National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ton metric tons

  1. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile ...

  2. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civi Washington, DC Secretary Abraham announced that DOE will dispose of 34 metric tons of surplus weapons grade plutonium by turning the material into mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for use in nuclear reactors. The decision follows an exhaustive Administration review

  3. 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is ...

  4. 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOEs Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  5. 12,877,644 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 1, 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  6. NNSA Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material August 25, 2008 WASHINGTON, D.C. -Today the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced that it successfully eliminated 100 metric tons of U.S. highly enriched uranium (HEU), enough for thousands of nuclear weapons. For the last decade, the U.S. HEU disposition program has eliminated surplus HEU from the nuclear weapons program by downblending

  7. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weapons Stockpile | Department of Energy to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will

  8. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of President Obama’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today that its Illinois Basin-Decatur Project successfully captured and stored one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) and injected it into a deep saline formation.

  9. Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric Ton Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 30, Allentown, PA-based Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. successfully captured and transported, via pipeline, its 3 millionth metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) to be used for enhanced oil recovery. This achievement highlights the ongoing success of a carbon capture and storage (CCS) project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

  10. In Milestone, Energy Department Projects Safely and Permanently Store 10 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carbon Capture and Storage projects supported by the Department reached a milestone of 10 million tons of carbon dioxide.

  11. 12,893,780 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 19, 2016 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 12,893,780 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 19, 2016 12,893,780 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 19, 2016 This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions from 210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the

  12. Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 3 Total Mobile Combustion 1 Stationary Combustion 2 Total Waste Combustion Human Sewage in Wastewater Total Nitrogen Fertilization of Soils Crop Residue Burning Solid Waste of Domesticated Animals Total 1980 60 44 104 1 10 11 364 1 75 440 88 642 1981 63 44 106 1 10 11 364 2 74 440 84 641 1982 67 42 108 1 10 11 339 2 74 414 80 614 1983 71 43 114

  13. Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 9 Total 5 Coal Mining Natural Gas Systems 1 Petroleum Systems 2 Mobile Com- bustion 3 Stationary Com- bustion 4 Total 5 Landfills Waste- water Treatment 6 Total 5 Enteric Fermen- tation 7 Animal Waste 8 Rice Cultivation Crop Residue Burning Total 5 1980 3.06 4.42 NA 0.28 0.45 8.20 10.52 0.52 11.04 5.47 2.87 0.48 0.04 8.86 0.17 28.27 1981 2.81 5.02 NA .27

  14. Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Total 2,9 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 5 Jet Fuel Kero- sene LPG 6 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 7 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total Wood 10 Waste 11 Fuel Ethanol 12 Bio- diesel Total 1949 1,118 270 12 140 NA 42 13 7 329 8 244 25 820 2,207 145 NA NA NA 145 1950 1,152 313 14 168 NA 48 16 9 357 8 273 26 918 2,382 147 NA NA

  15. Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110 26 239 140 1,095 50 NA NA 50

  16. Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Jet Fuel LPG 5 Lubricants Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Total Fuel Ethanol 8 Biodiesel Total 1949 161 NA 12 30 NA (s) 4 306 91 443 6 611 NA NA NA 1950 146 7 14 35 NA (s) 5 332 95 481 6 640 NA NA NA 1951 129 11 18 42 NA (s) 6 360 102 529 7 675 NA NA NA

  17. Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    commissioned LEED Platinum Building | Department of Energy Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building This project will operate; collect data; and market the energy savings and capital costs of a recently commissioned chiller geothermal heat pump project to promote the wide-spread adoption of this mature

  18. Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 8 Waste 9 Fuel Ethanol 10 Total 1949 148 19 16 3 2 7 NA 28 55 58 280 2 NA NA 2 1950 147 21 19 3 2 7 NA 33 66 63 297 2 NA NA 2 1951 125 25 21 4 3 8 NA 34 70 69 289 2 NA NA 2 1952 112 28 22 4 3 8 NA 35 71 73

  19. Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1951 235 42 2 NA 29 31 NA NA 308 1 NA 1 1952 240 50 2 NA 31 33 NA NA 323 1 NA 1 1953 260 57 3 NA 38 40 NA NA 358 (s) NA (s)

  20. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Tech Jump to: navigation, search Name: E-TON Solar Tech Place: Tainan, Taiwan Zip: 709 Product: Taiwan-based manufacturer of PV cells. Coordinates: 22.99721, 120.180862...

  1. Bioenergy Impacts … Billion Dry Tons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Oak Ridge National Laboratory published research that shows that U.S. resources could sustainably produce by 2030 at least one billion dry tons of non-food biomass resources, yielding up to 60 billion gallons of biofuels, as well as bio- based chemicals, products, and electricity. This could potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 500 million tons per year, create 1.5 million new jobs, and keep about $200 billion extra in the U.S. economy each year. Research is showing that U.S.

  2. "(Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ....0280756469,0.02562455361,0.02345646124 " China",2293,5558,5862,6284,7716,9057,10514,11945...,0.4312535075,0.4478837352,0.7550810962 " China",0.1064692737,0.1961919973,0.2032923089,0....

  3. Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wankerl, M.W.; Schmid, S.P.

    1995-12-31

    In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

  4. Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the Bioeconomy Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Bryce Stokes, Senior Advisor, CNJV stokes_bioenergy_2015.pdf (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications Biomass Econ 101: Measuring the Technological Improvements on Feedstocks Costs WEBINAR: A CHANGING MARKET FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOPRODUCTS 2016 Billion-Ton Report Factsheets

  5. 2016 Billion-Ton Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Billion-Ton Report 2016 Billion-Ton Report Alison Goss Eng, of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office, Tim Theiss, Laboratory Relationship Manager of the Bioenergy Technologies Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Tim Rials, Director of the Tennessee Forest Products Center, provide background and their insights into the production and contents of the soon-to-be-released 2016 Billion-Ton Report. The 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving

  6. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  7. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources | Department of Energy New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass

  8. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American ... of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. ...

  9. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - ...

  10. DOE Announces Webinars on Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an Opportunity in ... from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy ... Tribal Energy Financing Models, and More DOE Announces ...

  11. 2016 Billion-Ton Report Factsheets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Factsheets 2016 Billion-Ton Report Factsheets 2016 Billion-Ton Report Factsheets 2016_billion_ton_report_preview_factsheet.pdf (1.13 MB) summary_and_comparison_factsheet_bt16.pdf (299.96 KB) forest_resources_factsheet_bt16.pdf (217.66 KB) agricultural_residues_facsheet_bt16.pdf (745.74 KB) municipal_solid_waste_factsheet_bt16.pdf (341.29 KB) algae_research_factsheet_bt16.pdf (364.99 KB) to_the_biorefinery_factsheet_bt16.pdf (325.45 KB) More Documents & Publications A Summary of the

  12. Picture of the Week: The 100-Ton Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 The 100-Ton Test Before the historic Trinity test on July 16th, 1945, Los Alamos scientists conducted a host of other experiments designed to ensure that they would be ready to...

  13. Operational and maintenance manual, 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-03-03

    The 100 ton hydraulic trailer is used to remove the mitigation pump from Tank 241SY101. This manual explains how to inspect, operate, and maintain the trailer in a state of readiness.

  14. 305 Building 2 ton bridge crane and monorail assembly analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axup, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    The analyses in the appendix of this document evaluate the integrity of the existing bridge crane structure, as depicted on drawing H-3-34292, for a bridge crane and monorail assembly with a load rating of 2 tons. This bridge crane and monorail assembly is a modification of a 1 1/2 ton rated manipulator bridge crane which originally existed in the 305 building.

  15. Sneak Peek to the 2016 Billion-Ton Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Analysis * Potential economic availability of biomass feedstocks under speci- fed market scenarios, including currently used resources * Cost of production, harvesting, and transportation; potential yield range, and economic supply for 30 candidate feedstocks (>1 billion dry tons/year) Resource Commercialization * Advanced feedstock supply system simulation, expansion of feedstock production over time in response to simulated markets. Volume 2 Environmental Sustainability Analysis

  16. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  17. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy...

  18. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act Funds | Department of Energy Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with

  19. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry | Department of Energy Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry An update to the 2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply" For the most recent report, view the 2016 Billion-Ton Report. billion_ton_update.pdf (6.41 MB) More Documents & Publications 2016

  20. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, R.A.

    1995-03-06

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

  1. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodn; Schumann, M., E-mail: laura.baudis@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: alexkish@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: marrodan@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch [Physik Institut, University of Zrich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zrich, CH-8057 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 230 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ? 2 10{sup ?48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV?c{sup ?2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ? 6 GeV?c{sup ?2} to cross sections above ? 4 10{sup ?45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  2. AmeriFlux US-Ton Tonzi Ranch

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ton Tonzi Ranch. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the Tonzi Ranch site is classified as an oak savanna woodland on privately owned land. Managed by local rancher, Russell Tonzi, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. The overstory is dominated by blue oak trees (40% of total vegetation) with intermittent grey pine trees (3 trees/ha). Understory species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. These two distinctive layers operate in and out from one another. Growing season of the understory is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May. In contrast, the deciduous blue oak trees are dormant during the rainy winter months and reach maximum LAI in April. The blue oak ecosystem rings the Great Central Valley of California, inhabiting the lower reaches of the Sierra Nevada foothills.

  3. 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioeconomy | Department of Energy Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy, Volume I Download the full interactive report to view visualizations of potential energy crop production, agricultural residues, forestry production and other scenarios on the BioenergyKDF. 2016_billion_ton_report.pdf (29.08 MB) More

  4. A Summary of the Results of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy, Vol. 1 | Department of Energy A Summary of the Results of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy, Vol. 1 A Summary of the Results of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy, Vol. 1 bt16_webinar_20160721.pdf (3.32 MB) More Documents & Publications Biomass Econ 101: Measuring the Technological Improvements on Feedstocks Costs 2016 Billion-Ton Report Factsheets

  5. Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from groundwater across the site ahead of schedule and pumped a record volume of water through treatment facilities to remove contamination, with more than 130 tons of...

  6. U.S. Billion-Ton Update. Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-08-01

    This report is an update to the 2005 Billion-Ton Study that addresses shotcomings and questions that arose from the original report..

  7. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A large-scale carbon dioxide storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected.

  8. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    The US regulations governing the packaging and transportation of UF{sub 6} cylinders are contained in the publication 10CFR71. Under the current 10CFR71 regulations, packages are classified according to Fissile Class I, II, or III and a corresponding transport index (TI). UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2}-tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class II packages with a TI of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class I with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders are not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % since they have no approved overpack. This work reviews the suitability of 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages for reclassification as Fissile Class I with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10CFR71 criteria for Fissile Class I packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear suitable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from

  10. DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (Grand Junction, CO) ― The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has safely moved another million tons of uranium mill tailings from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

  11. Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel ...

  12. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed- Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996.

  13. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Bioproducts Industry An update to the 2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply" ...

  14. Two 175 ton geothermal chiller heat pumps for leed platinum building

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    technology demonstration project. Operation data, data collection and marketing (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Two 175 ton geothermal chiller heat pumps for leed platinum building technology demonstration project. Operation data, data collection and marketing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two 175 ton geothermal chiller heat pumps for leed platinum building technology demonstration project. Operation data, data collection and marketing The activities funded by this grant

  15. DOE Announces Webinars on Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunity in Innovative Sensors | Department of Energy Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an Opportunity in Innovative Sensors DOE Announces Webinars on Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an Opportunity in Innovative Sensors May 5, 2016 - 9:06am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is

  16. Future Bioeconomy Supported by More Than One Billion Tons of Biomass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential | Department of Energy Future Bioeconomy Supported by More Than One Billion Tons of Biomass Potential Future Bioeconomy Supported by More Than One Billion Tons of Biomass Potential July 12, 2016 - 2:15pm Addthis Within 25 years, the United States could produce enough biomass to support a bioeconomy, including renewable aquatic and terrestrial biomass resources that could be used for energy and to develop products for economic, environmental, social, and national security benefits.

  17. Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric Ton Milestone Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric Ton Milestone June 30, 2016 - ...

  18. Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000 tons of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    soil | Department of Energy Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000 tons of soil Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000 tons of soil DE-DT0010454-Task-Order-4 Airport Landfill Construction Activities The purpose of this task order (TO) is to support the EM-LA Field Office in replacing the cover at the Los Alamos County Airport Landfill. The new cover design is an evapotranspiration (ET) cover. Contractor: TSAY Corporation DOE Contracting

  19. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry U.S. BILLI N-TON UPDATE U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Energy Effciency and Renewable Energy Offce of the Biomass Program August 2011 Prepared by OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6335 managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 This report was prepared as an account of

  20. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) 's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Some 23,000 tons of asphalt removed during this summer's UPF site work have been put to use throughout the site. Potholes and gravel roads are now "paved" with the recycled asphalt that has been ground into a material called base course. Unlike gravel, the material tends to rebind into a solid form as it is packed down,

  1. REGIONAL FEEDSTOCK PARTNERSHIP SUMMARY REPORT Enabling the Billion-Ton Vision

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEEDSTOCK PARTNERSHIP SUMMARY REPORT Enabling the Billion-Ton Vision July 2016 Regional Feedstock Partnership Report | i Regional Feedstock Partnership Summary Report: Enabling the Billion-Ton Vision A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office July 2016 Prepared by Managed by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract DE-AC07-015D14517 This report was prepared as an account of

  2. 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (Grand Junction, CO) ― Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah.

  3. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. . AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  4. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Conrad, Jan; Edsj, Joakim E-mail: savage@fysik.su.se E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2011-04-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions.

  5. Criticality Safety Review of 2 1/2-, 10-, and 14-Ton UF(Sub 6) Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2 1/2 tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class II packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class I with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum 235U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2 1/2-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class I with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class I packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U.

  6. Occidental Chemical's Energy From Waste facility: 3,000,000 tons later

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasins, G.F. )

    1988-01-01

    Occidental Chemical's Energy From Waste's cogeneration facility continues to be one of the most successful RDF plants in the U.S. The facility began operation in 1980 and was an operational success after a lengthy 2-1/2 year start-up and redesign, utilizing the air classification technology to produce RDF. In 1984, the plant was converted to a simplified shred and burn concept, significantly improving overall economics and viability of the operation. After processing 3.0 million tons the facility is a mature operation with a well developed experience base in long range operation and maintenance of the equipment utilized for processing and incinerating municipal solid waste.

  7. An ounce of prevention, a ton of cure | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An ounce of prevention, a ... An ounce of prevention, a ton of cure Posted: June 24, 2015 - 3:11pm Aaron Spoon of Power Operations performs maintenance on 13.8 kV transformers 145 and 145A. Photo by Scott Fraker Y-12 recently saved time, taxpayer dollars, effort and potential injuries by taking a 72-hour planned simultaneous outage of power, steam and air systems. The weekend outage allowed a small army of Y-12 infrastructure, facilities and utilities workers to make repairs and perform

  8. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were

  9. Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern .0 .0 .8 9.1 .0 .0 .0 .8 9.1 9.8 Ohio .0 .0 17.4 5.7 .0 .0 .0 17.4 5.7 23.1 Pennsylvania 3.8 3.3 18.9 .8 .0 .0 .0 22.7 4.2 26.9 Virginia .1

  10. Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons) Year Rank Mining Method Location Total 1 Bituminous Coal 1 Subbituminous Coal Lignite Anthracite 1 Underground Surface 1 East of the Mississippi 1 West of the Mississippi 1 1949 437,868,000 [2] [2] 42,702,000 358,854,000 121,716,000 444,199,000 36,371,000 480,570,000 1950 516,311,000 [2] [2] 44,077,000 421,000,000 139,388,000 524,374,000 36,014,000 560,388,000 1951 533,665,000 [2] [2] 42,670,000 442,184,000 134,151,000 541,703,000 34,632,000 576,335,000

  11. Table 7.4 Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Short Tons) Year Australia New Zealand Canada Mexico Colombia Venezuela China India Indonesia Europe South Africa Other Total Norway Poland Russia Ukraine United Kingdom Other Total 2000 167,595 0 1,923,434 6,671 7,636,614 2,038,774 19,646 205 718,149 0 0 1,212 0 238 0 1,450 0 85 12,512,623 2001 315,870 24,178 2,571,415 8,325 11,176,191 3,335,258 109,877 1,169 882,455 15,933 514,166 219,077 0 75,704 12 824,892 440,408 97,261 19,787,299 2002 821,280 0

  12. Table 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons) Year Canada Brazil Europe Japan Other 3 Total Belgium 1 Denmark France Germany 2 Italy Nether- lands Spain Turkey United Kingdom Other 3 Total 1960 12,843 1,067 1,116 130 794 4,566 4,899 2,837 331 NA – 2,440 17,113 5,617 1,341 37,981 1961 12,135 994 971 80 708 4,326 4,797 2,552 228 NA – 2,026 15,688 6,614 974 36,405 1962 12,302 1,327 1,289 38 851 5,056 5,978 3,320 766 NA 2 1,848 19,148 6,465 973 40,215 1963 14,557 1,161

  13. Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour 1) Year Mining Method Location Total 2 Underground Surface 2 East of the Mississippi West of the Mississippi Underground Surface 2 Total 2 Underground Surface 2 Total 2 1949 0.68 [3] 1.92 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.72 1950 .72 [3] 1.96 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .76 1951 .76 [3] 2.00 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .80 1952 .80 [3] 2.10 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .84 1953 .88 [3] 2.22 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .93 1954 1.00 [3] 2.48 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA

  14. Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton) Year Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite 1 Anthracite Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 4.90 [4] 33.80 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.37 16.35 [R] 8.90 61.38 [R] 5.24 36.14 [R] 1950 4.86 [4] 33.16 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.41 16.44 [R] 9.34 63.73 [R] 5.19 35.41 [R] 1951 4.94 [4] 31.44 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.44 15.53 [R] 9.94 63.26 [R] 5.29 33.67 [R] 1952 4.92 [4] 30.78 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.39 14.95 [R] 9.58 59.94 [R]

  15. Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

    1985-05-01

    The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

  16. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  17. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  18. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore » requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  19. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  20. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  1. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used

  2. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    One Million Metric Tons of Carbon Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon January 8, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 ...

  3. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  4. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  5. NNSA Announces Contract to Downblend 12 Metric Tons of Surplus Highly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Assembly at Savannah River Site and Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Arrival of Plutonium and Uranium from Japan's Fast Critical Assembly at Savannah River Site and Y-12 National Security Complex June 06, 2016 WASHINGTON (June 6, 2016) - A shipment of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)'s Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) reactor arrived safely at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah

  6. Taking the One-Metric-Ton Challenge | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has undertaken an extensive dedicated maintenance effort to improve metal production ... Production, Program Management and Maintenance - proposed that their response to the ...

  7. 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The site is managed by MRCSP's partner, Core Energy, and is in the vicinity of natural gas processing plants that provide CO2 for the enhanced oil recovery operations. Southeast ...

  8. 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Air Products has successfully retrofitted its two Port Arthur SMRs with a vacuum swing adsorption system to separate the CO2 from the process gas stream, followed by compression ...

  9. 10,422,136 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of August 21, 2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed below. Regional Carbon...

  10. NNSA Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    secure and less expensive nuclear weapons complex. ... sale of LEU for safe use in power and research reactors around the world. ... NNSA maintains and enhances the safety, security, ...

  11. 10,651,176 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of September 16, 2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Products has successfully retrofitted its two Port Arthur SMRs with a vacuum swing adsorption system to separate the CO2 from the process gas stream, followed by compression and...

  12. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration review of non-proliferation programs, including alternative technologies to dispose of surplus plutonium to meet the non-proliferation goals agreed to by the United ...

  13. U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Read more information about the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Media contact(s): Megan Barnett, (202) 586-4940 Julianne Smith, (202) 586-7371 Addthis Related ...

  14. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  15. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  16. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15

    land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  17. A Summary of the Results of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy, Vol. 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Summary of the Results of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing Domestic Resources for a Thriving Bioeconomy, Vol. 1 July 21, 2016 Dr. Mark Elless U.S. Department of Energy Dr. Matthew Langholtz Mr. Laurence Eaton Mr. Aaron Myers Oak Ridge National Laboratory Dr. Bryce Stokes Allegheny Science and Technology - Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Agenda I. Introduction: Bioenergy Technologies Office Mission and Organization - Mark Elless, Bioenergy

  18. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply, April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country’s present petroleum consumption – the goal set by the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  19. Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2 Carbon Pollution Being Captured, ...

  20. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30

    - 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  1. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L.; Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  2. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  3. Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

  4. 12,893,780 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 19, 2016 | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following is a list of the oversight results by the Office of Inspector General regarding The Department's programs, grants, and projects funded under the Recovery Act. June 17, 2014 Audit Report: OAS-RA-14-04 Selected Activities of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office April 14, 2014 Special Report: OAS-RA-L-14-01 Allegations Regarding the Department of Energy's State Energy Program Funding to South Dakota February 19, 2014 Special Report:

  5. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33% was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  6. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-31

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  7. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  8. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tons of CO2 | Department of Energy Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2 Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2 June 26, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis Aerial view of Air Products’ existing steam methane reforming facility at Port Arthur, Texas, with new carbon-capture units and central co-gen and CO2 product compressor. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. Aerial view of Air Products' existing steam

  9. Billion Ton Study … A Historical Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... http:georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.govceqadvanced-energy.html 16 | ... 2006 http:georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.govstateoftheunion2006energysection3 17 | ...

  10. Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metrics Metrics Los Alamos expands its innovation network by engaging in sponsored research and licensing across technical disciplines. These agreements are the basis of a working relationship with industry and other research institutions and highlight the diversity of our collaborations. Los Alamos has a remarkable 70-year legacy of creating entirely new technologies that have revolutionized the country's understanding of science and engineering. Collaborations Data from Fiscal Year 2014. FY14

  11. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient

  12. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    relocations. It took nearly three days to disassemble the machine and prepare it for transport. The machine was partially disassembled, removing auxiliary pieces from the main...

  13. Webinar: Building the Billion Ton Bioeconomy | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Join the Biomass Research and Development (R&D) Board Operations Committee at a bioeconomy listening session on Thursday, May 5, 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Eastern Time. During the listening ...

  14. Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    material in the facility, a volume of soil and debris that would fill Seattle's ... The landfill accepts contaminated soil, demolition debris and solid waste from cleanup ...

  15. Billion-Ton Update and Ongoing Resource Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Update Combined into Composite * Agricultural resources - Crop residues - Grains to ... * Secondary processing residues and wastes are estimated using technical ...

  16. 14,700 tons of silver at Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calutron magnets was because of a shortage of copper during the war. As you will recall, Gen. Groves sent Col. Nichols to arrange for the purchase of as much uranium ore as could...

  17. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from cleanup operations across the...

  18. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy ...

  19. Enabling the Billion-Ton Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agreement for Pathways Program Employee Agreement for Pathways Program Employee Agreement for Pathways Program (331.12 KB) More Documents & Publications Career Pathways Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) DOE Mentoring Guidance and Program Plan Book1 Department of Energy

    Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns

  20. Evaluation of the 30 Ton CHA Crane Wheel Axle Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RICH, J.W.

    2002-06-04

    An existing design for eccentric bushings was utilized and updated as necessary to accommodate minor adjustment as required to correct wheel alignment on the North West Idler wheel. The design is revised to install eccentric bushings on only one end.

  1. Final TEchnical REport Two 175 ton geothermal chiller heat pumps...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... was generated by coal-fired plants, producing approximately 900 grams of C02 per kWh. ... Exposure to the working chiller plant (see images 1, 4, and 5) provided valuable ...

  2. EECBG SEP Attachment 1 - Process metric list

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    systems installed (tons) 3e. Biomass (non-transport) system installed Number of biomass ... Bike lanes installed Length of bike lanes installed (linear feet) 12k. Vehicle ...

  3. SECTION C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... tons (2,100 metric tons) of spent nuclear fuel, 11.5 tons (10.5 metric tons) of ... and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. ...

  4. Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Marilyn; Akbari, Hashem; Blumstein, Carl; Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard; Calwell, Chris; Carter, Sheryl; Cavanagh, Ralph; Chang, Audrey; Claridge, David; Craig, Paul; Diamond, Rick; Eto, Joseph H.; Fulkerson, William; Gadgil, Ashok; Geller, Howard; Goldemberg, Jose; Goldman, Chuck; Goldstein, David B.; Greenberg, Steve; Hafemeister, David; Harris, Jeff; Harvey, Hal; Heitz, Eric; Hirst, Eric; Hummel, Holmes; Kammen, Dan; Kelly, Henry; Laitner, Skip; Levine, Mark; Lovins, Amory; Masters, Gil; McMahon, James E.; Meier, Alan; Messenger, Michael; Millhone, John; Mills, Evan; Nadel, Steve; Nordman, Bruce; Price, Lynn; Romm, Joe; Ross, Marc; Rufo, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant; Schipper, Lee; Schneider, Stephen H; Sweeney, James L; Verdict, Malcolm; Vorsatz, Diana; Wang, Devra; Weinberg, Carl; Wilk, Richard; Wilson, John; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-03-01

    The growing investment by governments and electric utilities in energy efficiency programs highlights the need for simple tools to help assess and explain the size of the potential resource. One technique that is commonly used in this effort is to characterize electricity savings in terms of avoided power plants, because it is easier for people to visualize a power plant than it is to understand an abstraction such as billions of kilowatt-hours. Unfortunately, there is no standardization around the characteristics of such power plants. In this letter we define parameters for a standard avoided power plant that have physical meaning and intuitive plausibility, for use in back-of-the-envelope calculations. For the prototypical plant this article settles on a 500 MW existing coal plant operating at a 70percent capacity factor with 7percent T&D losses. Displacing such a plant for one year would save 3 billion kW h per year at the meter and reduce emissions by 3 million metric tons of CO2 per year. The proposed name for this metric is the Rosenfeld, in keeping with the tradition among scientists of naming units in honor of the person most responsible for the discovery and widespread adoption of the underlying scientific principle in question--Dr. Arthur H. Rosenfeld.

  5. STAR METRICS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy continues to define Phase II of the STAR METRICS program, a collaborative initiative to track Research and Development expenditures and their outcomes. Visit the STAR METRICS website for...

  6. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department today recognized more than 120 manufacturers that are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve their bottom lines. ...

  7. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Read more about it. Dec 29, 2015 at 1:00 am Blog archive April 2016 (12) March 2016 (28) February 2016 (21) January 2016 (21) December 2015 (18) November 2015 (11) October 2015 ...

  8. Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Photo of the Week: Inside the 60-Inch Cyclotron Super HILAC (Super Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator) was one of the first particle accelerators that could accelerate heavier elements ...

  9. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven members of the Regional Carbon...

  10. 1984 Virginia coal mine directory: producers of 100,000 tons or more

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbard, W.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this directory is to identify major Virginia coal sources for the use of prospective buyers and other interested parties. It is divided into lists: (1) 1984 Virginia coal production, (2) eighty-five largest companies identified by MSHA, (3) alphabetical listing of Virginia coal mines, (4) alphabetical listing of coal mines by county, and (5) coal mines rated by production figures. The rating order for the last list includes factors affecting productivity such as type of mine, number of injuries, seam thickness, total production, and average employment.

  11. Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and Grand County Council Vice Chair ... uranium mill tailings from the site to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction. ...

  12. A ton-scale bolometric detector for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedretti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2009-12-16

    After an introduction on neutrinoless double beta decay physics, a description of CUORE and CUORICINO experiments, detectors and results are reported. The actual efforts and next steps of the CUORE Project, required to probe the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino effective Majorana mass, are also described.

  13. Table 7.8 Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Sources: * 1949-1975Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Coke and Coal Chemicals" chapter. * 1976-1980U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Report, Coke and ...

  14. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the removal of a massive concrete vault that once held two 15,000-gallon stainless steel tanks used to collect highly contaminated waste from Hanford's 300 Area laboratories as ...

  15. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2005-03-02

    This ninth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DEFC04- 2002AL68080 presents the project status at the end of December 2004, and covers activities in the ninth project quarter, October - December 2004.

  16. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2006-03-23

    This thirteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of December 2005, and covers activities in the thirteenth project quarter, October 2005 ? December 2005.

  17. Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2007-03-31

    This eighteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of March 2007, and covers activities in the eighteenth project quarter, January 2007 – March 2007.

  18. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasoo, Lembit

    2003-02-11

    The mine proving ground to be used for the hybrid off highway vehicle (OHV) demonstration was visited, to obtain haul route profile data and OHV vehicle data. A 6500-ft haul mission with 7% average grade was selected. Enhancements made to a dynamic model of hybrid missions provided capability to analyze hybrid OHV performance. A benefits study defined relationships between fuel and productivity benefits and hybrid system parameters. OHV hybrid system requirements were established, and a survey of candidate energy storage technology characteristics was carried out. Testing of the performance of an existing power battery bank verified its suitability for use in the hybrid OHV demonstration.

  19. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2005-05-05

    This tenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-2002AL68080 presents the project status at the end of March 2005, and covers activities in the tenth project quarter, January-March 2005.

  20. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2004-11-08

    The vehicle model has been improved with coastdown testing. The hybrid system was simplified by moving to one battery technology. Full-scale testing apparatus is under construction; majority of parts are ordered and received.

  1. Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office’s 2014 Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Workers with EM’s Richland Operations Office and its contractors made progress this year in several areas of Hanford site cleanup that helped protect employees, the public, environment, and Columbia River.

  2. Lubricants Market to Record 44,165.11 Kilo Tons Volume by 2020...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over 50% of the global market share. Automotive oils sector is further segmented into hydraulic oil, engine oil, and gear oil. Improving GDP in developing nations such as India and...

  3. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilato...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that ...

  4. Resilience Metrics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Quadrennial Energy Review Technical Workshop on Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure April 28, 2014 Infrastructure Assurance Center ...

  5. Metric Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y 14 14 Value Metrics - Work to date Reliability Outage duration and frequency Momentary outages Power Quality measures Security Ratio of distributed ...

  6. performance metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance metrics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  7. Metric Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Smart Grid Metrics Monitoring our Progress Smart Grid Implementation Workshop Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team June 19, 2008 1 Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Many are working on the Smart Grid FERC DOE-OE Grid 2030 GridWise Alliance EEI NERC (FM) DOE/NETL Modern Grid

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Data presented in the State Energy Data System (SEDS) are expressed predominately in units that historically have been used in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic feet, and short tons. The metric conversion factors presented in Table E1 can be used to calculate the metric-unit equivalents of values expressed in U.S. customary units. For example, 500 short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500 short tons x 0.9071847 metric tons/short ton = 453.6 metric

  9. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shows the volume taken up by one metric ton of carbon dioxide. In 2013, the United States emitted the equivalent of 6.7 billion metric tons. By tracking how much greenhouse...

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- ... 1,843 349 63 236 2,491 1 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons ...

  11. Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Final Technical Report for DUSEL Research and Development on Sub-Kelvin Germanium Detectors for Ton Scale Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Blas Cabrera

    2012-09-10

    We have supported one graduate student and a small percentage of fabrication staff on $135k per year for three years plus one no cost extension year on this DUSEL R&D grant. ? There were three themes within our research program: (1) how to improve the radial sensitivity for single sided phonon readout with four equal area sensors of which three form a central circle and fourth a surrounding ring; (2) how to instrument double sided phonon readouts which will give us better surface event rejection and increased fiducial volume for future CDMS style detectors; and (3) can we manufacture much larger Ge detectors using six inch diameter material which is not suitable for standard gamma ray spectroscopy.

  14. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 11, DOE/AL68080-TSR11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2005-09-26

    This eleventh quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2005, and covers activities in the eleventh project quarter, April 2005-June 2005.

  15. Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 2, DOE/AL68080-TSR02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lembit Salasoo

    2003-05-16

    The hybrid OHV Energy Storage System concept was defined to be a mix of two energy storage technologies. The energy management system hardware configuration was identified, based on available GE Transportation Systems hardware. The subscale demonstration energy management system protection, performance, and sequencing requirements have been specified. A set of hybrid energy management strategies has been developed.

  16. Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 19, DOE/AL68080-TSR19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2007-06-30

    This nineteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2007, and covers activities in the nineteenth project quarter, April 2007 – June 2007.

  17. Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

    2008-12-31

    The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

  18. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy and bioproducts industry: The technical feasibility of a billion-ton annual supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, Robert D.; Wright, Lynn L.; Turhollow, Anthony F.; Graham, Robin L.; Stokes, Bryce J.; Erbach, Donald C.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30% or more of the country's present petroleum consumption.

  19. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Helium-Based Soundwave Chiller: Trillium: A Helium-Based Sonic Chiller- Tons of Freezing with 0 GWP Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Penn State is designing a freezer that substitutes the use of sound waves and environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional freezers. Called a thermoacoustic chiller, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the chiller is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. Penn State’s chiller uses helium gas to replace synthetic refrigerants. Because helium does not burn, explode or combine with other chemicals, it is an environmentally-friendly alternative to other polluting refrigerants. Penn State is working to apply this technology on a large scale.

  1. Energy Department Finalizes $1.2 Billion Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project funds more than 350 jobs and avoids more than 425,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually

  2. Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides ... 63,170 236,324 2,491,024 1Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons ...

  3. ARM - 2008 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  4. ARM - 2006 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  5. ARM - 2007 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  6. Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",19281,38 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",3558,44 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.4,28 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",6.4,1 " Carbon dioxide (lbsMWh)",1295,20 ...

  7. Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",61909,13 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",67635,10 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2,19 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",0.8,38 " Carbon dioxide (lbsMWh)",996,34 ...

  8. Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",47048,20 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",37289,23 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.9,9 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.5,17 " Carbon dioxide (lbsMWh)",1332,18 ...

  9. EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statement This Final SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which a disposition...

  10. Microsoft Word - Summary.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... of the NTS Air Quality Operating Permit, which was issued by the Nevada Bureau of Air Pollution Control in June 2004. During that year, an estimated 3.32 metric tons (3.66 tons) ...

  11. NIF Target Shot Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    target shot metrics NIF Target Shot Metrics Exp Cap - Experimental Capability Natl Sec Appl - National Security Applications DS - Discovery Science ICF - Inertial Confinement Fusion HED - High Energy Density For internal LLNL firewall viewing - if the page is blank, please open www.google.com to flush out BCB

  12. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  13. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition This Draft SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which DOE has not made a disposition decision, including 7.1 metric tons (7.8 tons) of plutonium from pits that were declared excess to national defense needs after publication of the 2007

  14. Metric Construction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Metric Construction Jump to: navigation, search Name: Metric Construction Place: Boston, MA Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test...

  15. Cyber threat metrics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, Jason Neal; Veitch, Cynthia K.; Mateski, Mark Elliot; Michalski, John T.; Harris, James Mark; Trevino, Cassandra M.; Maruoka, Scott

    2012-03-01

    Threats are generally much easier to list than to describe, and much easier to describe than to measure. As a result, many organizations list threats. Fewer describe them in useful terms, and still fewer measure them in meaningful ways. This is particularly true in the dynamic and nebulous domain of cyber threats - a domain that tends to resist easy measurement and, in some cases, appears to defy any measurement. We believe the problem is tractable. In this report we describe threat metrics and models for characterizing threats consistently and unambiguously. The purpose of this report is to support the Operational Threat Assessment (OTA) phase of risk and vulnerability assessment. To this end, we focus on the task of characterizing cyber threats using consistent threat metrics and models. In particular, we address threat metrics and models for describing malicious cyber threats to US FCEB agencies and systems.

  16. Nuclear Material Disposition | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disposition Nuclear Material Disposition In 1994 the United States declared 174 metric tons of highly enriched uranium as surplus to national security needs. A 2005 declaration added another 200 metric tons, making approximately 182 metric tons of HEU available to be down blended to low-enriched uranium for reactor use. Y-12 tops the short list of the world's most secure, reliable uranium feedstock suppliers for dozens of research and test reactors on six continents. These reactors can be used

  17. Metrics for Energy Resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul E. Roege; Zachary A. Collier; James Mancillas; John A. McDonagh; Igor Linkov

    2014-09-01

    Energy lies at the backbone of any advanced society and constitutes an essential prerequisite for economic growth, social order and national defense. However there is an Achilles heel to today?s energy and technology relationship; namely a precarious intimacy between energy and the fiscal, social, and technical systems it supports. Recently, widespread and persistent disruptions in energy systems have highlighted the extent of this dependence and the vulnerability of increasingly optimized systems to changing conditions. Resilience is an emerging concept that offers to reconcile considerations of performance under dynamic environments and across multiple time frames by supplementing traditionally static system performance measures to consider behaviors under changing conditions and complex interactions among physical, information and human domains. This paper identifies metrics useful to implement guidance for energy-related planning, design, investment, and operation. Recommendations are presented using a matrix format to provide a structured and comprehensive framework of metrics relevant to a system?s energy resilience. The study synthesizes previously proposed metrics and emergent resilience literature to provide a multi-dimensional model intended for use by leaders and practitioners as they transform our energy posture from one of stasis and reaction to one that is proactive and which fosters sustainable growth.

  18. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily

  19. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area- Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford’s former laboratory facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Richland Operations Office announced the removal of a massive concrete vault that once held two 15,000-gallon stainless steel tanks used to collect highly contaminated waste from Hanford’s 300 Area laboratories as part of the River Corridor Closure project.

  20. Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  1. AUDIT REPORT: OAS-L-13-11 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The SNF consists of irradiated reactor fuel and cut up assemblies containing uranium, thorium andor plutonium. The Department stores 34 metric tons of heavy metal SNF primarily in ...

  2. Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel, OAS-L-13...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The SNF consists of irradiated reactor fuel and cut up assemblies containing uranium, thorium andor plutonium. The Department stores 34 metric tons of heavy metal SNF primarily in ...

  3. DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EM's Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) and contractor Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services LLC (BWCS) began operations in 2011 to convert the nation's 800,000-metric-ton ...

  4. Two Colorado-Based Electric Cooperatives Selected as 2014 Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    jobs across the country, provides cost- competitive energy, and eliminates more than 115 electric metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions which is equal to removing 20 million...

  5. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector and source (million metric tons, unless otherwise noted)...

  6. New Energy Efficiency Standards to Help Americans Save Money...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by over 435 million metric tons and save American families and businesses 78 ... use of more than 12 million homes - and save Americans more than 15 billion in ...

  7. Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011)" "metric tons energy-related carbon dioxide per million dollars of GDP" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  8. Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by State (2000-2011)" "metric tons of carbon dioxide per person" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  9. Table 2. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " ,"million metric tons of carbon dioxide",,,,,"shares" "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total",,"Coal","Petrol...

  10. Table 3. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportat...

  11. Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000-2011)" "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011" "State",2000,2001,2002,...

  12. Word Pro - S12

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- ... Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. * Totals may not ...

  13. Energy Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    will show a lower growth trajectory Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2013 carbon dioxide emissions billion metric tons 6 CSIS | Energy Markets Outlook November 16,...

  14. Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    furnaces will save businesses 167 billion on their utility bills and reduce carbon pollution by 885 million metric tons. Read more DOE Releases Funding Opportunity for Emerging...

  15. About

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science, people, technologies close Raising the bar on carbon capture In the United States, industry produces more than 3 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide each year, around...

  16. EIS-0276: Rocky Flats Plutonium Storage, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to provide safe interim storage of approximately 10 metric tons of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS).

  17. Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 ...

  18. EERE Success Story—Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington State Ferries now uses blended biodiesel to run its ferries, preventing the emission of more than 29,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year.

  19. Categorical Exclusion B5.13 Supporting Information for DOE Notice...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Amt Injection metric tonnes (short tons) Injection Scheduled ... Feasibilitysafety of coal seam sequestration ... 8 MGSC Oil-bearing Well Conversion Employ advanced MVA ...

  20. Wednesday, June 16, 2010 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    To date, the program has downblended more than 12 metric tons -- enough for approximately 480 nuclear weapons -- of excess Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) that is not from ...

  1. Microsoft Word - Cover.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... CO 2 metric tons Sector-Specific Industrial ... Emissions From Purchased Energy for Emission Reductions (Not included in emissions ... Generating Efficiency** % J Electrical ...

  2. President Obama Announces Commitments and Executive Actions to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    create jobs and cut carbon pollution by advancing solar deployment and energy efficiency. ... smarter appliances that will cut carbon pollution by more than 380 million metric tons - ...

  3. ORMAT NEVADA | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    It is expected to prevent 301,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions annually. PROJECT STATISTICS: ORMAT NEVADA PROJECT SUMMARY OWNERS Ormat Nevada, Inc. & Ormat ...

  4. SHEPHERDS FLAT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It is expected to prevent 1,000,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions annually. PROJECT STATISTICS: SHEPHERDS FLAT PROJECT SUMMARY OWNER Caithness Energy, LLC LOCATIONS ...

  5. DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource | Department of Energy DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas

  6. Ames Laboratory Metrics | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metrics Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/2016 File (public): PDF icon ameslab_metrics_01-14-16

  7. Variable metric conjugate gradient methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1994-07-01

    1.1 Motivation. In this paper we present a framework that includes many well known iterative methods for the solution of nonsymmetric linear systems of equations, Ax = b. Section 2 begins with a brief review of the conjugate gradient method. Next, we describe a broader class of methods, known as projection methods, to which the conjugate gradient (CG) method and most conjugate gradient-like methods belong. The concept of a method having either a fixed or a variable metric is introduced. Methods that have a metric are referred to as either fixed or variable metric methods. Some relationships between projection methods and fixed (variable) metric methods are discussed. The main emphasis of the remainder of this paper is on variable metric methods. In Section 3 we show how the biconjugate gradient (BCG), and the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) methods fit into this framework as variable metric methods. By modifying the underlying Lanczos biorthogonalization process used in the implementation of BCG and QMR, we obtain other variable metric methods. These, we refer to as generalizations of BCG and QMR.

  8. Daylight metrics and energy savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardaljevic, John; Heschong, Lisa; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-12-31

    The drive towards sustainable, low-energy buildings has increased the need for simple, yet accurate methods to evaluate whether a daylit building meets minimum standards for energy and human comfort performance. Current metrics do not account for the temporal and spatial aspects of daylight, nor of occupants comfort or interventions. This paper reviews the historical basis of current compliance methods for achieving daylit buildings, proposes a technical basis for development of better metrics, and provides two case study examples to stimulate dialogue on how metrics can be applied in a practical, real-world context.

  9. List of SEP Reporting Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE State Energy Program List of Reporting Metrics, which was produced by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program for SEP and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) programs.

  10. Common Carbon Metric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Common Carbon Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Common Carbon Metric AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, World...

  11. Secretarial Determination Pursuant to USEC Privatization Act for the Sale or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Secretarial determination regarding the potential impacts of the transfer by DOE of up to 48 metric tons of low-enriched uranium to USEC Inc. in exchange for DOE receiving approximately 409 metric...

  12. Performance Metrics Tiers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Metrics Tiers Performance Metrics Tiers The performance metrics defined by the Commercial Buildings Integration Program offer different tiers of information to address the needs of various users. On this page you will find information about the various goals users are trying to achieve by using performance metrics and the tiers of metrics. Goals in Measuring Performance Many individuals and groups are involved with a building over its lifetime, and all have different interests in and

  13. Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2012-05-08

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Appendix C. Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors Data presented in the State Energy Data System (SEDS) are expressed predominately in units that historically have been used in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic feet, and short tons. The metric conversion factors presented in Table C1 can be used to calculate the metric-unit equivalents of values expressed in U.S. customary units. For example, 500 short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500

  15. Multi-Metric Sustainability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.; Macknick, J.; Mann, M.; Pless, J.; Munoz, D.

    2014-12-01

    A readily accessible framework that allows for evaluating impacts and comparing tradeoffs among factors in energy policy, expansion planning, and investment decision making is lacking. Recognizing this, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) funded an exploration of multi-metric sustainability analysis (MMSA) to provide energy decision makers with a means to make more comprehensive comparisons of energy technologies. The resulting MMSA tool lets decision makers simultaneously compare technologies and potential deployment locations.

  16. Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics Preprint E. Ibanez and M. Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 13th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power into Power Systems as Well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants Berlin, Germany November 11-13, 2014 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5D00-62847 September 2014 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a

  17. EECBG SEP Attachment 1 - Process metric list

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10-07B/SEP 10-006A Attachment 1: Process Metrics List Metric Area Metric Primary or Optional Metric Item(s) to Report On 1. Building Retrofits 1a. Buildings retrofitted, by sector Number of buildings retrofitted Square footage of buildings retrofitted 1b. Energy management systems installed, by sector Number of energy management systems installed Square footage of buildings under management 1c. Building roofs retrofitted, by sector Number of building roofs retrofitted Square footage of building

  18. Module 6- Metrics, Performance Measurements and Forecasting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This module reviews metrics such as cost and schedule variance along with cost and schedule performance indices.

  19. Definition of GPRA08 benefits metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Background information for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on the definitions of GPRA08 benefits metrics.

  20. Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Metrics Terminology Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology This document provides the terms and definitions used in the Department of Energys Performance Metrics Research Project. metrics_terminology_20090203.pdf (152.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Procuring Architectural and Engineering Services for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Transmittal Letter for the Statewide Benchmarking Process Evaluation Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program

  1. Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.

    2014-09-01

    As the penetration of variable generation (wind and solar) increases around the world, there is an accompanying growing interest and importance in accurately assessing the contribution that these resources can make toward planning reserve. This contribution, also known as the capacity credit or capacity value of the resource, is best quantified by using a probabilistic measure of overall resource adequacy. In recognizing the variable nature of these renewable resources, there has been interest in exploring the use of reliability metrics other than loss of load expectation. In this paper, we undertake some comparisons using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council in the western United States.

  2. Word Pro - A

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data presented in the Monthly Energy Review and in other U.S. Energy Information Administration publications are expressed predominately in units that historically have been used in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic feet, and short tons. The metric conversion factors presented in Table B1 can be used to calculate the metric-unit equivalents of values expressed in U.S. Customary units. For example, 500 short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500 short

  3. International Energy Outlook 2016-Energy-related CO2 emissions - Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration 9. Energy-related CO2 emissions print version Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world energy-related CO2 emissions [331] increase from 32.3 billion metric tons in 2012 to 35.6 billion metric tons in 2020 and to 43.2 billion metric tons in 2040. The

  4. 12-15-2008.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy 12,893,780 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 19, 2016 12,893,780 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of July 19, 2016 This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions from 210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the

  5. Western Resource Adequacy: Challenges - Approaches - Metrics...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised) Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United ...

  6. Microsoft Word - QER Resilience Metrics - Technical Workshp ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Offices of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) and Energy Policy and Systems ...

  7. Microsoft Word - QER Resilience Metrics - Technical Workshp ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quadrennial Energy Review Technical Workshop on Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure April, 29th, 2014 777 North Capitol St NE Ste 300, ...

  8. Module 6 - Metrics, Performance Measurements and Forecasting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This module reviews metrics such as cost and schedule variance along with cost and schedule performance indices. In addition, this module will outline forecasting tools such as ...

  9. Efficient Synchronization Stability Metrics for Fault Clearing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Efficient Synchronization Stability Metrics for Fault Clearing Authors: Backhaus, Scott N. 1 ; Chertkov, Michael 1 ; Bent, Russell Whitford 1 ; Bienstock, Daniel 2...

  10. Sheet1 Water Availability Metric (Acre-Feet/Yr) Water Cost Metric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sheet1 Water Availability Metric (Acre-FeetYr) Water Cost Metric (Acre-Foot) Current Water Use (Acre-FeetYr) Projected Use in 2030 (Acre-FeetYr) HUC8 STATE BASIN SUBBASIN ...

  11. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Clements, Samuel L.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kirkham, Harold; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Smith, David L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gardner, Chris; Varney, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

  12. Metrics for border management systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2009-07-01

    There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

  13. Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    AIKEN, S.C. – Workers recently completed a multiyear project that removed more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical solvents from beneath a portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS), preventing those pollutants from entering the local water table and helping the site avoid costs of more than $15 million.

  14. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects, such as regions of high density, are of interest.

  15. Audit Report: IG-0552 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Completion of K Basins Milestones The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington....

  16. EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transport up to an average of 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from the United...

  17. Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The determination covers the Department’s sales or transfers of no more than 2,705 metric tons (MTU) of natural uranium (NU) or NU equivalent in a calendar year.  The proposed transfers include up...

  18. Word Pro - S12

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    From Energy Consumption by Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total a by End-Use Sector, b 1973-2015 ... Petroleum Natural Gas Retail Electricity b Industrial ...

  19. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors and Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These standards combined will help reduce harmful carbon pollution by up to 158 million metric tons – equivalent to the annual electricity use of more than 21 million homes – and save businesses $26 billion on utility bills through 2030.

  20. DUF6 Project Continues on Success Track | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operated for DOE by Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services LLC (BWCS), the DUF6 project's mission is to convert the nation's approximately 800,000-metric-ton inventory of DUF6 to ...

  1. Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    more than 500 metric tons of weapons-origin HEU was downblended from dismantled ... Rosatom and the Department of Energy are in the process of extending the Russian-origin ...

  2. Photo Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction

    Victor Reis

    Victor Reis, the Assistant Secretary for the Department ... to build the stadium-size facility. Construction required more than 4,600 metric tons ...

  3. EA-1042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennesee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to raise the sludge land application loading limits from the current, self-imposed conservative 48 metric tons/ha lifetime loading to the...

  4. DUNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    600 m downstream of the Fermilab beamline, and a 40,000 metric ton cryogenic liquid argon detector deployed deep underground at Sanford Lab, located 800 miles (1,300 km)...

  5. National Offshore Wind Strategy: Facilitating the Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... 2.10. Regional heat maps of levelized cost of ... billion metric tons of carbon dioxide-through 2050 could save ... been announced in the global development pipeline 5. ...

  6. DOE-LPO-MiniReport_CLIMATE-Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... By issuing loans to Ford, Nissan, and Tesla to build and retool manufacturing facilities, ... Additionally, the Tesla project supported by LPO was expected to avoid 52,000 metric tons ...

  7. Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    megawatt project will power more than 60 percent of the plant with clean, renewable wind energy and reduce carbon emissions by over 35,000 metric tons per year - equivalent to...

  8. Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million metric tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 ...

  9. "Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,200...

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5 Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 ...

  11. Table 8 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Residential Sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Residential Sector Energy Consumption, 1990-2009" " (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Diioxide)" ,,1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

  12. Fossil Energy Today | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Here are just some of the stories featured in this issue: Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection; Atlas Estimates 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 ...

  13. A Nobel for Neutrinos: Super-Kamiokande | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    the large underground tank is slowly filled with 50,000 metric tons of ultra-pure water. ... Chen proposed the SNO detector, which could use heavy water to detect all flavors equally, ...

  14. Microsoft Word - Consolidated Verbatim Transcript CBS Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... for siting future nuclear waste is really a key element. ... we have in California like 3,000 metric tons of spent fuel. ... there; again, we need panels like that with some sort ...

  15. Energy Department Issues New Report, Highlights the Success and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the last decade, the industry has supported more than 55,000 direct domestic jobs across the country, and helped offset 200 million metric tons of carbon emissions per year, ...

  16. Alturas LLC- FE Dkt. No. 14-55-NG (FTA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on April 18, 2014, by Alturas LLC requesting long-term authority to export up to a total of 1.5 million metric tons ...

  17. Microsoft Word - LBNL_61917.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is capable of delivering up to 36,000 metric tons of water per day (Smith et al., 2000). ... June 2000. Smith, B., J. Beall and M. Stark. Induced Seismicity in the SE Geysers Field, ...

  18. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium using existing facilities at the Savannah River site: alternatives 3A/5A/6A/6B/7A/9A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium using ceramic in a new facility at Savannah River Site (SRS).

  19. Energy Department Finalizes $1.2 Billion Loan Guarantee to Support...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The project is also expected to avoid over 425,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually and produce enough to power over 64,000 homes. "This innovative solar power generation ...

  20. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  1. World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Once completed, the energy technology project will capture about 1.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually from an existing coal-fired power plant in Texas. The ...

  2. DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO2 capture at less than 40 per metric ton--when integrated into a new or existing coal fired power plant. The successful test moves chemical-looping a step closer to full scale. ...

  3. Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... mercury, particulate matter and other pollutants typical of a conventional coal-fired boiler. The plant would be designed to capture approximately 1.3 million metric tons of CO 2 ...

  4. PNNL-18482

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Then syngas is sent to a tar reformer and a scrubber. Syngas free of tars and particulates ... feed rate is assumed to be 2000 metric tonesday of dry feed (2205 short tons per day). ...

  5. 54.5 MPG and Beyond: Fueling Energy-Efficient Vehicles | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The standards will also help clean the air we breathe, reducing carbon dioxide pollution by over 6 billion metric tons. While the standards are based on an industry average fuel ...

  6. EERE Success Story-Wind Vision: Continuing the Success of Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind reduces air pollution emissions. Wind energy already helps the country avoid the emission of over 250,000 metric tons of air pollutants each year, which include sulfur ...

  7. Making a Difference: Hydropower and Our Clean Energy Future ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Not much beats stepping outside and taking a deep breath of fresh air. Guess what-you can ... 200 million metric tons of carbon pollution-equal to the output of more than 38 ...

  8. Technical Workshop: Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    List (55.27 KB) Sandia Report: Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (14.49 MB) Sandia ...

  9. Clean Cities Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2011-08-01

    Document provides Clean Cities coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.

  10. FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY 2014 Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets FY 2015 Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and ...

  11. Business Metrics for High-Performance Homes: A Colorado Springs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Business Metrics for High-Performance Homes: A Colorado Springs Case Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Business Metrics for High-Performance Homes: ...

  12. Label-invariant Mesh Quality Metrics. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Label-invariant Mesh Quality Metrics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Label-invariant Mesh Quality Metrics. Abstract not provided. Authors: Knupp, Patrick Publication ...

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Reference case Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use (million metric tons) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use (million metric tons) Sector and end use Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Space heating ........................................................ 228 293 248 236 228 218 207 -1.3% Space cooling

  14. Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium | Department of Energy USEC Privatization Act for the Sale or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium Secretarial Determination Pursuant to USEC Privatization Act for the Sale or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium Secretarial determination regarding the potential impacts of the transfer by DOE of up to 48 metric tons of low-enriched uranium to USEC Inc. in exchange for DOE receiving approximately 409 metric tons of uranium hexafluoride, the equivalent amount of

  15. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOX Update Kelly Trice, President & COO Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC. 2 What is MOX? * Mission - Convert at least 34 metric tons of U.S. weapons-grade plutonium to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for use in commercial power reactors - Implements international agreement with Russia where they will also dispose of 34 metric tons of surplus weapons-grade plutonium 3 MOX Safety Performance * Safety performance remains excellent - Over 16 million hours worked since start of construction - Currently have

  16. http://www.energy.gov/news/archives/print/5500.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Julianne Smith, (202) 586-7371 For Immediate Release September 17, 2007 U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's

  17. World`s LPG supply picture will change by 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1995-11-06

    Middle East LPG producers will continue to dominate world export markets in 1996. Led by Saudi Arabia, the Middle East will produce nearly 26 million metric tons of LPG in million metric tons of LPG in 1996, more than 54% of the world`s almost 48 million metric tons of export LPG. In 2000, however, with world exports of LPG expanding to 58.9 million metric tons, Middle East suppliers; share will have remained flat, making up 31.7 million metric tons, or 53.9%. Saudi Arabia`s contribution will exceed 15 million metric tons, reflecting essentially no growth since 1995. These and other patterns, from data compiled by Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, and published earlier this year, show other suppliers of LPG, especially African (Algeria/Nigeria), North Sea, and Latin American (Venezuela/Argentina), picking up larger shares in the last 5 years of this decade. This scenario assumes completion of several major supply projects that are either panned, under construction, or nearing start up in most of these areas. The paper discusses the global picture, the supply situation in the Middle East, Africa, the North Sea, and South America.

  18. Implementing the Data Center Energy Productivity Metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Marquez, Andres; Rawson, Andrew; Cader, Tahir; Fox, Kevin M.; Gustafson, William I.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-10-01

    As data centers proliferate in both size and number, their energy efficiency is becoming increasingly important. We discuss the properties of a number of the proposed metrics of energy efficiency and productivity. In particular, we focus on the Data Center Energy Productivity (DCeP) metric, which is the ratio of useful work produced by the data center to the energy consumed performing that work. We describe our approach for using DCeP as the principal outcome of a designed experiment using a highly instrumented, high performance computing data center. We found that DCeP was successful in clearly distinguishing between different operational states in the data center, thereby validating its utility as a metric for identifying configurations of hardware and software that would improve (or even maximize) energy productivity. We also discuss some of the challenges and benefits associated with implementing the DCeP metric, and we examine the efficacy of the metric in making comparisons within a data center and among data centers.

  19. Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics Quality Program Criteria Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics (128.47 KB) More Documents & Publications EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics CPMS Tables QA Corporate Board Meeting - July 2008

  20. Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H.; Banunarayanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation proposes a suite of metrics for evaluating the performance of solar power forecasting.

  1. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects,more » such as regions of high density, are of interest.« less

  2. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

  3. EECBG SEP Attachment 1 - Process metric list | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEP Attachment 1 - Process metric list EECBG SEP Attachment 1 - Process metric list Reporting Guidance Process Metric List eecbg_10_07b_sep__10_006a_attachment1_process_metric_list.pdf (93.56 KB) More Documents & Publications EECBG 10-07C/SEP 10-006B Attachment 1: Process Metrics List EECBG Program Notice 10-07A DOE Recovery Act Reporting Requirements for the State Energy Program

  4. Performance Metrics Research Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    NREL began work for DOE on this project to standardize the measurement and characterization of building energy performance. NREL's primary research objectives were to determine which performance metrics have greatest value for determining energy performance and to develop standard definitions and methods of measuring and reporting that performance.

  5. Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

  6. Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2012-10-01

    This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2010. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

  7. Widget:CrazyEggMetrics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CrazyEggMetrics Jump to: navigation, search This widget runs javascript code for the Crazy Egg user experience metrics. This should not be on all pages, but on select pages...

  8. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

    2014-07-01

    To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

  9. Financial Metrics Data Collection Protocol, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Wang, Na

    2010-04-30

    Brief description of data collection process and plan that will be used to collect financial metrics associated with sustainable design.

  10. Nonmaximality of known extremal metrics on torus and Klein bottle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpukhin, M A

    2013-12-31

    The El Soufi-Ilias theorem establishes a connection between minimal submanifolds of spheres and extremal metrics for eigenvalues of the Laplace-Beltrami operator. Recently, this connection was used to provide several explicit examples of extremal metrics. We investigate the properties of these metrics and prove that none of them is maximal. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  11. Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report A.iii Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... A.1 Metric #1: The Fraction of Customers and Total Load Served by Real-Time Pricing, Critical Peak Pricing, and Time-of-Use Pricing ........................................................................................ A.2 Metric #2: Real-Time System Operations Data

  12. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  13. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  14. Clean Cities 2013 Annual Metrics Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    3 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson and Mark Singer National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-62838 October 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013

  15. Clean Cities 2014 Annual Metrics Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    4 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson and Mark Singer National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-65265 December 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013

  16. Metric redefinitions in Einstein-Aether theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Brendan Z.

    2005-08-15

    'Einstein-Aether' theory, in which gravity couples to a dynamical, timelike, unit-norm vector field, provides a means for studying Lorentz violation in a generally covariant setting. Demonstrated here is the effect of a redefinition of the metric and 'aether' fields in terms of the original fields and two free parameters. The net effect is a change of the coupling constants appearing in the action. Using such a redefinition, one of the coupling constants can be set to zero, simplifying studies of solutions of the theory.

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,953 8 Electric utilities 23,050 8 IPP & CHP 8,903 11 Net generation (megawatthours) 149,340,447 6 Electric utilities 112,340,555 3 IPP & CHP 36,999,892 10 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 152,225 8 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 61,909 13 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 67,635 10 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 19 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,754 30 Electric utilities 11,526 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,592,137 24 Electric utilities 48,752,895 18 IPP & CHP 12,839,241 28 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,528 15 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 47,048 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,289 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 9 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,884 27 Electric utilities 11,175 25 IPP & CHP 4,709 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 60,119,907 26 Electric utilities 44,565,239 24 IPP & CHP 15,554,668 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,595 39 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 14,313 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 8,334 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 42 Nitrogen

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,948 45 Electric utilities 3,450 36 IPP & CHP 499 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,995,240 45 Electric utilities 9,344,872 38 IPP & CHP 1,650,368 48 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,852 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 10,638 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,093 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 15

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,949 10 Electric utilities 27,376 5 IPP & CHP 3,573 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 116,334,363 11 Electric utilities 102,294,256 5 IPP & CHP 14,040,107 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,716 36 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 18,316 40 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,427 398 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 44

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,464 48 Electric utilities 2,313 39 IPP & CHP 151 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,042,830 50 Electric utilities 5,509,991 40 IPP & CHP 532,839 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,129 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,281 38 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,558 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,250 7 Electric utilities 28,873 3 IPP & CHP 9,377 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,837,224 10 Electric utilities 109,523,336 4 IPP & CHP 16,313,888 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 105,998 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,144 14 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 62,516 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 24 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,672 47 Electric utilities 1,732 40 IPP & CHP 939 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,204,158 46 Electric utilities 5,517,389 39 IPP & CHP 4,686,769 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 21,670 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 26,928 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,313 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.2 4 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,727 4 Electric utilities 5,263 35 IPP & CHP 39,464 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 202,143,878 4 Electric utilities 10,457,398 36 IPP & CHP 191,686,480 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 187,536 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,076 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 96,624 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 20 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,499 14 Electric utilities 23,319 7 IPP & CHP 4,180 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 115,395,392 12 Electric utilities 100,983,285 6 IPP & CHP 14,412,107 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 332,396 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 133,412 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 103,391 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.8 1 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,507 24 Electric utilities 12,655 20 IPP & CHP 3,852 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,853,282 28 Electric utilities 43,021,954 27 IPP & CHP 13,831,328 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 74,422 19 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 41,793 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,312 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 13 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,227 31 Electric utilities 11,468 24 IPP & CHP 2,759 33 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,728,363 31 Electric utilities 39,669,629 29 IPP & CHP 10,058,734 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,550 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 29,014 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 31,794 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,878 21 Electric utilities 19,473 15 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 90,896,435 17 Electric utilities 90,133,403 10 IPP & CHP 763,032 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 204,873 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 89,253 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,795 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,264 33 Electric utilities 85 47 IPP & CHP 12,179 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,833,652 35 Electric utilities 20,260 47 IPP & CHP 37,813,392 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,370 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,626 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 20,414 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,621 28 Electric utilities 11,557 22 IPP & CHP 4,064 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,998,330 27 Electric utilities 45,963,271 22 IPP & CHP 11,035,059 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 39,272 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 38,373 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 32,399 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 27 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,998 20 Electric utilities 20,490 14 IPP & CHP 508 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,506,886 20 Electric utilities 76,986,629 13 IPP & CHP 2,520,257 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,357 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,913 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 41,405 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 16 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,325 38 Electric utilities 7,296 31 IPP & CHP 1,029 44 Net generation (megawatthours) 43,784,526 33 Electric utilities 40,741,425 28 IPP & CHP 3,043,101 44 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 23,646 31 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 57,944 16 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 35,179 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 650 50 Electric utilities 337 44 IPP & CHP 313 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,031,394 48 Electric utilities 868,079 42 IPP & CHP 6,163,315 37 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 737 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric utilities 22,062 10 IPP & CHP 4,231 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 77,137,438 21 Electric utilities 62,966,914 16 IPP & CHP 14,170,524 23 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,550 20 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 40,656 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,295 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 23 Nitrogen

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  3. Metrics for Measuring Progress Toward Implementation of the Smart Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (June 2008) | Department of Energy Metrics for Measuring Progress Toward Implementation of the Smart Grid (June 2008) Metrics for Measuring Progress Toward Implementation of the Smart Grid (June 2008) Results of the breakout session discussions at the Smart Grid Implementation Workshop, June 19-20, 2008 Metrics for Measuring Progress Toward Implementation of the Smart Grid (308.23 KB) More Documents & Publications 5th Annual CHP Roadmap Workshop Breakout Group Results, September 2004

  4. Technical Workshop: Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution Infrastructure | Department of Energy Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Technical Workshop: Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure During this workshop, EPSA invited technical experts from industry, national laboratories, academia, and NGOs to discuss the state of play of and need for resilience metrics and how they vary by natural gas, liquid fuels and electric grid infrastructures. Issues important to

  5. Measuring energy efficiency: Opportunities from standardization and common metrics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Measuring energy efficiency: Opportunities from standardization and common metrics For 2016 EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, D.C. By Stacy Angel, Energy Information Portfolio Analyst Carol White, Senior Energy Efficiency Analyst How is the importance of measuring energy efficiency changing? * The number of energy efficiency policies and programs is growing. * Common metrics help measure progress towards multiple objectives. * Clear metrics help consumers make informed energy

  6. Integration of the EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics With Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Process | Department of Energy the EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics With Performance Analysis Process Integration of the EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics With Performance Analysis Process August 2009 Presenter: Robert Hinds, Savannah River Remediation, LLC Track 9-12 Topics Covered: Implementing CPMS for QA Corporate QA Performance Metrics Contractor Performance Analysis Contractor Assessment Programs Assessment Program Structure CPMS Integration with P/A Process Validating

  7. Clean Cities 2013 Annual Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Singer, M.

    2014-10-01

    Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy asks its Clean Cities program coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterize the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction (IR) initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this 2013 Annual Metrics Report.

  8. Metrics correlation and analysis service (MCAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranovski, Andrew; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Hesselroth, Ted; Mhashilkar, Parag; Levshina, Tanya; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of Grid workflow activities and their associated software stacks inevitably involves multiple organizations, ownership, and deployment domains. In this setting, important and common tasks such as the correlation and display of metrics and debugging information (fundamental ingredients of troubleshooting) are challenged by the informational entropy inherent to independently maintained and operated software components. Because such an information 'pond' is disorganized, it a difficult environment for business intelligence analysis i.e. troubleshooting, incident investigation and trend spotting. The mission of the MCAS project is to deliver a software solution to help with adaptation, retrieval, correlation, and display of workflow-driven data and of type-agnostic events, generated by disjoint middleware.

  9. Clean Cities 2014 Annual Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Caley; Singer, Mark

    2015-12-22

    Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy asks its Clean Cities program coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterize the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction (IR) initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this 2014 Annual Metrics Report.

  10. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in ...

  11. Office of HC Strategy Budget and Performance Metrics (HC-50)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Human Capital Strategy, Budget, and Performance Metrics provides strategic direction and advice to its stakeholders through the integration of budget analysis, workforce projections,...

  12. EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    QA Corporate Board Meeting - November 2008 Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics FY 2015 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE ...

  13. DOE Announces Webinars on Solar Forecasting Metrics, the DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Solar Forecasting Metrics, the DOE ... from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable ... to liquids technology, advantages of using natural gas, ...

  14. Integration of the EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics With Performanc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of the EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics With Performance Analysis Process ... Assessment Program Structure CPMS Integration with PA Process Validating The Process ...

  15. Exploration Cost and Time Metric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English Exploration Cost and Time Metric Screenshot References: Conference Paper1...

  16. Wave Energy Converter System Requirements and Performance Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department and Wave Energy Scotland are holding a joint workshop on wave energy converter (WEC) system requirements and performance metrics on Friday, February 26.

  17. Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Department of Energy's human capital initiatives and functions through the strategic integration of corporate human capital performance metrics and the budget ...

  18. Integrating the stabilization of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, H.F.

    1996-05-01

    In response to Recommendation 94-1 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the Department of Energy committed to stabilizing specific nuclear materials within 3 and 8 years. These efforts are underway. The Department has already repackaged the plutonium at Rocky Flats and metal turnings at Savannah River that had been in contact with plastic. As this effort proceeds, we begin to look at activities beyond stabilization and prepare for the final disposition of these materials. To describe the plutonium materials being stabilize, Figure 1 illustrates the quantities of plutonium in various forms that will be stabilized. Plutonium as metal comprises 8.5 metric tons. Plutonium oxide contains 5.5 metric tons of plutonium. Plutonium residues and solutions, together, contain 7 metric tons of plutonium. Figure 2 shows the quantity of plutonium-bearing material in these four categories. In this depiction, 200 metric tons of plutonium residues and 400 metric tons of solutions containing plutonium constitute most of the material in the stabilization program. So, it is not surprising that much of the work in stabilization is directed toward the residues and solutions, even though they contain less of the plutonium.

  19. Analyzing and Comparing Biomass Feedstock Supply Systems in China: Corn Stover and Sweet Sorghum Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Lantian; Cafferty, Kara; Roni, Mohammad; Jacobson, Jacob; Xie, Guanghui; Ovard, Leslie; Wright, Christopher

    2015-06-11

    This paper analyzes the rural Chinese biomass supply system and models supply chain operations according to U.S. concepts of logistical unit operations: harvest and collection, storage, transportation, preprocessing, and handling and queuing. In this paper, we quantify the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum in China under different scenarios. We analyze three scenarios of corn stover logistics from northeast China and three scenarios of sweet sorghum stalks logistics from Inner Mongolia in China. The case study estimates that the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk to be $52.95/dry metric ton and $52.64/dry metric ton, respectively, for the current labor-based biomass logistics system. However, if the feedstock logistics operation is mechanized, the cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk decreases to $36.01/dry metric ton and $35.76/dry metric ton, respectively. The study also includes a sensitivity analysis to identify the cost factors that cause logistics cost variation. Results of the sensitivity analysis show that labor price has the most influence on the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk, with a variation of $6 to $12/dry metric ton.

  20. Analyzing and Comparing Biomass Feedstock Supply Systems in China: Corn Stover and Sweet Sorghum Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad S. Roni; Kara G. Cafferty; Christopher T Wright; Lantian Ren

    2015-06-01

    China has abundant biomass resources, which can be used as a potential source of bioenergy. However, China faces challenges implementing biomass as an energy source, because China has not developed the highly networked, high-volume biomass logistics systems and infrastructure. This paper analyzes the rural Chinese biomass supply system and models supply chain operations according to the U.S. concepts of logistical unit operations: harvest and collection, storage, transportation, preprocessing, and handling and queuing. In this paper, we quantify the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum under different scenarios in China. We analyze three scenarios of corn stover logistics from northeast China and three scenarios of sweet sorghum stalks logistics from Inner Mongolia in China. The case study shows that the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk will be $52.95/dry metric ton and $52.64/ dry metric ton, respectively, for the current labor-based biomass logistics system. However, if the feedstock logistics operation is mechanized, the cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk will be down to $36.01/ dry metric ton and $35.76/dry metric ton, respectively. The study also performed a sensitivity analysis to find the cost factors that cause logistics cost variation. A sensitivity analysis shows that labor price has the most influence on the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk, causing a variation of $6 to $12/metric ton.

  1. Analyzing and Comparing Biomass Feedstock Supply Systems in China: Corn Stover and Sweet Sorghum Case Studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ren, Lantian; Cafferty, Kara; Roni, Mohammad; Jacobson, Jacob; Xie, Guanghui; Ovard, Leslie; Wright, Christopher

    2015-06-11

    This paper analyzes the rural Chinese biomass supply system and models supply chain operations according to U.S. concepts of logistical unit operations: harvest and collection, storage, transportation, preprocessing, and handling and queuing. In this paper, we quantify the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum in China under different scenarios. We analyze three scenarios of corn stover logistics from northeast China and three scenarios of sweet sorghum stalks logistics from Inner Mongolia in China. The case study estimates that the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk to be $52.95/dry metric ton and $52.64/dry metric ton, respectively,more » for the current labor-based biomass logistics system. However, if the feedstock logistics operation is mechanized, the cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk decreases to $36.01/dry metric ton and $35.76/dry metric ton, respectively. The study also includes a sensitivity analysis to identify the cost factors that cause logistics cost variation. Results of the sensitivity analysis show that labor price has the most influence on the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk, with a variation of $6 to $12/dry metric ton.« less

  2. Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

    2002-06-11

    In this report, we identify and describe 24 practical diagnostics that are ready now to evaluate residential commissioning metrics, and that we expect to include in the commissioning guide. Our discussion in the main body of this report is limited to existing diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. Appendix C describes the 83 other diagnostics that we have examined in the course of this project, but that are not ready or are inappropriate for residential commissioning. Combined with Appendix B, Table 1 in the main body of the report summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of all 107 diagnostics. We first describe what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Our intent in this discussion is to formulate and clarify these issues, but is largely preliminary because such a practice does not yet exist. Subsequent sections of the report describe metrics one can use in residential commissioning, along with the consolidated set of 24 practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now to evaluate them. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies by LBNL staff and others in more than 100 houses. These studies concentrate on evaluating diagnostics in the following four areas: the DeltaQ duct leakage test, air-handler airflow tests, supply and return grille airflow tests, and refrigerant charge tests. Appendix A describes those efforts in detail. In addition, where possible, we identify the costs to purchase diagnostic equipment and the amount of time required to conduct the diagnostics. Table 1 summarizes these data. Individual equipment costs for the 24

  3. Metrics for Evaluating Conventional and Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    With numerous options for the future of natural gas, how do we know we're going down the right path? How do we designate a metric to measure and demonstrate change and progress, and how does that metric incorporate all stakeholders and scenarios?

  4. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  5. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  6. Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Ganguly, Srirupa; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in data centers. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing data centers - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, data center designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior data center benchmarking studies supported by the California Energy Commission. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the LBNL data center benchmarking database that was developed from these studies. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including facility designers and energy managers. This guide also builds on recent research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Save Energy Now program.

  7. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool ...

  8. Microsoft Word - followup to Fin Risk Metrics workshop.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 21, 2008 PurposeSubject: Follow-up to Financial Risk Metrics Workshop Page 1 of 1 Differences in Cash Flow between Net Billing and Direct Pay for Energy Northwest Attached...

  9. Analysis of Solar Cell Quality Using Voltage Metrics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toberer, E. S.; Tamboli, A. C.; Steiner, M.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    The highest efficiency solar cells provide both excellent voltage and current. Of these, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) is more frequently viewed as an indicator of the material quality. However, since the Voc also depends on the band gap of the material, the difference between the band gap and the Voc is a better metric for comparing material quality of unlike materials. To take this one step further, since Voc also depends on the shape of the absorption edge, we propose to use the ultimate metric: the difference between the measured Voc and the Voc calculated from the external quantum efficiency using a detailed balance approach. This metric is less sensitive to changes in cell design and definition of band gap. The paper defines how to implement this metric and demonstrates how it can be useful in tracking improvements in Voc, especially as Voc approaches its theoretical maximum.

  10. Towards Efficient Supercomputing: Searching for the Right Efficiency Metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of supercomputing has traditionally been in the execution time. In early 2000 s, the concept of total cost of ownership was re-introduced, with the introduction of efficiency measure to include aspects such as energy and space. Yet the supercomputing community has never agreed upon a metric that can cover these aspects altogether and also provide a fair basis for comparison. This paper exam- ines the metrics that have been proposed in the past decade, and proposes a vector-valued metric for efficient supercom- puting. Using this metric, the paper presents a study of where the supercomputing industry has been and how it stands today with respect to efficient supercomputing.

  11. Resilient Control Systems Practical Metrics Basis for Defining Mission Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig G. Rieger

    2014-08-01

    "Resilience” describes how systems operate at an acceptable level of normalcy despite disturbances or threats. In this paper we first consider the cognitive, cyber-physical interdependencies inherent in critical infrastructure systems and how resilience differs from reliability to mitigate these risks. Terminology and metrics basis are provided to integrate the cognitive, cyber-physical aspects that should be considered when defining solutions for resilience. A practical approach is taken to roll this metrics basis up to system integrity and business case metrics that establish “proper operation” and “impact.” A notional chemical processing plant is the use case for demonstrating how the system integrity metrics can be applied to establish performance, and

  12. A Graph Analytic Metric for Mitigating Advanced Persistent Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, John R.; Hogan, Emilie A.

    2013-06-04

    This paper introduces a novel graph analytic metric that can be used to measure the potential vulnerability of a cyber network to specific types of attacks that use lateral movement and privilege escalation such as the well known Pass The Hash, (PTH). The metric is computed from an oriented subgraph of the underlying cyber network induced by selecting only those edges for which a given property holds between the two vertices of the edge. The metric with respect to a select node on the subgraph is defined as the likelihood that the select node is reachable from another arbitrary node in the graph. This metric can be calculated dynamically from the authorization and auditing layers during the network security authorization phase and will potentially enable predictive deterrence against attacks such as PTH.

  13. Municipal solid waste to electricity recommendations for project in Bangkok, Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) is charged with the responsibility of public cleansing and waste disposal in the metropolitan area. BMA operates 600 trucks which collect the waste twice a day and dump it at its three sites located in the Huai Kwong, Bangkok Noi and Rataburana districts. Presently these trucks collect 3,000 metric tons of garbage per day. At the waste dump sites, which are rapidly overflowing, BMA presently operates four compost plants, three with input capacity of 320 tons per day each and a fourth which uses about 160 tons of garbage per day--thus utilizing about 1,120 tons of garbage per day. Creation of new sites would require going even farther away from the city, resulting in excessive transportation costs.

  14. ARM - Evaluation Product - Barrow Radiation Data (2009 metric)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsBarrow Radiation Data (2009 metric) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Barrow Radiation Data (2009 metric) Observations from a suite of radiometers including Precision Spectral Pyranometers (PSPs), Precision Infrared Radiometers (PIRs), and a Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) are

  15. New IEC Specifications Help Define Wind Plant Performance Reporting Metrics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy IEC Specifications Help Define Wind Plant Performance Reporting Metrics New IEC Specifications Help Define Wind Plant Performance Reporting Metrics January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program and Sandia National Laboratories have been working with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Committee on wind turbine availability to

  16. Weatherization Assistance Program Goals and Metrics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Goals and Metrics Weatherization Assistance Program Goals and Metrics UT - Bettelle - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Logo The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) regularly reviews the work of states and grant recipients for effectiveness and for meeting program goals. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides technical support to the program and conducts the evaluations. Goals The overall goal of WAP is to reduce the burden of energy prices on the

  17. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) | Department of Energy Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) This report has been written for the Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability to support the Office of

  18. Enclosure - FY 2015 Q4 Metrics Report 2015-11-02.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fourth Quarter Overall Root Cause Analysis (RCA)Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Performance Metrics No. ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2015 Target Comment No. 2 3 ...

  19. Microsoft Word - 2014-5-27 RCA Qtr 2 Metrics Attachment_R1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Quarter Overall Root Cause Analysis (RCA)Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Performance Metrics 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2014 Target FY 2014 Projected ...

  20. Audit Report: IG-0522 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Audit Report: IG-0522 September 11, 2001 The Plutonium Immobilization Plant at the Savannah River Site In September 2000, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into an agreement stipulating that each country would irreversibly transform 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into forms that cannot be used for weapons purposes. As part of the United States' commitment, the Department of Energy has developed plans to dispose of 8.4 metric tons of the plutonium and convert 25.6

  1. Characterization of Poplar Budbreak Gene Enhances Understanding of Spring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Chapter 9 Energy-related CO2 emissions Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world energy- related CO2 emissions 331 increase from 32.3 billion metric tons in 2012 to 35.6 billion metric tons in 2020 and to

  2. Chapter 9 - Energy-related CO2 emission

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Chapter 9 Energy-related CO2 emissions Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world energy- related CO2 emissions 331 increase from 32.3 billion metric tons in 2012 to 35.6 billion metric tons in 2020 and to

  3. Clint, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EIA Energy Conference April 7, 2009 John W. Rowe Chairman and CEO Exelon Corporation Exelon Surpasses EPA Climate Leaders Goal by Reducing GHG Emissions by 35% We couldn't take a million cars off the road. But we did reduce our GHG emissions by that much. ($75) ($50) ($25) $0 $25 $50 $75 $100 $125 $150 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 million metric tons of CO2 $/metric ton of CO2 Landfill Gas 25% Reduction in Building Energy Use Solar PV >$700 (>$250 with tax Incentives) Exelon's Supply Curve of CO2

  4. Municipal garbage disposal: A problem we cannot ignore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In 1980 the US generated 150 million metric tons of municipal solid waste, and this figure is expected to increase to over 200 million metric tons by 1990. This comment discusses the traditional approaches to waste management, as well as current options available for waste disposal and the federal environmental laws that impinge on these options. Next, the national dimensions of the garbage disposal problem, as epitomized by the garbage barge and the international export of waste generated by this country, are discussed. This Comment concludes with recommendations for a change in public policy to foster recycling, taxing non-biodegradable products, as well as more stringent regulatory controls on solid waste disposal.

  5. New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40%

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_David Thomas_WR Transparency at NMMSS 2013 Annual Mtg_FINAL.pptx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    HEU Downblending in Russia Under the 1993 U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement David Thomas NNSA/SAIC Russian HEU Down Blending Almost Complete  The Agreement for the disposition of 500MT of Russian HEU was signed in 1993 and the Purchase Contract between USEC and Tenex was signed in 1994  To date, 472.6 metric tons of HEU have been converted to LEU and delivered to USEC  By December 2013, 500 metric tons will be converted to LEU and delivered to USEC  Deliveries of "WR" LEU

  7. Metrics Evolution in an Energy Research & Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon

    2011-08-01

    All technology programs progress through three phases: Discovery, Definition, and Deployment. The form and application of program metrics needs to evolve with each phase. During the discovery phase, the program determines what is achievable. A set of tools is needed to define program goals, to analyze credible technical options, and to ensure that the options are compatible and meet the program objectives. A metrics system that scores the potential performance of technical options is part of this system of tools, supporting screening of concepts and aiding in the overall definition of objectives. During the definition phase, the program defines what specifically is wanted. What is achievable is translated into specific systems and specific technical options are selected and optimized. A metrics system can help with the identification of options for optimization and the selection of the option for deployment. During the deployment phase, the program shows that the selected system works. Demonstration projects are established and classical systems engineering is employed. During this phase, the metrics communicate system performance. This paper discusses an approach to metrics evolution within the Department of Energy's Nuclear Fuel Cycle R&D Program, which is working to improve the sustainability of nuclear energy.

  8. Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H. F.; Banunarayanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    Forecasting solar energy generation is a challenging task due to the variety of solar power systems and weather regimes encountered. Forecast inaccuracies can result in substantial economic losses and power system reliability issues. This paper presents a suite of generally applicable and value-based metrics for solar forecasting for a comprehensive set of scenarios (i.e., different time horizons, geographic locations, applications, etc.). In addition, a comprehensive framework is developed to analyze the sensitivity of the proposed metrics to three types of solar forecasting improvements using a design of experiments methodology, in conjunction with response surface and sensitivity analysis methods. The results show that the developed metrics can efficiently evaluate the quality of solar forecasts, and assess the economic and reliability impact of improved solar forecasting.

  9. Non-minimal derivative couplings of the composite metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-11-04

    In the context of massive gravity, bi-gravity and multi-gravity non-minimal matter couplings via a specific composite effective metric were investigated recently. Even if these couplings generically reintroduce the Boulware-Deser ghost, this composite metric is unique in the sense that the ghost reemerges only beyond the decoupling limit and the matter quantum loop corrections do not detune the potential interactions. We consider non-minimal derivative couplings of the composite metric to matter fields for a specific subclass of Horndeski scalar-tensor interactions. We first explore these couplings in the mini-superspace and investigate in which scenario the ghost remains absent. We further study these non-minimal derivative couplings in the decoupling-limit of the theory and show that the equation of motion for the helicity-0 mode remains second order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss preliminary implications for cosmology.

  10. ARM - Evaluation Product - AERI Data Quality Metric (AERI-QC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsAERI Data Quality Metric (AERI-QC) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : AERI Data Quality Metric (AERI-QC) Ancillary NetCDF file to be used with the regular AERI data files to document times when the data may not be correct. Data Details Contact David Turner National Oceanic and

  11. Calabi-Yau metrics for quotients and complete intersections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Braun, Volker; Brelidze, Tamaz; Douglas, Michael R.; Ovrut, Burt A.

    2008-05-22

    We extend previous computations of Calabi-Yau metrics on projective hypersurfaces to free quotients, complete intersections, and free quotients of complete intersections. In particular, we construct these metrics on generic quintics, four-generation quotients of the quintic, Schoen Calabi-Yau complete intersections and the quotient of a Schoen manifold with Z₃ x Z₃ fundamental group that was previously used to construct a heterotic standard model. Various numerical investigations into the dependence of Donaldson's algorithm on the integration scheme, as well as on the Kähler and complex structure moduli, are also performed.

  12. Primer Control System Cyber Security Framework and Technical Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne F. Boyer; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-05-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a control system cyber security framework and a set of technical metrics to aid owner-operators in tracking control systems security. The framework defines seven relevant cyber security dimensions and provides the foundation for thinking about control system security. Based on the developed security framework, a set of ten technical metrics are recommended that allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture.

  13. Culture, and a Metrics Methodology for Biological Countermeasure Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Mary J.

    2007-03-15

    Outcome Metrics Methodology defines a way to evaluate outcome metrics associated with scenario analyses related to biological countermeasures. Previous work developed a schema to allow evaluation of common elements of impacts across a wide range of potential threats and scenarios. Classes of metrics were identified that could be used by decision makers to differentiate the common bases among disparate scenarios. Typical impact metrics used in risk calculations include the anticipated number of deaths, casualties, and the direct economic costs should a given event occur. There are less obvious metrics that are often as important and require more intensive initial work to be incorporated. This study defines a methodology for quantifying, evaluating, and ranking metrics other than direct health and economic impacts. As has been observed with the consequences of Hurricane Katrina, impacts to the culture of specific sectors of society are less obvious on an immediate basis but equally important over the ensuing and long term. Culture is used as the example class of metrics within which • requirements for a methodology are explored • likely methodologies are examined • underlying assumptions for the respective methodologies are discussed • the basis for recommending a specific methodology is demonstrated. Culture, as a class of metrics, is shown to consist of political, sociological, and psychological elements that are highly valued by decision makers. In addition, cultural practices, dimensions, and kinds of knowledge offer complementary sets of information that contribute to the context within which experts can provide input. The quantification and evaluation of sociopolitical, socio-economic, and sociotechnical impacts depend predominantly on subjective, expert judgment. Epidemiological data is limited, resulting in samples with statistical limits. Dose response assessments and curves depend on the quality of data and its relevance to human modes of exposure

  14. untitled

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... related to the regulatory framework and drivers for cleanup of the ... monoxide; 3.9 tons of volatile organic compounds; and 0.1 ton of metal Annual air emissions: 7.1 tons, ...

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million Short Tons 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 300 600 900 Million Short Tons Surface 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 Million Short Tons Underground ...

  16. Deep Energy Retrofit Performance Metric Comparison: Eight California Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Fisher, Jeremy; Less, Brennan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we will present the results of monitored annual energy use data from eight residential Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) case studies using a variety of performance metrics. For each home, the details of the retrofits were analyzed, diagnostic tests to characterize the home were performed and the homes were monitored for total and individual end-use energy consumption for approximately one year. Annual performance in site and source energy, as well as carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions were determined on a per house, per person and per square foot basis to examine the sensitivity to these different metrics. All eight DERs showed consistent success in achieving substantial site energy and CO2e reductions, but some projects achieved very little, if any source energy reduction. This problem emerged in those homes that switched from natural gas to electricity for heating and hot water, resulting in energy consumption dominated by electricity use. This demonstrates the crucial importance of selecting an appropriate metric to be used in guiding retrofit decisions. Also, due to the dynamic nature of DERs, with changes in occupancy, size, layout, and comfort, several performance metrics might be necessary to understand a project’s success.

  17. Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul

    2007-10-26

    A wide spectrum of laboratory owners, ranging from universities to federal agencies, have explicit goals for energy efficiency in their facilities. For example, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) requires all new federal buildings to exceed ASHRAE 90.1-2004 1 by at least 30 percent. The University of California Regents Policy requires all new construction to exceed California Title 24 2 by at least 20 percent. A new laboratory is much more likely to meet energy efficiency goals if quantitative metrics and targets are explicitly specified in programming documents and tracked during the course of the delivery process. If efficiency targets are not explicitly and properly defined, any additional capital costs or design time associated with attaining higher efficiencies can be difficult to justify. The purpose of this guide is to provide guidance on how to specify and compute energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks for laboratories, at the whole building as well as the system level. The information in this guide can be used to incorporate quantitative metrics and targets into the programming of new laboratory facilities. Many of these metrics can also be applied to evaluate existing facilities. For information on strategies and technologies to achieve energy efficiency, the reader is referred to Labs21 resources, including technology best practice guides, case studies, and the design guide (available at www.labs21century.gov/toolkit).

  18. EERE Portfolio. Primary Benefits Metrics for FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    This collection of data tables shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for both the entire EERE portfolio of renewable energy technologies as well as the individual technologies. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2004 - 2014 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Volumetrically Contaminated Clean Metal, Available for Recycling 97,000 tons Clean Metal, Available for Recycling with application of 10 CFR 835 42,000 tons RADIOLOGICAL AREA, ...

  1. Southline Transmission Line Project - Volume 1 Front Matter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Infrastructure Program TPE total potential effect tpy ton(s) per year UAS FTC Unmanned Aircraft Systems Flight Test Center Southline Transmission Line Project Final ...

  2. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments...

  3. All 2015 Tables_2013 Dollars.xlsx

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode Year Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton) Average Delivered Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)...

  4. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  5. Lake City Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Cooling Equipment: Rebates are structured with a base rebate (ton) and an additional efficiency bonus rebate (ton)...

  6. Clark Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See program website Heat Pumps: Up to 250ton Outdoor Ductless Heat Pump: 250ton Web-Enabled Programmable Thermostats: Contact CPU for details Compressed Air Audit: Free...

  7. On the existence of certain axisymmetric interior metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angulo Santacruz, C.; Batic, D.; Nowakowski, M.

    2010-08-15

    One of the effects of noncommutative coordinate operators is that the delta function connected to the quantum mechanical amplitude between states sharp to the position operator gets smeared by a Gaussian distribution. Although this is not the full account of the effects of noncommutativity, this effect is, in particular, important as it removes the point singularities of Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstroem solutions. In this context, it seems to be of some importance to probe also into ringlike singularities which appear in the Kerr case. In particular, starting with an anisotropic energy-momentum tensor and a general axisymmetric ansatz of the metric together with an arbitrary mass distribution (e.g., Gaussian), we derive the full set of Einstein equations that the noncommutative geometry inspired Kerr solution should satisfy. Using these equations we prove two theorems regarding the existence of certain Kerr metrics inspired by noncommutative geometry.

  8. Microsoft Word - 2014-1-1 RCA Qtr 1 Metrics Attachment_R1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2014 Target FY 2014 Projected FY 2014 ... ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2014 Target FY 2014 1 th Qtr Actual ...

  9. Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front Quantized QCD, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front Quantized QCD, and Conformal Quantum Mechanics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front...

  10. Optimal recovery of linear operators in non-Euclidean metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osipenko, K Yu

    2014-10-31

    The paper looks at problems concerning the recovery of operators from noisy information in non-Euclidean metrics. Anumber of general theorems are proved and applied to recovery problems for functions and their derivatives from the noisy Fourier transform. In some cases, afamily of optimal methods is found, from which the methods requiring the least amount of original information are singled out. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  11. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14404 Third Quarter 2009 Modeling Program Metric: Coupled model comparison with observations using improved dynamics at coarse resolution Quantifying the impact of a finite volume dynamical core in CCSM3 on simulated precipitation over major catchment areas July 2009 Peter J. Gleckler and Karl E. Taylor Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research 
 2
 Disclaimer This

  13. Guidebook for ARRA Smart Grid Program Metrics and Benefits | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Guidebook for ARRA Smart Grid Program Metrics and Benefits Guidebook for ARRA Smart Grid Program Metrics and Benefits The Guidebook for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Smart Grid Program Metrics and Benefits describes the type of information to be collected from each of the Project Teams and how it will be used by the Department of Energy to communicate overall conclusions to the public. Guidebook for ARRA Smart Grid Program Metrics and Benefits (975.03 KB) More

  14. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  15. DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest.

  16. DOE-Sponsored Project Shows Huge Potential for Carbon Storage in Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wyoming Rock Springs Uplift could potentially store 14 to 17 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, according to results from a Department of Energy-sponsored study. This is equal to 250 to 300 years’ worth of CO2 emissions produced by the Wyoming’s coal-fired power plants and other large regional anthropogenic CO2 sources at current emission levels.

  17. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Cuzens; Necitas Sumait

    2012-09-13

    BlueFire Ethanol, Inc., a U.S. based corporation with offices in Irvine, California developed a cellulosic biorefinery to convert approximately 700 dry metric tons per day in to 18.9 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol. The Project is proposed to be located in the city of Fulton, County of Itawamba, Mississippi.

  18. Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE’s GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts are hunting down fugitive carbon emissions from across 20 Energy Department laboratories, sites and program offices — and they’ve already prevented the release of more than 600,000 metric tons of CO2 equivalent since 2009 -- equal to taking 140,000 cars off the road for a year.

  19. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production from Existing Nuclear Power Plants Using Alkaline Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana R. Swalla

    2008-12-31

    The mid-range industrial market currently consumes 4.2 million metric tons of hydrogen per year and has an annual growth rate of 15% industries in this range require between 100 and 1000 kilograms of hydrogen per day and comprise a wide range of operations such as food hydrogenation, electronic chip fabrication, metals processing and nuclear reactor chemistry modulation.

  20. Fossil Energy Today- First Quarter, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here are just some of the stories featured in this issue: Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection; Atlas Estimates 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource; CCUS Projects Making Progress; Department Releases Study on Natural Gas Exports.

  1. NETL’s 2015 Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Increase in U.S. CO2 Storage Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today released the fifth edition of the Carbon Storage Atlas (Atlas V), which shows prospective carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resources of at least 2,600 billion metric tons – an increase over the findings of the 2012 Atlas.

  2. Table 1. U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009" " (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent)" " Greenhouse Gas",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009 "Carbon

  3. Metrics for the National SCADA Test Bed Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Philip A.; Mortensen, J.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2008-12-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program is providing valuable inputs into the electric industry by performing topical research and development (R&D) to secure next generation and legacy control systems. In addition, the program conducts vulnerability and risk analysis, develops tools, and performs industry liaison, outreach and awareness activities. These activities will enhance the secure and reliable delivery of energy for the United States. This report will describe metrics that could be utilized to provide feedback to help enhance the effectiveness of the NSTB Program.

  4. User's Guide to the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Koran, William

    2012-02-28

    The intent of this user guide is to provide a brief description of the functionality of the Energy Charting and Metrics (ECAM) tool, including the expanded building re-tuning functionality developed for Pacific Northwest National laboratory (PNNL). This document describes the tool's general functions and features, and offers detailed instructions for PNNL building re-tuning charts, a feature in ECAM intended to help building owners and operators look at trend data (recommended 15-minute time intervals) in a series of charts (both time series and scatter) to analyze air-handler, zone, and central plant information gathered from a building automation system (BAS).

  5. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (EIA) Frequently Asked Questions Coal Does EIA have county-level energy production data? Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and prices for individual states? Does EIA publish coking coal prices? From what country does the United States import the most coal? How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? How large are U.S. coal reserves? How many power plants are there in the United States? How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",24048,17 " Electric Utilities",17045,17 " IPP & CHP",7003,16 "Net generation (megawatthours)",70155504,22 " Electric Utilities",48096026,19 " IPP & CHP",22059478,14 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",78556,18 " Nitrogen

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",3948,45 " Electric Utilities",3450,36 " IPP & CHP",499,48 "Net generation (megawatthours)",10995240,45 " Electric Utilities",9344872,38 " IPP & CHP",1650368,48 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",13852,35 " Nitrogen

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30949,10 " Electric Utilities",27376,5 " IPP & CHP",3573,26 "Net generation (megawatthours)",116334363,11 " Electric Utilities",102294256,5 " IPP & CHP",14040107,24 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",13716,36 "

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",17166,23 " Electric Utilities",14377,18 " IPP & CHP",2788,32 "Net generation (megawatthours)",61064796,25 " Electric Utilities",47301782,20 " IPP & CHP",13763014,26 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",81239,17 " Nitrogen

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",28249,13 " Electric utilities",21311,11 " IPP & CHP",6938,17 "Net generation (megawatthours)",112257187,13 " Electric utilities",94847135,8 " IPP & CHP",17410053,19 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",22597,32 " Nitrogen

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",74646,2 " Electric utilities",28201,4 " IPP & CHP",46446,2 "Net generation (megawatthours)",198807622,5 " Electric utilities",71037135,14 " IPP & CHP",127770487,4 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3102,46 "

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",14933,29 " Electric utilities",10204,28 " IPP & CHP",4729,18 "Net generation (megawatthours)",53847386,30 " Electric utilities",43239615,26 " IPP & CHP",10607771,30 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",28453,30 " Nitrogen

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8832,35 " Electric utilities",161,45 " IPP & CHP",8671,12 "Net generation (megawatthours)",33676980,38 " Electric utilities",54693,45 " IPP & CHP",33622288,11 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",1897,47 " Nitrogen

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",3086,46 " Electric utilities",102,46 " IPP & CHP",2984,31 "Net generation (megawatthours)",7703584,47 " Electric utilities",49050,46 " IPP & CHP",7654534,35 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",824,48 " Nitrogen

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",9,51 " Electric utilities",, " IPP & CHP",9,51 "Net generation (megawatthours)",67612,51 " Electric utilities",, " IPP & CHP",67612,51 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",0,51 " Nitrogen oxide (short

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural Gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",59440,3 " Electric utilities",51775,1 " IPP & CHP",7665,15 "Net generation (megawatthours)",230015937,2 " Electric utilities",211970587,1 " IPP & CHP",18045350,15 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",126600,10 "

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",38250,7 " Electric utilities",28873,3 " IPP & CHP",9377,10 "Net generation (megawatthours)",125837224,10 " Electric utilities",109523336,4 " IPP & CHP",16313888,20 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",105998,11 " Nitrogen

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Petroleum", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",2672,47 " Electric utilities",1732,40 " IPP & CHP",939,45 "Net generation (megawatthours)",10204158,46 " Electric utilities",5517389,39 " IPP & CHP",4686769,40 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",21670,33 " Nitrogen

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4944,42 " Electric utilities",3413,37 " IPP & CHP",1531,39 "Net generation (megawatthours)",15184417,43 " Electric utilities",9628016,37 " IPP & CHP",5556400,39 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",5777,42 " Nitrogen

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",44727,4 " Electric utilities",5263,35 " IPP & CHP",39464,4 "Net generation (megawatthours)",202143878,4 " Electric utilities",10457398,36 " IPP & CHP",191686480,3 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",187536,6 " Nitrogen

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",27499,14 " Electric utilities",23319,7 " IPP & CHP",4180,23 "Net generation (megawatthours)",115395392,12 " Electric utilities",100983285,6 " IPP & CHP",14412107,22 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",332396,3 " Nitrogen

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16507,24 " Electric utilities",12655,20 " IPP & CHP",3852,25 "Net generation (megawatthours)",56853282,28 " Electric utilities",43021954,27 " IPP & CHP",13831328,25 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",74422,19 " Nitrogen oxide

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",14227,31 " Electric utilities",11468,24 " IPP & CHP",2759,33 "Net generation (megawatthours)",49728363,31 " Electric utilities",39669629,29 " IPP & CHP",10058734,31 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",31550,29 " Nitrogen

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",20878,21 " Electric utilities",19473,15 " IPP & CHP",1405,40 "Net generation (megawatthours)",90896435,17 " Electric utilities",90133403,10 " IPP & CHP",763032,49 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",204873,5 " Nitrogen

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",26657,15 " Electric utilities",18120,16 " IPP & CHP",8537,13 "Net generation (megawatthours)",104229402,15 " Electric utilities",58518271,17 " IPP & CHP",45711131,8 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",96240,14 "

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4470,43 " Electric utilities",10,49 " IPP & CHP",4460,20 "Net generation (megawatthours)",13248710,44 " Electric utilities",523,49 " IPP & CHP",13248187,27 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10990,38 " Nitrogen oxide

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",12264,33 " Electric utilities",85,47 " IPP & CHP",12179,8 "Net generation (megawatthours)",37833652,35 " Electric utilities",20260,47 " IPP & CHP",37813392,9 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",41370,26 " Nitrogen oxide

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",13128,32 " Electric utilities",971,42 " IPP & CHP",12157,9 "Net generation (megawatthours)",31118591,40 " Electric utilities",679986,43 " IPP & CHP",30438606,12 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",6748,41 "

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30435,12 " Electric utilities",22260,9 " IPP & CHP",8175,14 "Net generation (megawatthours)",106816991,14 " Electric utilities",84075322,12 " IPP & CHP",22741669,13 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",173521,7 " Nitrogen

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",15621,28 " Electric utilities",11557,22 " IPP & CHP",4064,24 "Net generation (megawatthours)",56998330,27 " Electric utilities",45963271,22 " IPP & CHP",11035059,29 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",39272,27 " Nitrogen

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16090,26 " Electric utilities",13494,19 " IPP & CHP",2597,34 "Net generation (megawatthours)",55127092,29 " Electric utilities",47084382,21 " IPP & CHP",8042710,34 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",101093,13 "

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",21790,19 " Electric utilities",20538,13 " IPP & CHP",1252,42 "Net generation (megawatthours)",87834468,18 " Electric utilities",85271253,11 " IPP & CHP",2563215,46 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",149842,9 " Nitrogen

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",6330,41 " Electric utilities",3209,38 " IPP & CHP",3121,30 "Net generation (megawatthours)",30257616,41 " Electric utilities",12329411,35 " IPP & CHP",17928205,16 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",14426,34 " Nitrogen

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8732,36 " Electric utilities",7913,30 " IPP & CHP",819,46 "Net generation (megawatthours)",39431291,34 " Electric utilities",36560960,30 " IPP & CHP",2870331,45 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",63994,22 " Nitrogen oxide

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",10485,34 " Electric utilities",8480,29 " IPP & CHP",2006,35 "Net generation (megawatthours)",36000537,37 " Electric utilities",27758728,33 " IPP & CHP",8241809,33 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10229,40 "

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4418,44 " Electric utilities",1121,41 " IPP & CHP",3297,28 "Net generation (megawatthours)",19538395,42 " Electric utilities",2085585,41 " IPP & CHP",17452810,18 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3107,45 " Nitrogen

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",19399,22 " Electric utilities",544,43 " IPP & CHP",18854,7 "Net generation (megawatthours)",68051086,23 " Electric utilities",-117003,50 " IPP & CHP",68168089,7 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3369,44 " Nitrogen oxide

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8072,39 " Electric utilities",6094,33 " IPP & CHP",1978,37 "Net generation (megawatthours)",32306210,39 " Electric utilities",26422867,34 " IPP & CHP",5883343,38 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",12064,37 " Nitrogen oxide

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",40404,6 " Electric utilities",10989,27 " IPP & CHP",29416,5 "Net generation (megawatthours)",137122202,7 " Electric utilities",34082856,31 " IPP & CHP",103039347,5 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",31878,28 " Nitrogen

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30498,11 " Electric utilities",26941,6 " IPP & CHP",3557,27 "Net generation (megawatthours)",128143588,9 " Electric utilities",119432144,2 " IPP & CHP",8711444,32 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",64168,21 " Nitrogen

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",6790,40 " Electric utilities",5516,34 " IPP & CHP",1274,41 "Net generation (megawatthours)",36462508,36 " Electric utilities",32088446,32 " IPP & CHP",4374062,42 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",52716,23 " Nitrogen oxide

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",31507,9 " Electric utilities",11134,26 " IPP & CHP",20372,6 "Net generation (megawatthours)",134476405,8 " Electric utilities",43290512,25 " IPP & CHP",91185893,6 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",355108,1 " Nitrogen oxide

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",15884,27 " Electric utilities",11175,25 " IPP & CHP",4709,19 "Net generation (megawatthours)",60119907,26 " Electric utilities",44565239,24 " IPP & CHP",15554668,21 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10595,39 "

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",42723,5 " Electric utilities",39,48 " IPP & CHP",42685,3 "Net generation (megawatthours)",221058365,3 " Electric utilities",90994,44 " IPP & CHP",220967371,2 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",297598,4 " Nitrogen

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",1810,49 " Electric utilities",8,50 " IPP & CHP",1803,38 "Net generation (megawatthours)",6281748,49 " Electric utilities",10670,48 " IPP & CHP",6271078,36 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",100,49 " Nitrogen

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",22824,18 " Electric utilities",20836,12 " IPP & CHP",1988,36 "Net generation (megawatthours)",97158465,16 " Electric utilities",93547004,9 " IPP & CHP",3611461,43 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",43659,25 "

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",20998,20 " Electric utilities",20490,14 " IPP & CHP",508,47 "Net generation (megawatthours)",79506886,20 " Electric utilities",76986629,13 " IPP & CHP",2520257,47 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",89357,16 " Nitrogen

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",112914,1 " Electric utilities",29113,2 " IPP & CHP",83800,1 "Net generation (megawatthours)",437629668,1 " Electric utilities",94974953,7 " IPP & CHP",342654715,1 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",349245,2 " Nitrogen

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8325,38 " Electric utilities",7296,31 " IPP & CHP",1029,44 "Net generation (megawatthours)",43784526,33 " Electric utilities",40741425,28 " IPP & CHP",3043101,44 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",23646,31 " Nitrogen oxide

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",650,50 " Electric utilities",337,44 " IPP & CHP",313,49 "Net generation (megawatthours)",7031394,48 " Electric utilities",868079,42 " IPP & CHP",6163315,37 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",70,50 " Nitrogen oxide

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",26292,16 " Electric utilities",22062,10 " IPP & CHP",4231,22 "Net generation (megawatthours)",77137438,21 " Electric utilities",62966914,16 " IPP & CHP",14170524,23 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",68550,20 "

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16276,25 " Electric utilities",11981,21 " IPP & CHP",4295,21 "Net generation (megawatthours)",81059577,19 " Electric utilities",63331833,15 " IPP & CHP",17727743,17 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",102406,12 "

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8458,37 " Electric utilities",7233,32 " IPP & CHP",1225,43 "Net generation (megawatthours)",49696183,32 " Electric utilities",45068982,23 " IPP & CHP",4627201,41 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",45704,24 " Nitrogen oxide

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Item","Value" "Primary energy source","Coal" "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",1068422 " Electric utilities",616632 " IPP & CHP",451791 "Net generation (megawatthours)",4093606005 " Electric utilities",2382473495 " IPP & CHP",1711132510 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)", " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3842005 " Nitrogen oxide (short

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Carbon Emission Comparisons One million metric tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions equals: - the combustion of 530 thousand short tons of coal - the coal input to 1 coal plant (200-MW) in about 1 year - the combustion of 18 billion cubic feet of natural gas - the combustion of 119 million gallons of gasoline = the combustion of gasoline for 7 hours in the U.S. = 323 thousand new cars, each driven 12,400 miles = 282 thousand new light-duty vehicles, each driven 12,200 miles = 274

  16. Conceptual Soundness, Metric Development, Benchmarking, and Targeting for PATH Subprogram Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey. G.; Doris, E.; Coggeshall, C.; Antes, M.; Ruch, J.; Mortensen, J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the conceptual soundness of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) program's revised goals and establish and apply a framework to identify and recommend metrics that are the most useful for measuring PATH's progress. This report provides an evaluative review of PATH's revised goals, outlines a structured method for identifying and selecting metrics, proposes metrics and benchmarks for a sampling of individual PATH programs, and discusses other metrics that potentially could be developed that may add value to the evaluation process. The framework and individual program metrics can be used for ongoing management improvement efforts and to inform broader program-level metrics for government reporting requirements.

  17. EECBG 10-07C/SEP 10-006B Attachment 1: Process Metrics List |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 10-07C/SEP 10-006B Attachment 1: Process Metrics List EECBG 10-07C/SEP 10-006B Attachment 1: Process Metrics List eecbg_sep_reporting_guidance_attachment_06242011.pdf (56.65 KB) More Documents & Publications EECBG SEP Attachment 1 - Process metric list EECBG Program Notice 10-07A DOE Recovery Act Reporting Requirements for the State Energy Program

  18. CEM_Metrics_and_Technical_Note_7_14_10.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CEM_Metrics_and_Technical_Note_7_14_10.pdf CEM_Metrics_and_Technical_Note_7_14_10.pdf (129.47 KB) More Documents & Publications SEAD-Fact-Sheet.pdf Schematics of a heat pump clothes dryer<br /> Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Heat Pump Clothes Dryer CEM_Metrics_and_Technical_Note_7_14_10.pdf Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States

  19. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B. )

    1992-02-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths.

  20. Metrics for Assessment of Smart Grid Data Integrity Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annarita Giani; Miles McQueen; Russell Bent; Kameshwar Poolla; Mark Hinrichs

    2012-07-01

    There is an emerging consensus that the nation’s electricity grid is vulnerable to cyber attacks. This vulnerability arises from the increasing reliance on using remote measurements, transmitting them over legacy data networks to system operators who make critical decisions based on available data. Data integrity attacks are a class of cyber attacks that involve a compromise of information that is processed by the grid operator. This information can include meter readings of injected power at remote generators, power flows on transmission lines, and relay states. These data integrity attacks have consequences only when the system operator responds to compromised data by redispatching generation under normal or contingency protocols. These consequences include (a) financial losses from sub-optimal economic dispatch to service loads, (b) robustness/resiliency losses from placing the grid at operating points that are at greater risk from contingencies, and (c) systemic losses resulting from cascading failures induced by poor operational choices. This paper is focused on understanding the connections between grid operational procedures and cyber attacks. We first offer two examples to illustrate how data integrity attacks can cause economic and physical damage by misleading operators into taking inappropriate decisions. We then focus on unobservable data integrity attacks involving power meter data. These are coordinated attacks where the compromised data are consistent with the physics of power flow, and are therefore passed by any bad data detection algorithm. We develop metrics to assess the economic impact of these attacks under re-dispatch decisions using optimal power flow methods. These metrics can be use to prioritize the adoption of appropriate countermeasures including PMU placement, encryption, hardware upgrades, and advance attack detection algorithms.