Sample records for ton year bituminous

  1. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  2. 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

  3. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  4. Our 6-year-old plantation in Escanaba is growing 3.6 dry tons per acre each year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hybrids, aspen, and European larch in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. USDA: A guide to insect, disease The paper and oriented-strand board industries in Michigan consume a large quantity of aspen fiber each year. Prices for aspen pulpwood have hit record highs in recent years as a result of increased demand

  5. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the bituminous coal resources of the United States, identifies those resources which are potentially amenable to Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), identifies products and markets in the vicinity of selected target areas, identifies UCG concepts, describes the state of the art of UCG in bituminous coal, and presents three R and D programs for development of the technology to the point of commercial viability. Of the 670 billion tons of bituminous coal remaining in-place as identified by the National Coal Data System, 32.2 billion tons or 4.8% of the total are potentially amenable to UCG technology. The identified amenable resource was located in ten states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. The principal criteria which eliminated 87.3% of the resource was the minimum thickness (42 inches). Three R and D programs were developed using three different concepts at two different sites. Open Borehole, Hydraulic Fracture, and Electrolinking concepts were developed. The total program costs for each concept were not significantly different. The study concludes that much of the historical information based on UCG in bituminous coals is not usable due to the poor siting of the early field tests and a lack of adequate diagnostic equipment. This information gap requires that much of the early work be redone in view of the much improved understanding of the role of geology and hydrology in the process and the recent development of analytical tools and methods.

  6. Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Swedish National Energy Administration ton coal equivalenttCO 2 ) Energy Electricity * bituminous coal Costs areare needed, such as energy price reform (coal, electricity,

  7. Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das Department of Civil Engineering IIT Kanpur Introduction The bituminous pavement rehabilitation alternatives are mainly overlaying, recycling and reconstruction. In the recycling process the material from deteriorated pavement, known as reclaimed asphalt

  8. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: catalog of bituminous coals and site selection. Appendix A. National coal resource data system: Ecoal, Wcoal, and Bmalyt. Final report, Phase I. [Bituminous coal; by state; coal seam depth and thickness; identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Appendix A is a catalog of the bituminous coal in 29 states of the contiguous United States which contain identified bituminous coal resources.

  9. Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Joseph Anthony

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for use of the material in a bituminous base. Preliminary investigation on the optimum mix design included Hveem stability, Marshall stability and Durability tests, A test section consisting of the experimental hot-mixed pavement, littercrete, and a... for flexural fatigue tests, Hveem and Marshall stabilities, thermal expansion, direct tension, splitting tensile and Schmidt tests. Four in. (10. 2 cm. ) diameter cores were taken after compaction (before traffic) and after six months in service. Samples...

  10. Updated Costs (June 2011 Basis) for Selected Bituminous Baseline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date:2011-Oct-17 Project: Bituminous Baseline Study Case: Case 1 GEE Radiant IGCC wo CO2 Plant Size: 622.1 MW,net Estimate Type: Conceptual Cost Base (Jun) 2011 (x1000) Acct...

  11. Evaluation of an alternative bituminous material as a soil stabilizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Rak

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics as an alternative bituminous soil stabilizer in terms of replacing the cutback asphalts because the PRB material has been proved an environmentally safe material. Based on various laboratory tests, including an unconfined compressive strength test...

  12. Investigation of plasma-aided bituminous coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of plasma-aided bituminous coal gasification. Distributions of concentrations, temperatures, and velocities of the gasification products along the gasifier are calculated. Carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and heat engineering characteristics of synthesis gas at the outlet of the gasifier are determined at plasma air/steam and oxygen/steam gasification of Powder River Basin bituminous coal. Numerical simulation showed that the plasma oxygen/steam gasification of coal is a more preferable process in comparison with the plasma air/steam coal gasification. On the numerical experiments, a plasma vortex fuel reformer is designed.

  13. Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

  14. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  15. Investigation of the combustion characteristics of Zonguldak bituminous coal using DTA and DTG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Okutan, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion characteristics of coking, semicoking, and noncoking Turkish bituminous coal samples from Zonguldak basin were investigated applying differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG) techniques. Results were compared with that of the coke from Zonguldak bituminous coal, a Turkish lignite sample from Soma, and a Siberian bituminous coal sample. The thermal data from both techniques showed some differences depending on the proximate analyses of the samples. Noncombustible components of the volatile matter led to important changes in thermal behavior. The data front both methods were, evaluated jointly, and some thermal properties were interpreted considering these methods in a complementary combination.

  16. INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicate that coal-derived asphaltenes exhibit an acid-baseanyone functional group is asphaltenes is amphoteric. Theseto oil, and 31.6% to asphaltenes) of a bituminous coal when

  17. Physical and mechanical properties of bituminous mixtures containing oil shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katamine, N.M.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rutting of bituminous surfaces on the Jordanian highways is a recurring problem. Highway authorities are exploring the use of extracted shale oil and oil shale fillers, which are abundant in Jordan. The main objectives of this research are to investigate the rheological properties of shale oil binders (conventional binder with various percentages of shale oil), in comparison with a conventional binder, and to investigate the ability of mixes to resist deformation. The latter is done by considering three wearing course mixes containing three different samples of oil shale fillers--which contained three different oil percentages--together with a standard mixture containing limestone filler. The Marshall design method and the immersion wheel tracking machine were adopted. It was concluded that the shale oil binders displayed inconsistent physical properties and therefore should be treated before being used. The oil shale fillers have provided mixes with higher ability to resist deformation than the standard mix, as measured by the Marshall quotients and the wheel tracking machine. The higher the percentages of oil in the oil shale fillers, the lower the ability of the mixes to resist deformation.

  18. Surface Properties of Photo-Oxidized Bituminous Coals: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural weathering has a detrimental effect on the hydrophobic nature of coal, which in turn can influence clean-coal recovery during flotation. Few techniques are available that can establish the quality of coal surfaces and that have a short analysis time to provide input for process control. Luminescence emissions which can be quantified with an optical microscope and photometer system, are measurably influenced by degree of weathering as well as by mild storage deterioration. In addition, it has been shown that when vitrinite is irradiated with a relatively high intensity flux of violet- or ultraviolet- light in the presence of air, photo-oxidation of the surface occurs. The combination of measuring the change in luminescence emission intensity with degree of surface oxidation provided the impetus for the current investigation. The principal aim of this research was to determine whether clear correlations could be established among surface oxygen functionality, hydrophobicity induced by photo-oxidation, and measurements of luminescence intensity and alteration. If successful, the project would result in quantitative luminescence techniques based on optical microscopy that would provide a measure of the changes in surface properties as a function of oxidation and relate them to coal cleanability. Two analytical techniques were designed to achieve these goals. Polished surfaces of vitrain bands or a narrow size fraction of powdered vitrain concentrates were photo-oxidized using violet or ultraviolet light fluxes and then changes in surface properties and chemistry were measured using a variety of near-surface analytical techniques. Results from this investigation demonstrate that quantitative luminescence intensity measurements can be performed on fracture surfaces of bituminous rank coals (vitrains) and that the data obtained do reveal significant variations depending upon the level of surface oxidation. Photo-oxidation induced by violet or ultraviolet light fluxes does result in a progressive and significant increase in the amount of near-surface oxygen concentration at about the same level regardless of bituminous coal rank. These incremental changes in oxygen concentration appear to lower the hydrophobicity as shown by contact angle measurements on polished surfaces. Although this influence diminished as coal rank increased, the level of oxygen uptake was about the same, suggesting that the type of oxygen functionality formed during oxidation may be of great importance in modifying surface hydrophobicity. Changes in functional-group chemistry, measured by a variety of near-surface techniques, showed a general increase in the concentration of carbonyl-containing groups while those of CH{sub 2} groups decreased. All of these observations follow the trends observed in previous investigations of naturally weathered coals. The photo-oxidation technique also resulted in the development of phenolic, ester and anhydride moieties instead of the expected emplacement of carboxylic acid groups which are normally associated with naturally weathered coals. The importance of this observation is that esters and anhydrides would result in a more hydrophobic surface in comparison to the more hydrophilic surface resulting from acid functionality. This observation is consistent with the results of film flotation of UV-irradiated powdered vitrain in which floatability was generally observed to increase with increasing photo- oxidation.

  19. adaptation and use of bituminous materials: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptation and use of bituminous materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1...

  20. Design principles for design of bituminous pavement with stabilized/ cemented layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Design principles for design of bituminous pavement with stabilized/ cemented layer Animesh Das1 Introduction A pavement designer wishes to design a pavement structure which is reliable and cost effective. Various materials have been used for pavement construction so as to economize the design. Depleting

  1. Principles of bituminous pavement design and the recent trends Animesh Das1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Principles of bituminous pavement design and the recent trends Animesh Das1 Introduction Understanding pavement behaviour is a complex task. This complexity is due to the complex response of the individual pavement materials which is very difficult to predict. In a typical pavement a number

  2. 90-Ton Triple Cylinder Jack Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, Al; /Fermilab

    1988-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The three D-Zero cryostats (2 EC and 1 CC) will rest on three carriages which in turn ride on a set of hardened ways in the center beam. A pair of Tychoway rollers will be fitted to each of the four corners of the three carriages to provide the rolling support. In the final design, the two EC cryostats will be able to roll out and away from the CC cryostat in order to provide access to the space between each cryostat for maintenance and repairs. The cryostat will be frequently accessed, about once a month. during a collider run. The heaviest cryostat weighs about 360 tons. The large roller weight in one position for such a long period of time, created a concern about the rollers dimpling the hardened ways or even suffering permanent deformations themselves. There is also the possibility that the vertical position of the cryostat will need to be adjusted to align it with the beam line or that the carriage and cryostat will have to be lifted to remove and service the rollers. A device or system was needed to (1) relieve the weight of the cryostats from the rollers and the hardened ways, and (2) minimally adjust the vertical position of the cryostats, if necessary, and/or service the rollers. Compact hydraulic jacks seemed to be the answer. The first and foremost criteria was capacity. It was desired that the jacks be rated to twice the actual load. A jack is to be placed beside each roller, giving a total of eight per cryostat. The load per jack for a 360 ton cryostat would then be 45 tons, leaving 90 tons as the required capacity. The second and equally important criteria to be met was size. After installation of the Tychoway rollers. room to mount these jacks is very limited underneath the carriage. The space surrounding the bottom of the carriage is cluttered with wiring and plumbing and thus further limits available space for the jacks. What was left was a 3.75-inch x 6.0625-inch x 12.25-inch rectangular envelope on each side of a pair of rollers (see Appendix A).

  3. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbH JumpOne MoliTON

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  11. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2004. Two companies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    80 INDIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium-efficiency photovoltaic devices. A major manufacturer is testing indium for a new application as a heat-management material in computers, which could increase consumption by 40 metric tons per year. The estimated

  12. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

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  18. OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62% Landfill 1080 tons / 38% Electricals 36 Landfill As of Monday 7 March 2011, no general waste generated from the Bloomsbury Campus has been sent to landfill. Through partnership between UCL Estates and Office and General, an agreement has been reached

  19. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign to minimize odor, electroplating, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood

  20. (Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, with an estimated total output of 2,500 tons from domestic and foreign ores and concentrates, and from old and new, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment. Silver was used for miniature antennas

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  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826 YEAR

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 2014

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR424

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  13. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  14. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 2. Gasification of Jetson bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report describes the gasification testing of Jetson bituminous coal. This Western Kentucky coal was gasified during an initial 8-day and subsequent 5-day period. Material flows and compositions are reported along with material and energy balances. Operational experience is also described. 4 refs., 24 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 9. Gasification of Elkhorn bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the ninth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Elkhorn bituminous coal. The period of gasificastion test was September 13 to October 12, 1983. 9 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  16. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 7. Gasification of Piney Tipple bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the seventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Piney Tipple bituminous coal. The period of the gasification test was July 18-24, 1983. 6 refs., 20 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. Applicability of beneficiated sub-bituminous coal in a phase II (AAA), deregulated electrical power market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loreman, M.R.; McCord, T.G.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities have adapted to an operating environment increasingly constrained by emissions requirements, e.g., Phase 1 of the US 1992 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), and by competitive economic conditions triggered in the present early stages of utility deregulation. Low capacity utilization, while not desirable, has been a factor in the ability of utilities to adapt. The method of choice for many Midwestern utilities has been to switch to sub-bituminous coals from the Powder River Basin (PRB) with their low sulfur and low delivered cost. However, the derates that have been experienced by switching to PRB coal in order to adapt to present regulations will become a negative factor as capacity utilization increases. Beneficiation of sub-bituminous coals would provide one option for utilities to eliminate derates and thereby increases capacity utilization, while maintaining low SO{sub 2} emissions. An optimum product can be delivered where just enough upgraded material could be blended with run-of-mine PRB coal at the beneficiation plant/mine facility to allow desired power plant performance at the lowest cost. Two plants, large enough to provide trainload quantities of unblended upgraded product, are in operation. A third plant is under construction. Progress continues in demonstrating the ability to transport and use these materials in utility boilers. This paper reviews the results of full-scale burns of the products from one of these plants, including shipments of both blended and unblended material. Technically, burns have been completed in boiler types including both pulverized-fired and cyclone-fired units. Stable flames are produced with NO{sub x} emissions lower than or comparable to the baseline blend. Opacity results are consistent with those of the source coal used for upgrading. Also considered are the economics of increased capacity utilization using these beneficiated PRB fuels in blends with PRB coal.

  18. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  19. Evaluation of reclaimed rubber in bituminous pavements. Final report, July 1993-April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trepanier, J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 1038 of the 1991 Intermodel Surface Transportation efficiency Act (ISTEA) mandated use of crumb rubber from scrap tires in asphalt pavement starting in FY 94. To gain some experience, the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) constructed five demonstration projects in 1993 and one in 1994. All used the `dry process` to introduce crumb rubber into the mix. With the dry process, crumb rubber is added to the heated aggregate prior to addition of asphalt cement (AC). Three projects used very low addition rates. Each was divided into five equal segments. One segment, the control, used no crumb rubber. The other segments used 1/2, 1, 1 1/2 and 2 pounds of crumb rubber per ton of hot mix. The other three projects each used 20 pounds of crumb rubber per ton of hot mix. Both batch plants and drier-drum plants were used, and the crumb rubber was supplied in pre-measured batch-size packets, 50-pound paper bags and 2000-pound super sacks.

  20. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration Field Officerelocates 18-ton machine

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were closed temporarily, and Issues: In February 2013, the owner of the 270,000-ton-per-year Hannibal, OH, smelter filed for chapter in October. In June, the Sebree, KY, smelter was sold as part of a corporate restructuring. Expansion

  2. Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

  3. Pore size distribution and accessible pore size distribution in bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurovs, Richard [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The porosity and pore size distribution of coals determine many of their properties, from gas release to their behavior on carbonization, and yet most methods of determining pore size distribution can only examine a restricted size range. Even then, only accessible pores can be investigated with these methods. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) are increasingly used to characterize the size distribution of all of the pores non-destructively. Here we have used USANS/SANS to examine 24 well-characterized bituminous and subbituminous coals: three from the eastern US, two from Poland, one from New Zealand and the rest from the Sydney and Bowen Basins in Eastern Australia, and determined the relationships of the scattering intensity corresponding to different pore sizes with other coal properties. The range of pore radii examinable with these techniques is 2.5 nm to 7 {micro}m. We confirm that there is a wide range of pore sizes in coal. The pore size distribution was found to be strongly affected by both rank and type (expressed as either hydrogen or vitrinite content) in the size range 250 nm to 7 {micro}m and 5 to 10 nm, but weakly in intermediate regions. The results suggest that different mechanisms control coal porosity on different scales. Contrast-matching USANS and SANS were also used to determine the size distribution of the fraction of the pores in these coals that are inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, at ambient temperature. In some coals most of the small ({approx} 10 nm) pores were found to be inaccessible to CD{sub 4} on the time scale of the measurement ({approx} 30 min - 16 h). This inaccessibility suggests that in these coals a considerable fraction of inherent methane may be trapped for extended periods of time, thus reducing the effectiveness of methane release from (or sorption by) these coals. Although the number of small pores was less in higher rank coals, the fraction of total pores that was inaccessible was not rank dependent. In the Australian coals, at the 10 nm to 50 nm size scales the pores in inertinites appeared to be completely accessible to CD{sub 4}, whereas the pores in the vitrinite were about 75% inaccessible. Unlike the results for total porosity that showed no regional effects on relationships between porosity and coal properties, clear regional differences in the relationships between fraction of closed porosity and coal properties were found. The 10 to 50 nm-sized pores of inertinites of the US and Polish coals examined appeared less accessible to methane than those of the inertinites of Australian coals. This difference in pore accessibility in inertinites may explain why empirical relationships between fluidity and coking properties developed using Carboniferous coals do not apply to Australian coals.

  4. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  5. Speciation of chromium in feed coals and ash byproducts from Canadian power plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fariborz Goodarzi; Frank E. Huggins [Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants were examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largely as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur bituminous feed coal from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents, chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely, Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+}, but in some cases, it is slightly lessand varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantlyCr{sup 3+}. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium, similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy for speciation determination. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

  7. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2} tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class 2 packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class 1 with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum {sup 235}U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2{1/2}-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class 1 with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class 1 packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 11 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. 9,997,638 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 9, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  9. 9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  10. 9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  11. 9,355,469 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 29, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  12. 9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  13. 10,045,885 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 16, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  14. 10,180,047 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of May 28, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  15. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  16. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

  17. A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Empl, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

  18. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  19. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  20. Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergy Policy Act of 2005 | Department ofCO2 |

  1. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 40% was used in the armor, chemical

  2. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was produced. In 2011, an estimated 66% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 34

  3. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon produced titanium forgings, mill products, and castings. In 1996, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  4. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 35% was used in the chemical process

  5. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon produced titanium forgings, mill products, and castings. In 1997, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  6. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2005, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal was used

  7. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Oregon% of the titanium metal used was in aerospace applications. The remaining 40% was used in armor, chemical processing

  8. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2004, an estimated 60% of the titanium metal was used

  9. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms with operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot to produce forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2001, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal

  10. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2006, an estimated 72% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  11. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was produced. In 2012, an estimated 72% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 28

  12. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada and Utah. Titanium ingot and castings. In 2013, an estimated 73% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  13. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2007, an estimated 76% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  14. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two firms in Nevada and Oregon. Ingot was made by the two sponge producers and by nine other firms in seven States. About 30 companies produced titanium forgings, mill

  15. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2002, an estimated 65% of the titanium metal used

  16. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by four operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2010, an estimated 75% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  17. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. Ingot and castings. In 2008, an estimated 79% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining

  18. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by two operations in Nevada and Utah. Ingot was made forged components, mill products, and castings. In 2003, an estimated 55% of the titanium metal used

  19. TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Titanium sponge metal was produced by three operations in Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. A fourth, an estimated 76% of the titanium metal was used in aerospace applications. The remaining 24% was used in armor

  20. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  1. Investigation of mercury transformation by HBr addition in a slipstream facility with real flue gas atmospheres of bituminous coal and Powder River Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Quanhai Wang; Chien-wei Chen; Bobby Chen; Martin Cohron; Yi-chuan Tseng; Cheng-chung Chiu; Paul Chu; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of speciated mercury transformation with the addition of hydrogen bromide (HBr) at elevated temperatures was conducted in a slipstream reactor with real flue gas atmospheres. Test results indicated that adding HBr into the flue gas at several parts per million strongly impacted the mercury oxidation and adsorption, which were dependent upon temperature ranges. Higher temperatures (in the range of 300-350 C) promoted mercury oxidation by HBr addition but did not promote mercury adsorption. Lower temperatures (in a range of 150-200 C) enhanced mercury adsorption on the fly ash by adding HBr. Test results also verified effects of flue gas atmospheres on the mercury oxidation by the addition of HBr, which included concentrations of chlorine and sulfur in the flue gas. Chlorine species seemed to be involved in the competition with bromine species in the mercury oxidation process. With the addition of HBr at 3 ppm at a temperature of about 330 C, the additional mercury oxidation could be reached by about 55% in a flue gas atmosphere by burning PRB coal in the flue gas and by about 20% in a flue gas by burning bituminous coal. These are both greater than the maximum gaseous HgBr2 percentage in the flue gas (35% for PRB coal and 5% for bituminous coal) by thermodynamic equilibrium analysis predictions under the same conditions. This disagreement may indicate a greater complexity of mercury oxidation mechanisms by the addition of HBr. It is possible that bromine species promote activated chlorine species generation in the flue gas, where the kinetics of elemental mercury oxidation were enhanced. However, SO{sub 2} in the flue gas may involve the consumption of the available activated chlorine species. Thus, the higher mercury oxidation rate by adding bromine under the flue gas by burning PRB coal may be associated with its lower SO{sub 2} concentration in the flue gas. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Mercury emissions during cofiring of sub-bituminous coal and biomass (chicken waste, wood, coffee residue, and tobacco stalk) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Hongcang Zhou; Junjie Fan; Houyin Zhao; Tuo Zhou; Pauline Hack; Chia-Chun Chan; Jian-Chang Liou; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (USA). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four types of biomass (chicken waste, wood pellets, coffee residue, and tobacco stalks) were cofired at 30 wt % with a U.S. sub-bituminous coal (Powder River Basin Coal) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor. A cyclone, followed by a quartz filter, was used for fly ash removal during tests. The temperatures of the cyclone and filter were controlled at 250 and 150{sup o}C, respectively. Mercury speciation and emissions during cofiring were investigated using a semicontinuous mercury monitor, which was certified using ASTM standard Ontario Hydra Method. Test results indicated mercury emissions were strongly correlative to the gaseous chlorine concentrations, but not necessarily correlative to the chlorine contents in cofiring fuels. Mercury emissions could be reduced by 35% during firing of sub-bituminous coal using only a quartz filter. Cofiring high-chlorine fuel, such as chicken waste (Cl = 22340 wppm), could largely reduce mercury emissions by over 80%. When low-chlorine biomass, such as wood pellets (Cl = 132 wppm) and coffee residue (Cl = 134 wppm), is cofired, mercury emissions could only be reduced by about 50%. Cofiring tobacco stalks with higher chlorine content (Cl = 4237 wppm) did not significantly reduce mercury emissions. Gaseous speciated mercury in flue gas after a quartz filter indicated the occurrence of about 50% of total gaseous mercury to be the elemental mercury for cofiring chicken waste, but occurrence of above 90% of the elemental mercury for all other cases. Both the higher content of alkali metal oxides or alkali earth metal oxides in tested biomass and the occurrence of temperatures lower than 650{sup o}C in the upper part of the fluidized bed combustor seemed to be responsible for the reduction of gaseous chlorine and, consequently, limited mercury emissions reduction during cofiring. 36 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

  3. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

  4. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  5. A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor, and Wei-Ngan Chin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobor, Aquinas

    A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor a logical framework for specifying and proving asser- tions about program termination. Although termination. Here we propose to integrate termination requirements directly into our specification logic

  6. The Scale of the Energy Challenge 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons of coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    and rooftops in the United States. The total land area required by nuclear power plants is small! Ă? 20 15The Scale of the Energy Challenge Biomass Wind Nuclear Solar 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons

  7. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agg. Ind.App &T&D Efficinecy Energy Demand Elasticity of GDPAgg. Ind.App &T&D Efficinecy Figure 14 Energy Intensity 4.1energy consumption by sector in three scenarios Historical LBNL BPS Agg. Ind.App Efficinecy

  8. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inland coastal Coal, oil and oil product, crude oil, otherCoal, oil and oil product, crude oil, other Steam, diesel,Internation al Crude oil, oil products, NG, other Gas Fuel

  9. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naphtha Feed Stock Coal Heavy oil NG biomass Electricityheat Ammonia NG Fuel Oil Heavy oil Electric ity heat CoalCoke Electricit y NG Heavy oil Coal Coke Electricity Diesel

  10. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

  11. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Recent Trends in Energy Consumption in China Between 1980trends and policy options for reducing energy consumption orenergy consumption comprises a much larger share which is also expected to be the trend

  12. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump conditionerSmall cogen Stove District heating Heat pump Centralized AC

  13. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. I.. 1996. China's Energy A forecast to 2015, U.S. DOEChina’s energy/GDP elasticity remains at 1 and economic growth unfolds as forecast,

  14. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Pump Centralized AC by NG Electric water heater Gasheater gas boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump conditioner Air conditioning Lighting Cooking and waterWater heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boiler Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pump

  15. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovemberiMid-LevelMoab Marks 6-Million-Ton CleanupAccomplishes

  16. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

  17. Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70-90% Mercury Reduction on an Eastern Bituminous Coal Cyclone Boiler with SCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Campbell

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final site report for testing conducted at Public Service of New Hampshire's (PSNH) Merrimack Unit 2 (MK2). This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase III project with the goal to develop mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. While results from testing at Merrimack indicate that the DOE goal was partially achieved, further improvements in the process are recommended. Merrimack burned a test blend of eastern bituminous and Venezuelan coals, for a target coal sulfur content of 1.2%, in its 335-MW Unit 2. The blend ratio is approximately a 50/50 split between the two coals. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on the flue gas stream either in front of the air preheater (APH) or in between the two in-series ESPs. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that, without SO3 control, the sorbent concentration required to achieve 50% control would not be feasible, either economically or within constraints specific to the maximum reasonable particle loading to the ESP. Subsequently, with SO{sub 3} control via trona injection upstream of the APH, economically feasible mercury removal rates could be achieved with PAC injection, excepting balance-of-plant concerns. The results are summarized along with the impacts of the dual injection process on the air heater, ESP operation, and particulate emissions.

  18. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  19. XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

  20. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  1. LNG to the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, S.T.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2000, about 190 MM metric-tpy of LNG will be moving in world trade, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer By the year 2000, approximately 190 million metric tons per year of LNG will be moving in worldwide trade. Production of LNG will be spread throughout most of the world, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer. LNG will be delivered only to the heavily industrialized areas of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The success of any LNG project will be dependent on its individual economics, market needs, financial planning, and governmental permit processes. We hope industry will be able to put together the LNG projects required to meet the quanitities of production forecast here for the year 2000.

  2. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Characterization of liquids derived from laboratory coking of decant oil and co-coking of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omer Gul; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, decant oil and a blend of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil were subjected to coking and co-coking in a laboratory-scale delayed coker. Higher yields of coke and gas were obtained from co-coking than from coking. Coal addition into the feedstock resulted in lighter overhead liquid. GC/MS analyses of gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel show that co-coking of coal/decant oil gave higher quantity aromatic components than that of coking of decant oil alone. Simulated distillation gas chromatography analyses of overhead liquids and GC/MS analyses of vacuum fractions show that when coal was reacted with a decant oil, the coal constituents contributed to the distillable liquids. To address the reproducibility of the liquid products, overhead liquid samples collected at the first, third, and fifth hours of experiments of 6 h duration were evaluated using simulated distillation gas chromatography and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. NMR analyses of the liquid products showed that, even though there were slight changes in the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spectra, the standard deviation was low for the time-dependent samples. Simulated distillation gas chromatography showed that the yields of refinery boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, and fuel oil cuts) were reproducible between runs. Fractionation of the overhead liquids into refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, fuel oil fractions) showed that the boiling range materials and chemical compositions of fractions were found to be reproducible. 54 refs., 17 tabs.

  4. 26The Frequency of Large Meteor Impacts On February 14, 2013 a 10,000 ton meteor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the town of Chelyabinsk and the explosion caused major damage to the town injuring 1,000 people `discovered' for many decades afterwards, the Chelyabinsk Meteor was extensively videoed by hundreds explodes with an energy of 4.2x109 Joules. How many tons of TNT did the Chelyabinsk Meteor yield

  5. Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    analyses the global waste market, with particular reference to municipal solid waste (MSW). Key NoteGlobal MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market between growth in wealth and increase in waste -- the more affluent a society becomes, the more waste

  6. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  7. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  8. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless surface mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  9. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  10. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless surface mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  11. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless proprietary data. Based on average prices, the value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United is zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates were consumed by five titanium pigment producers

  12. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  13. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise mining operations in Florida, Georgia, and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  14. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise mining operations in Florida, Georgia, and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 97% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic TiO2 pigment

  15. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise-mining operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed in the United States 94% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by domestic titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment

  16. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of TiO2 content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of TiO2 content, unless otherwise-mineral sands operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by TiO2 pigment producers

  17. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2, unless-mineral sands operations in Florida and Virginia. The value of titanium mineral concentrates consumed deposits was zircon. About 95% of titanium mineral concentrates was consumed by TiO2 pigment producers

  18. The Nature of Faint Blue Stars in the PHL and Ton Catalogues based on Digital Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andernach, H; W., W Copo Cordova; Santiago-Bautista, I del C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined accurate positions for 3000 of the "faint blue stars" in the PHL (Palomar-Haro-Luyten) and Ton/TonS catalogues. These were published from 1957 to 1962, and, aimed at finding new white dwarfs, provide approximate positions for about 10750 blue stellar objects. Some of these "stars" had become known as quasars, a type of objects unheard-of before 1963. We derived subarcsec positions from a comparison of published finding charts with images from the first-epoch Digitized Sky Survey. Numerous objects are now well known, but unfortunately neither their PHL or Ton numbers, nor their discoverers, are recognized in current databases. A comparison with modern radio, IR, UV and X-ray surveys leads us to suggest that the fraction of extragalactic objects in the PHL and Ton catalogues is at least 15 per cent. However, because we failed to locate the original PHL plates or finding charts, it may be impossible to correctly identify the remaining 7726 PHL objects.

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled of nonstockpile- grade materials, as follows: 16,400 tons of natural battery ore, 81 tons of chemical ore, and 392

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    for such nonmetallurgical purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled of nonstockpile-grade materials, as follows: 16,400 tons of natural battery ore, 81 tons of chemical ore, and 392

  1. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 tons of the material from the Department of Energy's stockpile, while the remaining 10,000 tons,700 1,800 150,000 160,000e Bolivia -- -- -- 5,400,00 Brazil 32 32 910 NA Canada 660 660 180,000 360

  2. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  3. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  4. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  5. Status of ArDM-1t: First observations from operation with a full ton-scale liquid argon target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ArDM Collaboration; J. Calvo; C. Cantini; M. Daniel; U. Degunda; S. Di Luise; L. Epprecht; A. Gendotti; S. Horikawa; L. Knecht; B. Montes; W. Mu; M. Munoz; S. Murphy; G. Natterer; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; L. Periale; C. Regenfus; L. Romero; A. Rubbia; R. Santorelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; T. Viant; S. Wu

    2015-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ArDM-1t is the first operating ton-scale liquid argon detector for direct search of Dark Matter particles. Developed at CERN as Recognized Experiment RE18, the experiment has been approved in 2010 to be installed in the Spanish underground site LSC (Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc). Under the label of LSC EXP-08-2010 the ArDM detector underwent an intensive period of technical completion and safety approval until the recent filling of the target vessel with almost 2 ton of liquid argon. This report describes the experimental achievements during commissioning of ArDM and the transition into a stage of first physics data taking in single phase operational mode. We present preliminary observations from this run. A first indication for the background discrimination power of LAr detectors at the ton-scale is shown. We present an outlook for completing the detector with the electric drift field and upgrade of the scintillation light readout system with novel detector modules based on SiPMs in order to improve the light yield.

  6. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactor Among Richland Operations Office's 2014 Accomplishments Much Accomplished at Hanford in 2010: Richland Operations Office Prime Contractors Cite Past Year's Cleanup...

  7. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  8. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  9. Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    to their high cellulose diet and their lack of the special enzyme that breaks down cellulose. Instead they rely on the bacteria that can be found in their stomach. This bacteria uses non-protein nitrogen in order to create short chain fatty acids or proteins. The cow regurgitates and chews its food further in order

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont. Together, these firms operated about 820 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 238 companies operated approximately 700 clay pits or quarries. The leading 20 firms

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, these firms operated approximately 739 mines. The estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays, these firms operated about 983 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1.8 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows: kaolin--55% paper, 8% kiln furniture

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 233 companies operated approximately 650 clay pits or quarries

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode clay produced was about $2.14 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 18.5% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free 11.0% ad val. Waste and scrap18 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters continued

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 760222 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11 smelters east

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, 7 companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion, prices in the aluminum scrap and secondary aluminum alloy markets fluctuated through September but closed20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    for such nonmetallurgical purposes as producing dry cell batteries, as an ingredient in plant fertilizers and animal feed Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled inventories of nonstockpile-grade materials, as follows, in tons: natural battery ore, 16,800; chemical ore

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled, as follows, in tons: natural battery, 16,800, and metallurgical, 331,000. Prepared by Thomas S. Jones [(703

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

  7. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  8. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  9. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  10. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  11. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  12. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  13. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  16. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2007. Indium-containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were exported to Canada for processing. Two companies, one in New York and the other in Rhode Island gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells require approximately 50 metric tons of indium to produce 1 gigawatt of solar power. Research was underway to develop a low-cost manufacturing process for flexible CIGS solar

  17. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but growing through the recycling of lithium batteries. Import Sources (1994-97): Chile, 96%; and other, 4 lithium salts from battery recycling and lithium hydroxide monohydrate from former Department of Energy102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters continued. Most of the production decreases continued to take place in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters from 693 thousand tons at yearend 2004. World Smelter Production and Capacity: Production Yearend

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption was about $408 million as measured

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, the United States consumed about 13% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 13% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 76%; full-alloy steel, 8

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, the United States was expected to consume about 5% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2010 was $883 million as measured by the value

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, the United States was expected to consume about 7% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2008 was $1,283 million

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 14% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys, respectively. The value

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, the United States was expected to consume about 6% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production company produced chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2011 was $1

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 16% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 74%; full-alloy steel

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, the United States was expected to consume about 2% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2009 was $358 million as measured by the value

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2007 was $548 million as measured

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 12% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 68%; full-alloy steel, 8

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in a significant decrease in mine production. The amount of tungsten concentrates remaining in stockpiles in China for the tungsten industry. Once the stockpiles are depleted, world mine production will have to increase to meet

  14. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  15. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  16. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2010. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2006­09): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China

  17. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    184 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines. Approximately 10 companies in the United States processed tungsten concentrates, ammonium paratungstate, tungsten oxide, and

  18. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2009. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2005-08): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government limited

  19. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Canada, 16%; Germany, 9 by Chinese production and exports. China's Government restricted the amounts of tungsten that could

  20. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994 of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste

  1. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994. In 2000, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 39%; Russia, 21

  2. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  3. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2011. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production (2007­10): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government regulates its

  4. AN APPLICATION OF URBANSIM TO THE AUSTIN, TEXAS REGION: INTEGRATED-MODEL FORECASTS FOR THE YEAR 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    , as well as energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. This work describes the modeling of year-2030 policies significantly impact the region's future land use patterns, traffic conditions, greenhouse gas (emitting over 6 billion metric tons of CO2-equivalents annually, and accounting for 22.2% of the world

  5. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, clay and shale production was reported in all States except Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; bentonite-- 25% pet waste absorbent, 21% drilling mud, 21% foundry sand bond, 15% iron ore pelletizing,300 Imports for consumption: Artificially activated clay and earth 17 18 21 27 20 Kaolin 57 63 114 158 275,980 Consumption, apparent 37,500 35,600 34,800 34,600 34,600 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 40 42 42

  7. Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 2 Aspen 3.29 250.00$ 822.50$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 3 Aspen 2.38 160.00$ 380.80$ Hard Maple Veneer Aspen 600.00$ -$ Hard Maple Birdseye Aspen 0.055 700.00$ 38

  8. New York looks to the future of waste (10 March 2006) New York City has been investigating ways to manage its waste more sustainably in years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and the lack of sites within the urban area itself which can process it. The city produces 46,000 tons of waste City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) attempted to build a series of waste-to-energy facilities and cleaner waste-to-energy facilities in New York City four years #12;ago, the proposal was met

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [(703) 648­4978, dedelste@usgs.gov] #12;49 COPPER 80% year-on-year increase in China's net imports 975 Secondary 54 46 38 37 60 Copper from all old scrap 156 138 143 153 170 Imports for consumption 33% of the U.S. copper supply. Import Sources (2008­11): Unmanufactured: Chile, 43%; Canada, 32

  10. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  11. TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moderately. Cost-cutting measures were expected to idle mining operations in Green Cove Springs, FL year of rutile. The first of two dredges was refurbished and commissioned at the Sierra Rutile mine in Sierra Leone. The second dredge is scheduled for start-up in 2007 and is expected to raise capacity

  12. Freshmen returning for their sophomore year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    in the main dining halls during final exams. 6 tons Organic waste BC Dining Services sends to a composting program operated by BC recycling vendor, Save That Stuff student life 232 Student clubs and organizations

  13. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  14. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bituminous coal, and brown coal, but not slaty coal. Figureston) f 19.92 to 33. II Brown coals, lignites (metric ton) fcoal, and 13%, lignite (brown coal). Coal bed methane may

  15. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  16. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

  19. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  20. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed

  1. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

  2. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 80% of the primary tin consumed

  3. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  4. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  5. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

  6. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

  7. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 97% of the primary tin. The major uses

  8. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 77% of the primary tin consumed

  9. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

  10. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

  11. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  12. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

  13. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

  14. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced boron minerals, mostly sodium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proprietary data, U.S. boron production and consumption in 2010 were withheld. The leading boron producer standards with respect to heat conservation, which directly correlates to higher consumption of borates32 BORON (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic

  16. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006, approximately. Import Sources (2002-05): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products

  17. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003, approximately and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 49

  18. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005, approximately. Import Sources (2001-04): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products

  19. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 41%; Russia, 21

  20. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 48%; Russia, 16

  1. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004, approximately (2000-03): Tungsten content of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought

  2. THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Srisuro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  3. The 10,000 Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.Srisaro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pallavi Pharkya thinks a lot about the future. Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  4. Coal upgrading program for Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic: Task 8.3. Topical report, October 1994--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal has been a major energy source in the Czech Republic given its large coal reserves, especially brown coal and lignite (almost 4000 million metric tons) and smaller reserves of hard, mainly bituminous, coal (over 800 million tons). Political changes since 1989 have led to the reassessment of the role of coal in the future economy as increasing environmental regulations affect the use of the high-sulfur and high-ash brown coal and lignite as well as the high-ash hard coal. Already, the production of brown coal has declined from 87 million metric tons per year in 1989 to 67 million metric tons in 1993 and is projected to decrease further to 50 million metric tons per year of brown coal by the year 2000. As a means of effectively utilizing its indigenous coal resources, the Czech Republic is upgrading various technologies, and these are available at different stages of development, demonstration, and commercialization. The purpose of this review is to provide a database of information on applicable technologies that reduce the impact of gaseous (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, volatile organic compounds) and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal in district and residential heating systems.

  5. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  6. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  7. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  8. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  9. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters were closed the entire year. Demolition of two smelters that had been idle for several years was started in 2010. Based: During the first half of 2010, production from domestic primary aluminum smelters had stabilized after

  11. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  12. By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    . years of apparent consumption. 25. At yearend, the estimated manganese Ironmaking and steelmaking have to reported data, the rates of consumption of manganese as ore in ironmaking and as ferroalloys and metal

  13. Windscale pile reactors - Decommissioning progress on a fifty year legacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Richard J. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the UK, if not the world. This paper presents a summary of the 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident, its unique challenges and a new technical approach developed to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors. The reactors will be decommissioned using a top down approach that employs an array of light weight, carbon fiber, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete. This relatively conventional decommissioning approach has been made possible by a recently completed technical assessment of reactor core fire and criticality risk which concluded that these types of events are not credible if relatively simple controls are applied. This paper presents an overview of the design, manufacture and testing of equipment to remove the estimated 15 tons of fire damaged fuel and isotopes from the Pile 1 reactor. The paper also discusses recently conducted characterization activities which have allowed for a refined waste estimate and conditioning strategy. These data and an innovative approach have resulted in a significant reduction in the estimated project cost and schedule. (authors)

  14. Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, Gregory K; Sanchez, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency labeling program operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products, and currently labels more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, heating, cooling and ventilation equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with stakeholders. This report presents savings estimates from the use ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of energy, dollar, and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2009, annual forecasts for 2010 and 2011, and cumulative savings estimates for the period 1993 through 2009 and cumulative forecasts for the period 2010 through 2015. Through 2009 the program saved 9.5 Quads of primary energy and avoided the equivalent of 170 million metric tons carbon (MMTC). The forecast for the period 2009-2015 is 11.5 Quads or primary energy saved and 202 MMTC emissions avoided. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 110 MMTC and 231 MMTC (1993 to 2009) and between 130 MMTC and 285 MMTC (2010 to 2015).

  15. LLNL Underground Coal Gasification Project annual report - fiscal year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.; O'Neal, E.M. (eds.)

    1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory has been conducting an interdisciplinary underground coal gasification program since 1974 under the sponsorship of DOE and its predecessors. We completed three UCG tests at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming, during the period 1975 to 1979. Five small field experiments, the large-block tests, were completed from 1981 to 1982 at the exposed coal face in the WIDCO coal mine near Centralia, Washington. A larger test at the same location, the partial-seam CRIP test, was completed during fiscal year 1984. In conjunction with the DOE and an industrial group lead by the Gas Research Institute, we have prepared a preliminary design for a large-scale test at the WIDCO site. The planned test features dual injection and production wells, module interaction, and consumption of 20,000 tons of coal during a hundred-day steam-oxygen gasification. During fiscal year 1984, we documented the large-block excavations. The cavities were elongated, the cavity cross sections were elliptical, and the cavities contained ash and slag at the bottom, char and dried coal above that, and a void at the top. The results from the large-block tests provided enough data to allow us to construct a composite model, CAVSM. Preliminary results from the model agree well with the product-gas chemistry and cavity shape observed in the large-block tests. Other models and techniques developed during the year include a transient, moving-front code, a two-dimensional, reactive-flow code using the method of lines, and a wall-recession-rate model. In addition, we measured the rate of methane decomposition in the hot char bed and developed an engineering rate expression to estimate the magnitude of the methane-decomposition reaction. 16 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

  16. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  17. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  18. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  19. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  20. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  1. 18 years experience on UF{sub 6} handling at Japanese nuclear fuel manufacturer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujinaga, H.; Yamazaki, N.; Takebe, N. [Japan Nucelar Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spring of 1991, a leading nuclear fuel manufacturing company in Japan, celebrated its 18th anniversary. Since 1973, the company has produced over 5000 metric ton of ceramic grade UO{sub 2} powder to supply to Japanese fabricators, without major accident/incident and especially with a successful safety record on UF{sub 6} handling. The company`s 18 years experience on nuclear fuel manufacturing reveals that key factors for the safe handling of UF{sub 6} are (1) installing adequate facilities, equipped with safety devices, (2) providing UF{sub 6} handling manuals and executing them strictly, and (3) repeating on and off the job training for operators. In this paper, equipment and the operation mode for UF{sub 6} processing at their facility are discussed.

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, 6 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2009, 6 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were closed the entire year, and demolition of 1 smelter that had been idle since 2000 was completed in 2009. Of the operating smelters, three were temporarily idled and parts of four others were temporarily closed in 2009. Based

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2011, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were closed the entire year. One smelter that was closed in 2009 was reopened during the first quarter of 2011. Five potlines that were closed in late 2008 and early 2009 at four other smelters were also restarted in early 2011. Based

  4. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  5. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  6. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W. G.; Reasoner, J. W.; Hower, J. C.; Yates, L. P.; Clark, C. P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Irefin, A.; Jiminez, A.; Jones, T. M.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of 40 hvb coals, mostly from western Kentucky fields, has been examined with regard to ASTM Gieseler plastometric properties. Twenty-nine of these coals have also been studied over a range of temperatures by isothermal Gieseler plastometry. Raw Gieseler data provide melting and coking slopes and readily calculable fluidity spans. Maximum fluidity by slope intersection is a more consistent measure than observed maximum fluidity. Isothermal slopes and maximum fluidities follow Arrhenius temperature dependencies, with activation energies related systematically to fluid properties. These freshly sampled coals are also characterized by chemical, physical and petrographic criteria, by quantitative solvent extractions, by pyrolysis gas chromatography, by Fourier Transform infrared analysis of coals and extraction residues, by the HPLC analysis of coal extracts, and by optical microscopy of coals and Gieseler semi-coke residues. Multiple linear regression analysis yields three-term expressions which estimate maximum fluidities (both ASTM and isothermal) with R values of .90 to .92. Slopes and critical temperatures are similarly predictable. Plastometer experiments with selected coals under superatmospheric pressures show both melting slopes and maximum fluidities to be sharply increased, the latter by one to three orders of magnitude. Some suggestions are offered to accommodate this new information into the general body of knowledge concerning the phenomenon of plasticity in mid-ranked coals. 81 references, 28 figures, 40 tables.

  7. Evaluation of an alternative bituminous material as a soil stabilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Rak

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Consequently, development of a new stabilization material, which is environmentally safe and non-flammable, is desired for replacing cutback asphalts. In this study a petroleum-resin-based (PRB) material was tested to investigate its physical and mechanical...

  8. australian bituminous coal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composted manure LAPC, high ash raw manure HARM, and high ash partially composted manure HAPC) as well as blends of each biomass with Texas lignite coal (TXL). Activation...

  9. Updated Costs (June 2011 Basis) for Selected Bituminous Baseline Cases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevision

  10. NETL - Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/Ames Global Emissions DatasourceNEPCEnergy

  11. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have been recastEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2012 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total Arts

  12. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Harvard Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have beenEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return REPORTS Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2011 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total

  13. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  14. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2005-06 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2005-06 Year in Review 2 Message from the Acting Director

  15. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2004-05 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2004-05 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director This has

  16. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2006-07 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2006-07 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director Academic

  17. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  18. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  19. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

  20. Microprocessors --10 Years Back, 10 Years Gurindar S. Sohi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Microprocessors -- 10 Years Back, 10 Years Ahead Gurindar S. Sohi Computer Sciences Department computer architects with an increasing number of faster transistors with which to build microprocessors. In the past decade, architects have seized these opportunities to build microprocessors that bear lit- tle

  1. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948 27069

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A79482693

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948269300

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196957

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695789

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.

  3. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  4. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  5. Visualizing Twenty Years of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potel, Mike; Wong, Pak C.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications marks the 20th anniversary of the Applications department as a regular feature of the magazine. We thought it might be interesting to look back at the 20 years of Applications department articles to assess its evolution over that time. By aggregating all twenty years of articles and applying a little statistical and visual analytics, we’ve uncovered some interesting characteristics and trends we thought we’d share to mark this 20 year milestone.

  6. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  7. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  8. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  9. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  10. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margorie Stockton

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2001, the Technical Area 3 steam plant was the primary source of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while research and development activities were the primary source of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from chemical use for research and development activities were also reported.

  11. Chapeau! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Kernen, Madeleine

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapeau! is a first-year college text. Although it may appear, at first glance, o move very fast and introduce a large amount of material early, the vocabulary and grammatical structures that we expect students to control ...

  12. Accountability report - fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

  13. CONSOL Energy invests in West Virginia CTL plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working with Synthesis Energy Systems (SES), America's leading bituminous coal producer assists with the engineering design package for a coal gasification and liquefaction plant to be located near Benwood in West Virginia. Coal will be converted to syngas using SES's proprietary U-GAS technology. The syngas is expected to be used to produce about 720,000 metric tons per year of methanol. The U-GAS technology is licensed from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The article explains how the GTI gasification process works. It is based on a surge-stage fluidised bed for production of low-to-medium calorific value synthesis gas from a variety of feedstocks, including coal. 2 figs.

  14. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

  15. The BosTon College STOKES HALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    's enduring commit- ment to the liberal arts," said Col- lege of Arts & Sciences Dean Da- vid Quigley. "The David Quigley September 30, 2010 Publi

  16. 1992 five year battery forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amistadi, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five-year trends for automotive and industrial batteries are projected. Topic covered include: SLI shipments; lead consumption; automotive batteries (5-year annual growth rates); industrial batteries (standby power and motive power); estimated average battery life by area/country for 1989; US motor vehicle registrations; replacement battery shipments; potential lead consumption in electric vehicles; BCI recycling rates for lead-acid batteries; US average car/light truck battery life; channels of distribution; replacement battery inventory end July; 2nd US battery shipment forecast.

  17. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benford, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pasqualetti, M.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    funding to Washington University in FY08 was $548.4M, up 2% from the previous year. Both the dollar amount funding. Funding from the NIH, consistently the University's main contributor of research funding, increased by $1.5M (0.4%) in FY08. Funding from private sources to Washington University actually increased

  19. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  20. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  1. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $/MBtu) Electric Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) kWh = kilowatthour; TWh= terawatthour; MBtu = Million Btu; MtC = Metric tons ofon heavy load. Idle Rate (Btu/h) Table 6-9. Energy Star

  2. Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  3. Mid-year market review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a tumultuous beginning marked by considerable excitement over the amendment to the US/Russian suspension agreement, 1994`s marketplace has been fairly quite so far. During the first half of the year, only thirty-two near-term uranium transactions, involving 10.1 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, have been reported. Compared to the same period in 1993, which saw 16.5 million pounds transacted in fifty deals, 1994`s volume represents a drop of 39 percent. With the amendment initialed in the last days of 1993, many market participants expected the first part of 1994 to be very active, with buyers and sellers rushing to conclude {open_quotes}matched sales.{close_quotes} No such surge materialized, however, and market volume remained below the average of 17.3 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in fifty transactions recorded over the past five years.

  4. Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  5. Northeast Regional Biomass Program. Ninth year, Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  6. Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) facility in Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1992 included those associated with environmental compliance, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. Four phases of the on-site Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project were completed in 1992. Remediation activities, which included the removal of 161,589 tons of uranium-mill-tailings-contaminated material from the facility, were conducted in compliance with all applicable permits. Off-site dose modeling for the GJPO was conducted to determine compliance with current National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, and applicable DOE Orders (5400.1 and 5400.5). The total off-site EDE to the public from all sources of radiation emanating from the facility (radon, air particulates, gamma) was calculated as 9 mrem/yr, which is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr above background. The radiological and nonradiological monitoring program at the GJPO facility included monitoring of activities that generate potentially hazardous or toxic wastes and monitoring of ambient air, surface water, and ground water.

  7. 1991 - The year in review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A look at the last year shows that utility regulators devoted a large part of their 1991 resources to the task of refining programs put in place over the last decade to push electric, gas and telephone regulation toward a more market-oriented approach. Heightened competition in electric generation, natural gas supply and transmission, and telecommunications markets kept regulators busy running competitive bidding programs, sorting competitive from noncompetitive services, and ensuring access to utility delivery networks.

  8. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  9. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  10. Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Lewis

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  11. Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  12. 2014 Year-in-Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)Department ofNow4 Year-in-Review i 2014 YIR May

  13. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73, (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For 1997, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of regulated air emissions from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of VOCs. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72, Construction Permits.

  14. Emissions Inventory Report Summary Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Air Quality Group, ESH-17

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds. For 1998, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72 Construction Permits.

  15. Natural Gas Year-in-Review

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 9, 2011 | Next Release Date: December 2012 Previous editions of Natural Gas Year-in-Review Year: 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Highlights Growing domestic production, rising...

  16. The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees December 11, 2013...

  17. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  18. Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian of years produced the bituminous coals currently found in southwestern Indiana. Bituminous coals in Indiana currently ranks as the seventh-largest coal-producing state in the nation and has an estimated 17.57 billion

  19. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

  20. Commission for Women Year-End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Commission for Women Year-End Report Academic Year 2009-2010 The Commission for Women ­ Knoxville. This year's Commission has been busy. We have accomplished our goals this year, thanks in great measure will be described later in this report. Campus and Community Programs In November the Commission for Women and Women

  1. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  2. Y-12 apprentice programs through the years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through the years Apprentice programs have been in existence at Y-12 at various times over the years beginning as early as the 1960's. With only one exception, in 1991 when an...

  3. The Year in Review: Comments from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Year in Review: Comments from the Executive Director The President's Diversity Initiative.udel.edu/udaily/2013/oct/historic-diversity-100212.html. Year in Review 1 Staffing and space 1 Disabilities Support 2

  4. the year in review OUR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    the year in review 2011-12 #12;OUR STUDENTS 26,771 total students 81 per cent average entering retired faculty: 39 graduate teaching assistants: 1,773 #12;the year in review 2011-12 #12;We Must

  5. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

  6. West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience FAQs · What is a First-Year Seminar? · Who must the knowledge and skills necessary for academic success. What are the goals and objectives of FYS? 1. Set

  7. Secretary Chu Celebrates NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks at NNSA's 10-year anniversary celebration on April 28, 2010.

  8. 1995 shipment review & five year forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetherolf, D.J. Jr. [East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc., Lyon Station, PA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 1995 battery shipment review and five year forecast for the battery market. Historical data is discussed.

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B O ), unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to reduce debt. The company leased the facilities for a term of 15 years. Electricity and steam produced), 14% (Foreign). Government Stockpile: None. Prepared by Phyllis A. Lyday, (703) 648-7713 [Fax: (703, insulating and reinforcing fiberglass, and agriculture. One company sold its electric and steam generating

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B O ), unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was centered in southern California. The largest producer operated an open pit tincal and kernite mine in the world. Importation of borates from northern Chile continued. Ulexite is mined in Chile production during the year. Neodymium-iron-boron alloys are used to produce the strongest magnetic material

  11. A Year in Review BOUNDLESS 20112012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Year in Review BOUNDLESS 2011­2012 #12;­ ­ ­ pg.18 30.03.12 Preparing Global Citizens at Arts & Science pg.26 31.05.12 Spring Reunion Boundless: pg.22 15.04.12 A Year in Review pg.14 31.01.12 29 Afterword pg.71 Volunteer Leadership #12;BOUNDLESS ENGAGEMENT BOUNDLESS COMMITMENT 02 / BOUNDLESS: A Year

  12. Clinical Biochemical Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Biochemical Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 YEAR 2 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training 8AM Newborn Screen Follow-up conference Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical

  13. Clinical Molecular Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Molecular Geneticist Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 YEAR 2 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. 11-12 DNA Sign- out conference Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training (includes rotation in Molecular Microbiology lab) Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research

  14. STIMULUS SNAPSHOTS Highlights From the Past Two Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n uSTEM Outreach SHARE

  15. Sandia Energy - Black Engineer of the Year Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6AndyBenjamin KarlsonBiofuelsBlack

  16. Vehicle technologies program Government Performance and Results Act (GPA) report for fiscal year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.; Stephens, T. S.; Birky, A. K. (Energy Systems); (DOE-EERE); (TA Engineering)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has defined milestones for its Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). This report provides estimates of the benefits that would accrue from achieving these milestones relative to a base case that represents a future in which there is no VTP-supported vehicle technology development. Improvements in the fuel economy and reductions in the cost of light- and heavy-duty vehicles were estimated by using Argonne National Laboratory's Autonomie powertrain simulation software and doing some additional analysis. Argonne also estimated the fraction of the fuel economy improvements that were attributable to VTP-supported development in four 'subsystem' technology areas: batteries and electric drives, advanced combustion engines, fuels and lubricants, and materials (i.e., reducing vehicle mass, called 'lightweighting'). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MA{sup 3}T (Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies) tool was used to project the market penetration of light-duty vehicles, and TA Engineering's TRUCK tool was used to project the penetrations of medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Argonne's VISION transportation energy accounting model was used to estimate total fuel savings, reductions in primary energy consumption, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that would result from achieving VTP milestones. These projections indicate that by 2030, the on-road fuel economy of both light- and heavy-duty vehicles would improve by more than 20%, and that this positive impact would be accompanied by a reduction in oil consumption of nearly 2 million barrels per day and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of more than 300 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. These benefits would have a significant economic value in the U.S. transportation sector and reduce its dependency on oil and its vulnerability to oil price shocks.

  17. Western Area Power Administration annual site environmental report for calendar year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the accomplishments and status of the environmental program of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) for calendar year 2005. In 2005, Western submitted 190 reports to state and local emergency response personnel and had 60 California Hazardous Materials Business Plans in place as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. These reports identify the hazardous substances contained at these sites. At sites where potential oil spills could harm surrounding ecosystems and waterways, Western prepares Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. These plans identify measures to prevent spills from harming the environment, such as identifying the need for secondary containment at facilities. Western currently has SPCC plans for 154 facilities in 13 states. In 2005, Western updated 19 SPCC plans and prepared one new plan. Western operated under 107 environmental permits in 2005. Western evaluates the impact of its planned actions on the environment by preparing National Environmental Policy Act documentation. In 2005, Western completed or was working on 60 categorical exclusions, 18 environmental assessments and eight environmental impact statements, issued six Findings of No Significant Impact, and prepared four Mitigation Action Plans. Western held several public workshops/meetings and consulted with 70 American Indian Tribes for various projects. In 2005, Western was working on or had completed 11 Section 7 consultations under the Endangered Species Act. In 2005, Western recycled more than 3,600 metric tons of electrical equipment, mineral oil dielectric fluid, asphalt, fluorescent and metal halide light bulbs, wood poles and crossarms, and other items as well as office waste. Western made $437,816 worth of purchases containing recovered content materials. Western met the requirement of Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management to have its Environmental Management System in place by December 31, 2005.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1995 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1995 were associated with mixed-waste treatment, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. As part of the GJPO Mixed-Waste Treatment Program, on-site treatability studies were conducted in 1995 that made use of pilot-scale evaporative-oxidation and thermal-desorption units and bench-scale stabilization. DOE-GJPO used some of its own mixed-waste as well as samples received from other DOE sites for these treatability studies. These studies are expected to conclude in 1996. Removal of radiologically contaminated materials from GJPO facility buildings was conducted under the provisions of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Remediation activities included the removal of 394 metric tons of contaminated material from Buildings 18 and 28 and revegetation activities on the GJPO site; remediation was conducted in compliance with applicable permits.

  19. A YEAR IN REVIEW 2012 COLLEGEOFMEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    A YEAR IN REVIEW 2012 COLLEGEOFMEDIA 810SOUTHWRIGHTSTREET 119GREGORYHALL URBANA,ILLINOIS61801 #12-accredited. I am happy to report that we just completed the six-year review cycle in November and have been and the education they are receiving." 2 C O L L E G E O F M E D I A Y E A R I N R E V I E W 2 012 3 year in review

  20. EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report provides details on the research conducted at EMSL--the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2008.

  1. BSc Computing Year 3 Graphics Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary

    BSc Computing Year 3 Graphics Programming 3D Maze Room Assignment Two by Richard M. Mann: 20032144 .................................................................................7 Figure 4: Controls Key-Map ......................................................................8

  2. Earth: The Early Years We discuss ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth: The Early Years We discuss ... · What happened to the Earth during the first few billion)? · What is the relationship to (early) life? #12;Age of Earth James Ussher (17th C) biblical account: 6: 20-40 m.y. (million years!) Charles Darwin evolution >300 m.y. Lord Kelvin (1880's) cooling Earth: 50

  3. BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 Armstrong, R.A., F. Gilbes, R. Guerrero. Lopez, and F. Gilbes, 2000, "Apparent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Station", Ocean Optics XV, Monaco. Gilbes, F., and R.A. Armstrong, 2000, "Inherent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Series

  4. Clinical Cytogenetics Two-Year Fellowship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Clinical Cytogenetics Two-Year Fellowship YEAR 1 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY A.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Cancer genetics conference (4th Monday) CMMG noon

  5. Manufacturing Environment in the Year 2000 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slautterback, W. H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturing will change more in the next 15 years than it has in the last 75 years. The reasons are clear ... survival and technology. Unless U.S. companies can compete in a world economy on price, quality, design and delivery, our companies...

  6. PHMC Year 2000: Status reporting for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Revision 0, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layfield, K.A.

    1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHMC Year 2000 status reporting process is designed to encompass the reporting requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), DOE HQ, RL and the PHMC for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Status reporting is required for all Year 2000 projects. The Year 2000 project list will be maintained current as Year 2000 projects are modified, added or deleted. Reporting is required until a Year 2000 project has completed compliance assurance. Some projects will be identified as DOE HQ reportable. These are projects determined to be the most critical and due the attention of DOE HQ.

  7. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC) for Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2003, the Technical Area 3 steam plant and the air curtain destructors were the primary sources of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while the air curtain destructors and chemical use associated with research and development activities were the primary sources of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions were reported from chemical use as well as from all combustion sources. In addition, estimates of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometers and ammonia were provided as requested by the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau.

  8. Calendar Year 2009 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the Audit of National Security Technologies, LLC Costs Claimed under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 for Fiscal Year 2007 May 6, 2009 Audit Report: IG-0815...

  9. Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study Study ID Nos. 546B, 563 Prepared RECYCLING PROGRAMS Study ID Nos. 546B and 563 Prepared for Southern California Edison Rosemead, California

  10. Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to...

  11. 500 Year Documentation Francis T. Marchese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    Documentation, Design, Management. Keywords Digital art, conservation, requirements engineering. 1. THE PROBLEM500 Year Documentation Francis T. Marchese Pace University Computer Science Department New York, NY the requirements for creating documentation that will support an artwork's adaptation to future technology

  12. Calendar Year 1997 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 1, 1997 Audit Report: CR-FS-97-02 Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 1996 April 24, 1997 Audit Report: WR-FS-97-04 Report on...

  13. Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997) A total of 517 students studied abroad; an additional 62) N Am: 36 (10) #12;Oceania: 39 (1) S Am: 100 (2) July, 1997 #12;

  14. Instructionally Related Activities Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Instructionally Related Activities Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the President ......................................................................................................... ix Budget Policy Statements, Procedures, and Guidelines Role of the Chair, IRA Committee

  15. Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the ASI Board of Directors, the ASI% Budgeted # of Paying Students 7,500 37,250 34

  16. Five year rollover hedges for agricultural lenders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, John Christopher

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FIVE YEAR ROLLOVER HEDGES FOR AGRICULTURAL LEADERS A Professional Paper by John Christopher Floyd. Jr. Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ARM University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master... of Agriculture May, 19BB Advisor Or. David J. Leatham Major Subject: Agricultural Economics FIVE YEAR ROLLOVER HEDGE FOR AGRICULTURAL LEMDERS A Professional Paper by John Christopher Floyd, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: an. Advis ry C...

  17. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

  18. Adams, JM (Dr) TUTORIAL (YEAR 2) -UG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    (YEA JMA 48 AZ 04 TUTX-PH00-GM1 Sem1: 01-06,08-14 SGT-Grp A1 TUTORIAL (YEAR 3) - UG SP, AL, JLK, PJM BB 03 Sem1: 09,11,13 UCAS JSA, JA, DB, WNC, AD, OH, JLK, PJM, BNM, PHR, RPS, PDS, JAT, PMW, AL, SP LTL EXAMPHY1022mm Sem1: 07, 15 Test TUTORIAL (YEAR 3) SP, AL, JLK, PJM, BNM, JM Room to be advised

  19. YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY Research Library Year in Review 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY 2008 1 Research Library Year Message from the Library Director 2 #12;YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY in Review ­ 2008 Table of Contents Message from the Library Director .....................................2

  20. Advanced reactors transition fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 7.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplished in FY 1996 and the out years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3. ). This document describes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP), DOE will provide authorization to perform the work outlined in the FY 1996 MYPP

  1. architecture 2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    master of architecture (M.Arch.) #12;2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option Taubman College's 2-year master of architecture option is for applicants who hold a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent. This 60 credit

  2. Characterization and Simulation of ECBM: History Matching of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    injection target of 20,000 short tons with current pressure will take longer than two years, as projected,000 short tons of CO2 over 2 years. 3. Injection pressure is 700 psig 4. 27 short tons of CO2 20, 600 short tons of CO2 #12;Scenario 2 (Medium Permeability) 12/8/2010 WVU PNGE 14 20, 713 short

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan...

  4. Occupational and traning requirements for expanded coal production (as of October 1980). [Forecasting to 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated because of the anticipated rapid growth in trained personnel requirements in bituminous coal mining, and because the industry had already experienced significant problems in recruiting skilled manpower in the course of its employment expansion during the 1970's. Employment in bituminous coal mining is projected to nearly double, from 234,000 in 1977 to 456,000 in 1995, as the net result of a projected threefold increase in coal output to nearly 2.0 billion in 1995 and of an expected significant improvement in overall productivity. A large proportion of current coal mining employees are in occupations which require significant amounts of training for effective work performance. Employment growth to 1955 will be most rapid in those occupations requiring the greatest training or educational preparation. The new training infrastructure which has emerged to meet these needs includes both internal, company-operated training programs and those offered by various external providers. Among the latter are: Vocational schools, community colleges, and university extension departments; public agencies, such as MSHA and state mining departments; coal industry trade associations; and vendors or training consultant groups. The Conference Board survey of coal industry training programs, conducted in late 1979, was designed to provide comprehensive data on the scope of the coal industry's own training activities and on related training issues, based on a mail questionnaire survey addressed to all companies producing 300,000 or more tons per year. The training programs are described with emphasis on time changes, regional effects and implications for a coordinated plan.

  5. Photovoltaic energy: Contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the National Photovoltaics Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of terrestrial photovoltaic technology as an energy option for the United States. In the past, a summary was prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. Tasks conducted in-house by participating national laboratories or under contract by industrial, academic, and other research institutes were highlighted. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed by Sandia National Laboratory or the Solar Energy Research Institute during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

  6. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  7. Happy New Year - First Blog Entry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil HanfordHappy New Year Happy New Year -

  8. Solid waste program fiscal year 1997 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riddelle, J.G.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical baseline, work breakdown structure, schedule baseline, cost baseline, and execution year for the solid waste program.

  9. FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology Internal Use Version Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4: Total UD Credits: 46 Total Credits: 120 3/19/12 #12;FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

  10. Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Van Mierlo, Frank; Sachs, Ely;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to see the progress they've made.

  11. Value Chain Partnerships Phase III, Year 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    interviews conducted with participants of the Pork Niche Market Working Group (PNMWG) and the Regional Food Systems Working Group (RFSWG). The response rate was 100%. The Pork Niche Market Working Group (PNMWG profit partners. More than eight in ten PNMWG participants developed new relationships in the past year

  12. Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

  13. The first forty years, 1947-1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S. (ed.); Cohen, A.; Petersen, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report commemorates the fortieth anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory by representing a historical overview of research at the facility. The chapters of the report are entitled: The First Forty Years, Brookhaven: A National Resource, Fulfilling a Mission - Brookhaven's Mighty Machines, Marketing the Milestones in Basic Research, Meeting National Needs, Making a Difference in Everyday Life, and Looking Forward.

  14. Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June #12;#12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many, geothermal, tidal or sea currents etc. (7) "OUS Method" refers to the inventory for FY07 that is similar

  15. University of California Year 2005 Paper 1571

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the IC chips are going to exceed current cooling techniques [1]. This will necessitate computer case: passive heat spreading and active cooling. In the former technique, one tries to lower the thermalUniversity of California Postprints Year 2005 Paper 1571 On-chip solid-state cooling for integrated

  16. February 2014 CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF COLLABORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    institutions, today leading the world in science and technology, were born about one hundred years ago and have back its place as the foremost science and technology institution in Japan under the leadership Federal Minister for Research and Technology, in August 1983, and during his visit Japan first expressed

  17. Final Year Projects Class of 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Engineering Page 10 Message from our Sponsor SAP Page 13 Project Areas/Technology Categories Page 15 Operating Systems/Programmes Page 16 Project Index Page 17-18 Projects 1-82 Page 20-101 Companies Sponsoring PrizesFinal Year Projects Class of 2012 schools of computing, electronic engineering and mechanical

  18. UIC Honors College This year represents the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

    . They are due February 15th. For all the important in- formation, check out the Ball website: http:// uichcab. The sessions cover the process of searching for internal and external awards, highlight upcoming deadlines scholarships (some are in preparation for applying next year). Please visit the OSSP website for more

  19. Biological consequences of Chernobyl: 20 years on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    Biological consequences of Chernobyl: 20 years on Anders Pape Møller1 and Timothy A. Mousseau2 1, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA The disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant of the four nuclear reactors of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on 26 April 1986 as a consequence

  20. Annual Site Environmental Report. Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1997. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs.

  1. Academic year 2014-2015 Study Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    90 3 Radiation Protection Hubert Thierens GE05 3 1 1 1 30 90 4 Nuclear Reactor Theory Peter Baeten MT2CRDT RefNo. Contact StudyLecturer (dept.) 1 Advanced Nuclear Reactor Physics and Technology Hamid Valid as from the academic year 2014-2015 Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (v2) Language

  2. FIRST YEAR CLINIC ROTATIONS Inpatient unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    FIRST YEAR CLINIC ROTATIONS Inpatient unit The fellow is responsible for the care and supervision weekly. Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic The fellow on the PHO clinic rotation will be scheduled to evaluate scheduled clinic and infusion center patients along with an attending provider. Patients seen

  3. Dissertation Research Progress Report Semester and Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Dissertation Research Progress Report Semester and Year: All doctoral students must meet with their supervisory committee to present their progress, every semester that they register for dissertation credits report. The Dean's office will place a registration hold on students taking dissertation credits

  4. Dissertation Fellowship Award Year 2012 -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Dissertation Fellowship Award Year 2012 - 2013 Information Sheet Description of Award This fellowship is awarded annually to exceptional UWM doctoral students with dissertator status. If awarded graduate tuition currently valued at $3,390.80 (dissertator level)* A remission of the non-resident portion

  5. Published: 3 January 2013 Egypt's New Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 3 January 2013 Egypt's New Year Resolution Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail CAIRO -- Egypt, is one of Egypt's largest extremist organizations. "Only when he changes his mind from being a Gamaa Brother to a national leader can we have real progress in Egypt," Mostafa said, adding: "For now

  6. TRINITY HALL ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    TRINITY HALL CAMBRIDGE ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 June 2011 #12;TRINITY HALL Index Balance Sheet 19 Cash Flow Statement 20 - 32 Notes to the Accounts #12;TRINITY HALL Governing Body;Status Trinity Hall, or The Master, Fellows and Scholars of the College or Hall of the Holy Trinity

  7. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prepared mixtures, field mixtures obtained at the plant and pavement cores. Laboratory tests included Hveem and Marshall stability, resilient modulus and indirect tension. Mixture conditioning to evaluate resistance to moisture damage included vacuum... Mixed and Compacted Specimens Tensile Strength Ratio for Laboratory Mixed and Compacted Specimens 14 Marshall Stability Before and After 7-days Soaking in Water for Lab Mixed and Compacted Specimens 36 FIGURE Page 15 16 Hveem Stability Before...

  8. INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    involves heating a slurry of coal and sodium hydroxideCoal is crushed, generally minus 20 mesh, and sent to a slurry

  9. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Clark, C.P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Reagles, C.L.; Whitt, J.M.

    1983-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The 40-coal database for the prediction of the plastic properties of hvb coals has been completed. Statistical analysis has been commenced. Most of the 37 ostensibly independent experimental variables and the 22 derived variables are shown to have little or no predictive power. Approximately a dozen independent variables appear to be systematically related to plasticity. Maximum fluidity can be determined in several ways from Gieseler plastometer data. Under both ASTM and isothermal conditions, maximum fluidity can be predicted using just two independent variables with a standard linear regression model of the form ln(maximum fluidity) = ..beta../sub 0/ + ..beta../sub 1/*V/sub 1/ + ..beta../sub 2/*V/sub 2/ with correlation coefficients greater than .85. The use of three or four independent variables permits predictions with R greater than .90. Pyrolysis gas chromatography has emerged as a powerful and relatively inexpensive new tool for the characterization of coals. In conjunction with studies of extraction, extract characteristics, and residue swelling, pyrolysis/GC affords insights into the basic factors determining the plastic behavior of coals.

  10. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 2, March 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W. G.; Reasoner, J. W.; Hower, J. C.; Yates, L. P.; Clark, C. P.; Jones, T. M.; Sturgeon, L. P.; Whitt, J. M.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The approach of this study is to secure three dozen (or more) coals of varying rank, composition and plasticity, and to analyze these coals carefully by standard chemical and petrographic techniques. The bitumen fractions will be determined, both by THF (asphaltenes but not preasphaltenes) and DMF (everything). Pyrolysis gas chromatography on both whole coals and extracted residues will compare capacities to generate metaplast. Extracts from coals with plasticities differing by at least four orders of magnitude will be examined for identifiable differences; extraction residues will be subjected to differential FTIR analysis. All of the data will be combined and subjected to systematic statistical analysis with the objective of identifying predictors of coal plasticity. This report describes the work in the first six months of the study. During this period equipment and instrumentation has been obtained, 24 coal samples have been obtained, the nonclassical methods have been developed and checked out, and an appreciable amount of experimentl data has been obtained.

  11. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 5. [Gieseler plastometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Bowling, C.C.; Davis, E.; Whitt, J.M.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The forty fresh coal samples have been obtained, and the proximate, ultimate and petrographic characterization on all samples is now completed. ASTM Gieseler plastometry analyses have been completed on all 40 coals, in quadruplicate, and the melting and coking slopes and intersection maximum fluidities have been estimated. Significant progress has been made in completing the nonstandard analyses which will provide an important part of the project database. Fifteen coals have been subjected to the 20-run sets of isothermal Gieseler analyses; the balance of this group is expected to be completed by mid-1983. Pyrolysis gas chromatogrpahy has been completed for 36 of the 40 coals. Quantitative extractions have now been completed for 32 of the 40 coals, both with tegrahydrofuran and with dimethylformamide. FTIR spectra have been obtained in sets of three (whole coal, residue from THF extraction, residue from DMF extraction) for 31 of the 40 coals. This report also includes a descriptive study by optical microscopy of selected coals and semi-cokes derived from these coals. Future work will include correlation analysis of the completed datasets, and an intensive study of the characteristics of six or seven coals selected from the present set.

  12. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 3, June 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Bowling, C.C.; Jones, T.M.; Sturgeon, L.P.; Whitt, J.M.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An additional 13 coals have been obtained, bringing the total to 37. Classical chemical and petrographic characterizations have been completed for most of the coals now in hand. The database for analytical pyrolysis/gas chromatography and for quantitative extraction (THF and DMF) has been more than doubled. The procedures for Fourier Transform infrared analysis have been further modified, making use of a new micropulverizer and drying system, and a procedure for the production of uniform and reproducible KBr pellets has been developed and is now in use. The first analytical isothermal plastometry (AIP) data have been obtained, on two highly plastic coals, and additional data are now being generated. Additional work will be carried out with the pyrolysis/GC system and the THF and DMF extraction work. With the progress made in FTIR spectra acquisition, it is expected to complete acquisition and storage of raw coal spectra and to commence application of techniques to provide differential spectrometric information. HPLC analysis of extracts now appears ready for standardization of procedure. Finally, with the data available, statistical analytical work will be initiated.

  13. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 4, Part I of II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Bowling, C.C.; Davis, E.; Jones, T.M.; Whitt, J.M.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have substantially enlarged the analytical database developed from the first 37 coals obtained for this study. Pyrolysis/GC has now been completed for 30 coals, and THF and DMF quantitative extractions for 23 coals. FT-IR spectra have been obtained and disc-stored for all coals; differential analysis of these data is now commencing. The first statistical trial runs have been made. ASTM maximum fluidity can be predicted by a simple two-variable regression equation with R = 0.95. This initial success encourages us to undertake a more sophisticated examination of the interdependencies which are becoming evident as the database is built. Under the original work plan we are to enter an intensive Phase 2 study of six selected coals by January 1983.

  14. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Jiminez, A.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Jones, T.M.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first dozen coals - high volatile B and C from western Kentucky - have been identified and samples obtained. Classical analyses are nearly completed on this first group. Method development work has been undertaken and is substantially completed for pyrolysis gas chromatography, quantitative extraction of bitumen fraction, and isothermal plastometry. The principal item of new equipment, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, has been purchased and has been delivered. It is planned to acquire and to commence classical (ASTM and petrographic) characterization of the second dozen coals to be used, and to commence the systematic acquisition of isothermal plastometric data, GC pyrograms, and quantitative extractions. Development work will be initiated on the statistical analytical approaches to be used, with the expectation of commencing the first statistical analysis in May 1982.

  15. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Clark, C.P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Reagles, C.L.; Whitt, J.M.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The greater part of the present study on predictors of coal fluidity has now been completed, with most of the developed database presented in the preceding Technical Progress Report. The one critical area in which we have fallen behind schedule is that of isothermal fluidity measurements at superatmospheric pressures. During the past quarter we have made several modifications to the experimental high-pressure Gieseler plastometer, and have been able to complete over 60 superatmospheric runs. This work will be completed and analyzed within the period of the 90-day no-cost extension which has been granted. The extra time has permitted completion of additional experiments in solvent extraction. During this period we have also completed characterization of THF extracts by HPLC, and characterization of coals, coal extraction residues and selected extracts by FTIR. 13 references, 25 tables.

  16. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Bowling, C.C.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Whitt, J.M.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed the pyrolysis/gas chromatographic analysis of all 40 coals in the present study, at two temperatures, 450/sup 0/ and 650/sup 0/C. We have also completed triplicate quantitative extraction analyses of all 40 coals, using tetrahydrofuran as the extractant solvent, and have completed a parallel set of extractions using N,N-dimethylformamide as the extractant solvent. In addition, we have completed analysis of over 100 additional isothermal Gieseler plastometer runs, and have made the first series of quantitative estimates of H(aromatic)/H(aliphatic) ratios from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy data. Exploratory work has begun on the petrographic characterization of the semi-coke residues from Gieseler plastometer runs, and also in characterizing THF extracts by thin layer chromatography and by column chromatography (quantitative group separations). Proximate, ultimate and petrographic characterization of the 40 coals has been completed previously. We are now prepared to start a study, using freshly re-sampled coals, of the effects of varying pressure upon the several parameters of fluidity.

  17. Thermo-Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic-Viscodamage-Healing Modeling of Bituminous Materials: Theory and Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darabi Konartakhteh, Masoud

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ……………… ……… 341 9.6. Extrapolation of the Rutting in 3D.……....………… 348 9.7. Comparison with Experimental Results.….………… 351 9.8. Conclusions………………………………………… 354 xviii CHAPTER Page X CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS..…………… 356 10... prediction using viscoelastic- viscoplastic model and experimental data for the cyclic stress control test at 19oC when the stress amplitude is 750kPa. (a) Loading cycles 1-30; (b) Loading cycles 970-980……………….. 268 7.36 Comparison of the VE...

  18. THE EFFECTS OF SOLVENTS ON SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL BELOW ITS PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grens III., Edward A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not hexane-solubles ("asphaltenes"), and pyridine- but notfractionated into oils, asphaltenes, and preasphaltenes, alltE;! nded to be largely asphaltenes and preasphaltenes, and

  19. HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holten, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    molecular-weight ranges of asphaltenes and preasphaltenes.consecutive reactions: coal asphaltenes oil Since the firstfirst being con- verted to asphaltenes. Recently, Sternberg,

  20. Development and evaluation of an automated reflectance microscope system for the petrographic characterization of bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, D. S.; Davis, A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of automated coal petrographic techniques will lessen the demands on skilled personnel to do routine work. This project is concerned with the development and successful testing of an instrument which will meet these needs. The fundamental differences in reflectance of the three primary maceral groups should enable their differentiation in an automated-reflectance frequency histogram (reflectogram). Consequently, reflected light photometry was chosen as the method for automating coal petrographic analysis. Three generations of an automated system (called Rapid Scan Versions I, II and III) were developed and evaluated for petrographic analysis. Their basic design was that of a reflected-light microscope photometer with an automatic stage, interfaced with a minicomputer. The hardware elements used in the Rapid Scan Version I limited the system's flexibility and presented problems with signal digitization and measurement precision. Rapid Scan Version II was designed to incorporate a new microscope photometer and computer system. A digital stepping stage was incorporated into the Rapid Scan Version III system. The precision of reflectance determination of this system was found to be +- 0.02 percent reflectance. The limiting factor in quantitative interpretation of Rapid Scan reflectograms is the resolution of reflectance populations of the individual maceral groups. Statistical testing indicated that reflectograms were highly reproducible, and a new computer program, PETAN, was written to interpret the curves for vitrinite reflectance parameters ad petrographic.

  1. Eastern gas shales bibliography selected annotations: gas, oil, uranium, etc. Citations in bituminous shales worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, V.S. (comp.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 2702 citations, most of which are annotated. They are arranged by author in numerical order with a geographical index following the listing. The work is international in scope and covers the early geological literature, continuing through 1979 with a few 1980 citations in Addendum II. Addendum I contains a listing of the reports, well logs and symposiums of the Unconventional Gas Recovery Program (UGR) through August 1979. There is an author-subject index for these publications following the listing. The second part of Addendum I is a listing of the UGR maps which also has a subject-author index following the map listing. Addendum II includes several important new titles on the Devonian shale as well as a few older citations which were not found until after the bibliography had been numbered and essentially completed. A geographic index for these citations follows this listing.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF SOLVENTS ON SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL BELOW ITS PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grens III., Edward A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    48. Table 1. Roland seam coal analyses Proximate analysis: (some ext'racts of Roland seam coal - 4 hours extraction at5. Extraction of Roland seam coal with solvent mixtures for

  3. INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alkali con- alkali-soluble Seam coal over the temperaturefor the Pittsburgh Seam coal. Another important conclusionVI, Composition of Roland seam coal--ultimate analysis~ wt%,

  4. HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holten, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variations in coal from rank to rank, mine to mine, seam tocoal was supplied by the Wyodak t. Resources Development Corporation from the Roland top seam

  5. Visual representation of carbon dioxide adsorption in a low-volatile bituminous coal molecular model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marielle R. Narkiewicz; Jonathan P. Mathews [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Department of Energy and Minerals Engineering

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide can be sequestered in unmineable coal seams to aid in mitigating global climate change, while concurrently CH{sub 4} can be desorbed from the coal seam and used as a domestic energy source. In this work, a previously constructed molecular representation was used to simulate several processes that occur during sequestration, such as sorption capacities of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}-induced swelling, contraction because of CH{sub 4} and water loss, and the pore-blocking role of moisture. This is carried out by calculating the energy minima of the molecular model with different amounts of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O. The model used is large (>2000 atoms) and contains a molecular-weight distribution, so that it has the flexibility to be used by other researchers and for other purposes in the future. In the low-level molecular modeling presented here, it was anticipated that CO{sub 2} would be adsorbed more readily than CH{sub 4}, that swelling would be anisotropic, greater perpendicular to the bedding plane because of the rank of this coal, and finally, that, with the addition of moisture, CO{sub 2} capacity in the coal would be reduced. As expected with this high-rank coal, there was swelling when CO{sub 2} perturbed the structure of approximately 5%. It was found that, on the basis of the interconnected pore structure and molecular sizes, CO{sub 2} was able to access 12.4% more of the pore volume (as defined by helium) than CH{sub 4}, in the rigid molecular representation. With water as stationary molecules, mostly hydrogen bound to the coal oxygen functionality, pore access decreased by 5.1% of the pore volume for CO{sub 2} accessibility and 4.7% of the pore volume for CH{sub 4} accessibility. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of Molten-Salt/Organic-Solvent CombinationsAs an alternative to molten salts, inorganic acids are aniii) Investigation of molten-salt/organic- Dee Extraction of

  7. HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holten, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefaction Chemistry B. Molten Salt Catalysis RationaleUsed Equipment and Procedure Molten Salt a. b. c. Treat~entEquipment and Procedure Molten Salt Treatment a. Equipment

  8. HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holten, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Liquefaction and Gasification of Western Coals", in5272 (1976). COal Processing - Gasification, Liguefaction,or gaseous fuels, coal gasification has advanced furthest

  9. HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holten, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of char and gases. The Fischer-Tropsch process is an exampleprocess economics, the Fischer-Tropsch process has not beenevaluations for a Fischer-Tropsch plant in the United

  10. HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holten, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or gaseous fuels, coal gasification has advanced furthestrapidly. While coal gasification may reach commercializa-5272 (1976). COal Processing - Gasification, Liguefaction,

  11. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Joseph Wade Button, B. S. , Texas ASM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Mr. Bob M. Gallaway and Dr. Dallas N. Little A field test was conducted to evaluate the use of hydrated lime as an antistrip additive in hot mix asphalt concrete.... Lime was added in the pugmill of the batch plant, on the cold feed belt, and through the fines feeder of the drum mix plant. The asphalt and aggregates used were characterized in the laboratory. Asphalt concrete mixture tests included laboratory...

  12. THE EFFECTS OF SOLVENTS ON SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL BELOW ITS PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grens III., Edward A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resistance heaters, with heat input adjusted to con- trolfix temperature) and the heat input adjusted to give reflux

  13. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment, limit oil consumption (e.g. , by increasingreduced the average oil consumption by 7 kg per ton of steeloil and oil products; (iii) retrofitting existing inefficient equipment; (iv) removing grossly inefficient equipment from service; (v) issuing energy-consumption

  14. Graphics Recognition: The Last Ten Years and the Next Ten Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Graphics Recognition: The Last Ten Years and the Next Ten Years Karl Tombre LORIA-INPL, ´Ecole des'05 marked the 10th anniversary of the series of inter- national workshops on graphics recognition to be Drifting Away Looking at the research themes of the groups active in graphics recognition, it appears

  15. End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2010-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2010-11 College of Textiles 1. Categorized ETF Expenditure,023 Microscopes for Fiber Science Laboratory $39,555 110 Classroom Upgrades $34,916 Teaching Lab Machines and Supplies $10,000 Knitting Machine $20,487 Supplies for teaching labs (chemicals, sensors, fibers, yarns

  16. End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2008-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    End-of-Year ETF Report Fiscal Year 2008-09 College of Textiles 1. Categorized ETF Expenditure,000 Knitting Machine $12,768 Examolites luminaries $35,216 Supplies for labs (microscopes, chemicals learned from the class. 3. Knitting Machine funds were matched from College resources. This new machine

  17. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides `execution year` work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets.

  18. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  19. Preliminary year-end market review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the year-end review of the 1993 uranium market. Through November 1993, a total of 84 near-term transactions have been reported, totalling more than 33.3 Mlb equivalent U3O8. Recent events related to the antidumping investigation and the higher price levels in the restricted markets---where a majority of the total sales volume was transacted---have also influenced the market, causing some buyers to defer additional purchases. Several key elements during the year contributed to perceptions about future market directions, including calls for changes to the antidumping suspension agreements; formalization of the Euratom Supply Agency`s position regarding imports from the Newly Independent States; and the HEU agreement between the USA and Russia.

  20. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1988 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), were in operation during the year. The Environmental Committee, which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB), continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY88 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations. Over the last two years the Department of Energy conducted major environmental audits at all of its facilities, including PPPL. No significant environmental concerns were noted as a result of the inspection and sampling at PPPL. 43 refs., 25 figs., 33 tabs.

  1. Hydrogen program summary Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program summary provides stakeholders within the hydrogen community with a snapshop of important advances that have occurred in the National Hydrogen Program over the fiscal year, including industry interactions and cooperation. The document will also be used to encourage additional potential industrial partners to join the Hydrogen Program Team. Fiscal Year 1994 marked a turning point for the Hydrogen Program, with a budget that grew significantly. The focus of the program was broadened to include development of hydrogen production technologies using municipal solid waste and biomass, in addition to an increased emphasis on industrial involvement and near-term demonstration projects. In order to maintain its near- and long-term balance, the Hydrogen Program will continue with basic, fundamental research that provides the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff investment in hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  2. Solid waste 30-year volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Armacost, L.L.; DeForest, T.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Williams, N.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site is described in this report. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste that will require treatment, storage, and disposal at Hanford`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during the 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The data used to complete this document were collected from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently, or are planning to, ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site. An analysis of the data suggests that over 300,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed at Hanford`s SWOC over the next 30 years. An extensive effort was made this year to collect this information. The 1993 solid waste forecast was used as a starting point, which identified approximately 100,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste to be sent to the SWOC. After analyzing the forecast waste volume, it was determined that additional waste was expected from the tank waste remediation system (TWRS), onsite decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities, and onsite remedial action (RA) activities. Data presented in this report establish a starting point for solid waste management planning. It is recognized that forecast estimates will vary (typically increasing) as facility planning and missions continue to change and become better defined, but the information presented still provides useful insight into Hanford`s future solid waste management requirements.

  3. Sandia Energy - Asian-American Engineer of the Year (AAEOY) Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6Andy Armstrong Home

  4. Five Years: Retrospective and Prospective Hughes: Five years ago when we started this report,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be entitled "Apocalypse Now." The stock markets posted their third straight year of declines, and SITAR depends on the willingness of businesses and investors to take risks. While heroic consumers have kept

  5. Hanford year 2000 Business Continuity Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGGENKAMP, S.L.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Year 2000 (Y2K) effort is to ensure that the Hanford site successfully continues its mission as we approach and enter the 21th century. The Y2K Business Continuity Planning process provides a structured approach to identify Y2K risks to the site and to mitigate these risks through Y2K Contingency Planning, ''Zero-Day'' Transition Planning and Emergency Preparedness. This document defines the responsibilities, processes and plans for Hanford's Y2K Business Continuity. It identifies proposed business continuity drills, tentative schedule and milestones.

  6. Pennsylvania company prepares year-end review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Equitable Resources, Inc., in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reports that consolidated income for calendar year 1989 was $50.9 million, or $2.43 per share, up from 1988's $47.1 million, or $2.27 per share. The difference was primarily due to a general increase in retail rates which became effective in January 1989 for distribution customers in the state. A December 1989 settlement of a pipeline subsidiary's rate increase also added to the increase. The rate increase had been in effect since 1986, but the full effect had been reserved pending the outcome of regulatory proceedings, the company stated.

  7. Accountability report. Fiscal Year 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consolidates several performance-related reports into a single financial management report. Information in this report includes information previously reported in the following documents: (1) US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) annual financial statement, (2) NRC Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, and (3) NRC Chairman`s semiannual report to Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations. This report also contains performance measures. The report is organized into the following subtopics: information about the US NRC, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement for Fiscal Year 1996. 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  9. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  10. Tropical Western Pacific: A Year in Darwin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z SiteManhattanPacific: A Year in Darwin C.

  11. Calendar Year 2001 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year

  12. Calendar Year 2002 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year2

  13. Calendar Year 2003 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical1 Calendar Year23

  14. Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year

  15. Calendar Year 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America UpdateCX-001638:6 Categorical13 Calendar Year4

  16. Secretary Moniz's First Year | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle SchoolPhysicsDeliveryforDepartmentAcademy ofFirst Year

  17. New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-ZeroNew Wave Power ProjectTom WalshYears

  18. Property:EndYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolveRtoSpp Jump to:Ease of ApplicationEndYear Jump

  19. Working Gas Volume Change from Year Ago

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear Jan Feb Marper3

  20. Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewable Energy, U.S. DepartmentTechnology Ten Year Site Plans Ten