment above and below the coal seams appear to be an effective gas seal. The coals were encountered in two intervals of 1 foot and 6 feet thickness separated by 2 feet of shale. The coals are classified as high volatile A or B bituminous based on vitrinite reflectance, fixed carbon, and calorific value. Coal maceral analysis shows that the coal is heterogeneous in petrographic properties. The vitrinite group is the predominant maceral constituent. Fusinite, semi-fusinite, massive micrinite, and sporinite are present in varying amounts. The distribution of porous fusinite layers within the coal seams may be important in the reverse linkage stage of the gasification process. The coal in the bottom seam contains an average of 45.6 standard cubic feet of free methane per ton of coal. This methane may assist in initiating the gasification process. Thermal Conductivity and Laser Thermal Diffusivity experiments were also performed on selected coal samples as well as on samples of the grout used in the instrumentation wells. While the thermal conductivity values were influenced by the tars and oils generated during the heating of the coal, the laser thermal diffusivity values were obtained at sufficiently low temperatures to minimize the influence of the tars and oils.

Zielinski, R. E.; Larson, R. J.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Underground coal gasification: Its potential for long-term supply of sng. Occasional pub  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the viability of underground coal gasification (UCU) as a future source of substitute natural gas (SNG). The economics of commercial scale UCG technology at a western site is estimated and compared with aboveground gasification and also with an extrapolation of GRI's Baseline Projection for natural gas prices. Although much technical and economic uncertainty exists regarding UCG, the potential reserve base for unmineable coals is very large, about four times that of currently mineable coals. Assuming that only 10 percent of the 1.8 trillion tons of marginal U.S. coal resources may be amendable to UCG, this represents 1000 trillion cubic feet of potential SNG production. The UCG economics of the paper are based on a techno-economic study conducted by Williams Brothers Engineering Company; the cosponsors included GRI, Amoco Production Company, Hunt Oil Company, and Williams Brothers Engineering Company.

Hill, V.L.; Burnham, K.B.; Barone, S.P.; Rosenberg, J.I.; Ashby, A.B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

395

Indonesian coal mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Stacker speeds coal recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Spring Creek Coal Co., near Decker, Montana, features the only stacker/reclaimer in the U.S. to stockpile and reclaim coal produced by a dragline/truck-shovel operation.

Jackson, D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 DOEEIA-0121 (201004Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2010 March 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal...

398

Coal Market Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6, DOEEIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for...

399

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention deals with the solubilization of coal using species of Streptomyces. Also disclosed is an extracellular component from a species of Streptomyces, said component being able to solubilize coal.

Strandberg, Gerald W. (Farragut, TN); Lewis, Susan N. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Overview of coal conversion  

SciTech Connect

The structure of coal and the processes of coal gasification and coal liquefaction are reviewed. While coal conversion technology is not likely to provide a significant amount of synthetic fuel within the next several years, there is a clear interest both in government and private sectors in the development of this technology to hedge against ever-diminishing petroleum supplies, especially from foreign sources. It is evident from this rather cursory survey that there is some old technology that is highly reliable; new technology is being developed but is not ready for commercialization at the present state of development. The area of coal conversion is ripe for exploration both on the applied and basic research levels. A great deal more must be understood about the reactions of coal, the reactions of coal products, and the physics and chemistry involved in the various stages of coal conversion processes in order to make this technology economically viable.

Clark, B.R.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Chemicals from coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Over the past month and a half, NAP spot coal prices have been flat or declining (graph above). ... (the walls of coal left in place to support the roof), ...

403

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Where is the coal in the United States? Coal Across the U.S. The U.S. contains coal resources in various places. The coal occurs...

404

"Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Overview"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48" 48" "Report Released: December 05, 2013" "Next Release Date: January 09, 2014" "Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Overview" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing","Week Ended",,"Year-To-Date[1]",,"Month Ended",,"January - November" "Region and State","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","November 2013","November 2012",2013,2012,"% Change" "Alabama",314.49,339.32,16938.35,18080.05,1450.46,1425.29,16938.35,18080.05,-6.3 "Alaska",37.08,45.44,1592.19,1874.56,170.87,187.66,1592.19,1874.56,-15.1

405

Coal gasification apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal hydrogenation vessel has hydrogen heating passages extending vertically through its wall and opening into its interior.

Nagy, Charles K. (Monaca, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method for fluorinating coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal is fluorinated by contact with fluorine gas at low pressure. After pial fluorination, when the reaction rate has slowed, the pressure is slowly increased until fluorination is complete, forming a solid fluorinated coal of approximate composition CF.sub.1.55 H.sub.0.15. The fluorinated coal and a solid distillate resulting from vacuum pyrolysis of the fluorinated coal are useful as an internal standard for mass spectrometric unit mass assignments from about 100 to over 1500.

Huston, John L. (Skokie, IL); Scott, Robert G. (Westmont, IL); Studier, Martin H. (Downers Grove, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ore components in coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dependence of the mineral content in coal and concentrates on the degree of metamorphism is analyzed.

Kh.A. Ishhakov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry, Siberian Branch

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Coal Industry Annual, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coal Industry Annual, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Coal Industry Annual, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1996-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Coal Industry Annual, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

Coal Industry Annual, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Coal Industry Annual, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Information Center

414

Coal Industry Annual, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Information Center

415

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (Energy Publishing, Coal & Energy Price Report, Bulletin, ... Although, the soaring demands of the Chinese steel industry are still with us, ...

416

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 39. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division and State June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 New England w w 21 w Maine w w w w Massachusetts w w w w Middle Atlantic 295 251 286 3.2 New York 137 78 107 27.6 Pennsylvania 158 172 179 -11.5 East North Central 734 692 761 -3.5 Illinois 160 152 187 -14.1 Indiana 113 119 96 18.7 Michigan 252 244 269 -6.3 Ohio 87 66 79 9.9 Wisconsin 122 110 131 -7.0 West North Central

417

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 42. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Census Division and State September 30, 2013 June 30, 2013 September 30, 2012 Percent Change (September 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic 62 62 58 6.7 Pennsylvania 62 62 58 6.7 East North Central 155 168 182 -15.0 Illinois 25 24 41 -38.9 Indiana 73 75 66 10.0 Michigan w w w w Ohio w w w w Wisconsin 5 5 3 46.9 West North Central 65 66 90 -28.1 Iowa w w w w Minnesota w w w w Missouri w w w

418

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 30. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State July - September 2013 April - June 2013 July - September 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 11 25 15 91 105 -14.0 Pennsylvania 11 25 15 91 105 -14.0 East North Central 79 115 108 377 409 -7.7 Illinois 23 31 29 96 96 -0.4 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio w 30 w w 81 w Wisconsin w w w w 19 w West North Central 78 74 75 279 265 5.3 Iowa w w w w w w

419

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2007 11,139 8,786 14,702 8,405 16,198 10,559 17,124 8,597 59,163 36,347 2008 15,802 7,640 23,069 8,982 20,321 8,485 22,329 9,101 81,519 34,208 2009 13,335 6,325 12,951 5,426 15,159 5,441 17,653 5,447 59,097 22,639 2010 17,807 4,803 21,965 5,058 21,074 4,680 20,870 4,811 81,716 19,353 2011 26,617 3,381 26,987 3,419 25,976 3,588 27,679 2,700

420

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 34. Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w 20 w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 583 589 651 1,171 1,237 -5.3 New York 155 181 206 337 374 -10.1 Pennsylvania 427 407 445 835 863 -3.2 East North Central 2,191 2,385 2,064 4,577 4,457 2.7 Illinois 736 810 679 1,547 1,543 0.3 Indiana 509 534 493 1,043 994 4.9 Michigan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 36. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State July - September 2013 April - June 2013 July - September 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 11 20 13 83 96 -13.0 Pennsylvania 11 20 13 83 96 -13.0 East North Central 89 112 123 398 454 -12.4 Illinois 22 34 29 101 95 6.5 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio w 19 w w 95 w Wisconsin w w w w 21 w West North Central 77 81 81 296 270 9.7 Iowa w w w w w w

422

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 31. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 139.64 145.00 158.61 143.29 158.91 -9.8 Pennsylvania 139.64 145.00 158.61 143.29 158.91 -9.8 East North Central 87.62 97.30 87.11 93.56 95.13 -1.7 Illinois 59.27 60.30 62.17 59.86 66.69 -10.2 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio 127.99

423

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 32. U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Other Industrial Commercial and Institutional Year and Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants CHP 2 Non- CHP 3 Total CHP 4 Non- CHP 5 Total Total 2007 January - March 257,516 5,576 5,834 8,743 14,578 547 510 1,058 278,727 April - June 246,591 5,736 5,552 8,521 14,074 426 279 705 267,106 July - September 283,556 5,678 5,546 8,180 13,725 458 247 705 303,665 October - December 257,478 5,726 5,605 8,634 14,238 495 563 1,058 278,500 Total 1,045,141 22,715 22,537 34,078 56,615

424

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 24. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 157.29 176.84 199.70 166.21 198.26 -16.2 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 157.26 171.51 191.48 163.85 190.51 -14.0 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding.

425

Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goal is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate their potential application for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGVs). Focus is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons adsorbent could be consumed in NGVs by year 2000. If successful, the results could lead to use of Illinois coal in a market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. Activated carbon samples were prepared from IBC-106 coal by controlling both the preoxidation temperature and time, and the devolatilization temperature in order to eliminate coal caking. A 4.6 cc pressurized vessel was constructed to measure the Vm/Vs methane adsorption capacity (volume of stored methane at STP per volume storage container). Several IBC-106 derived activated carbons showed methane adsorption capacities comparable to that of a 1000 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon. Results indicated that surface area and micropore volume of activated carbons are important for natural gas storage. Work is in progress to synthesize samples from IBC-106 coal with optimum pore diameter for methane adsorption.

Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 5. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2007 74.13 45.91 64.30 46.86 72.10 47.38 71.09 50.51 70.25 47.64 2008 81.81 52.91 97.24 55.59 102.51 64.65 104.97 65.33 97.68 59.83 2009 113.08 61.03 93.28 65.44 98.70 64.93 100.98 64.72 101.44 63.91 2010 106.52 62.02 121.36 71.91 125.45 77.12 126.16 76.18 120.41 71.77 2011 139.34 86.00 153.00 105.86 155.88

427

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 27. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w w w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 87.05 93.03 93.73 89.93 95.68 -6.0 New York 102.14 105.80 117.15 103.80 117.61 -11.7 Pennsylvania 78.57 86.97 82.64 82.74 85.48 -3.2 East North Central 78.02 80.16 80.91 79.07 81.26 -2.7 Illinois

428

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 26. Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w w w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 627 587 637 1,214 1,254 -3.1 New York 214 178 194 392 377 4.0 Pennsylvania 413 409 443 822 877 -6.2 East North Central 2,257 2,170 2,107 4,427 4,187 5.8 Illinois 742 778 677 1,521 1,481 2.7 Indiana 508 500 409 1,008 820 22.9 Michigan 338

429

Economic analysis of coal-fired cogeneration plants for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Appropriations Act of 1986 requires the Department of Defense to use an additional 1,600,000 tons/year of coal at their US facilities by 1995 and also states that the most economical fuel should be used at each facility. In a previous study of Air Force heating plants burning gas or oil, Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that only a small fraction of this target 1,600,000 tons/year could be achieved by converting the plants where coal is economically viable. To identify projects that would use greater amounts of coal, the economic benefits of installing coal-fired cogeneration plants at 7 candidate Air Force bases were examined in this study. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed that included two types of financing (Air Force and private) and three levels of energy escalation for a total of six economic scenarios. Hill, McGuire, and Plattsburgh Air Force Bases were identified as the facilities with the best potential for coal-fired cogeneration, but the actual cost savings will depend strongly on how the projects are financed and to a lesser extent on future energy escalation rates. 10 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

Holcomb, R.S.; Griffin, F.P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

431

Flash hydrogenation of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

Manowitz, Bernard (Brightwaters, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY); Sheehan, Thomas V. (Hampton Bays, NY); Winsche, Warren E. (Bellport, NY); Raseman, Chad J. (Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Proceedings: Coal Combustion Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the 2007 Coal Combustion workshop was to present a holistic view of the various combustion processes required for minimal emissions, peak performance, and maximum reliability in a coal-fired power plant. The workshop also defined needs for future RD in coal combustion technology.

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

433

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

Coal Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System's (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM's two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

Michael Mellish

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Origin, Pathway, and Destination of Niño-3 Water Estimated by a Simulated Passive Tracer and Its Adjoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of subtropical–tropical water mass exchange in the Pacific Ocean is investigated, focusing on the origin, pathway, and destination of water occupying the surface layer of the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean (Niño-3 region; 5°S–5°N, ...

Ichiro Fukumori; Tong Lee; Benny Cheng; Dimitris Menemenlis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Acquisition, filtering and toll data processing system for obtaining origin-destination matrix and travel times on highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an acquisition, filtering and real-time toll data processing system that provides a base for resolution and generation of studies and models of behavior on highways. Crossing points estimation, speed calculation, study traffic flow, ... Keywords: origin-destination matrix, toll data processing, traffic management, travel time

Ramón V. Cirilo Gimeno; Antonio García Celda; Pablo Mir Gómez

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By applying the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production can be modeled with a single Hubbert curve that extends to the practical end of commercial production of this highest-rank coal. The production of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80% complete and can be carried out at the current rate for the next 20 years. The production of subbituminous coal from existing mines can be carried out at the current rate for 40-45 years. Significant new investment to extend the existing mines and build new ones would have to commence in 2009 to sustain the current rate of coal production, 1 billion tons per year, in 2029. In view of the existing data, we conclude that there is no spare coal production capacity of the size required for massive coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Our analysis is independent of other factors that will prevent large-scale coal liquefaction projects: the inefficiency of the process and either emissions of greenhouse gases or energy cost of sequestration.

Croft, Gregory D. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Patzek, Tad W. [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@mail.utexas.edu

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Statistical modeling of spontaneous combustion in industrial-scale coal stockpiles  

SciTech Connect

Companies consuming large amounts of coal should work with coal stocks in order to not face problems due to production delays. The industrial-scale stockpiles formed for the aforementioned reasons cause environmental problems and economic losses for the companies. This study was performed in a coal stock area of a large company in Konya, which uses large amounts of coal in its manufacturing units. The coal stockpile with 5 m width, 10 m length, 3 m height, and having 120 tons of weight was formed in the coal stock area of the company. The inner temperature data of the stockpile was recorded by 17 temperature sensors placed inside the stockpile at certain points. Additionally, the data relating to the air temperature, air humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, and wind direction that are the parameters affecting the coal stockpile were also recorded. A statistical model applicable for a spontaneous combustion event was developed during this study after applying multi-regression analyses to the data recorded in the stockpile during the spontaneous combustion event. The correlation coefficients obtained by the developed statistical model were measured approximately at a 0.95 level. Thus, the prediction of temperature variations influential in the spontaneous combustion event of the industrial-scale coal stockpiles will be possible.

Ozdeniz, H [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Environmental impact assessment for steeply dipping coal beds: North Knobs site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is funding an underground coal gasification (UCG) project in steeply dipping coal beds (SDB), at North Knobs, about 8 miles west of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming. The project is being conducted to determine the technical, economic and environmental viability of such a technology. The development of SDB is an interesting target for UCG since such beds contain coals not normally mineable economically by ordinary techniques. Although the underground gasification of SDB has not been attempted in the US, Soviet experience and theoretical work indicate that the gasification of SDB in place offers all the advantages of underground gasification of horizontal coal seams plus some unique characteristics. The steep angle of dip helps to channel the produced gases up dip to offtake holes and permits the ash and rubble to fall away from the reaction zone helping to mitigate the blocking of the reaction zone in swelling coals. The intersection of SDB with the surface makes the seam accessible for drilling and other preparation. The tests at the North Knobs site will consist of three tests, lasting 20, 80 and 80 days, respectively. A total of 9590 tons of coal is expected to be gasified, with surface facilities utilizing 15 acres of the total section of land. The environmental effects of the experiment are expected to be very small. The key environmental impact is potential groundwater contamination by reaction products from coal gasification. There is good evidence that the surrounding coal effectively blocks the migration of these contaminants.

1978-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

To what extent are regional tourism organisations (RTOs) in Australia leveraging the benefits of web technology for destination marketing and eCommerce?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information-intensive nature of the tourism and travel industry suggests an important role for Web technology in the promotion and marketing of tourist destinations. The rapid development of the Internet and WWW is having profound impacts on the ... Keywords: Destination marketing, Internet, Regional tourism, World Wide Web, eCommerce, eMICA

Lois Burgess; Belinda Parish; Carole Alcock

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tons coal destination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

442

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices in 2007 real $ Coal Prices Coal prices have been farprices. Factors like coal prices and EOR revenues affect theCoal Prices..

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

444

Coal recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the beneficiation of coal by selective agglomeration and the beneficiated coal product thereof is disclosed wherein coal, comprising impurities, is comminuted to a particle size sufficient to allow impurities contained therein to disperse in water, an aqueous slurry is formed with the comminuted coal particles, treated with a compound, such as a polysaccharide and/or disaccharide, to increase the relative hydrophilicity of hydrophilic components, and thereafter the slurry is treated with sufficient liquid agglomerant to form a coagulum comprising reduced impurity coal.

Good, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY); Badgujar, Mohan (Williamsville, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Baseload coal investment decisions under uncertain carbon legislation  

SciTech Connect

More than 50% of electricity in the U.S. is generated by coal. The U.S. has large coal resources, the cheapest fuel in most areas. Coal fired power plants are likely to continue to provide much of U.S. electricity. However, the type of power plant that should be built is unclear. Technology can reduce pollutant discharges and capture and sequester the CO{sub 2} from coal-fired generation. The U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 provides incentives for large scale commercial deployment of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems (e.g., loan guarantees and project tax credits). This analysis examines whether a new coal plant should be pulverized coal (PC) or IGCC. Do stricter emissions standards (PM, SO{sub 2}, NOx, Hg) justify the higher costs of IGCC over PC? How does potential future carbon legislation affect the decision to add carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology? Finally, can the impact of uncertain carbon legislation be minimized? We find that SO{sub 2}, NOx, PM, and Hg emission standards would have to be far more stringent than twice current standards to justify the increased costs of the IGCC system. A CO{sub 2} tax less than $29/ton would lead companies to continuing to choose PC, paying the tax for emitted CO{sub 2}. The earlier a decision-maker believes the carbon tax will be imposed and the higher the tax, the more likely companies will choose IGCC with CCS. Having government announce the date and level of a carbon tax would promote more sensible decisions, but government would have to use a tax or subsidy to induce companies to choose the technology that is best for society. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., in conjunction with MEGTEC Systems, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, designed, built, and operated a commercial-size thermal flow reversal reactor (TFRR) to evaluate its suitability to oxidize coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM). Coal mining, and particularly coal mine ventilation air, is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions, a greenhouse gas. Ventilation air volumes are large and the concentration of methane in the ventilation air is low; thus making it difficult to use or abate these emissions. This test program was conducted with simulated coal mine VAM in advance of deploying the technology on active coal mine ventilation fans. The demonstration project team installed and operated a 30,000 cfm MEGTEC VOCSIDIZER oxidation system on an inactive coal mine in West Liberty, WV. The performance of the unit was monitored and evaluated during months of unmanned operation at mostly constant conditions. The operating and maintenance history and how it impacts the implementation of the technology on mine fans were investigated. Emission tests showed very low levels of all criteria pollutants at the stack. Parametric studies showed that the equipment can successfully operate at the design specification limits. The results verified the ability of the TFRR to oxidize {ge}95% of the low and variable concentration of methane in the ventilation air. This technology provides new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the reduction of methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air. A large commercial-size installation (180,000 cfm) on a single typical mine ventilation bleeder fan would reduce methane emissions by 11,000 to 22,100 short tons per year (the equivalent of 183,000 to 366,000 metric tonnes carbon dioxide).

Deborah Kosmack

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Clean coal technology demonstration program: Program update 1996-97  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (known as the CCT Program) reached a significant milestone in 1996 with the completion of 20 of the 39 active projects. The CCT Program is responding to a need to demonstrate and deploy a portfolio of technologies that will assure the U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 297 billion tons could continue to supply the nation`s energy needs economically and in a manner that meets the nation`s environmental objectives. This portfolio of technologies includes environmental control devices that contributed to meeting the accords on transboundary air pollution recommended by the Special Envoys on Acid Rain in 1986. Operational, technical, environmental, and economic performance information and data are now flowing from highly efficient, low-emission, advanced power generation technologies that will enable coal to retain its prominent role into the next millennium. Further, advanced technologies are emerging that will enhance the competitive use of coal in the industrial sector, such as in steelmaking. Coal processing technologies will enable the entire coal resource base to be used while complying with environmental requirements. These technologies are producing products used by utilities and industrial processes. The capability to coproduce products, such as liquid and solid fuels, electricity, and chemicals, is being demonstrated at a commercial scale by projects in the CCT Program. In summary, this portfolio of technologies is satisfying the national need to maintain a multifuel energy mix in which coal is a key component because of its low-cost, availability, and abundant supply within the nation`s borders.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Coal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Coal Coal Coal is the largest domestically produced source of energy in America and is used to generate a significant chunk of our nation's electricity. The Energy Department is working to develop technologies that make coal cleaner, so we can ensure it plays a part in our clean energy future. The Department is also investing in development of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies, also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration. Featured Energy Secretary Moniz Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy officials toured Kemper, the nation's largest carbon capture and storage facility, in Liberty, Mississippi. A small Mississippi town is making history with the largest carbon capture

449

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends, 2001 - 2010 Trends, 2001 - 2010 Transportation infrastructure overview In 2010, railroads transported over 70 percent of coal delivered to electric power plants which are generally concentrated east of the Mississippi River and in Texas. The U.S. railroad market is dominated by four major rail companies that account for 99 percent of U.S. coal rail shipments by volume. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by mode Rail Barge Truck Figure 2. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by rail, 2010 figure data Figure 3. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by barge, 2010 figure data Figure 4. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by truck, 2010 figure data The Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, where coal is extracted in

450

Coal: the new black  

SciTech Connect

Long eclipsed by oil and natural gas as a raw material for high-volume chemicals, coal is making a comeback, with oil priced at more than $100 per barrel. It is relatively cheap feedstock for chemicals such as methanol and China is building plants to convert coal to polyolefins on a large scale and interest is spreading worldwide. Over the years several companies in the US and China have made fertilizers via the gasification of coal. Eastman in Tennessee gasifies coal to make methanol which is then converted to acetic acid, acetic anhydride and acetate fiber. The future vision is to convert methanol to olefins. UOP and Lurgi are the major vendors of this technology. These companies are the respective chemical engineering arms of Honeywell and Air Liquide. The article reports developments in China, USA and India on coal-to-chemicals via coal gasification or coal liquefaction. 2 figs., 2 photo.

Tullo, A.H.; Tremblay, J.-F.

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

452

Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents  

SciTech Connect

A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

Tarrer, Arthur R. (Auburn, AL); Shridharani, Ketan G. (Auburn, AL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

454

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a particular type of coal, each of which is inherentlyThere are four classes of coal: bituminous, sub-bituminous,minerals Metallic ores Coal Crude petroleum Gasoline Fuel

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants with In-Situ CO 2 Capture Background Pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants provide nearly 50% of...

458

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs have on the price of coal delivered by railroadsindicate that the price of coal delivered by railroads ismake up the delivered price of coal that electric plants are

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Science and Technology Gaps in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is an appropriate technology to economically access the energy resources in deep and/or unmineable coal seams and potentially to extract these reserves through production of synthetic gas (syngas) for power generation, production of synthetic liquid fuels, natural gas, or chemicals. India is a potentially good area for underground coal gasification. India has an estimated amount of about 467 billion British tons (bt) of possible reserves, nearly 66% of which is potential candidate for UCG, located at deep to intermediate depths and are low grade. Furthermore, the coal available in India is of poor quality, with very high ash content and low calorific value. Use of coal gasification has the potential to eliminate the environmental hazards associated with ash, with open pit mining and with greenhouse gas emissions if UCG is combined with re-injection of the CO{sub 2} fraction of the produced gas. With respect to carbon emissions, India's dependence on coal and its projected rapid rise in electricity demand will make it one of the world's largest CO{sub 2} producers in the near future. Underground coal gasification, with separation and reinjection of the CO{sub 2} produced by the process, is one strategy that can decouple rising electricity demand from rising greenhouse gas contributions. UCG is well suited to India's current and emerging energy demands. The syngas produced by UCG can be used to generate electricity through combined cycle. It can also be shifted chemically to produce synthetic natural gas (e.g., Great Plains Gasification Plant in North Dakota). It may also serve as a feedstock for methanol, gasoline, or diesel fuel production and even as a hydrogen supply. Currently, this technology could be deployed in both eastern and western India in highly populated areas, thus reducing overall energy demand. Most importantly, the reduced capital costs and need for better surface facilities provide a platform for rapid acceleration of coal-gas-fired electric power and other high value products. In summary, UCG has several important economic and environmental benefits relevant to India's energy goals: (1) It requires no purchase of surface gasifiers, reducing capital expense substantially. (2) It requires no ash management, since ash remains in the subsurface. (3) It reduces the cost of pollution management and emits few black-carbon particulates. (4) It greatly reduces the cost of CO2 separation for greenhouse gas management, creating the potential for carbon crediting through the Kyoto Clean Development Mechanism. (5) It greatly reduces the need to mine and transport coal, since coal is used in-situ.

Upadhye, R; Burton, E; Friedmann, J

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective, the following goals were established for the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Project: Provide sufficient quantity of products for full-scale test burns; Develop data for the design of future commercial plants; Demonstrate plant and process performance; Provide capital and O&M cost data; and Support future LFC{trademark} technology licensing efforts. Each of these goals has been met and exceeded. The plant has been in operation for nearly 5 years, during which the LFC{trademark} process has been demonstrated and refined. Fuels were made, successfully burned, and a commercial-scale plant is now under contract for design and construction.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 17, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Completed modeling calculations of coal mineral matter transformations, deposition behavior, and heat transfer impacts of six test fuels; and ran pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, microagglomerate product, and mulled product.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Contaminants in coals and coal residues. [10 refs  

SciTech Connect

Most of the major enviromental pollutants from coals originate as impurities in the coal structure. These include various organic compounds, minerals, and trace elements that are released into the air and water when coal is mined, processed and utilized. The use of coal preparation to produce cleaner burning fuels involves an environmental compromise, wherein reduced emissions and solid wastes from coal burning sources are achieved at the expense of greater environmental degradation from coal cleaning wastes.

Wewerka, E.M.; Williams, J.M.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · CoalTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL · Indiana Coal Forecasting · Under-Ground Coal Gasification · Benefits of Oxyfuel Combustion · Economic

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

464

WCI Case for Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal The role of as an energy source The role of coal as an energy source Key Messages * Energy demand has grown strongly and will continue to increase, particularly in developing countries where energy is needed for economic growth and poverty alleviation. * All energy sources will be needed to satisfy that demand by providing a diverse and balanced supply mix. * Coal is vital for global energy security. It is abundantly available, affordable, reliable and easy and safe to transport. * In an energy hungry world the challenge for coal, as for other fossil fuels, is to further substantially reduce its greenhouse gas and other emissions, while continuing to make a major contribution to economic and social development and energy security. * Coal is part way down a technology pathway that has already delivered major

465

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Reference Shelf Documents Papers Presentations DOCUMENTS 2012 Technology Readiness Assessment-Analysis of Active Research Portfolio...

466

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

468

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Project Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information CoalBiomass Feed and Gasification Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification FE0005293 Development of Kinetics and Mathematical...

469

Illinois Coal Revival Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Illinois Coal Revival Program is a grants program providing partial funding to assist with the development of new, coal-fueled electric generation capacity and coal gasification or IGCC units...

470

COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation, 5-25~79. on Coal Liquefaction at ChevronHamersma, et a L, "Meyers Process for Coal Desulfurization,"in Wheelock, Coal Desulfurization, ACS Symp. Ser 64 (1977(.

Wrathall, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Integrated coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

Effron, Edward (Springfield, NJ)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Gasification of Lignite Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on the gasification of lignite coal is presented in two parts. The first includes research into technology options for preparing low-rank fuels for gasification, gasifiers for converting the coal into synthesis gas, and technologies that may be used to convert synthesis gas into valuable chemical products. The second part focuses on performance and cost screening analyses for either Greenfield or retrofit gasification options fueled by low-rank lignite coal. The work was funded through Tailor...

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State by State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 2. Coal Production by State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Coal-Producing Region and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Alabama 4,649 4,410 5,171 9,059 10,150 -10.8 Alaska 442 300 542 742 1,091 -32.0 Arizona 2,184 1,825 2,002 4,009 4,169 -3.8 Arkansas 2 4 11 6 33 -83.1 Colorado 5,297 5,781 6,885 11,079 13,914 -20.4 Illinois 13,474 13,996 12,487 27,470 24,419 12.5 Indiana 9,516 9,422 9,147 18,938 18,794 0.8 Kansas 5 5 5 9 8 23.7 Kentucky Total 20,683 20,594 22,803 41,276 49,276 -16.2 Eastern (Kentucky) 10,392 10,144 12,444 20,536 27,516 -25.4 Western (Kentucky) 10,291

475

Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.