Sample records for tons carbon equivalent

  1. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons of zirconium oxide (ZrO ) equivalent, unless otherwise noted)2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and concentrates: Australia, 51%; South Africa, 48%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, wrought, unwrought, waste and scrap: France, 69%; Australia, 21%; Germany, 8%; and United Kingdom, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

  2. 9,248,559 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 16, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE抯 Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  3. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for) Electricity Export 1 Combustion Emissions (MMT CO 2 e Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Total Emissions Offsite Emissions + Onsite Emissions Energy...

  4. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Computer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for) Electricity Export 0 Combustion Emissions (MMT CO 2 e Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Total Emissions Offsite Emissions + Onsite Emissions Energy...

  5. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  6. Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and not a safety hazard. During the summer of 1999, emissions from local waste-incinerators added 14C-CO2 established in 2000 at each of the four sites shown above. Time-zero sampling of organic and mineral horizons and TVA) demonstrate the potential for ecosystem of carbon recycling (S. Trumbore). Objectives 1. Quantify

  7. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  8. 9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  9. 9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  10. 9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  11. Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2路R 10.73 psia路ft3 lbmol路R 62.36 liter路torr mol路K 0.7302 ft3路atm lbmol路R Temperature Conversions: T

  12. Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually. Emissions. (fertilizers that use nitric acid or ammonium bicarbonate result in emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous oxide, ammonia and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.) ~Indirect: Phosphorus in excess causes eutrophication

  13. Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on an in-depth analysis of the U.S. cement industry, identifying cost-effective energy efficiency measures and potentials. The authors assess this industry at the aggregate level (Standard Industrial Classification 324), which includes establishments engaged in manufacturing hydraulic cements, including Portland, natural, masonry, and pozzolana when reviewing industry trends and when making international comparisons. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Between 1970 and 1997, primary physical energy intensity for cement production (SIC 324) dropped 30%,from 7.9 GJ/t to 5.6 GJ/t, while carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption (carbon dioxide emissions expressed in tons of carbon per ton cement) dropped 25%, from 0.16 tC/ton to 0.12 tC/ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and clinker calcination dropped 17%, from 0.29 tC/ton to 0.24 tC/ton. They examined 30 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. They constructed an energy conservation supply curve for U.S. cement industry which found a total cost-effective reduction of 0.6 GJ/ton of cement consisting of measures having a simple payback period of 3 years or less. This is equivalent to potential energy savings of 11% of 1994 energy use for cement making and a savings of 5% of total 1994 carbon dioxide emissions by the U.S. cement industry. Assuming the increased production of blended cement in the U.S., as is common in many parts of the world, the technical potential for energy efficiency improvement would not change considerably. However, the cost-effective potential, would increase to 1.1 GJ/ton cement or 18% of total energy use, and carbon dioxide emissions would be reduced by 16%.

  14. Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    objectives for this summer research were to: 1.) determine how much heavy metal pollution has accumulatedTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

  15. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign to minimize odor, electroplating, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood

  16. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment to resist mold

  17. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, with an estimated total output of 2,500 tons from domestic and foreign ores and concentrates, and from old and new, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment. Silver was used for miniature antennas

  18. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal recycled by the titanium industry totaled about 18,000 tons in 2001. Estimated use of titanium as scrap and in the form of ferrotitanium made from scrap by the steel industry was about 6,000 tons; by the superalloy industry, 900 tons; and, in other industries, 700 tons. Old scrap reclaimed totaled about 500 tons

  19. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock...

  20. Causal equivalence of frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Troy Lee, IV

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Mathematics August 2005 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Texas A&M University Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of TROY LEE HENDERSON, IV by A Dissertation CAUSAL EQUIVALENCE... to the Office of Graduate Studies of TROY LEE HENDERSON, IV by A Dissertation CAUSAL EQUIVALENCE OF FRAMES iii ABSTRACT Causal Equivalence of Frames. (August 2005) Troy Lee Henderson, IV, B.S., The University of Alabama; M.A., The University of Alabama Chair...

  1. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  2. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1997-2000): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 7%; United Kingdom, 2%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12 Stockpile, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

  3. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Import Sources (1995-98): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 53%; Australia, 45%; and other Kingdom, 4%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/99 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a supply

  4. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1998-2001): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 8%; United Kingdom, 3%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12,838 short tons) of zirconium ore (baddeleyite) during fiscal year 2002. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE

  5. ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was insignificant. Import Sources (1996-99): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 56%; Australia, 41, 4%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/00 Zirconium ores.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a stockpile

  6. (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    combined production accounted for nearly 80% of the U.S. total. The trend for recent U.S. gold exploration68 GOLD (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Gold was recovered as a byproduct of processing base metals, chiefly copper. Twenty-five lode mines yielded

  7. Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

  8. Equivalence Principle and Clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory suggests the existence of gravitational-strength scalar fields ("dilaton" and "moduli") whose couplings to matter violate the equivalence principle. This provides a new motivation for high-precision clock experiments, as well as a generic theoretical framework for analyzing their significance.

  9. Free products, Orbit Equivalence and Measure Equivalence Rigidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Free products, Orbit Equivalence and Measure Equivalence Rigidity Aur麓elien Alvarez and Damien Gaboriau February 18, 2009 Abstract We study the analogue in orbit equivalence of free product decomposition and free indecomposability for countable groups. We introduce the (orbit equivalence invariant

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual carbon balance Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rate in Virginia (metric tons... ;8 Table 6. Estimate the gross value of your carbon offset Year Rate1 Acres Annual tonnage Estimated annual... in our atmosphere are...

  11. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  12. Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn UpdatedUpdatedUpdatedUpdated Literature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    , such as unexpected fluctuations in energy demand, energy prices (e.g., oil, gas, coal) and weather conditions1 Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn the factors that shape the price of carbon, where one European Union Allowance is equal to one ton of CO2

  13. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  14. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area -...

  15. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E E E E E Recycling: New scrap metal recycled by the titanium industry was about 25,000 tons in 1996 industry was 4,700 tons; by the superalloy industry, 730 tons; and in other industries, 510 tons. Old scrap nation (MFN) Non-MFN3 12/31/96 12/31/96 Waste and scrap metal 8108.10.1000 Free Free. Unwrought metal

  16. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  17. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclear SecurityNationalApply for Our Jobs / HowSecurityrelocates 18-ton

  18. GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Donna

    GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850颅2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940- related CO2 emissions have risen 130-fold since 1850--from 200 million tons to 27 billion tons a year

  19. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  20. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

  1. SAPONIFICATION EQUIVALENT OF DASAMULA TAILA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Saxena

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  2. Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    , and carbon dioxide. Introduction Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide per capita are released annually into the atmosphere.1a,b CarbonStorage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks

  3. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Furnace Fans to Reduce Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    by at least 3 billion metric tons in total by 2030, equal to more than a year's carbon pollution from the entire U.S. electricity system. Furnace fans are used to circulate air...

  4. Figure 3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions" " (million metric tons)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,...

  5. 5 DECEMBER 2014 VOL 346 ISSUE 6214 1189SCIENCE sciencemag.org he social cost of carbon (SCC) is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    climate change damages associated with a one-metric-ton reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions- til a federal court held in 2008 that carbon emission reductions have nonzero value. After a brief to 2015. The SCC is the difference in damage valuations with and without the extra ton of CO2 in 2015

  6. Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

  7. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  8. Combined heat and power: How much carbon and energy can it save for manufacturers?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaarsberg, T.M.; Roop, J.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a September 1997 National Laboratory study for the US Department of Energy, the authors estimated the potential for reducing industrial energy consumption and carbon emissions using advanced technologies for combined heat and power (CHP) for the year 2010. In this paper the authors re-analyze the potential for CHP in manufacturing only. The authors also refine the assessment by more accurately estimating the average efficiency of industrial boilers most likely to be replaced by CHP. The authors do this with recent GRI estimates of the age distribution of industrial boilers and standard age-efficiency equations. The previous estimate was based on use of the best CHP technology available, such as the about-to-be commercialized industrial advanced turbine system (ATS). This estimate assumes the use of existing off-the-shelf CHP technologies. Data is now available with which to develop a more realistic suite of penetration rates for existing and new CHP technologies. However, potential variation in actions of state and federal electricity and environmental regulators introduces uncertainties in the use of existing and potential new CHP far greater than those in previous technology penetration estimates. This is, thus, the maximum cost-effective technical potential for the frozen technology case. The authors find that if manufacturers in 1994 had generated all their steam and electric needs with existing CHP technologies, they could have reduced carbon equivalent (carbon dioxide) emissions by up to 30 million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MtC) or nearly 20%. This result is consistent with carbon and energy savings found in other studies. For example, the aforementioned laboratory study found that just three CHP technologies, fuel cells, advanced turbines, and integrated combined cycle technologies, accounted for nearly 10% of the study's projected carbon savings of 400 MtC by 2010--enough to reduce projected US 2010 emissions to 1990 levels.

  9. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finley

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  10. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  11. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

  12. Mechanics of deformation of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Mohit, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deformation mechanics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays were studied using analytical and numerical methods. An equivalent orthotropic representation (EOR) ...

  13. I read with interest the report entitled, "Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System." Unfortunately your analysis does not take into consideration renewable power production using a Solena Group gasification process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In these tanks, we will sequester the carbon by growing algae that we would harvest and use as a biomass feedstock for the renewable power plant. This service would cost $50 per ton of carbon sequestered. Do you

  14. Carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

  15. Application of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation Equivalency to Construction of New Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BISHOP, G.E.

    1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office, is charged with moving 2.100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel elements left over from plutonium production into semi-permanent storage at DOE'S Hanford site in Washington state. In anticipation of eventual NRC regulation, the DOE decided to impose NRC requirements on new SNFP facility design and construction, specifically for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The SNFP implemented this policy of ''NRC equivalency'' with the goal of achieving a level of nuclear safety equivalent to that of NRC-licensed fuel processing facilities. Appropriate features of the NRC licensing process were adopted. However, the SNFP maintained applicable DOE requirements in tandem with the NRC regulations. Project work is continuing, with the first fuel movement scheduled for November, 2000.

  16. Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional Composite the statistically equivalent representative volume element (SERVE) are proposed for fiber-reinforced microstructures using a bilinear cohesive zone law. As introduced in the first article, a combination of statistical

  17. The Implied Cost of Carbon Dioxide under the Cash for Clunkers Christopher R. Knittel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    The Implied Cost of Carbon Dioxide under the Cash for Clunkers Program Christopher R. Knittel of the implied cost of carbon dioxide reductions under the Cash for Clunker program. The estimates suggest pollutants. Conservative estimates of the implied carbon dioxide cost exceed $365 per ton; best case scenario

  18. Economic Evaluation of Leading Technology Options for Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Economic Evaluation of Leading Technology Options for Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide by J茅r茅my, which releases nearly six billion tons of carbon per year into the atmosphere. These fuels will continue development. Since power plants are the largest point sources of CO2 emissions, capturing the carbon dioxide

  19. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  20. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  1. 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

  2. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockpile Center continued to solicit offers for the sale of titanium sponge held in the Government-grade sponge. For fiscal year 2001, 4,540 tons of titanium sponge is being offered for sale. Stockpile Status for disposal FY 2000 FY 2000 Titanium sponge 19,100 3,390 19,100 4,540 4,240 Ev

  3. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption E E E E E Recycling: New scrap metal recycled by the titanium industry totaled about 29,000 tons and automotive industries led to an increase in global production of TiO2 pigment compared with that in 2009

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined or remelted scrap contributed about48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined or remelted scrap contributed about48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturers, foundries, and chemical plants, 11%; ingot makers,10%; and copper smelters and refiners, 548 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons

  7. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  8. Equivalence of Convex Problem Geometry and Computational ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Equivalence of Convex Problem Geometry and Computational Complexity in the Separation Oracle Model?. Robert M. Freund哸nd Jorge Vera. January 2009.

  9. Dynamical ensembles equivalence in fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    1996-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissipative Euler and Navier Stokes equations are discussed with the aim of proposing several experiments apt to test the equivalence of dynamical ensembles and the chaotic hypothesis.

  10. Snow water equivalent estimation using blackbox optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St閜hane Alarie

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 7, 2011 ... Abstract: Accurate measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) is an important factor in managing water resources for hydroelectric power...

  11. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  12. Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

  13. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  14. Historic Energy Efficiency Rules Would Save Consumers Money and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and federal buildings set in the first and second terms combined will reduce carbon pollution by at least 3 billion metric tons cumulatively by 2030 -- equivalent to nearly...

  15. Energy Department Announces Next Phase of L Prize Competition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    11 terawatt-hours of electricity per year - approximately equivalent to the annual electricity consumption of Washington, D.C. - and avoid 7 million metric tons of carbon...

  16. A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor, and Wei-Ngan Chin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobor, Aquinas

    A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor a logical framework for specifying and proving asser- tions about program termination. Although termination. Here we propose to integrate termination requirements directly into our specification logic

  17. The Scale of the Energy Challenge 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons of coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    and rooftops in the United States. The total land area required by nuclear power plants is small! ? 20 15The Scale of the Energy Challenge Biomass Wind Nuclear Solar 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons

  18. Energy Conservation Project Evaluation by Investment Equivalents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, R. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using discounted cash flow techniques, a new parameter for the quick economic evaluation of energy conservation ideas is calculated. The meaning of the calculated value, an 'Investment Equivalent of Energy Saving', is: 'The maximum amount...

  19. Refining the Proof of Planar Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Armoni; M. Shifman; G. Veneziano

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline a full non-perturbative proof of planar (large-N) equivalence between bosonic correlators in a theory with Majorana fermions in the adjoint representation and one with Dirac fermions in the two-index (anti)symmetric representation. In a particular case (one flavor), this reduces to our previous result - planar equivalence between super-Yang--Mills theory and a non-supersymmetric ``orientifold field theory.'' The latter theory becomes one-flavor massless QCD at N=3.

  20. CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite 路 C-C supplied in two forms 路 T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

  1. Accelerating classical charges and the equivalence principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor T. Toth

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the behavior of a charged particle in a gravitational field and empty space. We resolve the apparent conflict between the Lorentz-Dirac equation and Larmor's formula of radiation by noting that the former describes an electron that is itself accelerated by an electromagnetic field. If instead, a hypothetical particle is considered that is accelerated by a non-electromagnetic force, Larmor's formula is found to be consistent with the accelerating particle's equation of motion. We consider the consequences concerning the equivalence principle and find that it is indeed violated if one demands that the same electromagnetic field be present in both the gravitational and accelerating cases; however, if one allows for the external electromagnetic fields to be different, the validity of the equivalence principle is restored. In either case, the basic idea behind the equivalence principle, which leads to a geometrized theory of gravity, remains unaffected.

  2. On the equivalence of nonadiabatic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Barreto

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show how an anisotropic fluid in the diffusion limit can be equivalent to an isotropic fluid in the streaming out limit, in spherical symmetry. For a particular equation of state this equivalence is total, from one fluid we can obtain the other and vice versa. A numerical master model is presented, based on a generic equation of state, in which only quantitative differences are displayed between both nonadiabatic fluids. From a deeper view, other difference between fluids is shown as an asymmetry that can be overcome if we consider the appropriate initial-boundary conditions. Equivalence in this context can be considered as a first order method of approximation to study dissipative fluids.

  3. Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation抯 finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation抯 balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

  4. Computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M酶ller, Jesper Michael

    Computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines and quantum circuit families Christian Westergaard 21st November 2005 Contents 1 The quantum Turing machine model 5 1.1 Basics of quantum Turing machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Projections on the quantum state space

  5. An Introduction to Decidability of DPDA Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stirling, Colin

    University of Edinburgh email: cps@dcs.ed.ac.uk 1 Introduction The DPDA equivalence problem was posed in 1966 produced a different proof of decidability that is essentially a simplification of S麓enizergues's proof [14, the tableau proof system uses conditional proof rules that involve distances between premises. Essentially

  6. An Introduction to Decidability of DPDA Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stirling, Colin

    University of Edinburgh email: cps@dcs.ed.ac.uk 1 Introduction The DPDA equivalence problem was posed in 1966 produced a di#erent proof of decidability that is essentially a simplification of S??enizergues's proof [14, the tableau proof system uses conditional proof rules that involve distances between premises. Essentially

  7. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  8. 9,030,305 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 6, 2015 ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

  9. 9,959,066 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of March 26, 2015 |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

  10. 9,932,381 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of March 18, 2015 |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

  11. 9,894,105 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of March 12, 2015 |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

  12. 8,993,963 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of December 17, 2014...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

  13. Equivalency-processing parallel photonic integrated circuit EP3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louri, Ahmed

    Equivalency-processing parallel photonic integrated circuit EP3 IC : equivalence search module present an optoelectronic module called the equivalency-processing parallel photonic integrated circuit EP3 IC that is created specifically to implement high-speed parallel equivalence searches i

  14. Proposal to Increase the Amount of the Contract about to be Awarded for the Supply of 12 Tons of Heavy Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to Increase the Amount of the Contract about to be Awarded for the Supply of 12 Tons of Heavy Water

  15. Distributional Impacts of a U.S. Greenhouse Gas Policy: A General Equilibrium Analysis of Carbon Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    We develop a new model of the U.S., the U.S. Regional Energy Policy (USREP) model that is resolved for large states and regions of the U.S. and by income class and apply the model to investigate a $15 per ton CO2 equivalent ...

  16. Thermodynamics of carbon dioxide in aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate systems at stripper conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    to equivalent solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA). Cullinane [1] measured CO2 solubility with a wetted wall titration of barium carbonate precipitation. The amount of amine was determined through a standard monotonic

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2009 declined by about 9% to 1.2 million tons and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    makers, 11%; and copper smelters and refiners, 6%. Copper in all old and new, refined or remelted scrap48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2002 declined to 1.13 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 70%; copper smelters and refiners, 8%; ingot makers, 1156 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2008 increased by about 12% to 1.3 million tons and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants, 14%; ingot makers, 9%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined50 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2000 declined to 1.45 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scrap, brass mills recovered 67%; copper smelters and refiners,18%; ingot makers, 11%; and miscellaneous52 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2004 rose to 1.16 million tons and was valued at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scrap (including aluminum- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 71%; copper smelters54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in four other States. Although copper was recovered

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2001 declined to 1.34 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scrap (including aluminum- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 65%; copper smelters54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2007 declined nominally to 1.19 million tons, but its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants, 11%; ingot makers, 9%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2006 rose to more than 1.2 million tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturers, foundries, and chemical plants, 12%; ingot makers, 10%; and copper smelters and refiners, 452 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1999 declined to 1.66 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mills. Of the total copper recovered from scrap, brass mills recovered 67%; copper smelters and refiners56 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2003 declined to 1.12 million tons and was valued at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 70%; copper smelters and refiners, 6%; ingot makers, 1254 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although copper

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1998 declined to 1.85 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , copper smelters and refiners recovered 23%; ingot makers, 10%; brass mills, 63%; and miscellaneous56 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2005 fell nominally to 1.15 million tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (including aluminum- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 73%; copper smelters and refiners, 556 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

  9. Einstein's Apple: His First Principle of Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelbert L. Schucking; Eugene J. Surowitz

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    After a historical discussion of Einstein's 1907 principle of equivalence, a homogeneous gravitational field in Minkowski spacetime is constructed. It is pointed out that the reference frames in gravitational theory can be understood as spaces with a flat connection and torsion defined through teleparallelism. This kind of torsion was introduced by Einstein in 1928. The concept of torsion is discussed through simple examples and some historical observations.

  10. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  11. On the equivalence theorem for integrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melikyan; E. Pereira; V. O. Rivelles

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the equivalence theorem for integrable systems using two formulations of the Alday-Arutyunov-Frolov model. We show that the S-matrix is invariant under the field transformation which reduces the non-linear Dirac brackets of one formulation into the standard commutation relations in the second formulation. We also explain how to perform the direct diagonalization of the transformed Hamiltonian by constructing the states corresponding to self-adjoint extensions.

  12. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and pigment industries. Global production of titanium mineral concentrates was expected to increase during half of 2015. In Western Australia, the heavy-mineral resource, data for at the Keysbrook project were172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise

  13. 26The Frequency of Large Meteor Impacts On February 14, 2013 a 10,000 ton meteor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the town of Chelyabinsk and the explosion caused major damage to the town injuring 1,000 people `discovered' for many decades afterwards, the Chelyabinsk Meteor was extensively videoed by hundreds explodes with an energy of 4.2x109 Joules. How many tons of TNT did the Chelyabinsk Meteor yield

  14. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 4: Mexico: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests` carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980`s in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country`s total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  15. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests' carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980's in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country's total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  16. AKS systems and Lepage equivalent problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago Capriotti

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrable systems known as "AKS systems" admit a natural formulation in terms of a Hamiltonian picture. The Lagrangian side of these systems are far less known; a version in these terms can be found in a work of Feher et al. The purpose of these notes in to provide a novel description of AKS systems in terms of a variational problem different from the usual in mechanics. Additionally, and using techniques borrowed from an article of M. Gotay, it was possible to build the Hamiltonian side of this variational problem, allowing us to establish the equivalence with the usual approach to these integrable systems.

  17. Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the atmosphere. o Accounts for 20% of methane emissions from human sources. Globally cattle produce about 80 million metric tons of methane annually. o Accounts for 28% of global methane emissions

  18. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 tons of the material from the Department of Energy's stockpile, while the remaining 10,000 tons,700 1,800 150,000 160,000e Bolivia -- -- -- 5,400,00 Brazil 32 32 910 NA Canada 660 660 180,000 360

  19. 1000ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  20. Gauge equivalence in stationary radiative transport through media ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability of the Gauge Equivalent Classes in Inverse. Stationary Transport. Stephen McDowall , Plamen Stefanov , and Alexandru. Tamasan.

  1. The equivalence principle in classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip D. Mannheim

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss our understanding of the equivalence principle in both classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. We show that not only does the equivalence principle hold for the trajectories of quantum particles in a background gravitational field, but also that it is only because of this that the equivalence principle is even to be expected to hold for classical particles at all.

  2. The Non-Equivalence of Empirically Equivalent Theories: The Case of Hidden Variables in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopra, Samir

    the postulation of the existence of the neutrino by Pauli to save the conservation of energy and momentum laws? In this paper, I will take as a case study, the issue of choosing between standard quantum mechanics (also known of an empirically equivalent (at minimum) theory to OQM. In conclusion, I will argue that the thesis of notational

  3. Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

  4. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  5. An investigation of carbon sequestration/ECBM potential in Australian coals: a simulation study for Sydney Coal Basin.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrivastava, Rahul

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A 2002 report by Australian National Greenhouse Gas Inventory suggests that since 1990 Australia's net emissions of carbon dioxide equivalent from stationary combustion sources are (more)

  6. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source" " (million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent, unless otherwise noted)" ,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016...

  7. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Pre-Combustion Post-Combustion CO2 Compression Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Program Plan Capture Handbook Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from...

  8. Hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Nikitin; Hirohito Ogasawara; David Mann; Reinhard Denecke; Zhiyong Zhang; Hongjie Dai; KJ Cho; Anders Nilsson

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards the development of a useful mechanism for hydrogen storage, we have studied the hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes with atomic hydrogen using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We find that atomic hydrogen creates C-H bonds with the carbon atoms in the nanotube walls and such C-H bonds can be com-pletely broken by heating to 600 oC. We demonstrate approximately 65+/-15 at % hydrogenation of carbon atoms in the single-walled carbon nanotubes which is equivalent to 5.1+/-1.2 weight % hydrogen capacity. We also show that the hydrogenation is a reversible process.

  9. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  10. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  11. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  12. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusiness CompetitionDepartmentand Reduce Energy Costs |HelpCarbon

  13. Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maienschein, J L

    2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

  14. acids biologically equivalent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Complexity of Computer Computations, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, on March 22, 1972. The equivalence problem is to determine the ......

  15. Equivalent circuit modeling of hybrid electric vehicle drive train

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Routex, Jean-Yves

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . Figure 3. 4. 6: The motor shaft at no load. Figure 3. 4. 7: Bond graph for the motor shaft. . . Figure 3. 4. 8: Equivalent circuit of the motor shaft. Figure 3. 5. 1: Concrete example: the elevator Figure 3. 5. 2: Electro-mechanical model... model of the elevator. Figure 3. 5. 8: Final equivalent circuit of the elevator. Figure 4. 1. 1: Mechanical model of a shaft. Figure 4. 1. 2: Equivalent circuit of the shaft. Figure 4. 1. 3: Mechanical model of a gearbox. Figure 4. 1. 4: Equivalent...

  16. EQUIVALENCE RATIONNELLE, EQUIVALENCE NUM ERIQUE ET PRODUITS DE COURBES ELLIPTIQUES SUR UN CORPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d麓emontrer les th麓eor`emes suivants : Th麓eor`eme 1 (cf. th. 1.7). L'麓equivalence rationnelle est 麓egale `a l'麓equivalen- ce num麓erique (`a coefficients rationnels) sur X. Th麓eor`eme 2 (cor. 3.10). Les conjectures de Lichtenbaum [32, 搂7] sont vraies pour X. Th麓eor`eme 3 (th. 4.5). Pour tout ouvert U de X, les

  17. Joule Equivalent of Electrical Energy by Dr. James E. Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Joule Equivalent of Electrical Energy by Dr. James E. Parks Department of Physics and Astronomy 401 The objectives of this experiment are: (1) to understand the equivalence of electrical energy and heat energy, (2) to learn techniques of calorimetry, (3) to learn how to measure electrical energy, and (4) to measure

  18. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  19. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 7, DOE/AL68080-TSR07

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lembit Salasoo

    2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis and results show hybrid system weight and efficiency affect productivity and fuel usage. Analysis shows equivalent hybrid benefits for adjacent size classes of mine truck. Preparations are ongoing for full power test. The battery cycling test protocol was modified.

  20. Personal carbon card: prospects and challenges for ICT Sandrine ROUSSEAUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    categories of programmes aiming at limiting the environmental impact of the individuals. Carbon compensation in carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq.), must be reduced by at least 50% in 2050 relative to their 1990 level is gradually being established by the most emitting countries in order to limit the emissions from the energy

  1. *can substitute CSE 131 or equivalent and ESE 101 or equivalent Updated June 2013 Mechanical Engineering Sample Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    *can substitute CSE 131 or equivalent and ESE 101 or equivalent Updated June 2013 Mechanical of Thermal Systems MEMS 412 3 Modeling Simulation and Control MEMS 4301 3 Structural Dynamics and Vibration MEMS 431 4 Intro to Circuits ESE 230 4 Engineering Ethics and Sustainability ENGR 4501 1 Engineering

  2. Supply Chain Network Sustainability Under Competition and Frequencies of Activities from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    to approximately 350 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions 颅 5% of the total US greenhouse gas emissions emissions. The company's CO2-equivalent emissions per million SEK ($148, 500) of sales were 3.16 metric tons by 32%; Improving energy efficiency in its stores; and offsetting using Gold Standard-verified carbon

  3. Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisholoy Goswami

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

  4. AN ISSUE OF PERMANENCE: ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TEMPORARY CARBON STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a `leaky' carbon sequestration reservoir, we argue that this is an issue that applies to just about all that the value of relatively deep ocean carbon sequestration can be nearly equivalent to permanent sequestration gases using carbon sequestration technologies (Herzog et al., 2000; Herzog, 2001) is being proposed

  5. A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Empl, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

  6. Design, construction and implementation of spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Nunez, Delia Josefina

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used for medical and space activities whenever a combination of high and low LET (lineal energy transfer) radiations are present. With the frequency and duration of space activities increasing...

  7. Behavioral Model Equivalence Checking for Large Analog Mixed Signal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Amandeep

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    is solved by interfacing a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) based optimizer with commercial circuit simulation tools, such as CADENCE SPECTRE. The proposed methodology is then applied for equivalence checking of a PLL as a test case and results...

  8. On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

  9. Development of design tool for statically equivalent deepwater mooring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udoh, Ikpoto Enefiok

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    tests is the depth and spatial limitations in wave basins. It is therefore important to design and build equivalent mooring systems to ensure that the static properties (global restoring forces and global stiffness) of the prototype floater are matched...

  10. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  11. Equivalent radii of antennas with noncircular cross section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Charles Wen-Hsun

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1960 Ma]or Sub)ect: Electrical Engineering EQUIVALENT RADII OF ANTENNAS WITH NONCIRCULAR CROSS SECTION A Thesis By CHARLES WEN-HSUN SU Approved as to style and content by: (C airman of Conunittee) (Head of Department...EQUIVALENT RADII OF ANTENNAS WITH NONCIRCULAR CROSS SECTION A Thesis By CHARLES WEN-HSUN SU Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  12. Carbon Nanotubes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredriksson, Tore

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also (more)

  13. Equivalent Neutrinos, Light WIMPs, and the Chimera of Dark Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Steigman

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    According to conventional wisdom, in the standard model (SM) of particle physics and cosmology the effective number of neutrinos is Neff=3 (more precisely, 3.046). In extensions of the standard model allowing for the presence of DeltaNnu equivalent neutrinos (or dark radiation), Neff is generally >3. The canonical results are reconsidered here, revealing that a measurement of Neff>3 can be consistent with DeltaNnu=0 (dark radiation without dark radiation). Conversely, a measurement consistent with Neff=3 is not inconsistent with the presence of dark radiation (DeltaNnu>0). In particular, if there is a light WIMP that annihilates to photons after the SM neutrinos have decoupled, the photons are heated beyond their usual heating from e+- annihilation, reducing the late time ratio of neutrino and photon temperatures (and number densities), leading to Neff3 even in the absence of equivalent neutrinos or dark radiation. A measurement of Neff>3 is thus no guarantee of the presence of equivalent neutrinos or dark radiation. In the presence of light WIMPs and/or equivalent neutrinos there are degeneracies among the light WIMP mass and its nature (fermion or boson, as well as its couplings to neutrinos or photons), the number and nature (fermion or boson) of the equivalent neutrinos, and their decoupling temperature (the strength of their interactions with the SM particles). There's more to a measurement of Neff than meets the eye.

  14. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  15. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  16. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  17. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  18. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  1. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but growing through the recycling of lithium batteries. Import Sources (1994-97): Chile, 96%; and other, 4 lithium salts from battery recycling and lithium hydroxide monohydrate from former Department of Energy102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were closed temporarily, and Issues: In February 2013, the owner of the 270,000-ton-per-year Hannibal, OH, smelter filed for chapter in October. In June, the Sebree, KY, smelter was sold as part of a corporate restructuring. Expansion

  3. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  4. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  5. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2010. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (200609): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China

  6. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2009. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2005-08): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government limited

  7. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  8. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2011. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production (200710): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government regulates its

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production, which had remained unchanged in 1995, resumed the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recovered from scrap, copper smelters and refiners recovered 26%; ingot makers, 10%; brass mills, 5752 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in six other States. While copper was recovered

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1995 continued its upward trend, begun in 1984, rising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in new scrap was consumed at brass mills. Of the total copper recovered from scrap, copper smelters50 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless noted) Domestic Production, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Montana, and Michigan, accounted for 97% of domestic production; copper

  11. Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

  12. Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for a Loan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in America by 2035." The Record Hill project will avoid over 70,000 tons of carbon pollution annually, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions from over 13,000...

  13. Containment, Equivalence and Coreness from CSP to QCSP and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madelaine, Florent

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and its quantified extensions, whether without (QCSP) or with disjunction (QCSP_or), correspond naturally to the model checking problem for three increasingly stronger fragments of positive first-order logic. Their complexity is often studied when parameterised by a fixed model, the so-called template. It is a natural question to ask when two templates are equivalent, or more generally when one "contain" another, in the sense that a satisfied instance of the first will be necessarily satisfied in the second. One can also ask for a smallest possible equivalent template: this is known as the core for CSP. We recall and extend previous results on containment, equivalence and "coreness" for QCSP_or before initiating a preliminary study of cores for QCSP which we characterise for certain structures and which turns out to be more elusive.

  14. Equivalence of History and Generator Epsilon-Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas F. Travers; James P. Crutchfield

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Epsilon-machines are minimal, unifilar presentations of stationary stochastic processes. They were originally defined in the history machine sense, as hidden Markov models whose states are the equivalence classes of infinite pasts with the same probability distribution over futures. In analyzing synchronization, though, an alternative generator definition was given: unifilar, edge-emitting hidden Markov models with probabilistically distinct states. The key difference is that history epsilon-machines are defined by a process, whereas generator epsilon-machines define a process. We show here that these two definitions are equivalent in the finite-state case.

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants, 14%; ingot makers, 11%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million tons

  16. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  17. Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Haack

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was focused upon developing a unique material technology for use in PEM fuel cell bipolar plates. The carbon/carbon composite material developed in this program is uniquely suited for use in fuel cell systems, as it is lightweight, highly conductive and corrosion resistant. The project further focused upon developing the manufacturing methodology to cost-effectively produce this material for use in commercial fuel cell systems. United Technology Fuel Cells Corp., a leading fuel cell developer was a subcontractor to the project was interested in the performance and low-cost potential of the material. The accomplishments of the program included the development and testing of a low-cost, fully molded, net-shape carbon-carbon bipolar plate. The process to cost-effectively manufacture these carbon-carbon bipolar plates was focused on extensively in this program. Key areas for cost-reduction that received attention in this program was net-shape molding of the detailed flow structures according to end-user design. Correlations between feature detail and process parameters were formed so that mold tooling could be accurately designed to meet a variety of flow field dimensions. A cost model was developed that predicted the cost of manufacture for the product in near-term volumes and long-term volumes (10+ million units per year). Because the roduct uses lowcost raw materials in quantities that are less than competitive tech, it was found that the cost of the product in high volume can be less than with other plate echnologies, and can meet the DOE goal of $4/kW for transportation applications. The excellent performance of the all-carbon plate in net shape was verified in fuel cell testing. Performance equivalent to much higher cost, fully machined graphite plates was found.

  18. Control of Nondeterministic Discrete Event Systems for Bisimulation Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    a certain finite state space, namely the power set of Cartesian product of system and specification state.jiang@gm.com). Nondeterminism in plant model can arise from unmodeled dynamics or abstraction. A nondeterministic plant can have], ready-trace [4], simulation and bisimulation equivalences [29]. Also, the supervisors can

  19. Easier way to calculate E fields Equivalent to Coulomb's law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    lines enter as leave closed surface the net is zero = 路= dAE AdE cos rr #12;Flux Calculate fluxGauss' Law Easier way to calculate E fields 颅 Gauss' Law Equivalent to Coulomb's law Use 路= AE rr Let A become small so flux becomes integral over Gaussian surface Flux is proportional to net

  20. Equivalence Checking for Function Pipelining in Behavioral Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Fei

    on subtle design invariants. Function pipelining (a.k.a. system-level pipelining) is an important, correct-by-construction abstraction of function pipeline; thus, instead of developing pipelineEquivalence Checking for Function Pipelining in Behavioral Synthesis Kecheng Hao, Sandip Ray

  1. AN ELECTRONIC EQUIVALENT SCHEME OF A JOSEPHSON JUNCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    AN ELECTRONIC EQUIVALENT SCHEME OF A JOSEPHSON JUNCTION C. K. BAK Physics Laboratory I. A lot of phenomena observed in Josephson junctions are easily identified in the 芦 equi- valent circuit ~. The lock range Ji corresponds to the supercurrent in a Josephson junction. The loop gain A(co) can

  2. New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pointcheval, David

    New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract) David Pointcheval Jacques Stern Abstract In this paper, we present new blind signature schemes based on the factorization problem. They are the first blind sig- nature schemes proved secure relatively to factorization. By security, we mean

  3. On the Equivalence of Constraint Satisfaction Francesca Rossi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their information content is essentially identical. In other words, it is only the information content of a CSP was visiting MCC. #12;Abstract A solution of a Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) is an assignment of values notion of equivalence. Two di erent algorithms, currently used for transforming any non-binary CSP

  4. An ideal independent source as an equivalent 1-port

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel Gluskin; Anatoly Patlakh

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a 1-port, not necessarily linear, with a dependent source, appearing at the port. The control of the source is entirely internal for the 1-port. If this source is a parallel voltage source, then the equivalent circuit is an ideal independent voltage source, and if it is a series current source, then the equivalent circuit is an ideal independent current source. (As usual, "ideal" source is defined as a source whose proposed function is independent of the load.) In the simple LTI case, these results can be obtained, respectively, by either taking RTh zero in the Thevenin equivalent, or taking RN infinite in the Norton equivalent; however the very fact that the final circuits do not include any linear elements indicates the possibility of generalization to nonlinear 1-ports. Some limitations on the circuit's structure (functional dependencies in it) are required, and the clearness of these limitations, i.e. clearness of the conditions for the 1-port to be an ideal source for any load, is the aesthetical point.

  5. Carbon Fiber

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  6. Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  7. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  8. Sorption of uranium from nitric acid solution using TBP-impregnated activated carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, W.A. [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan). Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology; Streat, M. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of extraction chromatography has been used to study the sorption of uranium from nitric acid solutions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) impregnated activated carbons. Batch equilibrium data and kinetic and breakthrough column behavior of uranium are reported. Wood based activated carbon has shown better capacity and breakthrough characteristics than shell based activated carbon. Sorption rate on impregnated carbons was relatively slow indicating that diffusion is the rate controlling step within the pore structure of the activated carbon. Uranium distribution on impregnated activated carbons is compared with equivalent bulk liquid extraction and a mechanism of uranium sorption is discussed.

  9. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  10. Alaska has 4. 0 trillion tons of low-sulfur coal: Is there a future for this resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for and use of low-sulfur coal may increase because of concern with acid rain. Alaska's low-sulfur coal resources can only be described as enormous: 4.0 trillion tons of hypothetical onshore coal. Mean total sulfur content is 0.34% (range 0.06-6.6%, n = 262) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. There are 50 coal fields in Alaska; the bulk of the resources are in six major fields or regions: Nenana, Cook Inlet, Matanuska, Chignik-Herendeen Bay, North Slope, and Bering River. For comparison, Carboniferous coals in the Appalachian region and Interior Province have a mean total sulfur content of 2.3% (range 0.1-19.0%, n = 5,497) with a mean apparent rank of high-volatile A bituminous coal, and Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains Cretaceous and Tertiary coals have a mean total sulfur content of 0.86% (range 0.02-19.0%, n = 2,754) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. Alaskan coal has two-fifths the total sulfur of western US coals and one-sixth that of Carboniferous US coals. Even though Alaska has large resources of low-sulfur coal, these resources have not been developed because of (1) remote locations and little infrastructure, (2) inhospitable climate, and (3) long distances to potential markets. These resources will not be used in the near future unless there are some major, and probably violent, changes in the world energy picture.

  11. XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

  12. Demonstration and evaluation of the 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system, Eldorado Resources, Ltd. , Port Hope, Ontario, September 3-4, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, J.N.; Huxford, T.J.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 3 and 4, 1986, the prototype 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system (LCBWS) developed by the US Enrichment Safeguards Program (ESP) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., was field tested at the Eldorado Resources, Ltd., (ERL) facility in Port Hope, Ontario. The 20-ton-capacity LCBWS has been designed and fabricated for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verifying the masses of large-capacity UF/sub 6/ cylinders during IAEA safeguards inspections at UF/sub 6/ handling facilities. The purpose of the Canadian field test was to demonstrate and to evaluate with IAEA inspectorates and with UF/sub 6/ bulk handling facility operators at Eldorado the principles, procedures, and hardware associated with using the 20-ton-capacity LCBWS as a portable means for verifying the masses of 10- and 14-ton UF/sub 6/ cylinders. Session participants included representatives from the IAEA, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Eldorado Resources, Ltd., the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), and the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Appendix A presents the list of participants and their organization affiliation. The two-day field test involved a formal briefing by ESP staff, two cylinder weighing sessions, IAEA critiques of the LCBWS hardware and software, and concluding discussions on the field performance of the system. Appendix B cites the meeting agenda. Summarized in this report are (1) the technical information presented by the system developers, (2) results from the weighing sessions, and (3) observations, suggestions, and concluding statements from meeting participants.

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and 32% other uses; bentonite--26% foundry sand bond, 23% pet waste absorbent, 20% drilling mud, 16% iron,710 Total3 43,000 43,100 41,800 41,600 42,200 Imports for consumption 35 45 64 86 97 Exports 4,680 4,830 5,080 5,230 4,700 Consumption, apparent 38,500 38,300 36,800 36,500 37,600 Price, average, dollars per ton

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % foundry sand bond, 23% drilling mud, 17% pet waste absorbent, 15% iron ore pelletizing, and 9% other uses,100 43,100 42,000 43,0003 Imports for consumption 36 35 45 64 75 Exports 4,620 4,680 4,830 5,080 5,100 Consumption, apparent 37,600 38,500 38,300 37,000 38,000 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 43 46 44

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, clay and shale production was reported in all States except Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; bentonite-- 25% pet waste absorbent, 21% drilling mud, 21% foundry sand bond, 15% iron ore pelletizing,300 Imports for consumption: Artificially activated clay and earth 17 18 21 27 20 Kaolin 57 63 114 158 275,980 Consumption, apparent 37,500 35,600 34,800 34,600 34,600 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 40 42 42

  16. Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering; Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article uses an analytical approach to determine the dilution of an unsteadily-generated solute in an unsteady solvent stream, under cyclic temporal boundary conditions. The goal is to find a simplified way of showing equivalence of such a process to a reference case where equivalent dilution is defined as a weighted average concentration. This derivation has direct applications to the ventilation of indoor spaces where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot in general be simultaneously optimized. By solving the equation we can specify how much air we need to use in one ventilation pattern compared to another to obtain same indoor air quality. Because energy consumption is related to the amount of air exchanged by a ventilation system, the equation can be used as a first step to evaluate different ventilation patterns effect on the energy consumption. The use of the derived equation is demonstrated by representative cases of interest in both residential and non-residential buildings.

  17. AFFILIATIONS: MILLER--Brookhaven National Laboratory, Up-ton, New York; SLINGO--Environmental Systems Science Centre,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    con- tinuously for periods of 6颅12 months and includes a core suite of active remote sensors of radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, and carbon dioxide at the surface. The centerpieces of the AMF are a collection of active and passive remote sensors (Table 1) including a vertically pointing 95-GHz Doppler

  18. Energy conservation and equivalence principle in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael B. Mensky

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized Stokes theorem (connecting integrals of dimensions 3 and 4) is formulated in a curved space-time in terms of paths in Minkowski space (forming Path Group). A covariant integral form of the conservation law for the energy-momentum of matter is then derived in General Relativity. It extends Einstein's equivalence principle on the energy conservation, since it formulates the conservation law for the energy-momentum of matter without explicit including the gravitational field in the formulation.

  19. Equivalence of topological and scattering approaches to quantum pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Braeunlich; G. M. Graf; G. Ortelli

    2009-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schroedinger equation with a potential periodically varying in time is used to model adiabatic quantum pumps. The systems considered may be either infinitely extended and gapped or finite and connected to gapless leads. Correspondingly, two descriptions of the transported charge, one relating to a Chern number and the other to a scattering matrix, have been available for some time. Here we generalize the first one and establish its equivalence to the second.

  20. State and Regional Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold; Durrant, Marie

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Carbon capture and geologic sequestration offer one method to reduce carbon emissions from coal and other hydrocarbon energy production. While the federal government is providing increased funding for carbon capture and sequestration, recent congressional legislative efforts to create a framework for regulating carbon emissions have failed. However, regional and state bodies have taken significant actions both to regulate carbon and facilitate its capture and sequestration. This article explores how regional bodies and state government are addressing the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. Several regional bodies have formed regulations and model laws that affect carbon capture and storage, and three bodies comprising twenty-?three states梩he Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Midwest Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord, and the Western Climate initiative梙ave cap-?and-?trade programs in various stages of development. State property, land use and environmental laws affect the development and implementation of carbon capture and sequestration projects, and unless federal standards are imposed, state laws on torts and renewable portfolio requirements will directly affect the liability and viability of these projects. This paper examines current state laws and legislative efforts addressing carbon capture and sequestration.

  1. Equivalent Neutrinos, Light WIMPs, and the Chimera of Dark Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steigman, Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to conventional wisdom, in the standard model (SM) of particle physics and cosmology the effective number of neutrinos is Neff=3 (more precisely, 3.046). In extensions of the standard model allowing for the presence of DeltaNnu equivalent neutrinos (or dark radiation), Neff is generally >3. The canonical results are reconsidered here, revealing that a measurement of Neff>3 can be consistent with DeltaNnu=0 (dark radiation without dark radiation). Conversely, a measurement consistent with Neff=3 is not inconsistent with the presence of dark radiation (DeltaNnu>0). In particular, if there is a light WIMP that annihilates to photons after the SM neutrinos have decoupled, the photons are heated beyond their usual heating from e+- annihilation, reducing the late time ratio of neutrino and photon temperatures (and number densities), leading to Neff3 even in the absence of equivalent neutrinos or dark radiation. A measurement of Neff>3 is thus no guarantee of the presence of equivalent neutrinos or dark ra...

  2. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

  3. Carbon microtubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

  4. Unintended Consequences of Transportation Carbon Policies: Land-Use, Emissions, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    Abstract Renewable fuel standards, low carbon fuel standards, and ethanol subsidies are popular policies to incentivize ethanol production and reduce emissions from transportation. Compared to carbon trading standard (LCFS) and ethanol subsidies have similar effects while costs under an equivalent cap and trade

  5. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  6. Carbon Storage Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

  7. Composite system in noncommutative space and the equivalence principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. P. Gnatenko

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a composite system made of N particles is examined in a space with a canonical noncommutative algebra of coordinates. It is found that the coordinates of the center-of-mass position satisfy noncommutative algebra with effective parameter. Therefore, the upper bound of the parameter of noncommutativity is re-examined. We conclude that the weak equivalence principle is violated in the case of a non-uniform gravitational field and propose the condition for the recovery of this principle in noncommutative space. Furthermore, the same condition is derived from the independence of kinetic energy on the composition.

  8. Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

  9. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  10. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both isotropic and anisotropic joint representations. For an isotropically jointed geologic medium, the results show that the properties of the joints can be combined with the properties of the intact rock to develop an equivalent continuum model suitable for analyzing wave propagation through the jointed medium. For an anisotropically jointed geologic medium, they found it difficult to develop an equivalent continuum (EC) model that matches the response derived from mesoscopic simulation. They also performed simulations of wave propagation through jointed media. Two appraoches are suggested for modeling the rock mass. In one approach, jointed are modeled explicitly in a Lagrangian framework with appropriate contact algorithms used to track motion along the interfaces. In the other approach, the effect of joints is taken into account using a constitutive model derived from mesoscopic simulations.

  11. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  12. Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

  13. Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

  14. A Common View on Strong, Uniform, and Other Notions of Equivalence in Answer-Set Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woltran, Stefan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logic programming under the answer-set semantics nowadays deals with numerous different notions of program equivalence. This is due to the fact that equivalence for substitution (known as strong equivalence) and ordinary equivalence are different concepts. The former holds, given programs P and Q, iff P can be faithfully replaced by Q within any context R, while the latter holds iff P and Q provide the same output, that is, they have the same answer sets. Notions in between strong and ordinary equivalence have been introduced as theoretical tools to compare incomplete programs and are defined by either restricting the syntactic structure of the considered context programs R or by bounding the set A of atoms allowed to occur in R (relativized equivalence).For the latter approach, different A yield properly different equivalence notions, in general. For the former approach, however, it turned out that any ``reasonable'' syntactic restriction to R coincides with either ordinary, strong, or uniform equivalence. I...

  15. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, 揜adiation Protection of the Public and the Environment). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec抯 Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, 揚ublic Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive, concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the 搇ikely dose scenarios met the 揻ew millirem in a year criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

  16. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

  17. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

  18. Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    G21942 Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1 2 Alain of hydraulic equivalence, we determined that deposits resulted from a combination of suspended-12 load fallout between transport mechanisms, hydraulic18 equivalences have a general applicability in geophysical flows

  19. Geodesic equivalence via integrability Peter Topalov y and Vladimir S. Matveev z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matveev, Vladimir S.

    Geodesic equivalence via integrability Peter Topalov #3;y and Vladimir S. Matveev z Keywords: Geodesically Equivalent Metrics, Projectively Equivalent Metrics, Integrable Systems, Levi-Civita Coordinates an orbital di#11;eomorphism be- tween two Hamiltonian systems, produces integrals of them. We treat geodesic

  20. Adjoint-based method for supersonic aircraft design using equivalent area distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Adjoint-based method for supersonic aircraft design using equivalent area distributions Francisco for the design of supersonic aircraft that must match a target equivalent area distribution at constant lift of an adjoint solver for the equivalent area distribution, and the shape design process of a trijet supersonic

  1. On the equivalence of state transformer semantics and predicate transformer semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keimel, Klaus

    On the equivalence of state transformer semantics and predicate transformer semantics Dedicated and the author [13] have worked out the equivalence between state transformer semantics and predicate transformer the last section, where the equivalence of predicate and state transformer semantics is finally put

  2. The Standard Model in Noncommutative Geometry and Morita equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco D'Andrea; Ludwik Dabrowski

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some properties of the spectral triple $(A_F,H_F,D_F,J_F,\\gamma_F)$ describing the internal space in the noncommutative geometry approach to the Standard Model, with $A_F=\\mathbb{C}\\oplus\\mathbb{H}\\oplus M_3(\\mathbb{C})$. We show that, if we want $H_F$ to be a Morita equivalence bimodule between $A_F$ and the associated Clifford algebra, two terms must be added to the Dirac operator; we then study its relation with the orientability condition for a spectral triple. We also illustrate what changes if one considers a spectral triple with a degenerate representation, based on the complex algebra $B_F=\\mathbb{C}\\oplus M_2(\\mathbb{C})\\oplus M_3(\\mathbb{C})$.

  3. Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.

  4. On the Equivalence Principle and Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trzetrzelewski, Maciej

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider an observer surrounded by a charged, conducting elevator (assume that the charge is isolated from the observer). In the presence of the external electric field the elevator will accelerate however, due to the screening effect, the observer will not be able to detect any electromagnetic field. According to the equivalence principle, the observer may identify the cause of the acceleration with the external gravitational field. However the elevator's motion is given by Lorentz-force equation. Therefore there should exist a metric, depending on electromagnetic potential, for which the geodesics coincide with the trajectories of the charged body in the electromagnetic field. We give a solution to this problem by finding such metric. In doing so one must impose a constraint on the electromagnetic field in a certain way. That constraint turns out to be achievable by marginal gauge transformations whose phase is closely related to the Hamilton-Jacobi function. Finally we show that for weak fields the Einstei...

  5. Galilei covariance and Einstein's equivalence principle in quantum reference frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Pereira; R. M. Angelo

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The covariance of the Schr\\"odinger equation under Galilei boosts and the compatibility of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with Einstein's equivalence principle have been constrained for so long to the existence of a superselection rule which would prevent a quantum particle to be found in superposition states of different masses. In a effort to avoid this expedient, thus allowing for nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to account for unstable particles, recent works have suggested that usual Galilean transformations are inconsistent with the nonrelativistic limit of the Lorentz transformation. Here we approach the issue in a fundamentally different way. Using a formalism of unitary transformations and employing quantum reference frames rather than immaterial coordinate systems, we show that the Schr\\"odinger equation, although form-variant, is fully compatible with the aforementioned principles of relativity.

  6. High-performance carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres for supercapacitors with low series resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Bin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Xiaohua, E-mail: hudacxh62@yahoo.com.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Guo, Kaimin [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China); Xu, Longshan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China); Chen, Chuansheng [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China); Yan, Haimei; Chen, Jianghua [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} CNTs-implanted porous carbon spheres are prepared by using gelatin as soft template. {yields} Homogeneously distributed CNTs form a well-develop network in carbon spheres. {yields} CNTs act as a reinforcing backbone assisting the formation of pore structure. {yields} CNTs improve electrical conductivity and specific capacitance of supercapacitor. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres were prepared by an easy polymerization-induced colloid aggregation method using gelatin as a soft template. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements reveal that the materials are mesoporous carbon spheres, with a diameter of {approx}0.5-1.0 {mu}m, a specific surface area of 284 m{sup 2}/g and average pore size of 3.9 nm. Using the carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres as electrode material for supercapacitors in an aqueous electrolyte solution, a low equivalent series resistance of 0.83 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and a maximum specific capacitance of 189 F/g with a measured power density of 8.7 kW/kg at energy density of 6.6 Wh/kg are obtained.

  7. 18 | MSU AGBIORESEARCH Developing economically and environmentally sound approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to offset carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions into the environment. In 2009, he undertook a project to quantify carbon offset protocol, MacFarlane determined that in 2009, about 66 tons of CO2 equivalents were offset part of MacFarlane's research relates to the carbon storage capacity of trees and their role in helping

  8. Inside this issue: Carpooling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    the purchase of green power and carbon offsets. The energy and electricity usage for the building, 470 metric tons of carbon were offset. This is equivalent to planting 174 acres of trees or taking 160 UAlbany Shuttle Runs on Hybrid Power for the Summer Routes University Hall goes carbon neutral Check out

  9. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  10. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  11. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  12. CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

  13. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  14. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  15. Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects 庐 Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

  16. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

  17. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  18. Optical Anisotropy of Schwarzschild Metric within Equivalent Medium Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sina Khorasani; Bizhan Rashidian

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is has been long known that the curved space in the presence of gravitation can be described as a non-homogeneous anisotropic medium in flat geometry with different constitutive equations. In this article, we show that the eigenpolarizations of such medium can be exactly solved, leading to a pseudo-isotropic description of curved vacuum with two refractive index eigenvalues having opposite signs, which correspond to forward and backward travel in time. We conclude that for a rotating universe, time-reversal symmetry is broken. We also demonstrate the applicability of this method to Schwarzschild metric and derive exact forms of refractive index. We derive the subtle optical anisotropy of space around a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and uncharged blackhole in the form of an elegant closed form expression, and show that the refractive index in such a pseudo-isotropic system would be a function of coordinates as well as the direction of propagation. Corrections arising from such anisotropy in the bending of light are shown and a simplified system of equations for ray-tracing in the equivalent medium of Schwarzschild metric is found.

  19. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  20. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  1. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  2. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  4. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. A process has been developed which results in high quality binder pitch suitable for use in graphite electrodes or carbon anodes. A detailed description of the protocol is given by Clendenin. Briefly, aromatic heavy oils are hydro-treated under mild conditions in order to increase their ability to dissolve coal. An example of an aromatic heavy oil is Koppers Carbon Black Base (CBB) oil. CBB oil has been found to be an effective solvent and acceptably low cost (i.e., significantly below the market price for binder pitch, or about $280 per ton at the time of this writing). It is also possible to use solvents derived from hydrotreated coal and avoid reliance on coke oven recovery products completely if so desired.

  6. The Woodland Carbon Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

  7. [Semantic equivalence of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the "Body Change Inventory"].

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conti, MA; Ferreira, ME; Amaral, AC; Hearst, N; Cord醩, TA; Scagliusi, FB

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    portugu閟 do 揃ody Change Inventory Semantic Equivalence ofof the 揃ody Change Inventory Maria Elisa Caputo Ferreira 1tion of the Body Change Inventory: An assessment instrument

  8. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  9. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Matthew Werden

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metallic nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical and ElectronicStructure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .

  10. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Matthew Werden

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical andElectronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .Photophysics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes . . . . .

  11. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  12. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  14. Power-system dynamic equivalents:coherency recognition via the rate of change of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Cat贸lica de Chile)

    .F.I.M.A. Indexing terms: Power systems and plant, Simulation, Time-varying parameters, Dynamic equivalents AbstractPower-system dynamic equivalents:coherency recognition via the rate of change of kinetic energy H of sections of a power system, its main drawback being the extensive computation times required to recognise

  15. Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin David J. Steigmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin David J author to receive correspondence (steigman@me.berkeley.edu) Abstract: The problem of plastic spin is phrased in terms of a notion of mechanical equivalence among local relaxed configurations of an elastic/plastic

  16. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  17. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed

  18. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

  19. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 80% of the primary tin consumed

  20. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  1. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  2. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

  3. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

  4. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 97% of the primary tin. The major uses

  5. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 77% of the primary tin consumed

  6. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

  7. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

  8. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  9. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

  10. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

  11. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1997 was essentially unchanged at 1.9 million metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    52 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 98% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in six other States. While copper was recovered at about 35 mines operating in the United States, 15

  13. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

  14. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Tapan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

  15. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  16. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  17. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

  18. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  19. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  1. ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major out a report or a web site about carbon footprint results of a product or of a company. Write a two

  2. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  3. Energy, Carbon-emission and Financial Savings from Thermostat Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T J [ORNL; Schroeder, Dana [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the easiest approaches to energy, and cost, savings for most people is the adjustment of thermostats to save energy. Here we estimate savings of energy, carbon, and money in the United States of America (USA) that would result from adjusting thermostats in residential and commercial buildings by about half a degree Celsius downward during the heating season and upward during the cooling season. To obtain as small a unit as possible, and therefore the least likely to be noticeable by most people, we selected an adjustment of one degree Fahrenheit (0.56 degree Celsius) which is the gradation used almost exclusively on thermostats in the USA and is the smallest unit of temperature that has been used historically. Heating and/or cooling of interior building space for personal comfort is sometimes referred to as space conditioning, a term we will use for convenience throughout this work without consideration of humidity. Thermostat adjustment, as we use the term here, applies to thermostats that control the indoor temperature, and not to other thermostats such as those on water heaters. We track emissions of carbon only, rather than of carbon dioxide, because carbon atoms change atomic partners as they move through the carbon cycle, from atmosphere to biosphere or ocean and, on longer time scales, through the rock cycle. To convert a mass of carbon to an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (thereby including the mass of the 2 oxygen atoms in each molecule) simply multiply by 3.67.

  4. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  5. An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Golestan Hospital, JondiShapour University of Medical Science, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics, JondiShapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chegeni, Nahid, E-mail: nchegen@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, JondiShapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima [Department of Medical Physics, JondiShapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 2.5% and 1.5 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

  6. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  7. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  8. Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

  9. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J. (1420 Fifth St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attentuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

  10. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attenuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power. 4 figs.

  11. Cytosolic carbonic anhydrase in the Gulf toadfish is important for tolerance to hypersalinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    /dehydra- tion reactions of CO2, producing equivalent amounts of H+ and HCO3 - (CO2 +H2OH+ +HCO3 - ). This enzyme of Mexico to northern South America. These environments are shallow water habitats often influenced, including bone formation, calcification, ion transport, acid颅base balance, and carbon dioxide transport

  12. SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Roundtable (CAPR) GEO Forest Monitoring SymposiumGEO Forest Monitoring)Amazon Initiative Consortium (IA) #12;Carbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Carbon for Poverty Reduction

  13. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  14. Carbon in detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review three principal results from a five year study of carbon and its properties in detonations and discuss the implications of these results to the behavior of explosives. We first present a new determination of the carbon melt line from release wave velocity measurements in the shocked state. We then outline a colloidal theory of carbon clustering which from diffusion limited coagulation predicts a slow energy release rate for the carbon chemistry. Finally, we show the results from the examination of recovered soot. Here we see support for the colloid theory and find the diamond phase of carbon. The main theme of this paper is that the carbon in detonation products is in the form of a colloidal suspension of carbon clusters which grow through diffusion limited collisions. Even the final state is not bulk graphite or diamond, but is a collection of small, less than 100 /angstrom/A, diamond and graphitic clusters. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  15. The Solar Neutrino Problem in the Light of a Violation of the Equivalence Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Gago; H. Nunokawa; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have found that long-wavelength neutrino oscillations induced by a tiny breakdown of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity can provide a viable solution to the solar neutrino problem.

  16. Understanding fractional equivalence and the differentiated effects on operations with fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naiser, Emilie Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared two representations for teaching fraction equivalence. It traced the implications of both representations on the student?s comprehension of fractions as well as their ability to perform operations with fractions...

  17. On the Expression Complexity of Equivalence and Isomorphism of Primitive Positive Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriote, Matt

    and existential quantification. The class of primitive positive formulas includes颅and is essentially equivalent to in the study of the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which can be defined #12;as the problem of deciding

  18. On the Expression Complexity of Equivalence and Isomorphism of Primitive Positive Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriote, Matt

    and existential quantification. The class of primitive positive formulas includes颅and is essentially equivalent to in the study of the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which can be defined Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings

  19. Spanish Translation of the Children's Hope Scale Using Quantitative Methods for Verifying Semantic Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frehe-Torres, Victoria Elena

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to translate the Children's Hope Scale (CHS) from English to Spanish using quantitative methods in order to verify semantic equivalence of the adapted measure. The study utilized bilingual, English and Spanish...

  20. *can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated September 2014 Mechanical Engineering Sample Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Dynamics and Vibration MEMS 4310 3 Vibration and Machine Elements Lab MEMS 405 2 Intro to Circuits ESE 230*can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated September 2014 Mechanical Engineering

  1. *can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated May 2014 Mechanical Engineering Sample Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Modeling Simulation and Control MEMS 4301 3 Structural Dynamics and Vibration MEMS 431 4 Intro to Circuits*can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated May 2014 Mechanical Engineering Sample

  2. A critical study of the equivalent circuits of three and four-winding transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitson, Donald Ray

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -WINDIHO TBAHSFORHERS A Thesis Donald Ray Whitson Jung 1951 A CRITICAL STUDY OF THE EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS OP THREE AND FOUR-WINDING THANSFORNERS Donald Rap Nhitson A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Nechanical College of Texas.... FOREWORD In the critical study of the equivalent circuits of three and four- winding transformers there was no attempt made to develop any new trans- former theory. This thesis presents the theory of two general methods of approach to the problem...

  3. A note on the equivalence principle applicability to the general theory of relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Morozov

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we are talking about the equivalence of Einsteinian gravitational equations solutions to relativist accelerated frames. It was established that there is a uniformly accelerated frame. Such a frame is deformed as an acceleration result, but it is a stiff frame according to Born, i.e. its metric tensor does not depend on time. The frame is pseudo-Riemannian. It was proved that an uniformly accelerated frame is locally equivalent to the relevant solution of Einstein's gravitational equation.

  4. Quasi-stationary circuit relationships from electromagnetic theory with special emphasis on equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandy, Woodrow Wheeler

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QUASI-STATIONARY CIRCUIT RELATIONSHIPS PROM ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON EQUIVALENCE A Dissertation By Woodrow W. Gandy ontent by Chairman of Committee QUASI-STATIONARY CIRCUIT RELATIONSHIPS FROM ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY... WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON EQUIVALENCE A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Major Subject: Electrical Engineering...

  5. An Equivalent Network for Load-Flow Analysis of Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Merion Luke

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EQUIVALENT NETWORK FOR LOAD-FLOW ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS A Thesis by Meri on L. Johnson Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partihl fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1960 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering AN EQUIVALENT NETWORK FOR LOAD-FLOW ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS A Thesis By Merion L. Johnson Approv as to style a d content by (Chairman of Co ittee ) (Head of Department...

  6. Knowing mathematics for teaching: a case study of teacher responses to students' errors and difficulties in teaching equivalent fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Meixia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to Student Errors and Difficulties (TRED) in teaching equivalent fractions with an eye on students cognitive gains as the assessment of teaching effects. This research used a qualitative paradigm. Classroom videos concerning equivalent fractions from six...

  7. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  8. Myhill-Nerode Handout Definition. An equivalence relation E on strings is right invariant iff concatenating a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    a right-invariant equivalence relation E (on , for a given ) of finite index. Let S be the (finite) set

  9. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL] [ORNL; Warren, Kaitlyn E [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSlQIJE Colloque C7, supplkment au no 12. Ton~e38, dkcembre 1977, page C7-227 ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND ORDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -227 ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND ORDERING OF INTERSTITIALS IN TRANSITION METALS M. C. CADEVILLE, C. DEMANGEAT, F. GAUTIER and M. F. LAPIERRE Laboratoire de Structure Electronique des Solides (ERA 100) Universitt Louis connaissance actuelle de la structure electro- nique et de l'ordre dans les alliages interstitiels carbone

  11. Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy 4 Report Introduction 5 Product Types 5 A. Carbon Offsets 5 B. Certified Emission Reductions (CERs. Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy

  12. Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions Dana S. Balser D. Anish Roshi (Raman (Agnes Scott College) #12;Carbon RRLs Carbon Radio Recombination Lines (RRLs) NGC 2024 (Orion B) IC 1795 (W3) Palmer et al. (1967) #12;Carbon RRLs Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) Hollenbach & Tielens (1997

  13. Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

  14. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

  15. Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

  16. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  17. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  18. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  19. Carbon Fiber SMC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    110,000 ACC capital) in 2008 * 54,000 for 2009 Partners * Continental Structural Plastic (CSP), a Tier One supplier * Discounted compounding and molding * Zoltek, a carbon...

  20. Activated Carbon Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

  1. Activated Carbon Injection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

  2. EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph B枚hringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

  3. Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions Climate change is real not only emitting less greenhouse gas (GHG), but actually sources of negative carbon. We then present two

  4. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

  5. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pearce, D. 2003. The Social Cost Of Carbon And Its PolicyR.S.J. 2008. The Social Cost of Carbon: Trends, Outliers and

  6. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from reservoir rock formation. - Task 2: Carbonation study of minerals. - Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock...

  7. Variational equivalence between Ginzburg-Landau, XY spin systems and screw dislocations energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alicandro; M. Cicalese; M. Ponsiglione

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss discrete two-dimensional models for XY spin systems and screw dislocations in crystals. We prove that, as the lattice spacing $\\e$ tends to zero, the relevant energies in these models behave like a free energy in the complex Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, justifying in a rigorous mathematical language the analogies between screw dislocations in crystals and vortices in superconductors. To this purpose, we introduce a notion of asymptotic variational equivalence between families of functionals in the framework of $\\Gamma$-convergence. We then prove that, in several scaling regimes, the complex Ginzburg-Landau, the XY spin system and the screw dislocation energy functionals are variationally equivalent. Exploiting such an equivalence between dislocations and vortices, we can show new results concerning the asymptotic behavior of screw dislocations in the $|\\log\\e|^2$ energetic regime.

  8. Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

    1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

  9. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  10. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Philip G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S. Subramoney,Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins 1 and

  11. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  12. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Philip G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.in Applied Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S.Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins

  13. Development of Continuous Solvent Extraction Processes For Coal Derived Carbon Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Dady B. Dadyburjor; Gregory W. Hackett; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; Robert C. Svensson; John W. Zondlo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this reporting period, tonnage quantities of coal extract were produced but solid separation was not accomplished in a timely manner. It became clear that the originally selected filtration process would not be effective enough for a serious commercial process. Accordingly, centrifugation was investigated as a superior means for removing solids from the extract. Results show acceptable performance. Petrographic analysis of filtered solids was carried out by R and D Carbon Petrography under the auspices of Koppers and consultant Ken Krupinski. The general conclusion is that the material appears to be amenable to centrifugation. Filtered solids shows a substantial pitch component as well as some mesophase, resulting in increased viscosity. This is likely a contributing reason for the difficulty in filtering the material. Cost estimates were made for the hydotreatment and digestion reactors that would be needed for a 20,000 ton per year demonstration plants, with the aid of ChemTech Inc. The estimates show that the costs of scaling up the existing tank reactors are acceptable. However, a strong recommendation was made to consider pipe reactors, which are thought to be more cost effective and potentially higher performance in large scale systems. The alternate feedstocks for coke and carbon products were used to fabricate carbon electrodes as described in the last quarterly report. Gregory Hackett successfully defended his MS Thesis on the use of these electrodes in Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC), which is excerpted in Section 2.4 of this quarterly report.

  14. Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

  15. Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

  16. Commercialization of New Carbon Fiber Materials Based on Sustainable Resources for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberle, Cliff [ORNL; Webb, Daniel C [ORNL; Albers, Tracy [GrafTech International; Chen, Chong [GrafTech International

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and GrafTech International have collaborated to develop and demonstrate the performance of high temperature thermal insulation prototypes made from lignin-based carbon fibers. This project will potentially lead to the first commercial application of lignin-based carbon fibers (LBCF). The goal of the commercial application is to replace expensive, Chinese-sourced isotropic pitch carbon fibers with lower cost carbon fibers made from a domestically sourced, bio-derived (renewable) feedstock. LBCF can help recapture jobs that were previously exported to China while resolving a supply chain vulnerability and reducing the production cost for GrafTech s high temperature thermal insulation. The performance of the LBCF prototypes was measured and found to be comparable to that of the current commercial product. During production of the insulation prototypes, ORNL and GrafTech demonstrated lignin compounding/pelletization, fiber production, heat treatment, and compositing at scales far surpassing those previously demonstrated in LBCF R&D or production. A plan was developed for the commercialization of LBCF thermal insulation, with key milestones including qualification of multiple scalable lignin sources in 2013, tons-scale production and field testing by customers in 2014, and product launch as soon thereafter as production capabilities can be constructed and commissioned.

  17. How many invariant polynomials are needed to decide local unitary equivalence of qubit states?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maci??ek, Tomasz [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnik體 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland) [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnik體 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Oszmaniec, Micha? [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnik體 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnik體 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Sawicki, Adam [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnik體 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland) [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnik體 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given L-qubit states with the fixed spectra of reduced one-qubit density matrices, we find a formula for the minimal number of invariant polynomials needed for solving local unitary (LU) equivalence problem, that is, problem of deciding if two states can be connected by local unitary operations. Interestingly, this number is not the same for every collection of the spectra. Some spectra require less polynomials to solve LU equivalence problem than others. The result is obtained using geometric methods, i.e., by calculating the dimensions of reduced spaces, stemming from the symplectic reduction procedure.

  18. On the electromagnetic constitutive laws that are equivalent to spacetime metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. H. Delphenich

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The raising of both indices in the components of the Minkowski electromagnetic field strength 2-form to give the components of the electromagnetic excitation bivector field can be regarded as being equivalent to an electromagnetic constitutive law, as well as being defined by the components of the spacetime metric. This notion is clarified, and the nature of the equivalent dielectric tensors and magnetic permeability tensors that are defined by some common spacetime metrics is discussed. The relationship of the basic construction to effective metrics is discussed, and, in particular, the fact that this effective metric is more general than the Gordon metric.

  19. Status of MICROSCOPE, a mission to test the Equivalence Principle in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Joel; Rodrigues, Manuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROSCOPE is a French Space Agency mission that aims to test the Weak Equivalence Principle in space down to an accuracy of $10^{-15}$. This is two orders of magnitude better than the current constraints, which will allow us to test General Relativity as well as theories beyond General Relativity which predict a possible Weak Equivalence Principle violation below $10^{-13}$. In this communication, we describe the MICROSCOPE mission, its measurement principle and instrument, and we give an update on its status. After a successful instrument's commissioning, MICROSCOPE is on track for on-schedule launch, expected in 2016.

  20. Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

  1. Pacific Northwest rangeland carbon sequestration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Seth T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This paper models the supply curve of carbon sequestration on Pacific Northwest rangelands. Rangeland managers have the ability to sequester carbon in agricultural soils by (more)

  2. CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

  3. Every invertible matrix is diagonally equivalent to a matrix with distinct eigenvalues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    Every invertible matrix is diagonally equivalent to a matrix with distinct eigenvalues Man-Duen Choi , Zejun Huang , Chi-Kwong Li , and Nung-Sing Sze搂 Abstract We show that for every invertible n?n complex matrix A there is an n?n diagonal invertible D such that AD has distinct eigenvalues. Using

  4. Evaluation of Equivalent Static Wind Loads on Buildings Xinzhong Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    effects. This load representation allows designers to follow a relatively simple static analysis procedureEvaluation of Equivalent Static Wind Loads on Buildings Xinzhong Chen1 and Ahsan Kareem2 1 Professor of Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA, kareem@nd.edu ABSTRACT Wind loads

  5. Equivalence of the Fleming-Viot and Look-down models of Muller's ratchet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Equivalence of the Fleming-Viot and Look-down models of Muller's ratchet Julien Audiffren Abstract We consider Muller's ratchet Fleming-Viot model with compensatory mu- tations, which is an infinite to the previous Muller's ratchet model. Keywords : Muller's ratchet, Fleming-Viot, Look-down, Tightness, SDEs

  6. Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin-scale flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin-scale groundwater flow models are the estimation of representative hydraulic conductivity for the model units. In this study, high-resolution, fully heterogeneous basin-scale hydraulic conductivity map is generated

  7. Equivalence Checking between Function Block Diagrams and C Programs Using HW-CBMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (RPS) in Korea. Our approach is effective to check equivalence between FBDs and ANSI-C programs: Equivanelce Checking, Behavioral Consistency, FBDs, Ver- ilog, ANSI-C, HW-CBMC. 1 Introduction Controllers Heidelberg 2011 #12;398 D.-A. Lee, J. Yoo, and J.-S. Lee FBDs program into ANSI-C program to compile

  8. Equivalent isotropic scattering formulation for transient short-pulse radiative transfer in anisotropic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    of the transient short-pulse radiation transport through forward and backward anisotropic scattering planar media time-resolved transmittance.13颅15 The complete transient radiative transfer equation has been conEquivalent isotropic scattering formulation for transient short-pulse radiative transfer

  9. On Enumeration of Polynomial Equivalence Classes and Their Application to MPKC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These problems are equivalent to finding the scale of the key space of a multivariate cryptosystem and the total and the potential capability of MPKC. We also consider their applications in the analysis of a specific multivariate number of different multivariate cryptographic schemes respectively, which might impact the security

  10. An equivalent circuit for the Brushless Doubly Fed Machine (BDFM) including parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    are presented. The machine is intended for use as a variable speed generator, or drive. A per phase equivalent generator for wind turbines, although the benefits of the BDFM for variable speed drives have also been of operation in a doubly- fed mode, in which the shaft speed has a fixed relationship to the two excitation

  11. 2006 29 1 A physics-based equivalent circuit model for LTCC Helical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Sung Woo

    2006 29 1 601 Abstract A physics-based equivalent circuit model for LTCC Helical type Inductors, C, , . Film Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) . LTCC of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic Helical Inductors Keun Heo, Juhwan Lim, Sungwoo Hwang Dept

  12. Capacitive Behavior of HF Power Transformers: Global Approach to Draw Robust Equivalent Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    behavior of all components. Among these components, HF power transformers constitute a special case. EvenCapacitive Behavior of HF Power Transformers: Global Approach to Draw Robust Equivalent Circuits of n-windings HF power transformers. A global approach, mainly based on energy considerations about

  13. Simple proof of equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and the circuit model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; Daniel A. Lidar; Morgan Mitchell

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and quantum computation in the circuit model. An explicit adiabatic computation procedure is given that generates a ground state from which the answer can be extracted. The amount of time needed is evaluated by computing the gap. We show that the procedure is computationally efficient.

  14. Creep Prediction Using The Non-Linear Strain Energy Equivalence Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creep Prediction Using The Non-Linear Strain Energy Equivalence Theory Jennifer K. Lynch, Ph Theory, a semi-empirical model, is utilized to predict long- term creep from short-term compressive-axial compression are performed at strain rates of 3 and 0.03 %/minute to predict creep behavior and stress

  15. CARTESIAN CLOSED 2-CATEGORIES AND PERMUTATION EQUIVALENCE IN HIGHER-ORDER REWRITING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    is the notion of permutation equivalence, which was generalised to the higher-order case by Bruggink [1]. He constructs a cartesian closed 2-category, whose 2-cells are Bruggink's proof terms modulo permutation closed 2-signatures are a 2-dimensional refinement of cartesian closed sketches [16, 4, 9]. Bruggink

  16. University of South Australia Go8 Foundation Studies Programs Entry Equivalences Code Academic Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    University of South Australia Go8 Foundation Studies Programs Entry Equivalences Code Academic Studies Program Western Australian Universities Foundation Studies Program University of Queensland.8 55 6 LBIF Bachelor of Engineering (Electrcal and Renewable Energy Systems) Y 75 74 67 285 72 6

  17. On the equivalence of economic lot scheduling and switched production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armbruster, Dieter

    On the equivalence of economic lot scheduling and switched production systems K.G.M. Jacobs from switched production systems are applied to the economic lot schedul- ing problem: i) A feedback-entrant production scheduling where parts arrive into the manufacturing system with certain (random) arrival rates

  18. Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

  19. Wave-Based Sound Propagation in Large Open Scenes using an Equivalent Source Formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Wave-Based Sound Propagation in Large Open Scenes using an Equivalent Source Formulation RAVISH We present a novel approach for wave-based sound propagation suitable for large, open spaces spanning or simulation systems, present a significant chal- lenge for interactive, wave-based sound propagation

  20. Lanthanum silicate gate dielectric stacks with subnanometer equivalent oxide thickness utilizing an interfacial silica consumption reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Lanthanum silicate gate dielectric stacks with subnanometer equivalent oxide thickness utilizing-8087 Received 13 April 2005; accepted 6 June 2005; published online 26 July 2005 A silicate reaction between process route to interface elimination, while producing a silicate dielectric with a higher temperature

  1. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert* Abstract statistic, called cumulative carbon. This statistic is the aggregate amount ofcarbon emitted in theform such activitiespersist.In thispaper the conceptis usedto addressthe question offair allocation of carbon emissions

  2. International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

  3. Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration Robert B. Jackson,1 * Esteban G. Farley,1 David C. le Maitre,5 Bruce A. McCarl,6 Brian C. Murray7 Carbon sequestration strategies plantations feature prominently among tools for carbon sequestration (1颅8). Plantations typi- cally combine

  4. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT抯 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for 揑nnovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies, the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  5. advanced carbon-carbon composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: CARBON-CARBON...

  6. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fibers, carbon nanotubes, and carbon capsule structures canand multi-walled nanotubes and carbon fiber, and occurs withMulti- walled carbon nanotubes, Carbon, v.43, pp.2608-2617,

  7. Effects of fuel type and equivalence ratios on the flickering of triple flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, K.B.; Kundu, A.; Ganguly, R.; Datta, A. [Department of Power Engineering, Jadavpur University, Salt Lake Campus, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study has been conducted in axisymmetric, co-flowing triple flames with different equivalence ratios of the inner and outer reactant streams (2<{phi}{sub in}<3 and 0{<=}{phi}{sub out}<0.7). Different fuel combinations, like propane/propane, propane/methane or methane/methane in the inner and outer streams respectively, have been used in the experiments. The structures of the triple flames have been compared for the different fuel combinations and equivalence ratios. The conditions under which triple flames exhibit oscillation have been identified. During the oscillation, the non-premixed flame and the outer lean premixed flame flicker strongly, while the inner rich premixed flame remains more or less stable. The flickering frequency has been evaluated through image processing and fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the average pixel intensity of the image frames. It is observed that, for all the fuel combinations, the frequency decreases with the increase in the outer equivalence ratio, while it is relatively invariant with the change in the inner equivalence ratio. However, an increase in the inner equivalence ratio affects the structure of the flame by increasing the heights of the inner premixed flame and non-premixed flame and also enlarges the yellow soot-laden zone at the tip of the inner flame. A scaling analysis of the oscillating flames has been performed based on the measured parameters, which show a variation of Strouhal number (St) with Richardson number (Ri) as St {proportional_to} Ri{sup 0.5}. The fuel type is found to have no influence on this correlation. (author)

  8. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO); Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  9. Extrasolar Carbon Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that some extrasolar planets planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk's C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptune-mass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures.

  10. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO) [ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO; Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager) [ATK, Program Manager

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  11. Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth抯 utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

  12. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  14. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  15. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

  16. 4, 1367, 2007 Modelling carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    BGD 4, 13颅67, 2007 Modelling carbon overconsumption and extracellular POC formation M. Schartau et carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon M. Schartau1 , A Correspondence to: M. Schartau (markus.schartau@gkss.de) 13 #12;BGD 4, 13颅67, 2007 Modelling carbon

  17. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  18. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  19. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

  20. Carbon dioxide removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  2. Black Carbon抯 Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; carbon budget;of an energy efficient carbon sequestration mechanism, asin the later section on carbon sequestration. In atmospheric

  3. Black Carbon抯 Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalinventory of black carbon emissions. Atmos. Environ. 1993,commonly studied form of carbon emissions. Black carbon (BC)

  4. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  5. Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    were incorporated onto the surface of epoxy carbon fiber composites, as proposed fire shieldsStudy of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites Qiang Wu, Wei Zhu, Chuck Zhang *, Zhiyong Liang, Ben Wang Department

  6. The potential role of a carbon tax in U.S. fiscal reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKibbin, Warwick [Australian National Univ. (Australia); The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Morris, Adele [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Wilcoxen, Peter [Syracuse University, NY (United States); The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Cai, Yiyong [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australian National Univ. (Australia)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines fiscal reform options in the United States with an intertemporal computable general equilibrium model of the world economy called G-Cubed. Six policy scenarios explore two overarching issues: (1) the effects of a carbon tax under alternative assumptions about the use of the resulting revenue, and (2) the effects of alternative measures that could be used to reduce the budget deficit. We examine a simple excise tax on the carbon content of fossil fuels in the U.S. energy sector starting immediately at $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) and rising at 4 percent above inflation each year through 2050. We investigate policies that allow the revenue from the illustrative carbon tax to reduce the long run federal budget deficit or the marginal tax rates on labor and capital income. We also compare the carbon tax to other means of reducing the deficit by the same amount. We find that the carbon tax will raise considerable revenue: $80 billion at the outset, rising to $170 billion in 2030 and $310 billion by 2050. It also significantly reduces U.S. CO2 emissions by an amount that is largely independent of the use of the revenue. By 2050, annual CO2 emissions fall by 2.5 billion metric tons (BMT), or 34 percent, relative to baseline, and cumulative emissions fall by 40 BMT through 2050. The use of the revenue affects both broad economic impacts and the composition of GDP across consumption, investment and net exports. In most scenarios, the carbon tax lowers GDP slightly, reduces investment and exports, and increases imports. The effect on consumption varies across policies and can be positive if households receive the revenue as a lump sum transfer. Using the revenue for a capital tax cut, however, is significantly different than the other policies. In that case, investment booms, employment rises, consumption declines slightly, imports increase, and overall GDP rises significantly relative to baseline through about 2040. Thus, a tax reform that uses a carbon tax to reduce capital taxes would achieve two goals: reducing CO2 emissions significantly and expanding short-run employment and the economy. We examine three ways to reduce the deficit by an equal amount. We find that raising marginal tax rates on labor income has advantages over raising tax rates on capital income or establishing a carbon tax. A labor tax increase leaves GDP close to its baseline, reduces consumption very slightly and expands net exports slightly. Investment remains essentially unchanged. In contrast, a capital tax increase causes a significant and persistent drop in investment and much larger reductions in GDP. A carbon tax falls between the two: it lowers GDP more than a labor tax increase because it reduces investment. However, its effects on investment and GDP are more moderate than the capital tax increase, and it also significantly reduces CO2 emissions. A carbon tax thus offers a way to help reduce the deficit and improve the environment, and do so with minimal disturbance to overall economic activity.

  7. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  8. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  9. What are the Hidden Quantum Processes In Einstein's Weak Principle of Equivalence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a quantum derivation of Einstein's Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) of general relativity using a new quantum gravity theory proposed by the authors called Electro-Magnetic Quantum Gravity or EMQG (ref. 1). Newtonian Inertia is a property of matter due to the strictly local electrical force interactions contributed by each of the (electrically charged) elementary particles of the mass with the surrounding (electrically charged) virtual particles (virtual masseons) of the quantum vacuum. The sum of all the tiny electrical forces (photon exchanges with the vacuum particles) originating in each charged elementary particle of the accelerated mass is the source of the total inertial force of a mass which opposes accelerated motion in Newton's law 'F = MA'. We found that gravity also involves the same 'inertial' electromagnetic force component that exists in inertial mass. We propose that Einstein's general relativistic Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) originates from common 'lower level' quantum vacuum ...

  10. Lyapunov spectra and nonequilibrium ensembles equivalence in 2D fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti; Lamberto Rondoni; Enrico Segre

    2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical experiments to study the Lyapunov spectra of dynamical systems associated with the Navier--Stokes (NS) equation in two spatial dimensions truncated over the Fourier basis. Recently new equations, called GNS equations, have been introduced and conjectured to be equivalent to the NS equations at large Reynolds numbers. The Lyapunov spectra of the NS and of the corresponding GNS systems overlap, adding evidence in favor of the conjectured equivalence already studied and partially extended in previous papers. We make use of the Lyapunov spectra to study a fluctuation relation which had been proposed to extend the ``fluctuation theorem'' to strongly dissipative systems. Preliminary results towards the formulation of a local version of the fluctuation formula are also presented.

  11. Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darabi, F; Atazadeh, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

  12. Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Darabi; M. Mousavi; K. Atazadeh

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

  13. Interacting Dark Energy Model: Exact Analytic Solution and Equivalent Scenario for MCG and Scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Pan; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark energy models have got tremendous enthusiasm recently both from theoretical and observational point of view. In the present work we assume that the universe at present is dominated by dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) which do not evolve separately but interact non-gravitationally with one another and are equivalent to a single dark fluid. We construct explicit solutions for two choices of the equation of state parameter for DE and results are analyzed both graphically as well as analytically. The modified chaplygin gas (MCG) model is shown to be compatible with this effective single dark fluid as well as different interacting holographic dark energy (HDE) models characterized by various IR cut off lengths. Finally, we establish the equivalence between HDE with different scalar field models.

  14. Breakdown of the equivalence between gravitational mass and energy for a composite quantum body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei G. Lebed

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The simplest quantum composite body, a hydrogen atom, is considered in the presence of a weak external gravitational field. We define an operator for the passive gravitational mass of the atom in the post-Newtonian approximation of the general relativity and show that it does not commute with its energy operator. Nevertheless, the equivalence between the expectation values of the mass and energy is shown to survive at a macroscopic level for stationary quantum states. Breakdown of the equivalence between passive gravitational mass and energy at a microscopic level for stationary quantum states can be experimentally detected by studying unusual electromagnetic radiation, emitted by the atoms, supported by and moving in the Earth's gravitational field with constant velocity, using spacecraft or satellite

  15. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  16. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  17. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  18. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  19. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  20. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  1. Gravitational radiation fields in teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and their energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. L. Nashed

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive two new retarded solutions in the teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity (TEGR). One of these solutions gives a divergent energy. Therefore, we used the regularized expression of the gravitational energy-momentum tensor, which is a coordinate dependent. A detailed analysis of the loss of the mass of Bondi space-time is carried out using the flux of the gravitational energy-momentum.

  2. ON NEARLY EQUIVALENT FORMS FOR GSp(4) DANIEL FILE AND RAMIN TAKLOO-BIGHASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takloo-Bighash, Ramin

    the theta lift of the representations (1, 2) and (JL 1 , JL 2 ) to GSp(4). Lemma 1. In the local situation this lemma is well-known. The non-vanishing of the local theta lifts follows from Remark 6.8 of [P where Tv is split. Let 1,v, 2,v be two non-equivalent supercuspidal representations of D v GL2(Fv) w

  3. Towards a proof of the equivalence between FRW background expansion and statistical isotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Yeinzon; Nieto, Carlos M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We will expose in this paper our advances towards a proof of the equivalence between FRW background expansion, during some period of time that contains primordial inflation, and the statistical isotropy of the primordial curvature perturbation $\\zeta$ at the end of this period of time. Our motivation rests on the growing interest in the existence of a preferred direction in the Universe hinted by the continuous presence of anomalies in the CMB data.

  4. Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of the Equivalence Principle with the Earth and Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale H. Boggs

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary objective of the Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment is to provide precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. Time series of the highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information used to determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Current LLR solutions give $(-1.0 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^{-13}$ for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)$. This result, in combination with laboratory experiments on the weak equivalence principle, yields a strong equivalence principle (SEP) test of $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)_{\\tt SEP} = (-2.0 \\pm 2.0) \\times 10^{-13}$. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. The result of the SEP test translates into a value for the corresponding SEP violation parameter $\\eta$ of $(4.4 \\pm 4.5)\\times10^{-4}$, where $\\eta = 4\\beta -\\gamma -3$ and both $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$ are parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters. The PPN parameter $\\beta$ is determined to be $\\beta - 1 = (1.2 \\pm 1.1) \\times 10^{-4}$. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data, and characterize the modeling and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches that are presented in the text. We emphasize that near-term improvements in the LLR ranging accuracy will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and, most notably, will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.

  5. Equivalent sets of coherent states of the 1D infinite square well and properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc-Antoine Fiset; V閞onique Hussin

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the equivalence (under some conditions) of two sets of coherent states built for the one-dimensional infinite square well: the so-called generalized and Gaussian Klauder coherent states. We then derive an approximate close expression approaching their probability density and wave function to explore their properties analytically. This process gives thereby explanation of the quasi-classical behavior of these states in terms of the main observables and the Heisenberg uncertainty product

  6. "The debate is over. We know the science.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levels by 2020. 路 California's challenge is to meet growing energy needs while reducing CO2 emissions the greenhouse effect or global warm- ing. The measure is usually expressed as tons of carbon di- oxide (CO2 ) equivalent. CO2 accounts for about 89 percent of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions in California. Methane

  7. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consider involves a GHG price of about $15 per ton carbon-equivalent (tce) levied only on the non-CO2 GHGs and held at that level through the century. We estimate that such a policy would reduce the global mean reduction in 2100 if all Annex B Parties except the US maintained it as is through the ce

  8. Electromagnetic wave propagation in an active medium and the equivalent Schrdinger equation with an energy-dependent complex potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in an active medium and the equivalent Schr枚dinger equation with an energy-dependent complex potential H. Bahlouli,* A. D. Alhaidari, and A. Al Zahrani Physics Department to provide an alternative, but equivalent, representation of plane electromagnetic em wave propagation

  9. Admission's procedure for PhD studies Evaluation of the equivalence of your Master Certificate or Licentiate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    or Licentiate At this point you have already applied online for a PhD of Science at www of science. The equivalence committee evaluates now if your Master Certificate or Licentiate is equivalent of the transcripts of your Bachelor's Degree AND Master's Degree or Licentiate containing credits and grades

  10. EMC analysis of static converters by the extraction of a complete equivalent circuit via a dedicated PEEC method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    EMC analysis of static converters by the extraction of a complete equivalent circuit via. By coupling these two methods, an equivalent circuit with lumped elements is obtained. Consequently, EMC capacitance effects, is rapidly limited to analyze the EM interactions between subsystems or to draw up EMC

  11. Equivalent CPT Method for Calculating Shallow Foundation Settlements in the Piedmont Residual Soils Based on the DMT Constrained Modulus Approach.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayne, Paul W.

    Equivalent CPT Method for Calculating Shallow Foundation Settlements in the Piedmont Residual Soils the Piedmont physiographic province, an equivalent method has been developed for the CPT to obtain constrained to the measured cone tip resistance (qc), particularly in fine sandy soils (e.g., M' = 2 qc). This too utililized

  12. Perfect Computational Equivalence between Quantum Turing Machines and Finitely Generated Uniform Quantum Circuit Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harumichi Nishimura; Masanao Ozawa

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to establish the computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines (QTMs) and quantum circuit families (QCFs) using Yao's quantum circuit simulation of QTMs, we previously introduced the class of uniform QCFs based on an infinite set of elementary gates, which has been shown to be computationally equivalent to the polynomial-time QTMs (with appropriate restriction of amplitudes) up to bounded error simulation. This result implies that the complexity class BQP introduced by Bernstein and Vazirani for QTMs equals its counterpart for uniform QCFs. However, the complexity classes ZQP and EQP for QTMs do not appear to equal their counterparts for uniform QCFs. In this paper, we introduce a subclass of uniform QCFs, the finitely generated uniform QCFs, based on finite number of elementary gates and show that the class of finitely generated uniform QCFs is perfectly equivalent to the class of polynomial-time QTMs; they can exactly simulate each other. This naturally implies that BQP as well as ZQP and EQP equal the corresponding complexity classes of the finitely generated uniform QCFs.

  13. Solar system and equivalence principle constraints on f(R) gravity by chameleon approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Capozziello; Shinji Tsujikawa

    2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study constraints on f(R) dark energy models from solar system experiments combined with experiments on the violation of equivalence principle. When the mass of an equivalent scalar field degree of freedom is heavy in a region with high density, a spherically symmetric body has a thin-shell so that an effective coupling of the fifth force is suppressed through a chameleon mechanism. We place experimental bounds on the cosmologically viable models recently proposed in literature which have an asymptotic form f(R)=R-lambda R_c [1-(R_c/R)^{2n}] in the regime R >> R_c. From the solar-system constraints on the post-Newtonian parameter gamma, we derive the bound n>0.5, whereas the constraints from the violations of weak and strong equivalence principles give the bound n>0.9. This allows a possibility to find the deviation from the LambdaCDM cosmological model. For the model f(R)=R-lambda R_c(R/R_c)^p with 0

  14. Quantum Tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle with the STE-QUEST Space Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brett Altschul; Quentin G. Bailey; Luc Blanchet; Kai Bongs; Philippe Bouyer; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Salvatore Capozziello; Naceur Gaaloul; Domenico Giulini; Jonas Hartwig; Luciano Iess; Philippe Jetzer; Arnaud Landragin; Ernst Rasel; Serge Reynaud; Stephan Schiller; Christian Schubert; Fiodor Sorrentino; Uwe Sterr; Jay D. Tasson; Guglielmo M. Tino; Philip Tuckey; Peter Wolf

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in detail the scientific objectives in fundamental physics of the Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Space Test (STE-QUEST) space mission. STE-QUEST was pre-selected by the European Space Agency together with four other missions for the cosmic vision M3 launch opportunity planned around 2024. It carries out tests of different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle using atomic clocks, matter wave interferometry and long distance time/frequency links, providing fascinating science at the interface between quantum mechanics and gravitation that cannot be achieved, at that level of precision, in ground experiments. We especially emphasize the specific strong interest of performing equivalence principle tests in the quantum regime, i.e. using quantum atomic wave interferometry. Although STE-QUEST was finally not selected in early 2014 because of budgetary and technological reasons, its science case was very highly rated. Our aim is to expose that science to a large audience in order to allow future projects and proposals to take advantage of the STE-QUEST experience.

  15. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  16. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkolaiko, G., E-mail: berko@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3368 (United States); Kuipers, J., E-mail: Jack.Kuipers@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Institut f黵 Theoretische Physik, Universit鋞 Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  17. Universality in Similarity Renormalization Group Evolved Potential Matrix Elements and T-Matrix Equivalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dainton; R. J. Furnstahl; R. J. Perry

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine how the universality of two-nucleon interactions evolved using similarity renormalization group (SRG) transformations correlates with T-matrix equivalence, with the ultimate goal of gaining insight into universality for three-nucleon forces. With sufficient running of the SRG flow equations, the low-energy matrix elements of different realistic potentials evolve to a universal form. Because these potentials are fit to low-energy data, they are (approximately) phase equivalent only up to a certain energy, and we find universality in evolved potentials up to the corresponding momentum. More generally we find universality in local energy regions, reflecting a local decoupling by the SRG. The further requirements for universality in evolved potential matrix elements are explored using two simple alternative potentials. We see evidence that in addition to predicting the same observables, common long-range potentials (i.e., explicit pion physics) is required for universality in the potential matrix elements after SRG flow. In agreement with observations made previously for Vlowk evolution, regions of universal potential matrix elements are restricted to where half-on-shell T-matrix equivalence holds.

  18. Formulating a simplified equivalent representation of distribution circuits for PV impact studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Broderick, Robert Joseph; Grijalva, Santiago [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing number of Distributed Generation (DG) being connected on the distribution system, a method for simplifying the complexity of the distribution system to an equivalent representation of the feeder is advantageous for streamlining the interconnection study process. The general characteristics of the system can be retained while reducing the modeling effort required. This report presents a method of simplifying feeders to only specified buses-of-interest. These buses-of-interest can be potential PV interconnection locations or buses where engineers want to verify a certain power quality. The equations and methodology are presented with mathematical proofs of the equivalence of the circuit reduction method. An example 15-bus feeder is shown with the parameters and intermediate example reduction steps to simplify the circuit to 4 buses. The reduced feeder is simulated using PowerWorld Simulator to validate that those buses operate with the same characteristics as the original circuit. Validation of the method is also performed for snapshot and time-series simulations with variable load and solar energy output data to validate the equivalent performance of the reduced circuit with the interconnection of PV.

  19. ammonium carbonates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

  20. a537 carbon steel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

  1. americium carbonates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

  2. affecting carbon tetrachloride: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

  3. Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoefer, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Hollow Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . 4.3.2.1 IncreasingThe electrochemistry of carbon nanotubes. Journal of Thethe sidewalls of carbon nanotubes. Journal of the American

  4. A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on carbon nanotubes Xing Chen *|| , Andras Kis 唡| ,that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. Astrength (2, 3), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are ideal nanoscale

  5. Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through single carbon nanotubes G. Chai Apollo Technologies,aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTsuse of fiber coated carbon nanotubes makes the handling of

  6. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Matthew Werden

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exciton binding energies in carbon nanotubes from two-photonExciton binding energies in carbon nanotubes from two-photonoptical transition energies of carbon nanotubes: the role of

  7. Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National REDD+ Carbon Accounting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Participatory Carbon...

  8. Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoversten, Shanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. , 2005, IPCC: Carbon Capture and Storage: Technical05CH11231. INTRODUCTION Carbon capture and storage (CCS)Development Mechanism CCS: Carbon Capture and Storage C02e:

  9. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of American爃ouseholdcarbon爁ootprint. 敔Ecological燼nd limitations)爋fcarbon爁ootprint爀stimates爐oward爋f爐he燼rt爄ncarbon爁ootprint燼nalyses爁or燙alifornia,

  10. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On carbon footprints and growing energy use Curtis M.reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organizationhis own organization's carbon footprint and answers this

  11. Carbon Nanotubes: Bearing Stress Like Never Before

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limaye, Aditya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hart, A.J. (2013). Carbon Nanotubes: Present and Futureproduction of carbon nanotubes, and can be used to producesynthesized properly, and carbon nanotubes are no exception.

  12. Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoefer, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters. Fullerenes, Nanotubes and Carbon Nanostructures,in Hollow Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . 4.3.2.1 Increasingmigration in graphite and carbon nanotubes. Chemical Physics

  13. Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nanoelectromechanical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleman, Benjamin Jose

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Nanotubes on the2.4 Static Deformation of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . .3.2 Field Emission from Carbon Nanotubes: Electrostatics

  14. Defects and Disorder in Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Philip G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perebeinos, V. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 423. Bachilo, S.M. & Mceuen, P. L. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 Biro, L. P. ,sectional structure of carbon nanotubes. Fullerenes '96.

  15. Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transport through single carbon nanotubes G. Chai Apolloaligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTsuse of fiber coated carbon nanotubes makes the handling of

  16. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    past two decades. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) -- also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration -- is a process that captures carbon dioxide...

  17. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    around Surface-Attached Carbon Nanotubes. Ind. Eng. Chem.the flexural rigidity of carbon nanotube ensembles. AppliedNanotechnology in Carbon Materials. Acta Metallurgica, 1997.

  18. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

  19. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)] [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson朆raun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger M黮ler counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber ?-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup 畗 phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (1.6) min and 15.3 (4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam delivery is suggested.

  20. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  1. Carbon-particle generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  2. Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

    1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

  3. Development of carbon-carbon composites from solvent extracted pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several methods used to fabricate carbon-carbon composites. One used extensively in the fabrication of aerospace components such as rocket nozzles and reentry vehicle nosetips, as well as commercial components for furnace fixturing and glass manufacturing, is the densification of a woven preform with molten pitch, and the subsequent conversion of the pitch to graphite through heat treatment. Two types of pitch are used in this process; coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch. The objective of this program was to determine if a pitch produced by the direct extraction of coal could be used as a substitute for these pitches in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. The program involved comparing solvent extracted pitch with currently accepted pitches and rigidizing a carbon-carbon preform with solvent extracted pitch for comparison with carbon-carbon fabricated with currently available pitch.

  4. SoftTemplated Mesoporous CarbonCarbon Nanotube Composites for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoporous Carbon-Carbon Nanotube Composites for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries Dr. B. K. Guo, Dr. X. Q. Wang, Dr. P. F. Fulvio , Dr. S. M. Mahurin, Dr. X.-G. Sun,...

  5. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  6. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Structural response of oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Timothy Harold

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: zden O. Ochoa (Chair of Committee) Tho . o k (Member) Paul . Roschke (Member) J. A. Caton (Head of Department) December l996 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT... Structural Response of Oxidation Resistant Carbon-carbon Composites. (December 1996) Timothy Harold Ashley, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ozden O. Ochoa Since carbon-carbon composites maintain their strength at high...

  8. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to bond with composite matrix material. It is important that a carbon fiber manufacturing cost model manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able associated with both the manufacture of carbon fibers themselves as well as their composites. Traditional

  9. ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

  10. Carbon nanotubes: synthesis and functionalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions were then used as the basis of several comparative CVD experiments showing that the quality of nanotubes and the yield of carbon depended on the availability of carbon to react. The availability could be controlled by the varying concentration...

  11. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion species at various energies...

  12. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  13. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  14. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  15. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    .5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

  17. Carbon-Fuelled Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether due to changes in policy or consumption of available fossil fuels, alternative sources of energy will be required, especially given the rising global energy demand. However, one of the main factors limiting the widespread utilization of renewable energy, such as wind, solar, wave or geothermal, is our ability to store energy. Storage of energy from carbon-neutral sources, such as electricity from solar or wind, can be accomplished through many routes. One approach is to store energy in the form of chemical bonds, as fuels. The conversion of low-energy compounds, such as water and carbon dioxide, to higher energy molecules, such as hydrogen or carbon-based fuels, enables the storage of carbon-neutral energy on a very large scale. The author箂 work in this area is supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  18. Carbon smackdown: smart windows

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Delia Milliron

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 3, 2010 Berkeley Lab talk: In the fourth of five Carbon Smackdown matches, Berkeley Lab researchers Delia Milliron of the Materials Sciences Division and Stephen Selkowitz of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division talk about their work on energy-saving smart windows.

  19. 14 April 2001 tmospheric carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    emissions is through increased carbon sequestration into forests. In a large-scale assessment, Birdsey- ing carbon sequestration in southern forests. Carbon sequestration via southern pine forests may policy commitments. Keywords: carbon sequestration; southern pine forests ABSTRACT MEETING GLOBAL POLICY

  20. 1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    BGD 1, 167颅193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167颅193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

  1. Carbon Nanotubes for Data Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joselevich, Ernesto

    Carbon Nanotubes for Data Processing Joerg Appenzeller, T. J. Watson Research Center, IBM Research.2 Electronic Structure of Graphene 4 2.3 Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes 4 2.4 Transport Properties 6 2.5 Contacts 9 3 Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes 10 3.1 Synthetic Methods 10 3.2 Growth Mechanisms 12

  2. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  3. CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION L.C. Castro, D.L. John, and D.L. Pulfrey Department A simple, non-equilibrium model is used to evaluate the likely DC performance of carbon nanotube field and transcon- ductance close to the low-quantum-capacitance limit. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, field

  4. 4, 99123, 2007 Amazon carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , suggested much larger estimates for tropical forest carbon sequestration in the Ama- zon BasinBGD 4, 99123, 2007 Amazon carbon balanc J. Lloyd et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences An airborne regional carbon balance

  5. Criticality Safety Analysis on the Mixed Be, Nat-U, and C (Graphite) Reflectors in 55-Gallon Waste Drums and Their Equivalents for HWM Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this analysis is to develop and establish the technical basis on the criticality safety controls for the storage of mixed beryllium (Be), natural uranium (Nat-U), and carbon (C)/graphite reflectors in 55-gallon waste containers and/or their equivalents in Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on the criticality safety limits and controls outlined in Section 3.0, the operations involving the use of mixed-reflector drums satisfy the double-contingency principle as required by DOE Order 420.1 and are therefore criticality safe. The mixed-reflector mass limit is 120 grams for each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent. a reflector waiver of 50 grams is allowed for Be, Nat-U, or C/graphite combined. The waived reflectors may be excluded from the reflector mass calculations when determining if a drum is compliant. The mixed-reflector drums are allowed to mix with the typical 55-gallon one-reflector drums with a Pu mass limit of 120 grams. The fissile mass limit for the mixed-reflector container is 65 grams of Pu equivalent each. The corresponding reflector mass limits are 300 grams of Be, and/or 100 kilograms of Nat-U, and/or 110 kilograms of C/graphite for each container. All other unaffected control parameters for the one-reflector containers remain in effect for the mixed-reflector drums. For instance, Superior moderators, such as TrimSol, Superla white mineral oil No. 9, paraffin, and polyethylene, are allowed in unlimited quantities. Hydrogenous materials with a hydrogen density greater than 0.133 gram/cc are not allowed. Also, an isolation separation of no less than 76.2 cm (30-inch) is required between a mixed array and any other array. Waste containers in the action of being transported are exempted from this 76.2-cm (30-inch) separation requirement. All deviations from the CS controls and mass limits listed in Section 3.0 will require individual criticality safety analyses on a case-by-case basis for each of them to confirm their criticality safety prior to their deployment and implementation.

  6. Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development National Renewable Energy Laboratory logo The National...

  7. Multi-wavelength surface emitting quantum cascade laser based on equivalent phase shift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J. C., E-mail: zhangjinchuan@semi.ac.cn; Liu, F. Q., E-mail: fqliu@semi.ac.cn; Yao, D. Y.; Wang, L. J.; Yan, F. L.; Liu, J. Q.; Wang, Z. G. [Institute of Semiconductors, Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083, People抯 Republic of China and Beijing Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around ????4.6??m is demonstrated by employing an equivalent phase shift (EPS) of quarter-wave (?/4). The EPS is fabricated through extending one sampling period by 50% in the center of a sampled Bragg grating. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern with a low divergence angle of about 0.6??16.8 is obtained. Selective single-mode lasing with a mean side mode suppression ratio above 20?dB and wavelength coverage range of 72?nm is achieved simultaneously on a single wafer only by changing the sampling period.

  8. Calculation of extremity neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood-Zika, Annmarie Ruth

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Figure 4. Comparison of NCRP 38 and Siebert and Schuhmacher quality factors. Table 2. PNNL dose equivalent averaged quality factors (Q). * Phantom Finger Wrist 30 cm ICRU sphere Composition PMMA PMMA Tissue-and-bone Tissue-and-bone PMMA PMMA... Tissue-and-bone Tissue-and-bone PM MA PMMA (???) 'Adapted from reference 53. Source Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf 9. 2 9. 7 9. 2 9. 7 9. 4 9. 7 9. 4 9. 7 10...

  9. Casimir Friction in Terms of Moving Harmonic Oscillators: Equivalence Between Two Different Formulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan S. H鴜e; Iver Brevik

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir friction problem can be dealt with in a simplified way by considering two harmonic oscillators moving with constant relative velocity. Recently we calculated the energy dissipation for such a case, [EPL {\\bf 91}, 60003 (2010); Europ. Phys. J. D {\\bf 61}, 335 (2011)]. A recent study of Barton [New J. Phys. {\\bf 12}, 113044 (2010)] seemingly leads to a different result for the dissipation. If such a discrepancy really were true, it would imply a delicate difficulty for the basic theory of Casimir friction. In the present note we show that the expressions for the dissipation are in fact physically equivalent, at T=0.

  10. Null Result for the Violation of Equivalence Principle with Free-Fall Rotating Gyroscopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, J; Zhang, Y Z; Zhou, Z B

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential acceleration between a rotating mechanical gyroscope and a non-rotating one is directly measured by using a double free-fall interferometer, and no apparent differential acceleration has been observed at the relative level of 2x10{-6}. It means that the equivalence principle is still valid for rotating extended bodies, i.e., the spin-gravity interaction between the extended bodies has not been observed at this level. Also, to the limit of our experimental sensitivity, there is no observed asymmetrical effect or anti-gravity of the rotating gyroscopes as reported by hayasaka et al.

  11. A Lorentz-Poincar type interpretation of the Weak Equivalence Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan; Broekaert

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The validity of the Weak Equivalence Principle relative to a local inertial frame is detailed in a scalar-vector gravitation model with Lorentz-Poincar\\'e type interpretation. Given the previously established first Post-Newtonian concordance of dynamics with General Relativity, the principle is to this order compatible with GRT. The gravitationally modified Lorentz transformations, on which the observations in physical coordinates depend, are shown to provide a physical interpretation of \\emph{parallel transport}. A development of ``geodesic'' deviation in terms of the present model is given as well.

  12. Noise Equivalent Counts Based Emission Image Reconstruction Algorithm of Tomographic Gamma Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Wang; Zheng Li; Wei Feng; Dong Han

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) is a technique used to assay the nuclide distribution and radioactivity in nuclear waste drums. Both transmission and emission scans are performed in TGS and the transmission image is used for the attenuation correction in emission reconstructions. The error of the transmission image, which is not considered by the existing reconstruction algorithms, negatively affects the final results. An emission reconstruction method based on Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC) is presented. Noises from the attenuation image are concentrated to the projection data to apply the NEC Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization algorithm. Experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. All maps equivalent to a given map, completely positive or not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Cheng Ou; Mark S. Byrd

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical map is a map which takes one density operator to another. Such a map can be written in an operator-sum representation (OSR) using a spectral decomposition. The method of the construction applies to more general maps which need not be completely positive. The OSR not unique; there is a freedom to choose the set of operators in the OSR differently, yet still obtain the same map. Here we identify all maps which are equivalent to a given map. Whereas the freedom for completely positive maps is unitary, the freedom for maps which are not necessarily completely positive is pseudo-unitary.

  14. XRD, lead equivalent and UV-VIS properties study of Ce and Pr lead silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alias, Nor Hayati, E-mail: norhayati@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abdullah, Wan Shafie Wan, E-mail: norhayati@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Isa, Norriza Mohd, E-mail: norhayati@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Isa, Muhammad Jamal Md, E-mail: norhayati@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Abdullah, Nuhaslinda Ee [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Muhammad, Azali [Malaysian Society for Non-Destructive Testing (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, Cerium (Ce) and Praseodymium (Pr) containing lead silicate glasses were produced with 2 different molar ratios low (0.2 wt%) and high (0.4wt%). These types of glasses can satisfy the characteristics required for radiation shielding glasses and minimize the lead composition in glass. The radiation shielding properties of the synthesized glasses is explained in the form of lead equivalent study. The XRD diffraction and UV-VIS analysis were performed to observe the structural changes of the synthesis glasses at 1.5 Gy gamma radiation exposures.

  15. Development of an optimal anisotropic responding (OAR) dosimeter for two-dosimeter dosimetry for better estimation of effective dose equivalent (He) and the impact of dosimeter misposition on estimating effective dose equivalent using isotropic dosimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Hsiang-Jung

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A single dosimeter is commonly worn on a radiation worker's chest to monitor radiation exposure. However, when a radiation worker is exposed to a posterior photon beam, effective dose equivalent (HE) can be severely underestimated using a single...

  16. *** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    *** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are Manufactured *** How Carbon Fiber Material Properties are Achieved *** Carbon Fiber Markets/Applications CarbonFiber AerospaceEngineeringGuestLecture: Friday as a Business Development Manager for Amoco's carbon fiber business unit (manufacturers of T-300 carbon fiber

  17. 6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    ACPD 6, 3419颅3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs麓er Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419颅3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs麓er Title Page

  18. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

  19. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  1. Full-wave analysis of superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates using equivalent surface impedance approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, L.H.; Lyons, W.G.; Orlando, T.P.; Ali, S.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Lyons, W.G. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.); Withers, R.S. (Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computationally efficient full-wave technique is developed to analyze single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates. The optic axis of the dielectric is in the plane of the substrate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the propagation direction. A dyadic Green's function for layered, anisotropic media is used to formulate an integral equation for the current in the strips. To increase the efficiency of the method, the superconducting strips are replaced by equivalent surface impedances which account for the loss and kinetic inductance of the superconductors. The validity of this equivalent surface impedance (ESI) approach is verified by comparing the calculated complex propagation constant and characteristic impedance for superconducting microstrip lines on an isotropic substrate to measured results, and to numerical results by the more rigorous volume-integral equation method. The results calculated using the ESI approach for perfectly conducting coupled lines on an anisotropic substrate agree with the results by the finite-difference time-domain method. This efficient ESI technique is then used to study the effects of the optic axis orientation and the strip width on the characteristics of single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on M-plane sapphire. The effects of the line separation and operating temperature on the coupled lines are also investigated.

  2. Euler-Bernoulli beams from a symmetry standpoint-characterization of equivalent equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, C Wafo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We completely solve the equivalence problem for Euler-Bernoulli equation using Lie symmetry analysis. We show that the quotient of the symmetry Lie algebra of the Bernoulli equation by the infinite-dimensional Lie algebra spanned by solution symmetries is a representation of one of the following Lie algebras: $2A_1$, $A_1\\oplus A_2$, $3A_1$, or $A_{3,3}\\oplus A_1$. Each quotient symmetry Lie algebra determines an equivalence class of Euler-Bernoulli equations. Save for the generic case corresponding to arbitrary lineal mass density and flexural rigidity, we characterize the elements of each class by giving a determined set of differential equations satisfied by physical parameters (lineal mass density and flexural rigidity). For each class, we provide a simple representative and we explicitly construct transformations that maps a class member to its representative. The maximally symmetric class described by the four-dimensional quotient symmetry Lie algebra $A_{3,3}\\oplus A_1$ corresponds to Euler-Bernoulli e...

  3. The improvement of the method of equivalent cross section in HTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.; Li, F. [Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Method of Equivalence Cross-Sections (MECS) is a combined transport-diffusion method. By appropriately adjusting the diffusion coefficient of homogenized absorber region, the diffusion theory could yield satisfactory results for the full core model with strong neutron absorber material, for example the control rod in High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR). Original implementation of MECS based on 1-D cell transport model has some limitation on accuracy and applicability, a new implementation of MECS based on 2-D transport model are proposed and tested in this paper. This improvement can extend the MECS to the calculation of twin small absorber ball system which have a non-circular boring in graphite reflector and different radial position. A least-square algorithm for the calculation of equivalent diffusion coefficient is adopted, and special treatment for diffusion coefficient for higher energy group is proposed in the case that absorber is absent. Numerical results to adopt MECS into control rod calculation in HTR are encouraging. However, there are some problems left. (authors)

  4. Does the Equivalence between Gravitational Mass and Energy Survive for a Composite Quantum Body?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei G. Lebed

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We define passive and active gravitational mass operators of the simplest composite quantum body - a hydrogen atom. Although they do not commute with its energy operator, the equivalence between the expectation values of passive and active gravitational masses and energy is shown to survive for stationary quantum states. In our calculations of passive gravitational mass operator, we take into account not only kinetic and Coulomb potential energies but also the so-called relativistic corrections to electron motion in a hydrogen atom. Inequivalence between passive and active gravitational masses and energy at a macroscopic level is demonstrated to reveal itself as time dependent oscillations of the expectation values of the gravitational masses for superpositions of stationary quantum states. Breakdown of the equivalence between passive gravitational mass and energy at a microscopic level reveals itself as unusual electromagnetic radiation, emitted by macroscopic ensemble of hydrogen atoms, moved by small spacecraft with constant velocity in the Earth's gravitational field. We suggest the corresponding experiment on the Earth's orbit to detect this radiation, which would be the first direct experiment where quantum effects in general relativity are observed.

  5. Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoefer, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESR is the equivalent series resistance and is calculatedESR is the equivalent series resistance and is calculatedequivalent circuit of the electrochemical system under inves- tigation. R s is the solution resistance,

  6. EB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    , the Carbon-Carbon composites (C/C) are materials frequently used in industrial applications such as planeEB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITE UNDER TRIBOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS 1, homogenization, carbon ABSTRACT Thermo mechanical properties of Carbon-Carbon composite (C/C) allow them

  7. Electrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 39653975 Elucidating differences between carbon paper and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of them are carbon-fiber-based porous materials: carbon paper is non-woven, while carbon cloth is wovenElectrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 3965颅3975 Elucidating differences between carbon paper and carbon the performance differences between carbon paper (CP) and carbon cloth (CC). Three-dimensional simulations, based

  8. Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle. Carbon is one is without carbon. Where else is carbon on our Earth? In rocks, living organisms, the atmosphere, oceans Does carbon stay in one place? What processes include moving carbon? Introduce residence time: How long does

  9. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  10. Equivalent circuit analysis applied to the investigation of the driving point impedance of a chemical high frequency analytical instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dausin, Lawrence Raymond

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A 4 N COLLESE OF TEXAS EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT ANALZSIS APPLIED TO THE ZNVESTIQATION OF THE DRZVINQ POZNT IMPEDANCE OF A CHEMICAL HIQH FREQUENCE AN ALTTZC AL INSTRUMENT A Thesis Laurence Raymond Dausin Subnitted to the Qraduate Sohool... of the Agrioultural and Hechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of RASTER OF SCIENCE January 1958 Na J or Sub J eat I Electrioa1 Engineering EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT ANALTSIS APPLIH) TO THE INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIVING...

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  12. Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11thFive-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious targetfor energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country sgross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20 percent from 2005 to2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and bindingtarget has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift inChina's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energydevelopment. The 20 percent energy intensity target also translates intoan annual reduction of over one billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making theChinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in theworld today. While it is still too early to tell whether China willachieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend inenergy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options towardmeeting the 20 percent target using a detailed endues energymodel.

  13. Carbon taxes and India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

  14. Processing gravity gradiometer data using an equivalent source technique Gravity and Magnetics Research Consortium, Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Processing gravity gradiometer data using an equivalent source technique Yaoguo Li Gravity The inherent relationship among the different components of gravity gradiometer data requires filtering operation on the constructed equivalent source. Introduction Gravity gradiometer data measure

  15. Natural CO2 Analogs for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott H. Stevens; B. Scott Tye

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes research conducted at three naturally occurring geologic CO{sub 2} fields in the US. The fields are natural analogs useful for the design of engineered long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in geologic formations. Geologic, engineering, and operational databases were developed for McElmo Dome in Colorado; St. Johns Dome in Arizona and New Mexico; and Jackson Dome in Mississippi. The three study sites stored a total of 2.4 billion t (46 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} equivalent to 1.5 years of power plant emissions in the US and comparable in size with the largest proposed sequestration projects. The three CO{sub 2} fields offer a scientifically useful range of contrasting geologic settings (carbonate vs. sandstone reservoir; supercritical vs. free gas state; normally pressured vs. overpressured), as well as different stages of commercial development (mostly undeveloped to mature). The current study relied mainly on existing data provided by the CO{sub 2} field operator partners, augmented with new geochemical data. Additional study at these unique natural CO{sub 2} accumulations could further help guide the development of safe and cost-effective design and operation methods for engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites.

  16. Black Carbon抯 Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOAA/ESRL. Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Annual Mean Data.H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalanalysis of black carbon in soils. Global Biogeochem. Cycle.

  17. Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B v + B d ) C T = Total carbon B v = biomass contained indevelopment through carbon sequestration: experiences in2000) Rural livelihoods and carbon management, IIED Natural

  18. Return to 1990: The cost of mitigating United States carbon emissions in the post-2000 period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; MacCracken, C.N.; Sands, R.D.; Wise, M.A.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Second Generation Model (SGM) is employed to examine four hypothetical agreements to reduce emissions in Annex 1 nations (OECD nations plus most of the nations of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) to levels in the neighborhood of those which existed in 1990, with obligations taking effect in the year 2010. The authors estimate the cost to the US of complying with such agreements under three distinct conditions: no trading of emissions rights, trading of emissions rights only among Annex 1 nations, and a fully global trading regime. The authors find that the marginal cost of returning to 1990 emissions levels in the US in the absence of trading opportunities is approximately $108 per metric ton carbon in 2010. The total cost in that year is approximately 0.2% of GDP. International trade in emissions permits lowers the cost of achieving any mitigation objective by equalizing the marginal cost of carbon mitigation among countries. For the four mitigation scenarios in this study, economic costs to the US remain below 1% of GDP through at least the year 2020.

  19. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Sensitivity of injection costs to input petrophysical parameters in numerical geologic carbon sequestration models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C. L.; Gragg, M. J.; Perfect, E.; White, Mark D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; McKay, L. D.

    2013-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations are widely used in feasibility studies for geologic carbon sequestration. Accurate estimates of petrophysical parameters are needed as inputs for these simulations. However, relatively few experimental values are available for CO2-brine systems. Hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the STOMP numerical code for supercritical CO2 injected into a model confined deep saline aquifer. The intrinsic permeability, porosity, pore compressibility, and capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters (residual liquid saturation, residual gas saturation, and van Genuchten alpha and m values) were varied independently. Their influence on CO2 injection rates and costs were determined and the parameters were ranked based on normalized coefficients of variation. The simulations resulted in differences of up to tens of millions of dollars over the life of the project (i.e., the time taken to inject 10.8 million metric tons of CO2). The two most influential parameters were the intrinsic permeability and the van Genuchten m value. Two other parameters, the residual gas saturation and the residual liquid saturation, ranked above the porosity. These results highlight the need for accurate estimates of capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters for geologic carbon sequestration simulations in addition to measurements of porosity and intrinsic permeability.