National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ton bbl mcf

  1. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil prices topped $70 per barrel (bbl) and catastrophic hurricanes in the Gulf Coast shut down a significant fraction of U.S. refinery capacity. The following year, oil approached $80 per bbl due to supply concerns, as well as continued political tensions in the Middle East. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was enacted in December of that year. By the end of December 2007, oil prices surpassed $100 per bbl for the first time, and by mid-summer 2008, prices approached $150 per bbl because of supply concerns, speculation, and weakness of the U.S. dollar. As fast as they skyrocketed, oil prices fell, and by the end of 2008, oil prices dropped below $50 per bbl, falling even more a month later due to the global economic recession. In 2009 and 2010, oil prices began to increase again as a result of a weak U.S. dollar and the rebounding of world economies.

  2. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Tech Jump to: navigation, search Name: E-TON Solar Tech Place: Tainan, Taiwan Zip: 709 Product: Taiwan-based manufacturer of PV cells. Coordinates: 22.99721, 120.180862...

  3. Bioenergy Impacts … Billion Dry Tons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by 2030 at least one billion dry tons of non-food biomass resources, yielding up to 60 billion gallons of biofuels, as well as bio- based chemicals, products, and electricity. ...

  4. A semisubmersible type drilling, early production and testing system with 100,000 bbl storage for deepwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Masahiro; Yokokura, Kozo; Nakamura, Arata

    1996-12-31

    Deepwater petroleum development is increasing throughout the world. Complete evaluation of deepwater oil fields prior to development is extremely important, but difficult due to harsh conditions and deepwater. Extended well testing and early production of a field will allow complete evaluation, reducing risk prior to long term commitments. Conceptual design and studies for a semisubmersible type deepwater drilling, early production and testing system with 100,000 bbl storage (DEPTS) that will allow this have been completed. Needs analysis were performed and several potential concepts compared. Sizing and costing of the semisubmersible unit, mooring, and riser systems as well as selection of the drilling, production, and storage units were carried out. The unique aspect of the system is that the combination of drilling, production facilities, and storage on the same vessel will allow the system to be applied across the early phases of offshore oil field development from drilling to early production. With storage integrated into the vessel, oil production can continue in the most extreme conditions. The system`s intended operational area will be the deepwater fields of Asia and Oceania. Studies have been carried out showing the technical and economic feasibility of the system in deepwater up to 2,000 m.

  5. Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the Bioeconomy Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Bryce Stokes, Senior Advisor, CNJV PDF icon stokes_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass Econ 101: Measuring the Technological Improvements on Feedstocks Costs WEBINAR: A CHANGING MARKET FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOPRODUCTS U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts

  6. Webinar: Building the Billion Ton Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building the Billion Ton Bioeconomy Webinar: Building the Billion Ton Bioeconomy May 5, 2016 2:00PM to 4:00PM EDT Online Join the Biomass Research and Development (R&D) Board Operations Committee at a bioeconomy listening session on Thursday, May 5, 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Eastern Time. During the listening session, titled "Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy in the United States," we encourage attendees to provide their thoughts and comments and to ask questions about the potential to grow

  7. Picture of the Week: The 100-Ton Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 The 100-Ton Test Before the historic Trinity test on July 16th, 1945, Los Alamos scientists conducted a host of other experiments designed to ensure that they would be ready to...

  8. Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO2 | Department of Energy Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of CO2 Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of CO2 June 27, 2014 - 11:09am Addthis An aerial view of Air Products’ steam methane reforming facility at Port Arthur, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. An aerial view of Air Products' steam methane reforming facility at Port Arthur, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. Allison Lantero

  9. "(Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Source: International Energy Outlook 2010" "Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2010)" "application/vnd.ms-excel" "U.S. history values from this report" "U.S. projections from AEO2011, early release" "Table 4. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions and shares by region, 1990-2035",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Additional data for analysis" "(Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide)"

  10. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  11. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy...

  12. In Milestone, Energy Department Projects Safely and Permanently Store 10 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carbon Capture and Storage projects supported by the Department reached a milestone of 10 million tons of carbon dioxide.

  13. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodn; Schumann, M., E-mail: laura.baudis@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: alexkish@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: marrodan@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch [Physik Institut, University of Zrich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zrich, CH-8057 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 230 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ? 2 10{sup ?48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV?c{sup ?2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ? 6 GeV?c{sup ?2} to cross sections above ? 4 10{sup ?45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  14. Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wankerl, M.W.; Schmid, S.P.

    1995-12-31

    In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

  15. U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S.

  16. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civi Washington, DC Secretary Abraham announced that DOE will dispose of 34 metric tons of surplus weapons grade plutonium by turning the material into mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for use in nuclear reactors. The decision follows an exhaustive Administration review of

  17. Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER -

  18. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon | Department of Energy One Million Metric Tons of Carbon Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon January 8, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon Project Achieves Major Milestone by Successfully Injecting Carbon into Saline Formation WASHINGTON - As part of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today

  19. Taking the One-Metric-Ton Challenge | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taking the One-Metric-Ton ... Taking the One-Metric-Ton Challenge Posted: January 13, 2016 - 4:46pm NNSA Uranium Program Manager Tim Driscoll speaks with the One-Metric-Ton Challenge team in Building 9212. The team has undertaken an extensive dedicated maintenance effort to improve metal production equipment reliability and reduce unexpected down time, with an end goal of significantly increasing purified metal production by fiscal year 2017. Last year, NNSA Uranium Program Manager Tim Driscoll

  20. U.S. Billion-Ton Update. Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-08-01

    This report is an update to the 2005 Billion-Ton Study that addresses shotcomings and questions that arose from the original report..

  1. Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the

  2. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An update to the 2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply"

  3. Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from groundwater across the site ahead of schedule and pumped a record volume of water through treatment facilities to remove contamination, with more than 130 tons of...

  4. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A large-scale carbon dioxide storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected.

  5. Knockdown of dual specificity phosphatase 4 enhances the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells to doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yu; Du, Feiya; Chen, Wei; Yao, Minya; Lv, Kezhen; Fu, Peifen

    2013-12-10

    Background: Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer-related deaths in females world-wide. Doxorubicin-based therapy has limited efficacy in breast cancer due to drug resistance, which has been shown to be associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the molecular mechanisms linking the EMT and drug resistance in breast cancer cells remain unclear. Dual specificity phosphatase 4 (DUSP4), a member of the dual specificity phosphatase family, is associated with cellular proliferation and differentiation; however, its role in breast cancer progression is controversial. Methods: We used cell viability assays, Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining, combined with siRNA interference, to evaluate chemoresistance and the EMT in MCF-7 and adriamycin-resistant MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells, and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Results: Knockdown of DUSP4 significantly increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells to doxorubicin, and MCF-7/ADR cells which expressed high levels of DUSP4 had a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, knockdown of DUSP4 reversed the EMT in MCF-7/ADR cells, as demonstrated by upregulation of epithelial biomarkers and downregulation of mesenchymal biomarkers, and also increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7/ADR cells to doxorubicin. Conclusions: DUSP4 might represent a potential drug target for inhibiting drug resistance and regulating the process of the EMT during the treatment of breast cancer. - Highlights: We used different technologies to prove our conclusion. DUSP4 knockdown increased doxorubicin chemosensitivity in breast cancer cells. DUSP4 is a potential target for combating drug resistance in breast cancer. DUSP4 is a potential target for regulating the EMT in breast cancer.

  6. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  7. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    The US regulations governing the packaging and transportation of UF{sub 6} cylinders are contained in the publication 10CFR71. Under the current 10CFR71 regulations, packages are classified according to Fissile Class I, II, or III and a corresponding transport index (TI). UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2}-tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class II packages with a TI of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class I with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders are not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % since they have no approved overpack. This work reviews the suitability of 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages for reclassification as Fissile Class I with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10CFR71 criteria for Fissile Class I packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear suitable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Why did they blow up 100 tons of TNT before the Trinity Test?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Why did they blow up 100 tons of TNT before the Trinity Test? At the Bradbury Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Why did they blow up 100 tons of TNT before the Trinity Test? Science question of the month May 1, 2016 Sometimes people ask us a question and we try to answer them How do you calibrate instruments for a test that's never been done before? Great question. The 100-ton test was performed before the Trinity test to calibrate instruments prepared to explore the expected

  9. Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets April 11, 2014 - 1:32pm Addthis The cyclotron, invented by Ernest Lawrence in the 1930s, is a unique circular particle accelerator, which Lawrence himself referred to as a "proton merry-go-round." In reality, the cyclotron specialized in smashing atoms. Part of this atom-smashing process requires very large, very heavy magnets -- sometimes weighing up to 220 tons. In this photo, workers

  10. Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from

  11. 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOEs Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  12. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  13. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed- Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996.

  14. DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (Grand Junction, CO) ― The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has safely moved another million tons of uranium mill tailings from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

  15. 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is ...

  16. Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel ...

  17. DOE Announces Webinars on Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunity in Innovative Sensors | Department of Energy Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an Opportunity in Innovative Sensors DOE Announces Webinars on Building a Billion Ton Bioeconomy and an Opportunity in Innovative Sensors May 5, 2016 - 9:06am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is

  18. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Investments | Department of Energy Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than

  19. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities | Department of Energy 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities February 14, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE 509-376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, Washington Closure

  20. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely | Department of Energy Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145

  1. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron

  2. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Home / Blog Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Some 23,000 tons of asphalt removed during this summer's UPF site work have been put to use throughout the site. Potholes and gravel roads are now "paved" with the recycled asphalt that has been ground into a material called base course. Unlike gravel, the material tends to rebind into a solid form as it is packed

  3. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weapons Stockpile | Department of Energy to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will

  4. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. . AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  5. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Conrad, Jan; Edsj, Joakim E-mail: savage@fysik.su.se E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2011-04-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions.

  6. Criticality Safety Review of 2 1/2-, 10-, and 14-Ton UF(Sub 6) Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2 1/2 tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class II packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class I with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum 235U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2 1/2-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class I with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class I packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U.

  7. Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 3 Total Mobile Combustion 1 Stationary Combustion 2 Total Waste Combustion Human Sewage in Wastewater Total Nitrogen Fertilization of Soils Crop Residue Burning Solid Waste of Domesticated Animals Total 1980 60 44 104 1 10 11 364 1 75 440 88 642 1981 63 44 106 1 10 11 364 2 74 440 84 641 1982 67 42 108 1 10 11 339 2 74 414 80 614 1983 71 43 114

  8. Occidental Chemical's Energy From Waste facility: 3,000,000 tons later

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasins, G.F. )

    1988-01-01

    Occidental Chemical's Energy From Waste's cogeneration facility continues to be one of the most successful RDF plants in the U.S. The facility began operation in 1980 and was an operational success after a lengthy 2-1/2 year start-up and redesign, utilizing the air classification technology to produce RDF. In 1984, the plant was converted to a simplified shred and burn concept, significantly improving overall economics and viability of the operation. After processing 3.0 million tons the facility is a mature operation with a well developed experience base in long range operation and maintenance of the equipment utilized for processing and incinerating municipal solid waste.

  9. An ounce of prevention, a ton of cure | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An ounce of prevention, a ... An ounce of prevention, a ton of cure Posted: June 24, 2015 - 3:11pm Aaron Spoon of Power Operations performs maintenance on 13.8 kV transformers 145 and 145A. Photo by Scott Fraker Y-12 recently saved time, taxpayer dollars, effort and potential injuries by taking a 72-hour planned simultaneous outage of power, steam and air systems. The weekend outage allowed a small army of Y-12 infrastructure, facilities and utilities workers to make repairs and perform

  10. Insulin like growth factor 2 regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomblin, Justin K.; Salisbury, Travis B.

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: IGF-2 stimulates concurrent increases in AHR and CCND1 expression. IGF-2 promotes the binding of AHR to the endogenous cyclin D1 promoter. AHR knockdown inhibits IGF-2 stimulated increases in CCND1 mRNA and protein. AHR knockdown inhibits IGF-2 stimulated increases in MCF-7 proliferation. -- Abstract: Insulin like growth factor (IGF)-1 and IGF-2 stimulate normal growth, development and breast cancer cell proliferation. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) promotes cell cycle by inhibiting retinoblastoma protein (RB1). The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a major xenobiotic receptor that also regulates cell cycle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether IGF-2 promotes MCF-7 breast cancer proliferation by inducing AHR. Western blot and quantitative real time PCR (Q-PCR) analysis revealed that IGF-2 induced an approximately 2-fold increase (P < .001) in the expression of AHR and CCND1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), followed by Q-PCR indicated that IGF-2 promoted (P < .001) a 7-fold increase in AHR binding on the CCND1 promoter. AHR knockdown significantly (P < .001) inhibited IGF-2 stimulated increases in CCND1 mRNA and protein. AHR knockdown cells were less (P < .001) responsive to the proliferative effects of IGF-2 than control cells. Collectively, our findings have revealed a new regulatory mechanism by which IGF-2 induction of AHR promotes the expression of CCND1 and the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. This previously uncharacterized pathway could be important for the proliferation of IGF responsive cancer cells that also express AHR.

  11. Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 9 Total 5 Coal Mining Natural Gas Systems 1 Petroleum Systems 2 Mobile Com- bustion 3 Stationary Com- bustion 4 Total 5 Landfills Waste- water Treatment 6 Total 5 Enteric Fermen- tation 7 Animal Waste 8 Rice Cultivation Crop Residue Burning Total 5 1980 3.06 4.42 NA 0.28 0.45 8.20 10.52 0.52 11.04 5.47 2.87 0.48 0.04 8.86 0.17 28.27 1981 2.81 5.02 NA .27

  12. Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern .0 .0 .8 9.1 .0 .0 .0 .8 9.1 9.8 Ohio .0 .0 17.4 5.7 .0 .0 .0 17.4 5.7 23.1 Pennsylvania 3.8 3.3 18.9 .8 .0 .0 .0 22.7 4.2 26.9 Virginia .1

  13. Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons) Year Rank Mining Method Location Total 1 Bituminous Coal 1 Subbituminous Coal Lignite Anthracite 1 Underground Surface 1 East of the Mississippi 1 West of the Mississippi 1 1949 437,868,000 [2] [2] 42,702,000 358,854,000 121,716,000 444,199,000 36,371,000 480,570,000 1950 516,311,000 [2] [2] 44,077,000 421,000,000 139,388,000 524,374,000 36,014,000 560,388,000 1951 533,665,000 [2] [2] 42,670,000 442,184,000 134,151,000 541,703,000 34,632,000 576,335,000

  14. Table 7.4 Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Short Tons) Year Australia New Zealand Canada Mexico Colombia Venezuela China India Indonesia Europe South Africa Other Total Norway Poland Russia Ukraine United Kingdom Other Total 2000 167,595 0 1,923,434 6,671 7,636,614 2,038,774 19,646 205 718,149 0 0 1,212 0 238 0 1,450 0 85 12,512,623 2001 315,870 24,178 2,571,415 8,325 11,176,191 3,335,258 109,877 1,169 882,455 15,933 514,166 219,077 0 75,704 12 824,892 440,408 97,261 19,787,299 2002 821,280 0

  15. Table 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons) Year Canada Brazil Europe Japan Other 3 Total Belgium 1 Denmark France Germany 2 Italy Nether- lands Spain Turkey United Kingdom Other 3 Total 1960 12,843 1,067 1,116 130 794 4,566 4,899 2,837 331 NA – 2,440 17,113 5,617 1,341 37,981 1961 12,135 994 971 80 708 4,326 4,797 2,552 228 NA – 2,026 15,688 6,614 974 36,405 1962 12,302 1,327 1,289 38 851 5,056 5,978 3,320 766 NA 2 1,848 19,148 6,465 973 40,215 1963 14,557 1,161

  16. Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour 1) Year Mining Method Location Total 2 Underground Surface 2 East of the Mississippi West of the Mississippi Underground Surface 2 Total 2 Underground Surface 2 Total 2 1949 0.68 [3] 1.92 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.72 1950 .72 [3] 1.96 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .76 1951 .76 [3] 2.00 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .80 1952 .80 [3] 2.10 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .84 1953 .88 [3] 2.22 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .93 1954 1.00 [3] 2.48 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA

  17. Table 7.8 Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Thousand Short Tons) Year Production Trade Stock Change 2 Consumption 3 Imports Exports Net Imports 1 1949 63,637 279 548 -269 176 63,192 1950 72,718 438 398 40 -659 73,417 1951 79,331 162 1,027 -865 372 78,094 1952 68,254 313 792 -479 419 67,356 1953 78,837 157 520 -363 778 77,696 1954 59,662 116 388 -272 269 59,121 1955 75,302 126 531 -405 -1,248 76,145 1956 74,483 131 656 -525 634 73,324 1957 75,951 118 822 -704 814 74,433 1958 53,604 122 393 -271 675 52,658 1959

  18. Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton) Year Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite 1 Anthracite Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 4.90 [4] 33.80 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.37 16.35 [R] 8.90 61.38 [R] 5.24 36.14 [R] 1950 4.86 [4] 33.16 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.41 16.44 [R] 9.34 63.73 [R] 5.19 35.41 [R] 1951 4.94 [4] 31.44 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.44 15.53 [R] 9.94 63.26 [R] 5.29 33.67 [R] 1952 4.92 [4] 30.78 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.39 14.95 [R] 9.58 59.94 [R]

  19. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  20. Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

    1985-05-01

    The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

  1. Global identification of genes regulated by estrogen signaling and demethylation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putnik, Milica; Zhao, Chunyan; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Department of Biology and Biochemistry, Science and Engineering Research Center Bldg, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5056 ; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estrogen signaling and demethylation can both control gene expression in breast cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-talk between these mechanisms is investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 137 genes are influenced by both 17{beta}-estradiol and demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A set of genes is identified as targets of both estrogen signaling and demethylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is no direct molecular interplay of mediators of estrogen and epigenetic signaling. -- Abstract: Estrogen signaling and epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are involved in regulation of gene expression in breast cancers. Here we investigated a potential regulatory cross-talk between these two pathways by identifying their common target genes and exploring underlying molecular mechanisms in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the expression of approximately 140 genes was influenced by both 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and a demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine (DAC). Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggests that these genes are involved in intracellular signaling cascades, regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Based on previously reported association with breast cancer, estrogen signaling and/or DNA methylation, CpG island prediction and GO analysis, we selected six genes (BTG3, FHL2, PMAIP1, BTG2, CDKN1A and TGFB2) for further analysis. Tamoxifen reverses the effect of E2 on the expression of all selected genes, suggesting that they are direct targets of estrogen receptor. Furthermore, DAC treatment reactivates the expression of all selected genes in a dose-dependent manner. Promoter CpG island methylation status analysis revealed that only the promoters of BTG3 and FHL2 genes are methylated, with DAC inducing demethylation, suggesting DNA methylation directs repression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. In a further analysis of the potential interplay between estrogen signaling and DNA methylation, E2 treatment showed no effect on the methylation status of these promoters. Additionally, we show that the ER{alpha} recruitment occurs at the FHL2 promoter in an E2- and DAC-independent fashion. In conclusion, we identified a set of genes regulated by both estrogen signaling and DNA methylation. However, our data does not support a direct molecular interplay of mediators of estrogen and epigenetic signaling at promoters of regulated genes.

  2. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore » requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  3. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  4. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  5. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  6. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  7. Context dependent reversion of tumor phenotype by connexin-43 expression in MDA-MB231 cells and MCF-7 cells: Role of ?-catenin/connexin43 association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talhouk, Rabih S.; Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Rahme, Gilbert J.; Hariri, Hanaa H.; Rayess, Tina; Dbouk, Hashem A.; Bazzoun, Dana; Al-Labban, Dania; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2013-12-10

    Connexins (Cx), gap junction (GJ) proteins, are regarded as tumor suppressors, and Cx43 expression is often down regulated in breast tumors. We assessed the effect of Cx43 over-expression in 2D and 3D cultures of two breast adenocarcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. While Cx43 over-expression decreased proliferation of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 by 56% and 80% respectively, MDA-MB-231 growth was not altered in 2D cultures, but exhibited 35% reduction in 3D cultures. C-terminus truncated Cx43 did not alter proliferation. Untransfected MCF-7 cells formed spherical aggregates in 3D cultures, and MDA-MB-231 cells formed stellar aggregates. However, MCF-7 cells over-expressing Cx43 formed smaller sized clusters and Cx43 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells lost their stellar morphology. Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced by 60% and 30% respectively. On the other hand, silencing Cx43 in MCF10A cells, nonneoplastic human mammary cell line, increased proliferation in both 2D and 3D cultures, and disrupted acinar morphology. Although Cx43 over-expression did not affect total levels of ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2, it decreased nuclear levels of ?-catenin in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and in 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells. Cx43 associated at the membrane with ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2 in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and only in 3D conditions in MDA-MB-231 cells. This study suggests that Cx43 exerts tumor suppressive effects in a context-dependent manner where GJ assembly with ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2 may be implicated in reducing growth rate, invasiveness, and, malignant phenotype of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells, by sequestering ?-catenin away from nucleus. - Highlights: Cx43 over-expressing MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were grown in 2D and 3D cultures. Proliferation and growth morphology were affected in a context dependent manner. Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced. Cx43-mediated gap junction complex assembly correlated with observed changes. We propose that membranous Cx43 sequesters ?-catenin away from the nucleus.

  8. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor ? target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Kwang Won

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)?-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ER? target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ER? target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ER? target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ER?-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators.

  9. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuenong; Wei, Han; Liu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qianying; Wei, Anhua; Shi, Du; Yang, Xian; Ruan, Jinlan

    2013-07-15

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death.

  10. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  11. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  12. Leptin upregulates telomerase activity and transcription of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, He; Zhao, Tiansuo; Wang, Xiuchao; Gao, Chuntao; Wang, Jian; Yu, Ming; Hao, Jihui

    2010-03-26

    The aim was to analyze the mechanism of leptin-induced activity of telomerase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We found that leptin activated telomerase in a dose-dependent manner; leptin upregulated the expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) at mRNA and protein levels; blockade of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation significantly counteracted leptin-induced hTERT transcription and protein expression; chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that leptin enhanced the binding of STAT3 to the hTERT promoter. This study uncovers a new mechanism of the proliferative effect of leptin on breast cancer cells and provides a new explanation of obesity-related breast cancer.

  13. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  14. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  15. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  16. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply, April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country’s present petroleum consumption – the goal set by the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  17. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stressrescue responses were induced. At high E2 concentration, classical genomic pathway involving ER binding to the regulatory regions was reduced, and alternate or indirect activation of genes through Oct-1 became more prominent.

  18. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  19. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L.; Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  20. Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Total 2,9 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 5 Jet Fuel Kero- sene LPG 6 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 7 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total Wood 10 Waste 11 Fuel Ethanol 12 Bio- diesel Total 1949 1,118 270 12 140 NA 42 13 7 329 8 244 25 820 2,207 145 NA NA NA 145 1950 1,152 313 14 168 NA 48 16 9 357 8 273 26 918 2,382 147 NA NA

  1. Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Wood 6 Total 6 1949 121 55 51 21 7 80 66 321 99 99 1950 120 66 61 25 9 95 69 350 94 94 1951 111 81 68 27 10 105 78 374 90 90 1952 103 89 70 27 10 108 85 385 84 84 1953 92 93 71 26 11 108 94 387 78 78 1954 82 104 79 27 12 118 99 404 75 75

  2. Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110 26 239 140 1,095 50 NA NA 50

  3. Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Jet Fuel LPG 5 Lubricants Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Total Fuel Ethanol 8 Biodiesel Total 1949 161 NA 12 30 NA (s) 4 306 91 443 6 611 NA NA NA 1950 146 7 14 35 NA (s) 5 332 95 481 6 640 NA NA NA 1951 129 11 18 42 NA (s) 6 360 102 529 7 675 NA NA NA

  4. Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 8 Waste 9 Fuel Ethanol 10 Total 1949 148 19 16 3 2 7 NA 28 55 58 280 2 NA NA 2 1950 147 21 19 3 2 7 NA 33 66 63 297 2 NA NA 2 1951 125 25 21 4 3 8 NA 34 70 69 289 2 NA NA 2 1952 112 28 22 4 3 8 NA 35 71 73

  5. Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1951 235 42 2 NA 29 31 NA NA 308 1 NA 1 1952 240 50 2 NA 31 33 NA NA 323 1 NA 1 1953 260 57 3 NA 38 40 NA NA 358 (s) NA (s)

  6. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  7. Hong Kong: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 167 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 169 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Hong Kong...

  8. Botswana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons 63 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 199 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 198 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Botswana No...

  9. Luxembourg: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 165 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 145 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Luxembourg...

  10. Zambia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons 69 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 118 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 105 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Zambia No...

  11. Sri Lanka: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 131 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 118 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Sri Lanka...

  12. Puerto Rico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 144 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 134 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Puerto Rico...

  13. Niger: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons 59 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 149 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 148 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Niger No...

  14. Bosnia and Herzegovina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons 17 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 106 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 102 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Bosnia and...

  15. Malta: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 113 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 138 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Malta Malta...

  16. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33% was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  17. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  18. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-31

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  19. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 *

  20. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 *

  1. table2.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1

  2. table4.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column

  3. table7.6_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column

  4. Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566,415 218,383,703 145,398,976 363,247 5,590,014 1,943,302,355 14,468,564 1,059 984,406

  5. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,229,870 169,653,294 133,545,718 363,247 4,365,768 1,828,157,897 13,815,263 832 809,873 6,874

  6. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  7. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons)

  8. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  9. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21

  10. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  11. table5.1_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total

  12. table5.3_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Row Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States 311 - 339

  13. table5.5_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE

  14. table5.7_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Row End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.3 2.4

  15. RPF101, a new capsaicin-like analogue, disrupts the microtubule network accompanied by arrest in the G2/M phase, inducing apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in the MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S-Jnior, Paulo Luiz de; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurcio Temotheo; Damio, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre de; Cmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Pereira, Alexandre; Madeiro de Souza, Dener; Parise Filho, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the world's leading cause of death among women. This situation imposes an urgent development of more selective and less toxic agents. The use of natural molecular fingerprints as sources for new bioactive chemical entities has proven to be a quite promising and efficient method. Capsaicin, which is the primary pungent compound in red peppers, was reported to selectively inhibit the growth of a variety tumor cell lines. Here, we report for the first time a novel synthetic capsaicin-like analogue, RPF101, which presents a high antitumor activity on MCF-7 cell line, inducing arrest of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase through a disruption of the microtubule network. Furthermore, it causes cellular morphologic changes characteristic of apoptosis and a decrease of ??m. Molecular modeling studies corroborated the biological findings and suggested that RPF101, besides being a more reactive molecule towards its target, may also present a better pharmacokinetic profile than capsaicin. All these findings support the fact that RPF101 is a promising anticancer agent. -- Highlights: ? We report for the first time that RPF101 possesses anticancer properties. ? RPF101 induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. ? RPF 101 decreases mitochondrial potential and induces DNA fragmentation.

  16. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  17. MCF Advisors LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Carolina Zip: 28202 Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy, Services, Solar, Wind energy Product: Provide investment banking services to privately-held small to middle...

  18. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet

  19. table1.1_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources RSE NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 *

  20. H. R. 4805: Internal Revenue Code of 1990. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, May 10, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives on May 10, 1990 to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. This bill reduces emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content. Separate sections are included which impose tax on coal, tax on petroleum, and tax on natural gas. The tax rate on coal will be $3.00 per ton for 1991, $6.00 per ton for 1992, $9.00 per ton for 1993, and $12 per ton for 1994. The tax rate on petroleum will be $.65 per barrel for 1991, $1.30 per barrel for 1992, $1.95 per barrel for 1993, and $2.60 per barrel for 1994. The tax rate on natural gas will be $.08 per MCF for 1991, $.16 per MCF for 1992, $.24 per MCF for 1993, and $.32 per MCF for 1994.

  1. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10

  2. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 73,745 2,609 0.72 20.30

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804

  4. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4

  5. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American ... our first 2 years of moving tailings," Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler said. ...

  6. Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MOAB, Utah – 6,000,000 is a big number, and it marks a significant cleanup milestone in the Beehive State.

  7. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from cleanup operations across the...

  8. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impacting other vital U.S. farm and forest products, such as food, feed, and fiber crops. ... in-depth analyses of land-use changes and competition among food, feed, and energy crops. ...

  9. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    relocations. It took nearly three days to disassemble the machine and prepare it for transport. The machine was partially disassembled, removing auxiliary pieces from the main...

  10. Energy Department Employee Recognized for Eliminating One Million Tons of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development | Department of Energy The Energy Department today issued a Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap that will help developers navigate regulatory requirements at every level of government to deploy geothermal energy projects. In partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service, the Energy Department enlisted the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to convene key federal, state, and local permitting officials, along with industry

  11. 14,700 tons of silver at Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calutron magnets was because of a shortage of copper during the war. As you will recall, Gen. Groves sent Col. Nichols to arrange for the purchase of as much uranium ore as could...

  12. Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will operate; collect data; and market the energy savings and capital costs of a recently commissioned chiller geothermal heat pump project to promote the wide-spread adoption of this mature technology.

  13. H. R. 1086: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue code of 1986 to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, February 21, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A new subchapter would be added to the Internal Revenue Code entitled Carbon Tax on Primary Fossil Fuels. The tax is imposed on coal, petroleum, and natural gas, and is phased in over five years beginning in 1992. The tax on coal is $3.60 per ton in 1992 and climbs to $18.00 per ton in 1996. The tax on petroleum begins at $0.78 per barrel and climbs to $3.90 per barrel in 1996. Natural gas is taxed at $0.096 per MCF in 1992 and $0.48 per MCF in 1996. The bill also describes inflation adjustments.

  14. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2004 through 2014 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42

  15. DATA MINING AT THE NEBRASKA OIL & GAS COMMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Weber

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study of the hearing records is to identify factors that are likely to impact the performance of a waterflood in the Nebraska panhandle. The records consisted of 140 cases. Most of the hearings were held prior to 1980. Many of the records were incomplete, and data believed to be key to estimating waterflood performance such as Dykstra-Parson permeability distribution or relative permeability were absent. New techniques were applied to analyze the sparse, incomplete dataset. When information is available, but not clearly understood, new computational intelligence tools can decipher correlations in the dataset. Fuzzy ranking and neural networks were the tools used to estimate secondary recovery from the Cliff Farms Unit. The hearing records include 30 descriptive entries that could influence the success or failure of a waterflood. Success or failure is defined by the ratio of secondary to primary oil recovery (S/P). Primary recovery is defined as cumulative oil produced at the time of the hearing and secondary recovery is defined as the oil produced since the hearing date. Fuzzy ranking was used to prioritize the relevance of 6 parameters on the outcome of the proposed waterflood. The 6 parameters were universally available in 44 of the case hearings. These 44 cases serve as the database used to correlate the following 6 inputs with the respective S/P. (1) Cumulative Water oil ratio, bbl/bbl; (2) Cumulative Gas oil ratio, mcf/bbl; (3) Unit area, acres; (4) Average Porosity, %; (5) Average Permeability, md; (6) Initial bottom hole pressure, psi. A 6-3-1 architecture describes the neural network used to develop a correlation between the 6 input parameters and their respective S/P. The network trained to a 85% correlation coefficient. The predicted Cliff Farms Unit S/P is 0.315 or secondary recovery is expected to be 102,700 bbl.

  16. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  17. EIS-0070: Mining, Construction and Operation for a Full-size Module at the Anvil Points Oil Shale Facility, Rifle, Garfield County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposal to mine 11 million tons of oil shale from the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) at Anvil Points, Colorado; to construct an experimental full-size shale retort module on a 365-acre lease tract having a 4700 bbl/day production capacity; and to consider extension, modification or new leasing of the facility. This project was cancelled after the DEIS was issued.

  18. COMPNAME","COMPID","YEAR","PLANTNAME","KIND","CONSTRUC","INSTALLED","MAXCAP","NE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EQUIP","TOTCOST","COSTCAP","GROSSEXP","OPERENG","FUEL","COOLANTS","STEXP","STOTH","STTRANS","ELECEXP","MISCST","RENTS","MAINSUP","MAINSTRUC","MAINBOIL","MAINELEC","MAINMISC","TOTPROD","EXPKWH","UNITCL","QUANTCL","AVGHEATCL","ACDELCL","ACBURNCL","ACBTUCL","ACNETGENCL","ABTUNETGCL","UNITGAS","QUANTGAS","AVGHEATGAS","ACDELGAS","ACBURNGAS","ACBTUGAS","ACNETGNGAS","ABTUNETGAS","UNITOIL","QUANTOIL","AVGHEATOIL","ACDELOIL","ACBURNOIL","ACBTUOIL","ACNETGNOIL","ABTUNETOIL" "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Sequoyah","Nuclear","01/01/81",,2441160,2303000,8760,1008,1.8570502e+10,3184031,533636867,2488511062,3025331960,1239,33187938,21080862,86166618,4316783,11925073,0,0,13329621,28360769,0,16330987,1528775,8295886,3650336,7012139,201997849,11,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",189924066,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10230 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Nuclear","01/01/96","1/1/1996",1269000,1200000,8208,728,8230350000,1953589,2108999339,4827648621,6938601549,5468,30551823,12179502,38261150,3963151,7056493,0,0,10400580,24553068,0,14243155,2328791,9244870,870737,990214,124091711,15,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",84467683,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10260 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",1088000,1407000,8760,14,256798000,0,6064116,119609619,125673735,116,112893140,2747882,9870790,0,0,0,0,0,477926,0,2274,1326,0,475339,7436,13582973,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",24224936,139600,0,0.41,0.03,0,13170 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",325200,431000,8760,8,176258000,0,3324533,63486109,66810642,205,80539157,665541,6810251,0,0,0,0,0,151587,0,1339166,1553,0,3922,4338,8976358,51,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2252179,1024,0,2.67,2.61,0,0,"Gallons",2063233,139100,0,0.37,0,0.03,14710 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Browns Ferry","Nuclear","01/01/74","1/1/1977",3456000,2529000,8760,1085,1.771301e+10,890631,909522117,3830292072,4740704820,1372,47061477,58344025,102890781,3642332,11672365,0,0,16130309,26099224,0,5560106,0,25822517,1921329,0,252082988,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",186421503,0,0,0,0.53,0,10520 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Cumberland","Steam","01/01/73","1/1/1973",2600000,2591000,8760,323,1.6530325e+10,1829568,103903145,1638681020,1744413733,671,63827428,5077791,197194700,0,86656,0,0,3945,13987241,0,1210473,1306476,16946838,4232440,841362,240887922,15,"Tons",6868849,10459,26.16,27.86,1.2,0.01,9746,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","1/1/1972",820300,622000,8760,9,264695000,0,3063638,102977658,106041296,129,1709273,879771,11709062,0,0,0,0,0,72128,0,301000,0,0,150309,2816,13115086,50,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3589538,1024,0,3.06,3.03,0,0,"Gallons",1173222,139500,0,0.55,0,0.03,14460 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","1/1/1972",476000,420000,8760,7,326221000,0,2826177,64911682,67737859,142,3078759,1248563,12167389,0,0,0,0,0,69117,0,27275,0,0,74,2699,13515117,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3866688,1024,0,2.8,2.71,0,0,"Gallons",3619161,138400,0,0.35,0,0.03,13670 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Bull Run","Steam","01/01/67","1/1/1967",950000,912000,8760,87,4389788000,2220883,35786684,300943172,338950739,357,21987402,2324904,50419615,0,2286709,0,0,1742,6906593,0,754423,481980,8505768,2788903,314448,74785085,17,"Tons",1593346,11895,28.85,30.74,1.24,0.01,9257,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Steam","01/01/59","1/1/1959",990000,858000,8760,122,4102572000,142024,73025058,451231229,524398311,530,20254094,1206283,60294160,0,16,0,0,0,9854407,0,392524,824748,8011764,5402527,184253,86170682,21,"Tons",2039487,9680,25.5,29.45,1.39,0.01,10585,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Steam","01/01/42","1/1/1945",240000,0,8760,0,-1381000,11997,4933530,18578656,23524183,98,-6629,177,0,0,0,0,0,0,109802,0,908,5,0,0,0,110892,-80,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Paradise","Steam","01/01/63","1/1/1970",2558200,2286000,8760,296,1.4181992e+10,8519495,115906466,1287447341,1411873302,552,57696636,6093708,168293657,0,752026,0,0,536,10779025,0,3529172,4127133,18094770,3094627,676700,215441354,15,"Tons",6332104,10413,21.43,26.2,1.14,0.01,10280,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Steam","01/01/56","1/1/1959",1255200,992000,8760,131,7002818000,690082,44703289,427469961,472863332,377,5073325,1612720,80238724,0,1258244,0,0,73323,7350012,0,1803476,714460,6039653,3054984,792751,102938347,15,"Tons",3266195,9540,22.99,24.49,1.19,0.01,9651,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"John Sevier","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1957",800000,748000,8760,129,5522165000,1570328,37309270,253176616,292056214,365,2993416,946133,70531483,0,3286201,0,0,0,4864155,0,569877,953882,3537596,666934,559907,85916168,16,"Tons",2120222,11710,32.44,33.21,1.3,0.01,9802,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Kingston","Steam","01/01/54","1/1/1955",1700000,1583000,8760,275,1.0147089e+10,3475653,55125946,433125237,491726836,289,31839874,1201130,133624099,0,732904,0,0,671,15993919,0,2888077,697638,10886872,3114678,359796,169499784,17,"Tons",4038449,11134,31.75,32.96,1.34,0.01,9845,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1965",1350000,1283000,8760,222,6557785000,279029,50717782,608908796,659905607,489,12808186,3684548,92134159,0,115314,0,0,3096,11894009,0,1552144,1216679,16776178,4392373,150021,131918521,20,"Tons",2890398,10787,27.4,31.47,1.38,0.01,10066,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Shawnee","Steam","01/01/53","1/1/1956",1750000,1368000,8760,264,8060005000,504507,64076435,534941906,599522848,343,20760203,5379072,113531307,0,6565666,0,0,278,7470171,0,2988378,2163530,11022440,5415043,396055,154931940,19,"Tons",3766896,10234,28.54,29.83,1.34,0.01,10474,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Steam","01/01/51","1/1/1959",1485200,1213000,8760,269,6638234000,87967,76839994,522564850,599492811,404,5328716,12443723,83697340,0,-481100,0,0,6321,6501533,0,2973740,1891947,6444598,2867797,430252,116776151,18,"Tons",2922958,11389,26.49,28.52,1.16,0.01,10912,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Widows Creek","Steam","01/01/52","1/1/1965",1968760,1652000,8760,332,8498846000,855691,74795817,748521437,824172945,419,22653730,3695032,119092329,0,6555644,0,0,1697,9854746,0,1449646,2594983,13869309,4635675,4932791,166681852,20,"Tons",3858785,10808,28.8,30.16,1.27,0.01,10896,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"PALO VERDE 17.49%","n","01/01/86","01/01/88",666364,659000,8760,0,5317709000,1244457,281584974,735793972,1018623403,1529,6013000,4282694,25651422,2986065,4032493,0,0,2276671,26939892,0,5837013,1933729,6303817,3749209,2418208,86411213,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBTU",57406,0,0,440.13,0.44,0.01,10795,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"San Tan","Combined Cy","01/01/74","01/01/75",414000,292000,4112,43,714062000,149179,2773141,65463525,68385845,165,-5000,380221,14107193,0,1594474,0,0,0,845877,0,332730,170816,0,7389209,249749,25070269,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",6579686,1017,2.12,2.12,2.08,0.02,9372,"BBL",291,485968,0,24.61,4.22,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"SOLAR PV1 & PV2","So1ar","01/01/98","01/01/98",216,100,3000,0,119493,0,0,1676818,1676818,7763,1852000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Steam","01/01/52","01/01/54",108000,106000,736,12,50072000,313326,2433283,15283485,18030094,167,726000,180057,1483303,0,338591,0,0,169009,304652,0,157896,27729,608781,344347,214929,3829294,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",651225,1016,2.16,2.16,2.12,0.03,13215,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/73",226850,149000,290,0,18990000,0,0,16888448,16888448,74,0,114913,724438,0,85074,0,0,0,40298,0,64493,11249,0,291038,96634,1428137,75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",281631,1017,2.09,2.09,2.06,0.04,15094,"BBL",60,488889,0,24.61,4.19,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"MOHAVE 10%","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",163620,158000,8715,0,996913000,42812,5046928,50920964,56010704,342,1221000,250561,13703464,0,389195,0,0,245787,1776796,-12611,497248,178489,1673455,685271,112185,19499840,20,"Tons",457815,10939,28.47,29.64,1.35,0.01,10093,"MCF",45107,1028,0,2.94,2.86,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CORONADO","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/80",821880,760000,8760,213,5039392000,8300198,158523884,696108809,862932891,1050,7523000,1228492,96325127,0,4607490,0,0,403466,4002498,10446,1754276,1703703,12035645,3902862,1238765,127212770,25,"Tons",2632698,9886,34.53,35.42,1.79,0.02,10357,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",24155,137315,24.21,26.79,4.65,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CRAIG 29%","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/81",259414,248000,8760,0,2050747000,83589,52424794,181936864,234445247,904,680000,368849,22362014,0,1036824,0,0,425951,1689040,12271,323682,251566,1760910,701820,370069,29302996,14,"Coal",1040589,10060,22.56,21.42,1.06,0.01,10223,"MCF",28100,1000,0,2.49,2.49,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CROSS CUT","Steam","01/01/42","01/01/49",30000,3000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 21.7%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",522857,488000,8760,539,3676183000,42866,27115117,246304509,273462492,523,5605000,1396220,45545213,0,1123640,0,0,257918,3750053,132023,667722,165042,7069421,2110905,434407,62652564,17,"Tons",1685726,10956,23.51,26.74,1.22,0.01,10061,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",8625,139078,22.75,28.63,4.9,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 100%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",2409480,2250000,8760,539,1.6020912e+10,197537,124954457,1135043822,1260195816,523,25829493,6236459,196347455,0,5554459,0,0,1293757,8406791,0,3306198,769371,29759456,10024854,2263428,263962228,16,"Tons",7339290,10979,23.5,26.63,1.21,0.01,10074,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",39756,139079,22.75,22.47,3.85,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"FOUR CORNERS 10%","Steam","01/01/69","01/01/70",163620,148000,8760,0,1176172000,11573,7334703,91939839,99286115,607,37000,105696,11684589,0,978340,0,0,90099,1040379,83795,135949,61864,1112429,291525,340786,15925451,14,"Tons",644302,8885,17.41,17.97,1.01,0.01,9757,"MCF",26430,1008,0,4.13,4.1,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"HAYDEN 50%","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",137700,131000,6809,0,812423000,482702,13855905,64632670,78971277,574,16419000,157050,8427442,0,469402,0,0,101091,1360780,0,245277,92834,431566,123971,241674,11651087,14,"Tons",413486,10561,22.49,20.28,0.96,0.01,10759,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",1248,138870,26.63,32.67,5.6,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/61",390472,407000,4062,62,888092000,139014,5833721,51714773,57687508,148,23000,345003,21091146,0,1032200,0,0,1186582,715713,0,741888,530777,2232219,897096,413430,29186054,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",9553025,1009,2.14,2.14,2.12,0.02,10859,"BBL",3,500000,0,24.61,4.1,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Gas Turbine","01/01/74","01/01/75",222950,197000,451,0,42223000,0,299904,22692012,22991916,103,0,108584,1469697,0,233742,0,0,0,36481,0,284381,9332,0,296342,34359,2472918,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",617372,1007,2.12,0,2.1,0.03,14371,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Alexandria City",298,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/56","01/01/74",171000,170000,5326,20,194429,0,0,0,0,0,0,708998,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,199997,14994,0,404462,0,1328451,6833,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346281,10,2.24,2.24,2.14,0.03,12.45,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/50",,102500,103000,8760,45,381623000,0,0,0,0,0,0,4120850,6152121,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,10272971,27,,239196,8800,25.72,25.72,1.46,0.02,11031,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","1/1/1972",22000,18000,95,0,1007000,0,0,0,0,0,0,9422,53460,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62882,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,99000,137300,0.54,0.54,3.93,0.05,13498 "Anaheim City of",590,1999,,"GAS TRUBINE","01/01/90","01/01/91",49270,45998,638,6,27719000,0,9226000,27237000,36463000,740,0,280835,699954,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,187223,0,0,0,1146979,2314991,84,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",258683,1009,2.76,2.76,2.74,25.7,9394,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#1","4 Gas 2 Int","01/01/62","01/01/72",85000,33000,1010,14,9983618,80839,3457655,22418738,25957232,305,380194,55796,353989,0,0,0,0,809120,0,3922,67280,67353,0,442853,0,1800313,180,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,273580,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.03,19744,778,0,133500,33.82,33.82,6.03,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#2","3 Gas 1 Ste","01/01/75","01/01/84",243200,151000,19516,30,759258360,11240,8928538,75136820,84076598,346,5364843,257796,10642281,0,678572,0,0,1623991,233929,0,330573,231135,303990,1190866,118352,15611485,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7701758,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.01,10144,570,0,133500,34.71,34.71,6.19,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Gas Turbine","01/01/54","01/01/54",5500,5000,0,0,493000,0,0,1065016,1065016,194,0,142,36663,0,0,0,0,7532,0,0,143,0,0,142049,0,186529,378,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1347,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Northeast","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",31500,31300,7566,24,120607160,70498,2376720,5711293,8158511,259,0,42490,2760067,0,395223,0,0,366434,798118,0,24135,51518,290200,20129,3652,4751966,39,"TON",58175,12000,39.8,39.48,1.64,0.02,12637,"MCF",125541,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.03,12648,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Steam","01/01/35","01/01/54",27500,22500,465,11,4508000,24099,1221355,5587700,6833154,248,0,31568,193351,0,41643,0,0,12652,492890,0,23781,136549,88433,55977,1897,1078741,239,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",70119,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.04,15874,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER TURBINES","GAS TURBINE","01/01/88","01/01/88",200000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER SOLAR","SOLAR","01/01/86","01/01/86",300,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER","STEAM","01/01/70","01/01/77",726000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"HOLLY","STEAM","01/01/60","01/01/74",558000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"SEAHOLM","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/55",120000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Braintree Town of",2144,1999,"Potter II","Gas Turbine","01/01/77","01/01/77",97500,79500,1284,27,72929000,20271,3762859,18429374,22212504,228,132748,176565,2625145,0,1154442,0,0,0,0,0,158096,316309,488498,491410,262035,5672500,78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",931167,1035,3.03,3.03,2.92,0.03,11631,"BBLS",14190,138809,15.72,15.72,2.7,0.03,10520 "Brownsville Public Utils Board",2409,1999,"SILAS RAY","STEAM GAS T","01/01/46","01/01/77",155000,197000,5256,29,206,528443,4499041,192117166,197144650,1272,0,205477,6239714,0,1311,0,0,155739,309455,0,74856,224382,203068,176038,1264465,8854505,42983034,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346974,1059,2.65,2.65,2.5,0.03,12048,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2439,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/70","01/01/87",39,30,265,8,5177,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,311874,0,0,0,0,499578,0,0,0,0,0,216081,0,1027533,198480,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",72688,1000,3.8,3.8,3.8,0.06,29839,"Bbl29839",639,128000,55.63,55.63,7.12,0.06,29839 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Bryan Municipal","STEAM, GAS","01/01/55","01/01/74",138000,115000,0,20,118273000,0,7590674,7546886,15137560,110,46427,76607,3529286,0,372623,0,0,606045,154868,9320,63805,20315,520977,159461,31344,5544651,47,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1626575,1,2.25,2.25,2.21,0.03,14.05,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Roland C. Dandy","STEAM","01/01/77","01/01/77",105000,106000,0,19,461142000,1183486,10201555,18752019,30137060,287,105283,76291,11510542,0,391030,0,0,512056,181517,12858,53081,31539,405327,91686,57727,13323654,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",5120070,1,2.24,2.24,2.21,0.02,11.36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Gas Turbine","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/71",25500,25000,106,1,2093500,13587,531143,3214616,3759346,147,17164,6073,130467,0,0,0,0,324,5442,16648,0,0,0,75762,0,234716,112,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",6016,137674,20.61,21.69,3.75,0.06,16616 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Joseph C McNeil GenrЬ ","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",50,53,4305,48,183109400,278455,18147811,50484579,68910845,1378217,571376,140467,6439721,0,788415,0,0,291816,360657,0,131396,35661,553086,1325161,20193,10086573,55,"Wood-Tons",263762,4750,23.46,23.52,2.47,0.03,13742,"MCF",66041,1012124,2.82,2.82,2.78,0.24,86785,"BBL",2260,136430,20.13,21.19,3.7,0,71.02 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Streeter Station","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/73",51500,50000,1650,23,38111600,281328,3758281,14375110,18414719,358,699506,97410,1113417,0,230220,0,0,102634,142771,0,90418,180725,588058,55402,9122,2610177,68,"Tons",19527,12429,38.79,36.49,1.47,0.02,14033.99,"MCF",49410,1000,2.75,2.75,2.75,0.04,14033.99,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Combustion Turbine","Combustion","01/01/68","01/01/68",25000,20000,193,0,2814300,70777,134588,3497629,3702994,148,3062,4978,122537,0,0,0,0,5713,0,0,6674,9708,0,32837,0,182447,65,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",50599,1000,2.42,2.42,2.42,0.04,17979.25,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"Reid Garner #4","Steam-coal","01/01/83","01/01/83",275000,250000,0,96,1597086000,319709000,0,0,319709000,1163,0,0,22054817,0,0,0,0,0,21659183,0,0,0,0,0,0,43714000,27,"Tons",672949,11858,0,13.11,1.31,0.01,11079,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",7515,133622,0,25,4.55,0.05,11570 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"BottleRock & S Geysep","Steam-Geoth","01/01/85","01/01/85",55000,0,0,0,0,10000,0,0,10000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Chanute City of",3355,1999,"Plant #3","Internal Co","01/01/85","01/01/91",31915,39975,595,8,10378156,50000,612000,15500000,16162000,506,0,369525,245371,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,166666,0,0,136912,0,918474,89,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",78668,1000,2.66,2.66,2.66,0.02,0.02,"Barrels",3969,138000,26.57,26.57,0.08,0.01,0.01 "PUD No 1 of Clark County",3660,1999,"River Road CCCT","Gas Turbine","01/01/97","01/01/97",248000,258504,7058,21,1711891704,1053160,141767983,13187783,156008926,629,2319343,4203148,23066109,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,91900,0,0,0,27361157,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",11463,1060,2042,2012,1.9,0.01,7114,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Combine Cyc","01/01/71","01/01/71",25550,24000,2149,6,43507,0,0,4581109,4581109,179,0,10000,1053091,0,0,0,0,130000,80000,0,10000,0,12009,328580,0,1623680,37320,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",374997,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.02,8.62,"BBL",70,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.05,13.99 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/65","01/01/65",11500,11500,754,6,12158,0,0,1445133,1445133,126,0,10000,478409,0,0,0,0,100000,50000,0,20000,0,0,226974,0,885383,72823,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",169662,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.03,13.99,"BBL",115,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.07,20.18 "Coffeyville City o",3892,1999,"COFFEYVILLE","STEAM","01/01/01","01/01/73",56985,55900,4013,23,68578900,0,0,0,0,0,0,57285,2419645,0,0,0,0,0,1146750,0,0,0,8610,0,0,3632290,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MMBTU",938070,1000,2.25,2.58,2.58,0.03,1368,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Steam","01/01/00","01/01/64",11125,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,68864,7301,41,105,51389,127700,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Diesel","01/01/48","01/01/78",13250,45933,1719,6,7081208,0,0,0,0,0,0,40423,214682,0,0,0,0,37863,0,0,0,12739,0,71418,0,377125,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",65604,9530000,2.84,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1725,126000,17.7,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Birdsall","Steam-Gas","01/01/53","01/01/57",62500,4500,1717,4,20716000,10761,2593301,11384249,13988311,224,0,67716,1180669,0,107787,0,0,227078,88988,0,31363,89311,290603,224308,38374,2346197,113,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",412714,806,2.83,2.83,3.52,0.06,16212,"GALLONS",22000,137420,0.11,0.11,0.81,0.01,16212 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Drake","Steam-Gas","01/01/25","01/01/74",257300,256000,8760,106,1484262000,2725551,23014851,80547185,106287587,413,0,1059853,25816108,0,1094453,0,0,3228406,1184954,0,462905,237248,4111443,1735831,152472,39083673,26,"TONS",769313,10914,29.13,31.49,1.44,0.01,11585,"MCF",494125,808,2.73,2.73,3.38,0.03,11585,"BARRELS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Nixon","Steam-Gas","01/01/80","01/01/80",207000,214000,6081,81,1117841000,5059222,39785705,107090082,151935009,734,0,969721,11571054,0,779121,0,0,1343687,1057607,0,489855,218501,3309067,2974204,146609,22859426,20,"TONS",538337,10432,18.31,18.84,0.9,0,10120,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",13952,136738,24.87,24.87,4.33,0.04,10120 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"CTS","Gas","01/01/99","01/01/99",71660,73000,458,0,22292000,418573,123167,32084223,32625963,455,0,0,715385,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,26204,0,741589,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",291394,983,2.89,2.87,2.92,0.03,12852,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbia City of",4045,1999,,"Steam/Gas T","01/01/10","01/01/70",86000,226000,8760,46,62152000,115894,3578025,15986526,19680445,229,5320808,43503,2133251,0,531664,0,0,967929,376491,0,170114,28005,512239,452108,0,5215304,84,"Tons",37319,13265,53.83,53.69,2.02,3.22,15930,"Mcf",34179,0,3.64,3.64,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbus City of",4065,1999,"O'Shaughnessy",,,,5000,5000,0,1,5860000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,49898,0,0,0,0,0,2864,0,52762,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Concord City of",4150,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,545243,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Connecticut Mun Elec Engy Coop",4180,1999,"Millstone Unit 3","Nuclear (e)","01/01/86","01/01/86",1253100,1164700,7329,933,8277624400,0,20415627,29930688,50346315,40,0,324496,363329,24201,162455,0,0,48209,296706,13608,313554,74201,315415,228127,1354,2165655,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Wansley 1 & 2","Coal fired","01/01/76","01/01/78",22220,0,0,0,149590620,0,0,9113036,9113036,410,28304,29233,2186381,0,24950,0,0,15863,81536,0,42895,19710,138435,167350,13819,2720172,18,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Scherer 1 & 2","Coal fired","/ /","01/01/84",22680,0,0,0,144814966,0,0,13467749,13467749,594,50818,27106,2605498,0,25617,0,0,15303,77539,0,34949,22981,256897,16076,11927,3093893,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Denton City of",5063,1999,"SPENCER PLANT","STEAM","01/01/55","01/01/73",179000,259100,11980,36,305539695,0,0,0,0,0,0,233373,9138796,0,348227,0,0,468112,432003,0,71604,11794,211613,467529,210327,11593378,38,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3800668,1,2.24,2.24,2.24,2.99,12.43,"BBl",0,139.68,7.82,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Willamette","Steam","01/01/31","01/01/50",25000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1189332,1189332,48,0,0,260,0,1204,0,0,-975,0,0,0,0,0,5095,7459,13043,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Energy Center","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",51200,41000,0,0,192829000,1280,320371,7521672,7843323,153,0,13058,1366594,0,0,0,0,261785,0,0,0,94,0,127793,0,1769324,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,321587,0,2.51,0,0,0,2495.24,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"ANIMAS","STEAM-COMBI","01/01/55","01/01/94",32180,28000,7808,14,170805000,5968,1109574,25033191,26148733,813,0,70145,3611891,0,225548,0,0,460952,226694,0,122984,0,217797,1021413,38103,5995527,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1668856,1013,2.13,2.13,2.1,0.02,9897,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"SAN JUAN","STEAM-COAL","/ /","/ /",4300042200,43000,7919,10,293222700,0,5471749,62874731,68346480,0,0,71242,5641682,0,114021,0,0,120758,93838,131,62021,34762,382623,77158,65298,6663534,23,"TONS",167448,9421,32.33,32.33,1.72,0.01,10774,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Fayetteville Public Works Comm",6235,1999,"Butler-Warner Gen PtP","Gas-Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/88",303400,276500,1134,33,0,749336,5123088,100277060,106149484,350,4108529,0,-6665,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,292639,-141172,144802,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1724674,1046,2.72,2.72,2.6,0.03,12249.5,"Barrels",4,138800,27.15,27.87,4.78,0.06,13375.25 "Fort Pierce Utilities Auth",6616,1999,"Steam","Steam","01/01/21","01/01/89",120011,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,564929,6990,0,231196,0,0,428922,138247,0,21508,56082,204594,1437831,87424,3177723,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #1","Internal Co",,"01/01/64",13190,0,0,9,2066120,5022,1113459,3036221,4154702,315,51721,42612,209909,0,0,0,0,518539,0,0,0,79604,0,0,0,850664,412,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",293755,138788,0.81,0.68,0.18,0.97,14.88 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #2","Internal Co","1/1/1968","01/01/73",37390,57000,1,9,1277200,1827,3178208,8088951,11268986,301,0,52596,205053,0,0,0,0,634322,0,28573,0,101784,0,0,0,1022328,800,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",319336,138788,0.86,0.64,0.13,0.16,9.2 "Fremont City of",6779,1999,"Wright","Steam","01/01/56","01/01/76",132700,83390,8760,47,336075,202231,5905920,42850719,48958870,369,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0

  19. 10,651,176 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of September 16, 2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Products has successfully retrofitted its two Port Arthur SMRs with a vacuum swing adsorption system to separate the CO2 from the process gas stream, followed by compression and...

  20. NNSA Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    secure and less expensive nuclear weapons complex. ... sale of LEU for safe use in power and research reactors around the world. ... NNSA maintains and enhances the safety, security, ...

  1. Lubricants Market to Record 44,165.11 Kilo Tons Volume by 2020...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over 50% of the global market share. Automotive oils sector is further segmented into hydraulic oil, engine oil, and gear oil. Improving GDP in developing nations such as India and...

  2. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, ... Approximately 20 MT will be reserved for space and research reactors that currently use ...

  3. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... sorghum as affected by low and normal input techniques. ... Richardson J. (eds.) 2001. Poplar Culture in North America. ... Plant Cell & Environment 29(4):720-728. Farnham D. 2001. ...

  4. 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 6 Energy Saving Tips for Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers 6 Energy Saving Tips for Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers February 28, 2014 - 6:11pm Addthis Dale Linkous carries pizza out of the walk-in freezer in the kitchen at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The Energy Department <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/new-energy-efficiency-standards-commercial-refrigeration-equipment-cut-businesses-energy">announced new energy

  5. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Read more about it. Dec 29, 2015 at 1:00 am Blog archive April 2016 (12) March 2016 (28) February 2016 (21) January 2016 (21) December 2015 (18) November 2015 (11) October 2015 ...

  6. A ton-scale bolometric detector for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedretti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2009-12-16

    After an introduction on neutrinoless double beta decay physics, a description of CUORE and CUORICINO experiments, detectors and results are reported. The actual efforts and next steps of the CUORE Project, required to probe the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino effective Majorana mass, are also described.

  7. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Richland Operations Office announced the removal of a massive concrete vault that once held two 15,000-gallon stainless steel tanks used to collect highly contaminated waste...

  8. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven members of the Regional Carbon...

  9. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration review of non-proliferation programs, including alternative technologies to dispose of surplus plutonium to meet the non-proliferation goals agreed to by the United ...

  10. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Through the Department's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better Plants), over 1,750 plants across the United States have saved about 1 billion in energy costs and ...

  11. 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Air Products has successfully retrofitted its two Port Arthur SMRs with a vacuum swing adsorption system to separate the CO2 from the process gas stream, followed by compression ...

  12. 10,422,136 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of August 21, 2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed below. Regional Carbon...

  13. Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office’s 2014 Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Workers with EM’s Richland Operations Office and its contractors made progress this year in several areas of Hanford site cleanup that helped protect employees, the public, environment, and Columbia River.

  14. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a ... Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform WEBINAR: A CHANGING MARKET FOR BIOFUELS ...

  15. 1984 Virginia coal mine directory: producers of 100,000 tons or more

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbard, W.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this directory is to identify major Virginia coal sources for the use of prospective buyers and other interested parties. It is divided into lists: (1) 1984 Virginia coal production, (2) eighty-five largest companies identified by MSHA, (3) alphabetical listing of Virginia coal mines, (4) alphabetical listing of coal mines by county, and (5) coal mines rated by production figures. The rating order for the last list includes factors affecting productivity such as type of mine, number of injuries, seam thickness, total production, and average employment.

  16. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilato...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting ...

  17. Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000 tons of soil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this task order (TO) is to support the EM-LA Field Office in replacing the cover at the Los Alamos County Airport Landfill. The new cover design is an evapotranspiration (ET) cover.

  18. 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The network of seven RCSPs are currently conducting field tests which involve integrated system testing and validation of geologic storage, simulation and risk assessment, and ...

  19. OXY (Occidental Petroleum Corp. ) units plan U. K. work worth $1. 5 billion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-15

    Occidental Refineries Ltd., an Occidental Petroleum Corp. subsidiary, plans to spend about $500,000 to build a 60,000 bbl/day hydrocracker on Canvey Island near London to produce aviation fuel, naphtha, and gasoline. Occidental hopes to deflect criticism by environmentalists, concerned about the concentration of petroleum facilities in the area, by installing a minimum amount of LPG storage and not using hydrogen sulfide on the site. During the 1970's, Occidental had prepared the site for the construction of a 125,000 bbl/day refinery, plans for which were scrapped after the demand for product compounds decreased. Occidental Chemical Co., another Occidental Petroleum subsidiary, plans to spend about $500,000 to build a 300,000 ton/yr ethylene plant at Peterhead, Scotl. The cracker would take part of the output from the de-ethanizer at the St. Fergus terminal for the proposed U.K. gas-gathering pipeline. Both projects would require about 3-4 yr to complete. Esso Chemical Ltd. will build a 550,000 ton/yr ethylene plant near the Mossmoran gas liquids plant in Fife, Scotl.

  20. Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water. Final report May 75-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Burch, D.W.; Kingsley, J.B.; Waddell, E.L. Jr

    1982-05-01

    The report summarizes a 5-year study of the beneficial uses of waste heat from condenser cooling water from steam-electric generating plants. The major effort addressed the recovery of plant nutrients in swine manure by aquatic farming of selected fish and Chinese waterchestnuts. Another effort included biogas production from swine manure in an anaerobic digester and the use of the digester waste to fertilize the aquatic farming system. Optimum recovery of plant nutrients resulted from operation of an integrated fish and waterchestnut system. Flowing water systems were 30-50% more productive than static systems. Annual fish yields of 5000-7000 lb/acre are projected for a properly stocked system over a 150-180 day growing period. Similarly, waterchestnut yields of nearly 17.8 tons/acre and dry hay yields of 6.7 tons/acre from sand-bed filters would be expected when fed wastewater from the fish system. The quality of the water leaving the sand beds would meet tertiary wastewater treatment standards during the growing season. An estimated 2000-head swine facility with a $400,000 investment would annually produce a 20% rate of return, save 360,000 bbl of oil through waste heat utilization, and produce biogas equivalent to 3000 bbl of oil.

  1. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 1/2 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the 'Clinton' in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic-CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the 'Clinton' reservoir in the ECOF.

  2. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian Clinton sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (Huff-n-Puff) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a Clinton-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day soak period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the Clinton sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the Clinton in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic- CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the Clinton reservoir in the ECOF.

  3. Floating LNG plant will stress reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, C.D.; Schulz, H.R.; Spring, W.

    1997-07-01

    Mobil has developed a unique floating LNG plant design after extensive studies that set safety as the highest priority. The result is a production, storage and offloading platform designed to produce 6 million tons per year of LNG and up to 55,000 bpd of condensate from 1 Bcfd of feed gas. All production and off-loading equipment is supported by a square donut-shaped concrete hull, which is spread-moored. The hull contains storage tanks for 250,000 m{sup 3} of LNG, 6540,000 bbl of condensate and ballast water. Both LNG and condensate can be directly offloaded to shuttle tankers. Since the plant may be moved to produce from several different gas fields during its life, the plant and barge were designed to be generic. It can be used at any location in the Pacific Rim, with up to 15% CO{sub 2}, 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, 55 bbl/MMcf condensate and 650 ft water depth. It can be modified to handle other water depths, depending upon the environment. In addition, it is much more economical than an onshore grassroots LNG plant, with potential capital savings of 25% or more. The paper describes the machinery, meteorology and oceanography, and safety engineering.

  4. Fuel-cell-propelled submarine-tanker-system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Court, K E; Kumm, W H; O'Callaghan, J E

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a systems analysis of a commercial Arctic Ocean submarine tanker system to carry fossil energy to markets. The submarine is to be propelled by a modular Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell system. The power level is 20 Megawatts. The DOE developed electric utility type fuel cell will be fueled with methanol. Oxidant will be provided from a liquid oxygen tank carried onboard. The twin screw submarine tanker design is sized at 165,000 deadweight tons and the study includes costs and an economic analysis of the transport system of 6 ships. The route will be under the polar icecap from a loading terminal located off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to a transshipment facility postulated to be in a Norwegian fjord. The system throughput of the gas-fed methanol cargo will be 450,000 barrels per day. The total delivered cost of the methanol including well head purchase price of natural gas, methanol production, and shipping would be $25/bbl from Alaska to the US East Coast. Of this, the shipping cost is $6.80/bbl. All costs in 1981 dollars.

  5. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30% or more of the country's present petroleum consumption.

  7. Helium-Based Soundwave Chiller: Trillium: A Helium-Based Sonic Chiller- Tons of Freezing with 0 GWP Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Penn State is designing a freezer that substitutes the use of sound waves and environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional freezers. Called a thermoacoustic chiller, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the chiller is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. Penn State’s chiller uses helium gas to replace synthetic refrigerants. Because helium does not burn, explode or combine with other chemicals, it is an environmentally-friendly alternative to other polluting refrigerants. Penn State is working to apply this technology on a large scale.

  8. Final Technical Report for DUSEL Research and Development on Sub-Kelvin Germanium Detectors for Ton Scale Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Blas Cabrera

    2012-09-10

    We have supported one graduate student and a small percentage of fabrication staff on $135k per year for three years plus one no cost extension year on this DUSEL R&D grant. ? There were three themes within our research program: (1) how to improve the radial sensitivity for single sided phonon readout with four equal area sensors of which three form a central circle and fourth a surrounding ring; (2) how to instrument double sided phonon readouts which will give us better surface event rejection and increased fiducial volume for future CDMS style detectors; and (3) can we manufacture much larger Ge detectors using six inch diameter material which is not suitable for standard gamma ray spectroscopy.

  9. Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

    2008-12-31

    The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

  10. Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 19, DOE/AL68080-TSR19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Richter

    2007-06-30

    This nineteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2007, and covers activities in the nineteenth project quarter, April 2007 June 2007.

  11. Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy and bioproducts industry: The technical feasibility of a billion-ton annual supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, Robert D.; Wright, Lynn L.; Turhollow, Anthony F.; Graham, Robin L.; Stokes, Bryce J.; Erbach, Donald C.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30% or more of the country's present petroleum consumption.

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA expects the WTI discount to average 10bbl in 2014 and 11bbl in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014 2 Cold weather also ...

  15. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  16. Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, recently cleaned up 77 waste sites at Hanford to meet two Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones before the end of 2011.

  17. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily

  18. Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  19. Design advanced for large-scale, economic, floating LNG plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naklie, M.M.

    1997-06-30

    A floating LNG plant design has been developed which is technically feasible, economical, safe, and reliable. This technology will allow monetization of small marginal fields and improve the economics of large fields. Mobil`s world-scale plant design has a capacity of 6 million tons/year of LNG and up to 55,000 b/d condensate produced from 1 bcfd of feed gas. The plant would be located on a large, secure, concrete barge with a central moonpool. LNG storage is provided for 250,000 cu m and condensate storage for 650,000 bbl. And both products are off-loaded from the barge. Model tests have verified the stability of the barge structure: barge motions are low enough to permit the plant to continue operation in a 100-year storm in the Pacific Rim. Moreover, the barge is spread-moored, eliminating the need for a turret and swivel. Because the design is generic, the plant can process a wide variety of feed gases and operate in different environments, should the plant be relocated. This capability potentially gives the plant investment a much longer project life because its use is not limited to the life of only one producing area.

  20. West Pearl Queen CO2 sequestration pilot test and modeling project 2006-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Symons, Neill Phillip; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Byrer, Charles; Elbring, Gregory Jay; McNemar, Andrea; Aldridge, David Franklin; Lorenz, John Clay

    2008-08-01

    The West Pearl Queen is a depleted oil reservoir that has produced approximately 250,000 bbl of oil since 1984. Production had slowed prior to CO{sub 2} injection, but no previous secondary or tertiary recovery methods had been applied. The initial project involved reservoir characterization and field response to injection of CO{sub 2}; the field experiment consisted of injection, soak, and venting. For fifty days (December 20, 2002, to February 11, 2003) 2090 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into the Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Queen Formation at the West Pearl Queen site. This technical report highlights the test results of the numerous research participants and technical areas from 2006-2008. This work included determination of lateral extents of the permeability units using outcrop observations, core results, and well logs. Pre- and post-injection 3D seismic data were acquired. To aid in interpreting seismic data, we performed numerical simulations of the effects of CO{sub 2} replacement of brine where the reservoir model was based upon correlation lengths established by the permeability studies. These numerical simulations are not intended to replicate field data, but to provide insight of the effects of CO{sub 2}.

  1. Guam: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  2. American Samoa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  3. Republic of the Congo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  4. Montenegro: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (bbl) 156 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Montenegro Montenegro global irradiation and solar electricity potential (horizontally-mounted photovoltaic modules)...

  5. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: After increasing in February, global crude oil prices declined in March. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $54.95/bbl on April 2, a decline of $4.59/bbl since the close on March 2 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price declined by $0.45/bbl over the same period to settle at $49.14/bbl on April 2. The average Brent price for March was 3.2% lower

  6. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    February 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices were relatively stable to start the year. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $107.19 per barrel (bbl) on February 6, a decline of less than $1/bbl from its settle price on January 2 (Figure 1). Over the same period, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $2.40/bbl, settling at $97.84/bbl on February 6. Crude oil has so

  7. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices moved higher toward the end of January and into the first week of February. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $56.57/bbl on February 5, an increase of $0.15/bbl from January 2 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract price settled at $50.48/bbl on February 5, $2.21/bbl lower than at the start of January. These changes were relatively small compared to an average

  8. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil markets continue to search for a bottom as prices declined again in December and the first week of January. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $50.96/bbl on January 8, a decline of $21.58/bbl from December 1 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract price settled at $48.79/bbl on January 8, decreasing by $20.21/bbl since the start of December. Crude oil prices now have declined more

  9. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil futures prices rose over the previous month but remained within the recent, and relatively narrow, trading range. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $108.10 per barrel (bbl) on March 6, an increase of $2.06/bbl from February 3 (Figure 1). Over the same period, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $5.13/bbl, settling at $101.56/bbl on March 6. The brief uptick in

  10. Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney

    2007-07-15

    The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10,000 tons 190 miles 2,000 tons Mixed steel, copper, aluminum 50,000 tons 5,000+ tons ... Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 Structural Steel 225,000 tons Potential For Recycle? EM ...

  12. Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – Workers recently completed a multiyear project that removed more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical solvents from beneath a portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS), preventing those pollutants from entering the local water table and helping the site avoid costs of more than $15 million.

  13. Iraqi crude exports may rise further

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-08

    Iraq will soon start exporting crude oil through a 550 mi, 500,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline from Iraq to Banias, Syria, on the Mediterranean. Iraq has already been transporting a reported 400,000 bbl/day in a 700,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline that goes to Dortyol, Turk., on the Mediterranean. Iraq's theoretical export capacity will soon reach 1.2 million bbl/day (compared with 3.2 million bbl/day before the war), assuming that the facilities are undamaged. Iran has been exporting some crude from its Kharg Island terminal, presumably by Iranian boat to the Lavan Island terminal at the southern end of the gulf, where it would be transported along with crude from offshore fields in the area. The exports apparently had been large enough to keep spot-market prices from rising much above the $40/bbl level, and in Dec. 1980, the spot-market prices eased to just under the $40 mark. Indonesia has raised the premium on its Sumatran light crude by $1/bbl, bringing the total to $35.20. Other producers have not yet raised their prices correspondingly. The agenda of the Dec. 1980 price-fixing meeting in Indonesia (assuming it takes place as planned) is discussed.

  14. Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-05-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

  15. A9_ISO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2014 1 November 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices fell from $95/barrel (bbl) on October 1 to $84/bbl at the end of the month. The causes included weakening outlooks for global economic and oil demand growth, the return to the market of previously disrupted Libyan crude oil production, and continued growth in U.S. tight oil production. Brent crude oil spot prices averaged $87/bbl in October, the first month Brent prices have

  16. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices were relatively stable throughout December before declining at the beginning of January, while U.S. domestic prices moved higher in December. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $107.78 per barrel (bbl) on January 2, a decline of $3.67/bbl from its close on December 2 (Figure 1). Over the same period, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $1.62/bbl, settling

  17. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil futures prices rebounded in April and approached the top of their recent trading range. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $107.76 per barrel (bbl) on May 1, an increase of $2.14/bbl from April 1 (Figure 1). West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices at the start of May were near the same levels as the beginning of April. The front month WTI contract settled at $99.42/bbl on May 1, a slight decrease

  18. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 October 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices continued on a downward trajectory in September, falling under $100 per barrel (bbl) for the first time since June 2012. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $93.42/bbl on October 2, a decrease of $6.92/bbl from September 2 (Figure 1). U.S. domestic crude oil benchmarks also declined, with the front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract price

  19. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    October 2014 1 October 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices continued on a downward trajectory in September, falling under $100 per barrel (bbl) for the first time since June 2012. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $93.42/bbl on October 2, a decrease of $6.92/bbl from September 2 (Figure 1). U.S. domestic crude oil benchmarks also declined, with the front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI)

  20. SECTION C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... tons (2,100 metric tons) of spent nuclear fuel, 11.5 tons (10.5 metric tons) of ... and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. ...

  1. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    fall to an average of 92bbl in the fourth quarter. The widening spread reflects the economics of running increasing volumes of very light crude oil at U.S. Gulf Coast refineries...

  2. Germany: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    276,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 54 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Germany PV Solar Resource: U.S., Germany and Spain PV Solar Resource - US, Spain and Germany Germany...

  3. Norway: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Natural Gas Reserves 2,313,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 17 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 6,680,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 21 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  4. China: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Natural Gas Reserves 3,030,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 13 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 20,350,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 13 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  5. Saudi Arabia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 7,461,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 5 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 264,600,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 1 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  6. United Kingdom: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 292,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 40 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 3,084,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 31 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  7. Libya: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Natural Gas Reserves 1,539,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 23 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 47,000,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 9 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  8. Ecuador: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 7,985,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 82 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 6,542,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 22 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  9. Trinidad and Tobago: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 436,100,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 33 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 728,300,000 Barrels (bbl) 42 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  10. Ukraine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Natural Gas Reserves 1,104,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 25 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 395,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 53 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  11. Czech Republic: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 3,072,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 92 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 15,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 86 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  12. Timor-Leste: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 200,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 45 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 553,800,000 Barrels (bbl) 46 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  13. Kyrgyzstan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 5,663,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 91 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 40,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 80 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  14. United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 19,120,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 14 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  15. Papua New Guinea: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 226,500,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 44 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 170,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 62 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  16. Serbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 48,140,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 66 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 77,500,000 Barrels (bbl) 75 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  17. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    three-year average production total of 4.0 million bbld (Table 1). * Global surplus crude oil production capacity in May and June was 2.4 million bbld, which is 0.3 million bbl...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in PADD 5 (exclusive of Hawaii and Alaska), and 2.6 million bbld of operable refinery capacity, four large refineries, each with an operable capacity greater than 200,000 bbl...

  19. CX-006736: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Movement of 5000 BBL Tank - Field OperationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/16/2010Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  20. Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",101093,13 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",23993,32 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",24037,33 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.7,5 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",0.9,37 ...

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",332396,3 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",133412,3 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",103391,3 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",5.8,1 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",2.3,8 ...

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",31550,29 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",29014,29 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",31794,29 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.3,29 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",14426,34 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",20538,36 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",17678,36 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1,34 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.4,21 ...

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",10990,38 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",8622,46 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",3298,46 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.7,25 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.3,23 ...

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",3842005 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",2400375 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",2160342 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.9 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.2 " ...

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",22597,32 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",56726,17 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",53684,16 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,41 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1,33 ...

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",28453,30 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",44349,24 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",38474,22 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,32 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",31878,28 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",46971,21 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",33240,26 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.5,39 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",10229,40 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",18606,39 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",16222,37 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.6,38 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1,32 ...

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",23646,31 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",57944,16 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",35179,24 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,31 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",2.6,7 ...

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",824,48 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",2836,48 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",4276,43 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.2,45 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",0.7,40 ...

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",173521,7 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",77950,9 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",64062,11 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.2,7 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.5,19 ...

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",5777,42 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",20301,37 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",1492,49 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.8,36 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",2.7,5 ...

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",204873,5 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",89253,7 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",85795,7 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",4.5,3 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",2,10 " ...

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",96240,14 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",83112,8 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",57137,15 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.8,21 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.6,15 ...

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",63994,22 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",27045,30 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",26348,31 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.2,8 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.4,20 ...

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",74422,19 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",41793,25 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",39312,21 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.6,13 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",41370,26 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",20626,35 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",20414,34 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.2,18 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",355108,1 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",105688,4 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",98650,5 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",5.3,2 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.6,16 ...

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",6748,41 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",13831,43 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",12231,39 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,40 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",21670,33 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",26928,31 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",7313,42 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",4.2,4 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",5.3,2 ...

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",297598,4 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",141486,2 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",101361,4 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.7,11 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",10595,39 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",14313,42 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",8334,40 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,42 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",0.5,45 ...

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",349245,2 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",229580,1 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",254488,1 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.6,26 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1,31 ...

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",149842,9 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",77749,10 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",75735,8 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.4,6 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.8,13 ...

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",89357,16 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",23913,33 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",41405,20 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.2,16 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",0,51 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",147,51 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",48,50 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0,51 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",4.3,3 " ...

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",52716,23 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",48711,19 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",30420,30 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.9,10 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",2.7,6 ...

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",100,49 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",1224,49 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",2566,48 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0,48 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,49 ...

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",64168,21 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",67534,12 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",58578,13 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1,33 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,30 ...

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",126600,10 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",91356,6 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",111549,2 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,30 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",0.8,39 ...

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (short tons)",3102,46 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",98348,5 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",57223,14 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0,49 " Nitrogen oxide (lbsMWh)",1,34 " ...

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",105998,11 " Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",58144,14 " Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",62516,12 " Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.7,24 " Nitrogen oxide (lbs...

  15. Furnace Standard Analysis Discussion Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    heating systems could have on overall energy usage, cost, and carbon emissions outcomes. ... Tons 4.5 Metric Tons 3.5 Metric Tons Annual Cost 1,119 1,029 1,806 714 544 ...

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2004 - 2014 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627

  17. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

  18. Coal Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Markets | Archive Coal Markets Weekly production Dollars per short ton Dollars per mmbtu Average weekly coal commodity spot prices dollars per short ton Week ending Week ago ...

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2014" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" ...

  20. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2014" "(dollars per short ton)" "Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)","Underground","Surface","Total" ...

  1. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments...

  2. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  3. Clark Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See program website Heat Pumps: Up to 250ton Outdoor Ductless Heat Pump: 250ton Web-Enabled Programmable Thermostats: Contact CPU for details Compressed Air Audit: Free...

  4. Lake City Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Cooling Equipment: Rebates are structured with a base rebate (ton) and an additional efficiency bonus rebate (ton)...

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming 2014 EIA reports and publications Wyoming supplies more energy to other states and has more producing federal oil and natural gas leases than any other state. Wyoming accounted for 7.4% of U.S. marketed natural gas production in 2013. The Powder River Basin's oil production grew from 38,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2009 to 78,000 bbl/d during the first quarter of 2014. Wyoming energy highlights: Energy production and other mining accounted for a large percentage of some state economies

  6. What Drives U.S. Gasoline Prices? - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    What Drives U.S. Gasoline Prices? Release date: October 30, 2014 Preface U.S. oil production has grown rapidly in recent years. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, which reflect combined production of crude oil and lease condensate, show a rise from 5.6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2011 to 7.4 million bbl/d in 2013. EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) projects continuing rapid production growth in 2014 and 2015, with forecast production in 2015 averaging 9.5 million

  7. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd) New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 12. Refinery Sales During 2014 Lindsay Goldberg LLC/Axeon Speciality Products LLC Nustar Asphalt LLC/Nustar Asphalt Refining LLC 2/14 Savannah, GA 28,000 Lindsay Goldberg LLC/Axeon Specialty Products LLC Nustar Asphalt LLC/Nustar Asphalt Refining LLC 2/14 Paulsboro, NJ 70,000 bbl/cd= Barrels per calendar day Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form

  8. Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million

  9. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2015 AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO2015 Annual Energy Outlook 2015 API American Petroleum Institute bbl Barrels bbl/d Barrels per day Brent North Sea Brent Btu British thermal unit(s) CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CHP Combined heat and power CO2 Carbon dioxide CPI Consumer price index CSAPR Cross-State Air Pollution Rule CTL Coal-to-liquids E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced

  10. EIA's U.S. Crude Import Tracking Tool: Selected Sample Applications

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Full report EIA's U.S. Crude Oil Import Tracking Tool: Selected Sample Applications Release date: November 20, 2014 Preface U.S. oil production has grown rapidly in recent years. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, which reflect combined production of crude oil and lease condensate, show a rise from 5.6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2011 to 7.5 million bbl/d in 2013. EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) projects continuing rapid production growth in 2014 and 2015, with

  11. Options for U.S. Petroleum Refineries to Process Additional Light Tight Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - Energy Information Administration Technical Options for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes Within the United States Release date: April 6, 2015 Preface U.S. oil production has grown rapidly in recent years. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, which reflect combined production of crude oil and lease condensate, show a rise from 5.6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2011 to 8.7 million bbl/d in 2014. Increasing production of light crude oil from low-permeability,

  12. Table B-1: Analytical Results Statistical Mean Upper Confidence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million

  13. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  14. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  16. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  17. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 March 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 11, 2008 Release Highlights The slowing economy combined with high petroleum prices is expected to constrain growth in U.S. consumption of liquid fuels and other petroleum products to just 40,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2008. After accounting for increased ethanol use, U.S. petroleum consumption falls by 90,000 bbl/d. U.S. real gross domestic product is expected to decline slightly in the first half of the year and then start growing again, with

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2015 AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO2015 Annual Energy Outlook 2015 API American Petroleum Institute bbl Barrels bbl/d Barrels per day Brent North Sea Brent Btu British thermal unit(s) CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CHP Combined heat and power CO2 Carbon dioxide CPI Consumer price index CSAPR Cross-State Air Pollution Rule CTL Coal-to-liquids E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced

  20. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Over the past month, international crude oil prices recorded the first month- over-month increase since June 2014. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $60.48/bbl on March 5, an increase of $5.73/bbl from February 2 (Figure 1). In the U.S. market, domestic crude oil prices continued to lag behind international benchmarks. The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract price

  1. Estrogen induced {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 expression regulates

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    proliferation of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Estrogen induced {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 expression regulates proliferation of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estrogen induced {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 expression regulates proliferation of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the regulation and biological functions of B4GALT1 expression induced

  2. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2015 Calendar Day Barrels per CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Calendar Day Barrels per Companies with Capacity Over 100,000 bbl/cd .............................................................................................................................. VALERO ENERGY CORP 1,964,300 Valero Refining Co Texas LP

  3. Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A K

    2003-08-20

    A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

  4. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  5. Charlotte, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celgard LLC Coalogix Inc Dragonfly Capital Greenwood Capital Partners MCF Advisors LLC Methane Credit Metso Power NewGen Fuel Technologies Ltd NewGen Technologies Inc Formerly...

  6. Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celgard LLC Coalogix Inc Dragonfly Capital Greenwood Capital Partners MCF Advisors LLC Methane Credit Metso Power NewGen Fuel Technologies Ltd NewGen Technologies Inc Formerly...

  7. North Carolina's 9th congressional district: Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celgard LLC Coalogix Inc Dragonfly Capital Greenwood Capital Partners MCF Advisors LLC Methane Credit Metso Power NewGen Fuel Technologies Ltd NewGen Technologies Inc Formerly...

  8. North Carolina's 8th congressional district: Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celgard LLC Coalogix Inc Dragonfly Capital Greenwood Capital Partners MCF Advisors LLC Methane Credit Metso Power NewGen Fuel Technologies Ltd NewGen Technologies Inc Formerly...

  9. North Carolina's 12th congressional district: Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celgard LLC Coalogix Inc Dragonfly Capital Greenwood Capital Partners MCF Advisors LLC Methane Credit Metso Power NewGen Fuel Technologies Ltd NewGen Technologies Inc Formerly...

  10. table7.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Bituminous and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Coal Lignite Coke Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (gallons) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 2.1 0.6 1 0.6

  11. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity...

  12. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 64 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons)...

  13. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity...

  14. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons)...

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hour 19501960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Short Tons per Employee Hour Mississippi 2.76 8.86 Underground Surface 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 19501960 1970 ...

  16. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by State, Year-End 2008 State 50lb 100lb Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs) Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs)...

  17. WAR DEPARTaMMeNT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    10 tom as BX0683. p 5 Production of heels at Ravsre Coppsr & Brass Comsaay: ExLrwion ia axpested to continua at 30 tons par waskand, whioh ..-,: is squix&mt to 130 tons per...

  18. Microsoft Word - 1-Cover DisclaimerTitle Blue Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... WSS are developed at the management level with the most ... the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) (54 Ci... 100 tons of any one criteria pollutant, or 10 tons ...

  19. Microsoft Word - Summary.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... of the NTS Air Quality Operating Permit, which was issued by the Nevada Bureau of Air Pollution Control in June 2004. During that year, an estimated 3.32 metric tons (3.66 tons) ...

  20. EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statement This Final SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which a disposition...

  1. Goal, Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 60 10 5 30 32 30 15 20 Ethanol (unit: 10 4 tonsyear) Biomass Liquid Fuel Biodiesel Biodiesel production in different provinces in 2012 (unit: 10 4 tons) Total: 882,900 tons ...

  2. Annual Energy Review, 1996

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Coal Flow, 1996 (Million Short Tons) Includes 24.0 million short tons consumed by independent power producers. Notes : Data are preliminary. Totals may not equal sum of...

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    60 80 100 120 140 Billion Short Tons 230 156 98 Western Interior Appalachian 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Billion Short Tons ming Virginia tucky sylvania rado Mexico 257 177 43 8 ...

  4. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shows the volume taken up by one metric ton of carbon dioxide. In 2013, the United States emitted the equivalent of 6.7 billion metric tons. By tracking how much greenhouse...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. U.S. average estimated coal transportation rates between mines and power plants Revenue Per Ton Mile (nominal dollars) Revenue Per Ton Mile (real 1999 dollars)1 2001 0.0139...

  7. Minnkota Power Cooperative (17 Utilities) - PowerSavers Residential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pump: 400 Furnace with ECM blower: 150 Mini-SplitDuctless Air-Source Heat Pump: 500 Ground-Source Heat Pump: 200ton - 400ton; varies by type Summary Minnesota...

  8. DOE STTR Phase I Final Technical Report For Agri-Tech Producers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... * Energy Content-lO,OOO BTUlb 5,500 kCalkg ( 10%) * Moisture Content < 10% * Input to Output Ratio: Approx. 3 tons of "green" feedstock yields 1 ton of torrefied product. ...

  9. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,962,799,960,1450,1335,1529,2730,1474,1219,748,877,1121,1023,703,1809 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)" "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",615,620,773,879,888,875,608,569,547,441,401,480,67...

  10. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...215,56088,48961,51066,47987,48329,43385,22889,24084,31108,29246,38817 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)" "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",1425,1316,1354,1363,1385,1510,1617,1170,1128,1325,...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: How Does...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lines. Connected to the vacuum side of the electrode rings of the interface are five nesting stainless-steel cones (total weight about 10 tons (9 metric tons)) that are...

  12. Energy Department Finalizes $1.2 Billion Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project funds more than 350 jobs and avoids more than 425,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually

  13. Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for a Loan Guarantee to Support World's Largest Wind Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act-Supported Loan Will Create Jobs and Avoid Over 1.2 Million Tons of Carbon Pollution Annually

  14. EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition This Draft SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which DOE has not made a disposition decision, including 7.1 metric tons (7.8 tons) of plutonium from pits that were declared excess to national defense needs after publication of the 2007

  15. Florida products pipeline set to double capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1995-11-13

    Directional drilling has begun this fall for a $68.5 million, approximately 110,000 b/d expansion of Central Florida Pipeline Co.`s refined products line from Tampa to Orlando. The drilling started in August and is scheduled to conclude this month, crossing under seven water bodies in Hillsborough, Polk, and Osceola counties. The current 6 and 10-in. system provides more than 90% of the petroleum products used in Central Florida, according to Central Florida Pipeline. Its additional capacity will meet the growing region`s demand for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The new pipeline, along with the existing 10-in. system, will increase total annual capacity from 30 million bbl (82,192 b/d) to approximately 70 million bbl (191,781 b/d). The older 6-in. line will be shutdown when the new line is operating fully. The steps of pipeline installation are described.

  16. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100 ton Stanat rolling mill 75 Ton Wabash Platten Press Rotary Die Swaging Machines 1.25" to 0.014" Loma Hydraulic Wire Drawing Benches Innovare Hydrostatic Extrusion Press 6" Reeves rolling mill 300 ton Baldwin press

  17. Propane Supply & Infrastructure Suggested Slides

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Winter 2014-15: Propane Supply & Infrastructure For State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) Workshop October 8, 2014 | Washington, DC By T. Mason Hamilton, Petroleum Markets Analyst U.S. Energy Information Administration Winter 2014-15 takeaways and potential issues- propane * Primary propane stocks in the Gulf Coast and Midwest are currently 10 million barrels (17%) above this time last year * Propane production from natural gas plants is up and is projected to average 970,000 bbl/d

  18. South America: everybody is drilling almost everywhere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    A group of studies describes accomplishments in 1980 in South America drilling and producing. There may be 3285 wells drilled during 1980, with the majority in Venezuela, Argentina and Peru, compared with a 2934 total for all countries on the continent in 1979. Reserves at the end of 1979 in South America exceeded 27 billion bbl, and production averaged 3.8 million bpd. Individual country reports are given for Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Trinidad, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, Urauguay, and Guyana.

  19. Developments in oil shale in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, C.F.; Dana, G.F.; Solti, G.; Qian, J.L.; Ball, F.D.; Hutton, A.C.; Hanna, J.; Russell, P.L.; Piper, E.M.

    1988-10-01

    Oil shale development continued at a slow pace in 1987. The continuing interest in this commodity is demonstrated by the 342 oil shale citations added to the US Department of Energy Energy Database during 1987. The Unocal project in Parachute, Colorado, produced 600,000 bbl of synfuel in 1987. An appreciable amount of 1987's activity was associated with the nonsynfuel uses of oil shale. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. RWGTM Presentation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Winter 2014-15: Propane Supply & Infrastructure For State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) Workshop October 8, 2014 | Washington, DC By T. Mason Hamilton, Petroleum Markets Analyst U.S. Energy Information Administration Winter 2014-15 takeaways and potential issues- propane * Primary propane stocks in the Gulf Coast and Midwest are currently 10 million barrels (17%) above this time last year * Propane production from natural gas plants is up and is projected to average 970,000 bbl/d

  1. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  2. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  3. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  4. Costs for off-site disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes: Salt caverns versus other disposal methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    According to an American Petroleum Institute production waste survey reported on by P.G. Wakim in 1987 and 1988, the exploration and production segment of the US oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes, more than 20 billion bbl of produced water, and nearly 12 million bbl of associated wastes in 1985. Current exploration and production activities are believed to be generating comparable quantities of these oil field wastes. Wakim estimates that 28% of drilling wastes, less than 2% of produced water, and 52% of associated wastes are disposed of in off-site commercial facilities. In recent years, interest in disposing of oil field wastes in solution-mined salt caverns has been growing. This report provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in oil-and gas-producing states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and the amounts they charge. It also compares cavern disposal costs with the costs of other forms of waste disposal.

  5. Worry grows as Iran/Iraq war lingers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-03

    Despite the Iran/Iraq war and the prospect of greater disruption of Persian Gulf oil deliveries, the international crude market has adjusted to the loss of supplies and remains stable, partly because some nonwarring members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries have boosted production to make up losses and partly because the industrialized nations have maintained high levels of crude and product stocks. These stocks would be draw-depleted in nine months if used at the rate of 1.8 million bbl/day; this and a 2 million bbl/day increase in OPEC production would make up for the entire war-caused shortfall. If the Strait of Hormuz were closed, the shortfall would be 17 million bbl/day, which would deplete stocks in less than one month. Patterns of supply and demand in non-Communist western countries in 1978-79 and 1979-80; the International Energy Agency oil-sharing plan which would go into effect in the case of a major oil shortage; and the prospects for a surge in prices in the international oil markets, are discussed.

  6. Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

    1997-01-21

    A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

  7. Measurement of the B????l?? and B???(')l?? branching fractions, the B????l?? and B???l?? form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B???(')l?? and B????l??, undertaken with approximately 46410? BB pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B???l?? and B????l?? decays in three and 12 bins of q, respectively, from which we extract the f+(q) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B???l??)=(0.360.05stat0.04syst)10?? and B(B????l??)=(1.420.05stat0.07syst)10??. We also measure B(B+??'l??)=(0.240.08stat0.03syst)10??. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| using three different QCD calculations.

  8. State companies dominate OGJ100 list of non-U. S. oil producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-20

    State owned oil and gas companies dominate the OGJ100 list of non-U.S. producers. Because many of them report only operating information, companies on the worldwide list cannot be ranked by assets or revenues. The list, therefore, is organized regionally, based on location of companies' corporate headquarters. The leading nongovernment company in both reserves and production is Royal Dutch/Shell. It ranks sixth in the world in liquids production and 11th in liquids reserves, as it has for the past 2 years. British Petroleum is the next largest nongovernment company. BP ranks 11th in liquids production and 16th in liquids reserves. Elf Aquitaine, 55.8% government-controlled, ranked 17th in liquids production. AGIP was 20th in liquids production. Kuwait Petroleum returned to the list of top 20 producers, ranking 12th, as it restored production shut in by facilities damage sustained during the Persian Gulf crisis. New to the top 20 reserves list is Petroleo Brasileiro, which moved to 20th position. The top 20 companies in the OGJ100 held reserves estimated at 869.3 billion bbl in 1992 vs. 869.5 billion bbl in 1991 and 854.2 billion bbl in 1990.

  9. Human 3[alpha]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural clues of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5[alpha]-DHT reverse binding and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Human 3[alpha]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural clues of 5[alpha]-DHT reverse binding and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Human 3[alpha]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural clues of 5[alpha]-DHT reverse binding and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth Authors: Zhang, Bo ;

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.30 5.91 Note: Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,027 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6.42 6.02 Note: Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,027 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.30 5.91 Note: Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,027 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6.26 6.48 Note: Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,027 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.65 5.67 Note: Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,027 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Monthly. Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,025 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6.26 6.48 Note: Prices were converted from per Mcf to per MMBtu using an average heat content of 1,027 Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy...

  17. Human 3[alpha]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Human 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural clues of 5alpha-DHT reverse binding and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth Citation Details ...

  18. Sample Format Natural Gas Exports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Destination Country Point of EXIT from U.S. Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Avg. Price at U.S. Border (U.S.MMBtu) Supplier(s) Foreign Transporter U.S....

  19. Sample Format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Country of Destination International Point of Exit U.S. Departure Facility Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Price at U.S. Border (USMMBtu) Supplier LNG Transporter...

  20. Sample Format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Origin International Point of Entry U.S. Receiving Facility Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Price at U.S. Border (USMMBtu) Supplier LNG Transporter Markets Served - U.S. Area*...

  1. Sample Format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Country of Destination International Point of Exit U.S. Departure Facility Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Price at U.S. Border (USMMBtu) Supplier CNG...

  2. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  3. Possible in-lattice confinement fusion (LCF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarasaki, Y.

    1996-05-01

    New scheme of a nuclear fusion reactor system is proposed, the basic concept of which comes from ingenious combination of hitherto developed techniques and verified facts; (1) so-called cold fusion (CF), (2) plasma of both magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and (3) accelerator-based D-T (D) neutron source. Through the comparison of the characteristics among ICF, LCF, and MCF, the feasibility of the LCFs is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-26

    In the second quarter of 1993, the United States produced 235 million short tons of coal. This brought the total for the first half of 1993 to 477 million short tons, a decrease of 4 percent (21 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first half of 1992. The decrease was due to a 26-million-short-ton decline in production east of the Mississippi River, which was partially offset by a 5-million-short-ton increase in coal production west of the Mississippi River. Compared with the first 6 months of 1992, all States east of the Mississippi River had lower coal production levels, led by West Virginia and Illinois, which produced 9 million short tons and 7 million short tons less coal, respectively. The principal reasons for the drop in coal output for the first 6 months of 1993 compared to a year earlier were: a decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets, particularly the steam coal markets; a draw-down of electric utility coal stocks to meet the increase in demand for coal-fired electricity generation; and a lower producer/distributor stock build-up. Distribution of US coal in the first half of 1993 was 15 million short tons lower than in the first half of 1992, with 13 million short tons less distributed to overseas markets and 2 million short tons less distributed to domestic markets.

  5. Coal production, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Coal production in the United States in 1991 declined to a total of 996 million short tons, ending the 6-year upward trend in coal production that began in 1985. The 1991 figure is 33 million short tons below the record level of 1.029 billion short tons produced in 1990 (Table 1). Tables 2 through 33 in this report include data from mining operations that produced, prepared, and processed 10,000 or more short tons during the year. These mines yielded 993 million short tons, or 99.7 percent of the total coal production in 1991, and their summary statistics are discussed below. The majority of US coal (587 million short tons) was produced by surface mining (Table 2). Over half of all US surface mine production occurred in the Western Region, though the 60 surface mines in this area accounted for only 5 percent of the total US surface mines. The high share of production was due to the very large surface mines in Wyoming, Texas and Montana. Nearly three quarters of underground production was in the Appalachian Region, which accounted for 92 percent of underground mines. Continuous mining methods produced the most coal among those underground operations that responded. Of the 406 million short tons, 59 percent (239 million short tons) was produced by continuous mining methods, followed by longwall (29 percent, or 119 million short tons), and conventional methods (11 percent, or 46 million short tons).

  6. Demand for petrochem feedstock to buoy world LPG industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-18

    This paper reports that use of liquefied petroleum gas as petrochemical feedstock will increase worldwide, providing major growth opportunities for LPG producers. World exports of liquefied petroleum gas will increase more slowly than production as producers choose to use LPG locally as chemical feedstock and export in value added forms such as polyethylene. So predicts Poten and Partners Inc., New York. Poten forecasts LPG production in exporting countries will jump to 95 million tons in 2010 from 45 million tons in 1990. However, local and regional demand will climb to 60 million tons/year from 23 million tons/year during the same period. So supplies available for export will rise to 35 million tons in 2010 from 22 million tons in 1990.

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2014 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 526 2.29 7.8 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 --

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2014 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 1,278 0.72 11.1 741 0.09 2.0 0 -- --

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2014 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2014 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 32 0.94 8.4 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 --

  11. U.S. Representatives Newhouse, Heck Tour Hanford Site Projects, Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S.

  12. Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Review Sustainability Platform Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Presentation on the Update to the Billion-Ton Study, including differences between the Update and the 2005 Billion-Ton Sudy, assumptions, and findings. PDF icon bt2_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry Importance of Biomass Production and Supply ECOWAS - GBEP REGIONAL BIOMASS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP

  13. LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals March 8, 2010 More than 136 tons of metal saved from demolished buildings LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 9, 2009-Los Alamos National Laboratory announced today that Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year, largely due to the skill of heavy equipment operators and efforts to gut the buildings before they come down. Some 106 tons of metal came

  14. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-20

    The United States produced 242 million short tons of coal in the first quarter of 1993, a decrease of 6 percent (14 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first quarter of 1992. The decrease was due to a decline in production east of the Mississippi River. All major coal-producing States in this region had lower coal production levels led by West Virginia, which produced 5 million short tons less coal. The principal reasons for the overall drop in coal output compared to a year earlier were: A decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets; a slower rate of producer/distributor stock build-up; and a drawn-down of electric utility coal stocks. Distribution of US coal in the first quarter of 1993 was 10 million short tons lower than in the first quarter of 1992, with 5 million short tons less distributed to both electric utilities and overseas markets. The average price of coal delivered to electric utilities during the first quarter of 1993 was $28.65 per short ton, the lowest value since the first quarter of 1980. Coal consumption in the first quarter of 1993 was 230 million short tons, 4 percent higher than in the first quarter of 1992, due primarily to a 5-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Total consumer stocks, at 153 million short tons, and electric utility stocks, at 144 million short tons, were at their lowest quarterly level since the end of 1989. US. coal exports totaled 19 million short tons, 6 million short tons less than in the first quarter of 1992, and the lowest quarterly level since 1988. The decline was primarily due to a 1-million-short-ton drop in exports to each of the following destinations: Italy, France, Belgium and Luxembourg, and Canada.

  15. Biomass: Wood as Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply | Department of Energy as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30% or more of

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2009 - 2015 (thousand short tons) January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports ...

  17. Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for $1.187 Billion Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act-Supported Project Estimated to Create Over 350 Jobs and Avoid over 430,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide Annually

  18. CX-003011: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    retrofits to replace a 50 ton heating, ventilating, and air conditioning chiller at the 1984 Town Hall, and 5) building retrofits including replacinginstalling LED exit signs,...

  19. Fort Rucker UESC Energy Conservation Project, Completed Dec....

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the existing 40 ton DX * Replaced the AHU * Replaced the steam boiler with hot water boiler * Installed Controls * Installed dedicated AHU to serve a meeting room * Solved...

  20. Appendix G: Conversion factors

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production ... million Btu per short ton 20.142 Consumption...

  1. President Obama Announces Commitments and Executive Actions to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    create jobs and cut carbon pollution by advancing solar deployment and energy efficiency. ... smarter appliances that will cut carbon pollution by more than 380 million metric tons - ...

  2. Coal-Producing Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Coal Production by State (thousand short tons) Year to Date Coal-Producing Region and State October - December 2015 July - September 2015 October - December 2014 2015 2014 ...

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table ...

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June ...

  5. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ...

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number ...

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2014" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground - Minable ...

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2014" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State and ...

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2014" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" ...

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2014 and 2013" ,"Number of Mining Operations2",,,"Number of Employees3",,,"Average Production per Employee Hour" ,,,..."(short tons)4" ...

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2014" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above ...

  12. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  13. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  14. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  15. EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of U.S Coal by Destination Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2004 (Thousand Short Tons)...

  16. file://J:\\mydocs\\Coal\\Distribution\\2003\\distable4.HTML

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2003 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: Alabama State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity...

  17. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  18. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  19. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  20. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  1. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  2. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  3. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  4. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  5. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  6. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  7. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  8. file://C:\\Documents%20and%20Settings\\TTH\\Local%20Settings\\Tempo

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2003 (Thousand Short Tons) ORIGIN: Alabama State of Destination by Method of...

  9. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  10. Annual Coal Distribution Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2001 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: Alabama State of Origin by...

  11. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  12. file://C:\\Documents%20and%20Settings\\ICR\\My%20Documents\\Coal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distribution by Destination: Alaska Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2002 (Thousand Short Tons) State...

  13. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  14. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all ...

  16. The Manhattan Project National Security History Series

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... uranium metal, and fifty tons of uranium oxide achieved the first self-sustaining chain ... Szilard had trouble obtaining supplies for his experiment, primarily because bismuth, the ...

  17. The PROJECT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... uranium metal, and fifty tons of uranium oxide achieved the first self-sustaining chain ... Szilard had trouble obtaining supplies for his experiment, primarily because bismuth, the ...

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 7.3 Coal Consumption by Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Residential Sector 1 Commercial Sector 1 Industrial Sector Transportation Sector ...

  19. Categorical Exclusion B5.13 Supporting Information for DOE Notice...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Amt Injection metric tonnes (short tons) Injection Scheduled ... Feasibilitysafety of coal seam sequestration ... 8 MGSC Oil-bearing Well Conversion Employ advanced MVA ...

  20. Department of Energy Offers $2.1 Billion Conditional Commitment Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Thermal Power Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California Solar Project Estimated to Create Over 1,000 Jobs and Avoid Over 710,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide Annually

  1. Biogas Purifications for Fuel Cells: SulfaTrap Sorbents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    over 70 tons of sorbent products for distributed fuel cell systems and chemical synthesis plants * Natural gas, LPG, biogas, ethylene and reformate gas desulfurization TDA 2 2 ...

  2. Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    also saving consumers an estimated 5 billion annually as of 2012. Since 1992, building codes have saved about 300 million tons of carbon cumulatively. Read the fact sheet...

  3. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... integrates environmental, safety, and health requirements and controls into all work activities. ... At the Moab Site, half of the estimated 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings has ...

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - EM SSAB Chairs Webinar - Marcinowski Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (DUF6) conversion plants * Safely transport 650,000 tons of mill tailings from the Moab project to Crescent Junction for disposal * Idaho: Start treatment of sodium bearing ...

  5. NREL: Technology Deployment - Renewable Energy Project Helps...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Project Helps Tribe Reduce Carbon Footprint by 20,000 Tons News DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community ...

  6. Vehizero | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicles Product: A Mexico-based company which designs and assembles energy efficient, electric hybrid one ton cargo vehicles. References: Vehizero1 This article is a stub....

  7. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with...

  8. Microsoft Word - Cover.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... CO 2 metric tons Sector-Specific Industrial ... Emissions From Purchased Energy for Emission Reductions (Not included in emissions ... Generating Efficiency** % J Electrical ...

  9. About

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science, people, technologies close Raising the bar on carbon capture In the United States, industry produces more than 3 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide each year, around...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Users can also compare data across different energy sources by converting to British thermal units (Btu) and tons of oil equivalent (TOE). New visualization features include...

  11. U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 10,679.56...

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Simon saline formation. The CO 2 pipeline will originate at the Meredosia power plant site and transport approximately 1 million metric tons (MMT) per year of compressed and ...

  13. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas (GHG) emissions reduced by 100,000 tons a year significantly decreasing the carbon footprint of the SR Site Overall annual air emissions rates will decrease: -...

  14. DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource | Department of Energy Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas

  15. The second-phase development of the China JinPing underground...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Physics (TAUP), presentations and panel discussions addressed plans for one-ton ... for dark matter studies, low-energy solar neutrino detection, neutrinoless double ...

  16. Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 (Thousand Short Tons) " "State Region ","Domestic ","Foreign ","Total "," " "Alabama",18367,3744,22111," " "Alaska",957,546,1502," " "Arizona",13041,"-",13041," "...

  17. Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee to Support World's Largest Wind Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    845-Megawatt Wind Facility Will Create Hundreds of Jobs and Avoid Over 1.2 Million Tons of Carbon Dioxide Annually

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    procedures, and assumptions are described in the documentation at http:www.eia.govstatesedsseds-technical-notes-complete.cfm Thousand Short Tons Cubic Feet Barrels...

  19. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program ... diode (LED) retrofits, 4) building retrofits to replace a 50 ton HVAC ...

  20. Gambia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear NA 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  1. DOE/EIS-0288-S1 Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... an individual receives from natural and man-made radiation. ... the ability to supply requirements at either site ... Greenhouse gas emissions (7,100 tons of carbon dioxide ...

  2. DOE/EIA-M060(2009) June

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    mine typecoal typeyear Scalar -- EIA estimate ADJMMP ADD Price adjustment variable (additive) Supply region mine typecoal typeyear 1987 DollarsTon -- EIA estimate...

  3. Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    mine typecoal typeyear Scalar -- EIA estimate ADJMMP ADD Price adjustment variable (additive) Supply region mine typecoal typeyear 1987 DollarsTon -- EIA estimate...

  4. Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System Model...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    mine typecoal typeyear Scalar -- EIA estimate ADJMMP ADD Price adjustment variable (additive) Supply region mine typecoal typeyear 1987 DollarsTon -- EIA estimate...

  5. DOE/EIA-M060(2011) Coal Market Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    mine typecoal typeyear Scalar -- EIA estimate ADJMMP ADD Price adjustment variable (additive) Supply region mine typecoal typeyear 1987 DollarsTon -- EIA estimate...

  6. DOE/EIA-M060(2010) Coal Market Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    mine typecoal typeyear Scalar -- EIA estimate ADJMMP ADD Price adjustment variable (additive) Supply region mine typecoal typeyear 1987 DollarsTon -- EIA estimate...

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 6,085 670...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 6,982 679...

  9. Volume I Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Measures ...... 4-46 Table 4.6-1. Criteria Air Pollution Emissions (TonsYear) Over the 8 to 12 Month Proposed Project Construction ...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient equipment. Newly installed ground source heat pumps are eligible for a 750 per ton rebate. This rebate amount also covers...

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2004 through 2014 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur ...

  12. 105 K East and 105 K West fuel transfer bay crane use strategy for spent nuclear fuel path-forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ard, K.E.

    1996-04-02

    The purpose of this document is to outline the K Basins 30 ton crane qualification strategy for use in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project fuel relocation campaign.

  13. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Agricultural Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Maximum Rebate 1,000ton Program Info...

  14. EIS-0276: Rocky Flats Plutonium Storage, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to provide safe interim storage of approximately 10 metric tons of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS).

  15. Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy Website http:www.hawaiienergy.comfor-your-business State Hawaii Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled PackagedSplit AC: 200ton Variable...

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Coal Production by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","October - December","July - September","October - December",2015,2014,"Percent" "and ...

  17. GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and data to Billion Ton Study Sustainability Chapter in collaboration with other ... and academia use to assess life-cycle energy and environmental metrics of biofuels. ...

  18. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Environmental Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    apparatus, product, or process ...yr Million metrics tons of carbon per year NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NESHAPs ... 30 4.4 Sustainability and the ...

  19. Energy Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    will show a lower growth trajectory Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2013 carbon dioxide emissions billion metric tons 6 CSIS | Energy Markets Outlook November 16,...

  20. Energy Information Administration quarterly coal report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-21

    The United States produced just over 1 billion short tons of coal in 1992, 0.4 percent more than in 1991. Most of the 4-million-short-ton increase in coal production occurred west of the Mississippi River, where a record level of 408 million short tons of coal was produced. The amount of coal received by domestic consumers in 1992 totaled 887 million short tons. This was 7 million short tons more than in 1991, primarily due to increased coal demand from electric utilities. The average price of delivered coal to each sector declined by about 2 percent. Coal consumption in 1992 was 893 million short tons, only 1 percent higher than in 1991, due primarily to a 1-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Consumer coal stocks at the end of 1992 were 163 million short tons, a decrease of 3 percent from the level at the end of 1991, and the lowest year-end level since 1989. US coal exports fell 6 percent from the 1991 level to 103 million short tons in 1992. Less coal was exported to markets in Europe, Asia, and South America, but coal exports to Canada increased 4 million short tons.

  1. Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by State (2000-2011)" "metric tons of carbon dioxide per person" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  2. Table 2. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " ,"million metric tons of carbon dioxide",,,,,"shares" "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total",,"Coal","Petrol...

  3. Table 3. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportat...

  4. Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000-2011)" "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011" "State",2000,2001,2002,...

  5. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cartridges * Electrical Ballasts * Used oi l and oil filters * Electronics * Wood pallets, spools, * Lamps timbers. and waste * Metals In FY 20 14, 185 .36 metric tons of...

  6. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    salt * Paper * Plastic * Tires * Toner cartridges * Used oil and oil filters * Wood pallets * Wood waste (spools, timbers, and crating materials) In FY 2015, 170 metric tons of...

  7. NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  8. Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    200ton Mini SplitDuctless Air Source Heat Pump: 250 Clothes Washers: 50 Clothes Dryer: 80 Refrigerators: 65 Dishwashers: 20 - 50 (with recycling of older unit)...

  9. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Furnace Fans to Reduce Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by 340 million metric tons through 2030," said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. "These standards help Americans save money by saving energy while also protecting the environment. ...

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total...

  12. Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    furnaces will save businesses 167 billion on their utility bills and reduce carbon pollution by 885 million metric tons. Read more DOE Releases Funding Opportunity for Emerging...

  13. Annual Energy Review - July 2006

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5 (Million Short Tons) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2005 203 Notes: * Production categories are estimated; other data are preliminary. * Values are...

  14. Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released September 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 (Million Short Tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 197 Notes: * Production categories are estimated; all data are preliminary. * Values are...

  15. City of Painesville, Ohio Vanadium Redox Battery Demonstration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    with an additional 212 created by 2016 Energy costs will be reduced Power quality will be improved Carbon emissions will be reduced by 24,000 metric tons ...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Biomass Resource Assessments and What...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    are their adequate supplies at reasonable prices? * efficient operations: can we obtain a ... purchase order * One-year contract * Prices * FOB 135-150ton Pellets * Sources * ...

  17. Two Colorado-Based Electric Cooperatives Selected as 2014 Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    jobs across the country, provides cost- competitive energy, and eliminates more than 115 electric metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions which is equal to removing 20 million...

  18. "Table 2. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary Transport Mode and Supply Region" "(2013 dollars per ton)" "Coal Supply Region",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "Railroad"...

  19. Table 1. Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode" "Year","Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)","Average Delivered Cost...

  20. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector and source (million metric tons, unless otherwise noted)...

  1. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | August 7, 2015: Fermilab...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    since February 2014, recording neutrino interactions in the 14,000-ton far detector in Ash River, Minnesota, while construction was still under way. This allowed the...

  2. Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011)" "metric tons energy-related carbon dioxide per million dollars of GDP" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  3. Black Hills Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Montana Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount HVAC and Water Heaters Variable Frequency Drive: 30 hp Single Phase or Split System HVAC: 50 ton Geothermal Heat...

  4. By Coal Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    California (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total...

  5. Wright-Hennepin Cooperative Electric Association - Residential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    330 - 630 Geothermal Heat Pump: 150 per ton Electronically Commuted Motor: 25 Heat Pump Water Heater: 100 (new construction) -200 (replacement) Ductless Heat Pump: 100...

  6. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    361,000 Tons of Soil Removed Additional Scope: Additional waste sites and contamination resulting from past operations. Central Plateau Cleanup All 200 West Carbon...

  7. For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chromium cleanup along Columbia River Cleanup work removes major source of contamination to groundwater at Hanford Site RICHLAND, Wash. - More than two million tons of...

  8. IVANPAH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    year and prevent 500,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions annually. PROJECT STATISTICS: IVANPAH PROJECT SUMMARY OWNERS BrightSource Energy, NRG Energy & Google ...

  9. GRANITE RELIABLE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It will prevent 130,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions annually. PROJECT STATISTICS: GRANITE RELIABLE PROJECT SUMMARY OWNERS BAIF Granite Holdings & Freshet Wind ...

  10. SHEPHERDS FLAT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It is expected to prevent 1,000,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions annually. PROJECT STATISTICS: SHEPHERDS FLAT PROJECT SUMMARY OWNER Caithness Energy, LLC LOCATIONS ...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by ... tons) Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves ...

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2014 and 2013 (million short tons) 2014 2013 Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage ...

  13. Democratic Republic of Congo: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear NA 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  14. Word Pro - S7.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 (Million Short Tons) Notes: * Values are derived from source data prior to rounding for publication. * Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding....

  15. Word Pro - S7

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 (Million Short Tons) Notes: * Production categories are estimated; all data are preliminary. * Values are derived from source data prior to rounding for publication. * Totals may...

  16. Annual Energy Review 2003 - September 2004

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 (Million Short Tons) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2003 199 Notes: * Production categories are estimated; other data are preliminary. * Totals may not...

  17. Annual Energy Review 2004 - August 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 (Million Short Tons) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2004 203 Notes: * Production categories are estimated; other data are preliminary. * Totals may not...

  18. Forest County Potawatomi Community Wundar Hall Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Initial focus primarily on energy usage at major facilities and on renewable ... in northern Wisconsin, resulted in an annual reduction of 170 tons in carbon ...

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 projects reduced need for U.S. oil imports due to tight oil production growth

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7, 2014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 projects reduced need for U.S. oil imports due to tight oil production growth U.S. production of tight crude oil is expected to make up a larger share of total U.S. oil output in the years ahead, and help lower imports share of total U.S. oil consumption. In its annual long-term projections, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects total U.S. crude oil production to reach a record 9.6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2019, under its baseline

  20. Microsoft Word - notification of sampling line loss.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 1 January 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Outlook for Non-OPEC Supply in 2010-2011 1 Summary Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil and other liquid fuels 2 (hereafter "liquids"): those that are members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that are outside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the latter category. After growing by 630,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2009, EIA

  1. Iran sets sights on 5 million b/d of crude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that Iran, currently producing 3.2 million b/d of oil, has set a production target of 5 million b/d by March 1994. On the way to that target Iran's oil flow will climb to 4 million b/d by March 1993, says A. Moshtaqhian, director of exploration and production for National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC). With oil reserves of about 100 million bbl, Iran will find it easy to increase productive capacity, Moshtaqhian told the Gulf Oil and Politics publication.

  2. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  3. Another Kazakh megaproject lined up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-13

    This paper reports that Agip SpA and British Gas plc (BG) have signed an exclusive protocol of intent with Kazakhstan for joint further development of supergiant Karachaganak oil and gas/condensate field and related work in the Uralsk region of the former Soviet republic. The deal ultimately could mean an outlay of $6 billion during a 10 year period of boost production in the field, on stream since 1986, by drilling wells and implementing advanced recovery techniques. Reserves currently are pegged at more than 20 tcf of gas and a combined 1.9-2 billion bbl of liquids, an estimate likely to rise.

  4. Microsoft Word - 2013webinar_flyerFINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Crude Oil Production Outlook 1 February 14, 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Key drivers for EIA's short-term U.S. crude oil production outlook Crude oil production increased by 790,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) between 2011 and 2012, the largest increase in annual output since the beginning of U.S. commercial crude oil production in 1859. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects U.S. crude oil production to continue rising over the next two years represented in the

  5. Cause not found for Texas LPG site blast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-20

    This paper reports that National Transportation Safety Board investigators completed the first phase of tests at Seminole Pipeline Co.'s liquid petroleum gas storage dome near Brenham, Tex., without finding the cause of an explosion there Apr. 7. But in a week of investigation, NTSB determined that a release of brine and product occurred at the 350,000 bbl LPG storage dome, about 45 miles northwest of Houston, just before the blast. The explosion sent shock waves felt as far as 130 miles away. Three persons have died from injuries suffered in the accident. Another 18 were injured.

  6. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 1 May 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 9, 2006 Release Overview Crude oil prices surged in April and have now almost doubled over the last 2 years. While rising crude oil prices have slowed world petroleum demand growth, world consumption nevertheless rose by 3.8 million barrels per day (bbl/d) over this period. In 2004 production in both Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and non-OPEC countries increased to meet growing demand. In 2005 all of the increase in world

  7. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  8. recycling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6%2A en Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt http:nnsa.energy.govblogy%E2%80%9112%E2%80%99s-rough-roads-smoothed-over-23000-tons-recycled-asph...

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Source: Table 11.4. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 Million Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0 50 100 150 200 Thousand Metric Tons of ...

  10. EIS-0073: Solvent Refined Coal-I Demonstration Project, Daviess County, Kentucky

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental, economic, and social impacts associated with construction and operation of a 6,000-tons-per-stream-day-capacity coal liquefaction facility in Newman, Kentucky, and the potential impacts of a future expansion of the proposed facility to an approximately 30,000 tons per stream day capacity.

  11. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the Adorer cranes in the device assembly facility using actual, rather than conservative, stress-components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalder, E.N.C.

    1996-12-26

    Fracture mechanics analyses were done on 3 critical locations on the lower flange of the load beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. This was done to determine appropriate flaw sizes for NDE detection during periodic inspection, and appropriate inspection intervals.

  12. TO : R. f. Snlth, Jr. Assistmt Director, DATE:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    cast iron acrap were sold to Schra&k*a Scrap Senlce' T;;ci?or 32.00 par ton, the same price rdceired for the original tlfty-fire tons awarded to them as a result of the public...

  13. Algeria LPG pipeline is build by Bechtel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, C.

    1984-08-01

    The construction of the 313 mile long, 24 in. LPG pipeline from Hassi R'Mel to Arzew, Algeria is described. The pipeline was designed to deliver 6 million tons of LPG annually using one pumping station. Eventually an additional pumping station will be added to raise the system capacity to 9 million tons annually.

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Figure 3. Electric power sector consumption of coal by census region, 2010 (million short tons and percent change from 2009) U.S. total: 975.6 million short tons (4.5%) Figure 3. Electric Power Sector Consumption of Coal by Census Region, 2010 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-

  15. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...94,42,42,40,35,46,69,73,68,63,104,188,139,172,98,63,79,30,13,11,10,22 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)" "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",1,1,1,2,2,2,3,4,3,3,6,3,0,11,0,0,195,163,119,187,1...

  16. Application of spectral hole burning to the study of in vitro cellular systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milanovich, Nebojsa

    1999-11-08

    Chapter 1 of this thesis describes the various stages of tumor development and a multitude of diagnostic techniques used to detect cancer. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the aspects of hole burning spectroscopy important for its application to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 3 gives general descriptions of cellular organelles, structures, and physical properties that can serve as possible markers for the differentiation of normal and cancerous cells. Also described in Chapter 3 are the principles of cryobiology important for low temperature spectroscopy of cells, characterization of MCF-10F (normal) and MCF-7 (cancer) cells lines which will serve as model systems, and cellular characteristics of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT), which was used as the test probe. Chapters 4 and 5 are previously published papers by the author pertaining to the results obtained from the application of hole burning to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 4 presents the first results obtained by spectral hole burning of cellular systems and Chapter 5 gives results for the differentiation of MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells stained with APT by an external applied electric (Stark) field. A general conclusion is presented in Chapter 6. Appendices A and B provide additional characterization of the cell/probe model systems. Appendix A describes the uptake and subcellular distribution of APT in MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells and Appendix B compares the hole burning characteristics of APT in cells when the cells are in suspension and when they are examined while adhering to a glass coverslip. Appendix C presents preliminary results for a novel probe molecule, referred to as a molecular thumbtack, designed by the authors for use in future hole burning applications to cellular systems.

  17. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. New system pinpoints leaks in ethylene pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamande, A.; Condacse, V.; Modisette, J.

    1995-04-01

    A model-based leak detection, PLDS, developed by Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston has been operating on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline since 1989. The 6-in. pipeline extends from Antwerp to Jemeppe sur Sambre, a distance of 73.5 miles and is buried at a depth of 3 ft. with no insulation. Except for outlets to flares, located every 6 miles for test purposes, there are no injections or deliveries along the pipeline. Also, there are block valves, which are normally open, at each flare location. This paper reviews the design and testing procedures used to determine the system performance. These tests showed that the leak system was fully operational and no false alarms were caused by abrupt changes in inlet/outlet flows of the pipeline. It was confirmed that leaks larger than 2 tonnes/hr. (40 bbl/hr) are quickly detected and accurately located. Also, maximum leak detection sensitivity is 1 tonne/hr. (20 bbl/hr) with a detection time of one hour. Significant operational, configuration, and programming issues also were found during the testing program. Data showed that temperature simulations needed re-examining for improvement since accurate temperature measurements are important. This is especially true for ethylene since its density depends largely on temperature. Another finding showed the averaging period of 4 hrs. was too long and a 1 to 2 hr. interval was better.

  19. Recomplete deep hot wells successfully with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, T.; Fleckenstein, W.; Shelley, B.

    1995-06-01

    A squeeze reperforation procedure in the Elk Hills, California field using coiled tubing included contaminating excess cement and jetting it from the well bore to eliminate the need to drill out cement before shooting new perforations. The 324-7R well was producing 260 b/d of oil through 2 7/8-in. production tubing, with a 20,000-scf/bbl gas-oil ratio (GOR). Bottomhole static temperature was 250 F. After pumping a cement squeeze to 9,000 ft trough 1{1/2}-in. coiled tubing (CT) run inside the production tubing, oil production increased to 550 b/d of oil, and the GOR decreased to 5,000 scf/bbl when new perforations were shot. Cement was pumped 9,000 ft through the CT and circulated back through the production tubing/CT annulus. Operation cost was estimated at 20% less than for a comparable job performance with conventional tubing. Cost of the CT squeeze was recovered by 58 days incremental production.

  20. Heavy oil. upgrading integrated with steam drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Driesen, R.; Viens, C.H.; Fornoff, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the upgrading of heavy oil from a representative Venezuelan Jobo crude (9.2/sup 0/API, 4.1% sulfur, and 500 ppm total metals) from the Orinoco area involved 110 computer simulations based on a modified C-E Lummus Refinery Linear Program model on the assumptions of a 125,000 bbl/day refinery built, starting at 1979 prices, for completion by 1986 near the producing field to supply the fuel oil needed to provide oil field steam. All of the upgrading systems were economically attractive; the per cent return-on-investment (ROI) before taxes for the methods studied were: for Lummus LC-Fining, 135.9%; for Exxon's FLEXICOKING, 132.4%; for delayed coking, 119.2%; and for deasphalting, 106.5%. LC-Fining provided the best over-all combination of flexibility, product yield, product quality, and return on investment. The economics favored upgrading to the maximum extent possible; there was a reduction in the ROI for all the upgrading systems when product specifications were lowered from the premium base case (1.2% SO/sub 2/ emitted per million Btu fired). The premium upgraded heavy crude oils should be worth $3.00-$3.50/bbl more than comparable conventional crude oils, could be of up to 27/sup 0/API, and could be substituted, at up to 50%, for conventional crude oils in a typical U.S. refinery.