Sample records for tom sloan kansas

  1. Velda Sloan Oral History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Velda; Heidrick, Sarah

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Oral history interview with Velda Sloan conducted by Sarah Heidrick in Salina, Kansas, on November 9, 2009. In this interview, Velda Sloan discusses her experiences attending Methodist and Presybterian churches in a variety of locations during...

  2. Kansas Certified Development Companies (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas Certified Development Companies (CDC) assist businesses by developing loan packages that meet the financial need of a project. These packages often contain multiple sources of project...

  3. Tom McQuiston- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tom McQuiston is a doctor of public health specializing in occupational health, safety and environment issues.

  4. Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) allows for the retention of employee payroll withholding taxes for qualified companies or third parties performing services on behalf of such companies....

  5. Forestry Policies (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas is home to an established forestry industry managing roughly 2 million acres of land. The vast majority of these lands are privately owned. The Kansas Forest Service (KFS) provides the...

  6. Kansas- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas adopted the Net Metering and Easy Connection Act in May 2009 (see K.S.A. 66-1263 through 66-1271), establishing net metering for customers of investor-owned utilities in Kansas. Net metering...

  7. Tom Stephens | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Analyst Tom Stephens E-mail tstephens@anl.gov Projects HTEBdyn Heavy Truck Energy Balance Dynamic Model Heavy Truck Benefits Analysis Models Heavy Vehicle...

  8. EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

  9. Hispanic Theatre in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    96 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW Hispanic Theatre in Kansas The Fanlights (Los soles truncos), by the late Rene Marqués, was performed in English translation at the University of Kansas, in Lawrence, April 10-12 and 17-21, 1979. The play...

  10. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Dale

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have ...

  11. Kansas refraction profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steeples, Don W.; Miller, Richard D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the MGA (Bickford et al., 1979). The NemahaRidge is another of the major structural discontinuities in the study area. Seismic-reflection evidence suggests major uplift during late Mississippian time which produced the Nemaha Ridge, forming... the boundary between the Salina and Forest City basins in Kansas (Steeples, 1982, also this volume). Aside from the MGA and Nemaha Ridge, the Ozark uplift, Sioux uplift, Central Kansas uplift, Forest City basin, Anadarko basin, Denver basin, and Salina...

  12. The Kansas Black Bass Tournament Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kansas Black Bass (Micropterus spp.) Tournament Monitoring Program was begun by the Kansas Fish and Game program of the Kansas Fish and Game Commission avoids both of these prob- lems. The Kansas Black Bass annually to each of the bass clubs in Kansas before the bulk of fishing begins, and clubs are asked

  13. The Kansas Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Karen P.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Plains An Exhibit from the Kansas Collection UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LIBRARIES T R A V E L L I N G ACROSS KANSAS f r o m e a s t to west , one is a w a r e of a t rans i t ion f r o m the ta l l g r a s s P r a i r i e P l a i n... s with wooded val leys to the f lat , t r e e l e s s , ar id High P l a i n s of w e s t e r n K a n s a s . Wal ter P r e s c o t t Webb in The G r e a t P l a i n s explains the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of the plains environment and the f l o r a l...

  14. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  15. Tom Rogers Director, Industrial Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-ResolvedTo: Ms.CampbellTom Rogers,

  16. 3, 187223, 2003 TOMS cloudy ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 187­223, 2003 TOMS cloudy ozone anomaly X. Liu et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Occurrence of ozone anomalies over cloudy 2003 Correspondence to: X. Liu (xliu@nsstc.uah.edu) 187 #12;ACPD 3, 187­223, 2003 TOMS cloudy ozone

  17. Tom Donahue Environmental Ethics ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Donahue Environmental Ethics 1 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS EPE399/PHIL331/PLSC335 Summer Session. The course concludes by critically examining a recent influential book: Stephen M. Gardiner's A Perfect Moral, as John Dewey famously said, "A problem well posed is half solved." #12;Tom Donahue Environmental Ethics 2

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce Margon

    1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an ambitious, multi-institutional project to create a huge digital imaging and spectroscopic data bank of 25% of the celestial sphere, approximately 10,000 deg^2 centred on the north galactic polar cap. The photometric atlas will be in 5 specially-chosen colours, covering the pi ster of the Survey area to a limiting magnitude of r~23.1, on 0.4" pixels, resulting in a 1 Tpixel map. This data base will be automatically analysed to catalog the photometric and astrometric properties of 10^8 stellar images, 10^8 galaxies, and 10^6 colour-selected QSO candidates; the galaxy data will in addition include detailed morphological data. The photometric data are used to autonomously and homogeneously select objects for the spectroscopic survey, which will include spectra of 10^6 galaxies, 10^5 QSOs, and 10^5 unusual stars. Although the project was originally motivated by the desire to study Large Scale Structure, we anticipate that these data will impact virtually every field of astronomy, from Earth-crossing asteroids to QSOs at z>6. In particular, the ~12 TByte multi-colour, precision calibrated imaging archive should be a world resource for many decades of the next century.

  19. Some Kansas Lawyer-Poets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Brian; Hoeflich, Michael H.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Kansas Lawyer-Poets Brian Moline" & MH. Hoeflich·· At first glance the idea of a Kansas lawyer-poet might seem odd. We tend to think oflawyers as hard-boiled men and women ofthe world, not as sensitive poetic types. Similarly, when we think... of Kansas we think first of farmers and ranchers, not of lawyers. The idea of Kansas lawyer-poets, therefore, may well seem to be strange and the breed quite limited, but nothing could be further from the truth. Throughout American history, lawyers have...

  20. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  1. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  2. National Nuclear Security Administration Kansas City Field Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    City Field Office 14520 Botts Road Kansas City, Missouri 64147 Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Kansas City Plant Home Page - Provides background information and related news on...

  3. Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Location: Hugoton, KS Eligibility: 1705 Snapshot In...

  4. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2007 (42nd Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................. 381 Population of Kansas by Region, July 1, 2007, and Percent Change, 2006-2007 (map) ................................................... 382 Population Projections for Kansas, by Age and Gender, 2000-2030, Selected Years...-2007 ............................................................................................................................ 423 Cumulative Components of Population Change for Kansas, by County, April 1, 2000 - July 1, 2007 ......................... 426 Projected Percent Population Change for Kansas, by County, 2000-2030 (map...

  5. newmanagement MIT SloanNewsandinsightsfortheMITSloancommunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    feedback--and hope that all the School has done for alumni this academic year, including the articles (http://mitsloan.mit.edu/alumni/best-practices. php) gives you access to articles from the Sloan Management Review, podcasts with faculty and researchers at the School, articles from this magazine, faculty

  6. Empirical Bayes for Learning to Learn Tom Heskes tom@mbfys.kun.nl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heskes, Tom

    mul­ titask learning, linking theoretical results to practical simulations. In our model all tasksEmpirical Bayes for Learning to Learn Tom Heskes tom@mbfys.kun.nl SNN, University of Nijmegen are combined in a single feedforward neu­ ral network. Learning is implemented in a Bayesian fashion

  7. Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction allows Kansas taxpayers to claim an expense deduction for business machinery and equipment, placed in service in Kansas during the tax year. The one-time...

  8. Collection, Storage And Impounding Of Waters (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas Statute Chapter 82 Article 4 lays out property tax exemption requirements for landowners who build and maintain dams on their property in the state of Kansas. Dams must meet the given...

  9. Geothermal evaluation of Kansas: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeples, D.W.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information from the literature and from four drill holes in Kansas is presented. Geothermal gradients and heat flow measurements are presented. An aeromagnetic map of Kansas is included. (MHR)

  10. The Biology of Some Kansas Eumenidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isely, Dwight

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is based on field observations and collections made by the author while connected with the Biological Survey of the University of Kansas, in Northwestern Kansas, during the summer of 1912. Specimens of fully ...

  11. Kansas City Power & Light- Solar PV Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light and its affiliate Kansas City Power and Light Greater Missouri Operations (collectively referred to as KCP&L) offer rebates to their customers for the installation...

  12. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2005 (40th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, elections, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, income, finance, state and local...

  13. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2013 (48th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Policy & Social Research

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract 2013, contains the latest available state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, ...

  14. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2001 (36th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, elections, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, income, ...

  15. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2008 (43rd Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on agriculture, banking and finance, business and exports, climate, communications and information, crime, education, employment and ...

  16. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2004 (39th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, elections, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, income, ...

  17. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2003 (38th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, elections, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, income, ...

  18. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2012 (47th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Policy & Social Research

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract 2012, contains the latest available state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, ...

  19. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2002 (37th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on population, vital statistics and health, housing, elections, education, business and manufacturing, exports, employment, income, ...

  20. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2009 (44th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Statistical Abstract contains state, county, and city-level data for Kansas on agriculture, banking and finance, business and exports, climate, communications and information, crime, education, employment and ...

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  2. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg K-12 School (Revised) (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg...

  3. Independent Oversight Focused Review, Kansas City Plant, Summary...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review, Kansas City Plant, Summary Report - December 2001 Independent Oversight Focused Review, Kansas City Plant, Summary Report - December 2001 December 2001 Focused Review of...

  4. Kansas City Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Kansas City Field Office Kansas City Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14...

  5. Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, biomass and wind power.The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making...

  6. Kansas City Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Kansas City, Missouri. Kansas City Summary of Reported Data More Documents & Publications Michigan...

  7. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009 (Brochure) This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas,...

  8. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting...

  9. aneta ozolina toms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. 9 University Librarian Tom Leonard Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Manager and Project Analyst Zsu Zsu Listro The Bancroft Library Director Elaine Tennant...

  10. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Kansas as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  11. A List of Kansas Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Charles H.

    1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Master Th e s i s Geology Grov e r , C h a r l e s H. 1895 L i s t of Kansas m i n e r a l s * A l i s t of Kansas Minerals with "brief notes on the^cr^stjalogr&phio (form, chemical composition, and the p r i n c i p a l l o c a l i t i e s f...£om which £hey have been reported* ^S/V-y The f o l l o w i n g l i s t , i t i s believed, embraces a l l the minerals of the state that have been so f a r discovered and reported. Two s i m i l a r i i s t s have been heretofore published i n...

  12. Tom O'Neill | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactiveI Disposal Sites25, 2015 To: Sent:NRareTom

  13. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for August 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  14. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for June 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  15. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  16. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  17. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  18. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for July 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  19. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  20. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  1. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for July 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  2. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for July 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  3. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  4. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for May 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  5. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  6. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  7. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for November 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  8. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  9. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for June 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  10. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  11. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  12. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  13. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for June 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  14. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  15. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  16. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for April 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  17. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for March 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  18. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  19. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  20. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for August 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  1. Kansas Water Office November 14, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adequate quantities of good quality water to meet future needs. #12;#12;Kansas Reservoir Loss of Capacity 0 that adversely affect the water quality of Kansas lakes and streams. Ensure that water quality conditions are maintained at a level equal to or better than year 2000 conditions. Reduce total nitrogen and phosphorus

  2. Essential and Fixed Oils of Kansas Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington, Earl J.

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Kansas", published in Topeka, 1892, was used. This is the most complete catalog of Kansas plants available at the present time. The numbers to the Left of the botanical names refer to those of this check list . A new flora of the state has been...

  3. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2011 (46th Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Policy & Social Research

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . Mercer, project manager Whitney K. Onasch, data collection management and compilation Laura Kriegstrom Stull, editor, graphic design, and data visualization Xanthippe Wedel, data compilation and visualization, programming, and production Steven...) ....................................................................................................................... 21 Kansas Senate Districts, 2002 (map) .................................................................................................................................................. 22 Kansas Senate Districts, 2012 (map...

  4. Kansas Statistical Abstract 2006 (41st Edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Research Institute

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 ...................... 466 Projected Percent Population Change for Kansas, by County, 2000-2025 (map).............................................................. 468 Population Projections for Kansas, by County, 2000...: Genna Hurd, editor Susan Mercer, project manager Laura Kriegstrom Stull, editor, graphic design, and data visualization Charlotte Murayan, data collection management and compilation Xanthippe Wedel, data compilation and visualization, programming...

  5. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriam, Daniel F., E-mail: dmerriam@kgs.ku.edu [University of Kansas (United States); Brady, Lawrence L.; Newell, K. David [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U.S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer.

  6. Kansas Natural Gas Processed in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessAprilResidential ConsumersThousandKansas

  7. City of Kansas City, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCity ofCity of Johnson,City of Kansas

  8. Kansas BEST for Innovation 1 B.E.S.T.for Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Science and Technology for Innovation #12;Kansas B.E.S.T. for Innovation 2 Acknowledgments The drafters and Technology for Innovation (Kansas B.E.S.T. for Innovation)--Kansas can capitalize on the inherent streKansas BEST for Innovation 1 KANSAS B.E.S.T.for Innovation Kansas: Building an Environment

  9. Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone Commissioner of Agriculture As Chairperson of Colorado's newly created Forestry Advisory Board, I would like to thank you for taking the time

  10. FIA-12-0057- In the Matter of Tom Thielen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tom Thielen filed a Privacy Act Appeal regarding a determination issued to him by the Department of Energy’s Richland Operations Office (Richland).  Richland had previously withheld certain...

  11. Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, R.T.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas City Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.

  12. Kansas City Completes Innovative Business Incubator | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The logo for EnergyWorks KC. The Blue Hills Business Center and Contractor Incubator is now open This Kansas City, Missouri, center has been a collaborative effort between...

  13. Black Literary Suite: Kansas Authors Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Meredith Joan

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    authors were born or lived in the Sunflower State, and their work often reflects their time in Kansas. This Black Literary Suite exhibit highlights four important black writers—Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Frank Marshall Davis, and Kevin Young...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    production facilities in Kansas, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  15. Kansas City- EnergyWorks KC (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EnergyWorks KC program offers residents, small businesses, churches, schools, and non-profit Kansas City organizations an opportunity to increase the efficiency of their homes and buildings. An...

  16. Greensburg, Kansas : rebuilding a green town

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Anna (Anna Miriam)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tornado that hit Greensburg, Kansas, in May 2007, traveled down the center of Main Street at two hundred and five miles per hour and destroyed ninety-five percent of the town's built environment. The extensive damage ...

  17. 25055 W. Valley Parkway Olathe, Kansas 66061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    25055 W. Valley Parkway Suite 106 Olathe, Kansas 66061 Evans Enterprises is growing, or a person we need to reach out to. Our company website is below, and I am happy to answer any questions you

  18. Some rhetorical functions of Fielding's narrator in Tom Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Mary Jo

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOME RHETORICAL FUNCTIONS OF FIELDING' S NARRATOR IN TOM JONES A Thesis by MARY JO HOFFMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of toe requirement for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December 1971... Rhetorical Punotions of Fielding's Narrator in Tom Jones. (December 1971) Mary Jo Hoffman, B. Aes Mary Hardin-Baylor College Directed by: Dr. Harry P. Kroitor Examination of instances of the appearance of Pieldingts narrator at chapter ends...

  19. BERG, BELHUMEUR: TOM-VS-PETE CLASSIFIERS AND IDENTITY-PRESERVING ALIGNMENT 1 Tom-vs-Pete Classifiers and Identity-Preserving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    BERG, BELHUMEUR: TOM-VS-PETE CLASSIFIERS AND IDENTITY-PRESERVING ALIGNMENT 1 Tom these "Tom-vs-Pete" classifiers to stress their binary nature. We assemble a collection of these classifiers. To distinguish images of Stephen Fry and Brad Pitt, the best feature might be "crooked nose." With a sufficiently

  20. Scully field - Marion County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgat, B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scully field is a multipay new-field discovery located in the southern end of Salina basin, Marion County, Kansas. The Scully field was discovered using a combination of satellite imagery and subsurface control. The overall trapping mechanism at the Scully field is anticlinal closure. Infield drilling has demonstrated, however, that significant stratigraphic variations do exist within the productive area. The Simpson sands have been subdivided in five separate units which range from 4 to 12 ft (1 to 4 m) in thickness. Three of these are of economic importance in the field. In general, the sands with the most economic potential are distributed within relative Ordovician paleolows. The Viola has four main lithologic divisions. The uppermost of these is a relatively thin dolomite cap which ranges from 2 to 15 ft (1 to 5 m). This upper dolomite is the primary Viola pay zone. The Mississippian section is eroded deeply over the Scully structure and demonstrates about 70 ft (20 m) of thinning. The potential pay interval is chert which has 25 to 30% porosity based on log analysis. The trapping mechanism is a combination of erosional truncation and structural closure. In addition to the structural information obtained from satellite imagery, R.J. Walker Oil Co., Inc., evaluated the hydrocarbon potential of T18S, R1E, Marion County, Kansas, which contains the Scully field, using remote sensing technology developed by Earth Reference Systems of Long Beach, California. The technology involves direct detection of hydrocarbons in place, using satellite data, nonlinear mathematics, and the fundamental principles of molecular structure and electromagnetic wave propagation.

  1. Kansas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has|Issues inU N EKEP

  2. Geothermal Business on the Rise for Kansas Company | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Business on the Rise for Kansas Company Geothermal Business on the Rise for Kansas Company April 16, 2010 - 4:43pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy...

  3. Kansas City Power and Light- Solar Photovoltaic Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light and its affiliate Kansas City Power and Light Greater Missouri Operations (collectively referred to as KCP&L) offer rebates to their customers for the installation...

  4. Paleoecology and paleontology of the Lower Cretaceous Kiowa Formation, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, R. W.

    1970-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    paleontologist at the University of Kansas, and by MYRL WALKER and ORVILLE BONNER, vertebrate paleontologists at Fort Hays Kansas State College, where my collection of vertebrates has been deposited. In general, the taxonomic diversity of plesiosaurs, sharks..., and fishes is moderate, and reptile species other than plesiosaurs are few. Rocks in southern Kansas have yielded the greatest number of specimens and species; central Kansas has yielded only a few species of crocodiles and sharks. Fish scales are relatively...

  5. Croatian Language and Cultural Maintenance in the Slavic-American Community of Strawberry Hill, Kansas City, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, Holly Hood

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate levels of immigrant language retention among Croatian-Americans in the Slavic diaspora community of Strawberry Hill in Kansas City, Kansas. There have been three major waves of Croatian...

  6. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  7. Learning Globally Consistent Maps by Relaxation Tom Duckett Stephen Marsland & Jonathan Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    Learning Globally Consistent Maps by Relaxation #3; Tom Duckett Stephen Marsland & Jonathan Shapiro-70182  Orebro Manchester M13 9PL Sweden England Tom.Duckett@aass.oru.se fmarslans

  8. James H. Lane and the Origins of the Kansas Jayhawk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, Frank

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In contrast, John Speer, editor of the Lawrence Republican, considered him to be the liberator of Kansas. Albert Castel, Civil War Kansas: Reaping the Whirlwind (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1997); Donald L. Gilmore, Civil War on the Missouri...-Kansas Border (Gretna, La.: Pelican, 2008), 133; John Speer, Life of Gen. James H. Lane, “The Liberator of Kansas” (Garden City, Kans.: John Speer, 1896); Starr, Jennison’s Jayhawkers, 14. James H. Lane ended his political career as a U.S. Senator...

  9. Kansas Labor Unions: Past, Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shulenburger, David E.; Johnson, Nancy Brown

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Labor Unions: Past, Present and Future,” Kansas Business Review, with N.B. Johnson, Volume 6 (May-June, 1983), pp. 13-17. Terms of Use: http://www2.ku.edu/~scholar/docs/license.shtml and N. B. Johnson Kansas Labor Unions: Past, Present, and Future... that the strikers were " . . . sober, in­ telligent, orderly men" and encouraged the railroad to "arrange terms for an amicable settlement."6 Governor Martin's stalwart stand not to intervene with troops represented one of the earliest occasions in which a state...

  10. EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental...

  11. Selection to the Kansas Supreme Court

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ware, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This process for selecting justices to the Kansas Supreme Court is described by the organized bar as a "merit," rather than political, process. Other observers, however, emphasize that the process has a political side as well. This paper surveys debate about...

  12. Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone Commissioner of Agriculture desired benefits? The members of Colorado's Forestry Advisory Board have presented this question, Colorado Forestry Advisory Board #12;2003 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests 1 2003 Report

  13. The Computational Complexity of Abduction Tom Bylander, Dean Allemang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bylander, Tom

    The Computational Complexity of Abduction Tom Bylander, Dean Allemang, Michael C. Tanner, and John Abstract The problem of abduction can be characterized as finding the best explanation of a set of data. In this paper we focus on one type of abduction in which the best explanation is the most plausible combination

  14. Towards a Taxonomy of Software Evolution Tom Mens Jim Buckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zenger, Matthias

    Towards a Taxonomy of Software Evolution Tom Mens Jim Buckley Vrije Universiteit Brussel Pleinlaan taxonomies of software evolution have focused on the purpose of the change (i.e., the why) rather than the underlying mechanisms. This paper proposes a taxonomy of software evolution based on the characterizing

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Gloria M. Calaf Debasish Roy Tom K. Hei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Gloria M. Calaf Æ Debasish Roy Æ Tom K. Hei Immunochemical analysis of protein of the cell cycle (Bravo et al. 1987; Waseem and Lane G. M. Calaf (&) Æ D. Roy Æ T. K. Hei Center the transformed cells after injecting them into nude mice. A decrease in RbA/p48 protein expression and m

  16. Random walks in random environment Tom Schmitz (MPI Leipzig)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thalmaier, Anton

    Random walks in random environment Tom Schmitz (MPI Leipzig) The model of random walks in random environment (RWRE) originates from physical and biological sciences and describes a random motion in a disordered medium. We consider RWRE on the d-dimensional lattice. The jump probabil- ities are themselves

  17. EECBG Success Story: Resourceful Kansas Puts Energy Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is a great place to harness wind and solar power. Through the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program, the Resourceful Kansas team is...

  18. Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

  19. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas To Be...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rebuilds as a National Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet) Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009...

  20. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This executive summary provides an overview of an NREL assessment to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region around Greensburg, Kansas.

  1. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. City Hall (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document showcases the LEED-Platinum designed Greensburg City Hall, which was rebuilt green, after a massive tornado destroyed Greensburg, Kansas in May 2007.

  2. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, City Hall (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designated City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. City Hall (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designated City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  4. Rebuilding It Better: City of Greensburg, Kansas, Business Incubator (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed SunChips Business Incubator in Greensburg, Kansas.

  5. Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Addthis Employees speak about the changes happening in their lives since a wind turbine component manufacturing facility came to Hutchinson, Kansas. | Video courtesy of...

  6. Options for Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles in Greensburg, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrow, G.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper describes DOE/NREL recommendations to rebuild Greensburg, Kansas, as a sustainable community after being struck by a tornado in 2007.

  7. Lessons Learned from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Kleinman; J. E. Gunn; B. Boroski; D. Long; S. Snedden; A. Nitta; J. Krzesi?ski; M. Harvanek; E. Neilsen; B. Gillespie; J. C. Barentine; A. Uomoto; D. Tucker; D. York; S. Jester

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronomy is changing. Large projects, large collaborations, and large budgets are becoming the norm. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one example of this new astronomy, and in operating the original survey, we put in place and learned many valuable operating principles. Scientists sometimes have the tendency to invent everything themselves but when budgets are large, deadlines are many, and both are tight, learning from others and applying it appropriately can make the difference between success and failure. We offer here our experiences well as our thoughts, opinions, and beliefs on what we learned in operating the SDSS.

  8. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  9. Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas City Plant is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. AlliedSignal and its predecessors have been the operating contractors since 1949. The principal operation performed at the Kansas City Plant is the manufacture of non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons. This activity involves metals and plastics machining, plastics fabrication, plating, microelectronics, and electrical and mechanical assembly. No radioactive materials are machined or processed. This report presents information and data pertaining to the environmental monitoring program and compliance with environmental standards.

  10. Biographical Dictionary of Kansas Artists (active before 1945)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Susan V.

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    at West 25 th near Riedy Road, Kansas City from 1905-07. Kansas City Directory 1905, 1906, 1907 Beard, William Holbrook. b. Painesville, OH, Apr. 13, 1824; d. New York, NY, Feb. 20, 1900. Painter, spec. animals, landscapes, portraits. Pupil of his...

  11. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Kansas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared an environmental impact statement to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action of providing Federal financial assistance to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC (Abengoa Bioenergy) to support the design, construction, and startup of a commercial-scale integrated biorefinery to be located near the city of Hugoton in Stevens County, southwestern Kansas.

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tom Walsh...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tom Walsh & Co., who worked with Building America research partner BIRA to design HERS 59 homes with ducts in conditioned space in dropped ceiling soffits, extensive air sealing,...

  13. Evapotranspiration and Precipitation in Kansas: Part I Dale Bremer, Kansas State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..."an annual mean temperature almost as high as that of Virginia, more sunshine than that of any state) involve water, which is a politically hot topic in Kansas and across the western U.S. States, including. The article in this issue discusses the fundamentals of ET and the water budget of a land's surface

  14. Running the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data archive server

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Stoughton, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to over 12Tb of data in 17 million files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. Many tasks which seem trivial when serving smaller, less complex data sets present challenges when serving data of this volume and technical complexity. The included output files should be chosen to support as much science as possible from publicly released data, and only publicly released data. Users must have the resources needed to read and interpret the data correctly. Server administrators must generate new data releases at regular intervals, monitor usage, quickly recover from hardware failures, and monitor the data served by the DAS both for contents and corruption. We discuss these challenges, describe tools we use to administer and support the DAS, and discuss future development plans.

  15. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

  16. A Search for Nitrogen Enriched Quasars in the Sloan EDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for nitrogen-rich quasars in the Sloan EDR catalog has yielded 16 candidates, including four with very prominent emission, but no cases with nitrogen emission as strong as in Q0353-383. The quasar Q0353-383 has long been known to have extremely strong nitrogen intercombination lines at lambda 1486 and lambda 1750 Angstroms, implying an anomalously high nitrogen abundance of about 15 times solar. It is still the only one of its kind known. A preliminary search through the EDR using the observed property of the weak C IV emission seen in Q0353-383 resulted in a sample of 23 objects with unusual emission or absorption-line properties, including one very luminous redshift 2.5 star-forming galaxy. We present descriptions, preliminary emission-line measurements, and spectra for all the objects discussed here.

  17. The Kansas Revised Limited Liability Company Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hecker, Edwin W. Jr.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    changes; dissolution and winding up; and foreign LLCs. VC LU with with uction, c tate Act :ted the - - the le :stry, c ility ited ltes --A I grant k k Amy c " ,,..A 2 * I wish to thank the University of Kansas School of Law for 2 re... validated, 1999 Supp. 17-7678(a), there is no longer any neea for a papel the wordir ,spending provisions ot the LCA demor fully the latter embraces the KLLCA de gcsimile communication" as nic equipn ~d or transfer a copy of an 3ocumt.n~ via teleoho K...

  18. Relief work in Kansas, 1856-1857

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Meara, Edith

    1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raised a relief fond §2,000 of which was donated to tho use of tho National- Kan3a3 Committee* At a mass meeting hold at tho Broadway Tabernacle of New York, great enthusiasm wae 3hown for the Kansas relief work; a fund was raised, and a committee... was given out in October, 1056* A notice in tho "lawronco Herald of Freedom" of Novoabcr 22, 185G, announced that tho Control Committee had opened of~ ficoo in Lawrence undor tho management of Col* Kldridgo and v3n» l&itcli~ inaon, and wr,o prepared...

  19. Kansas City Plant Celebrates Safety Milestone

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gang of motorcycle riders arrived at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant on July 1 to help celebrate a significant safety achievement - working nearly five million hours, covering a one-year period without a lost-time injury. The bikers -- some of whom are plant employees -- represent Bikers Against Child Abuse, the local nonprofit selected to receive a $5,000 donation as part of the plant's safety achievement celebration. The organization was selected because it aligns with the plant's community outreach focus on Family Safety & Security and partnership with the plant's union members.

  20. Langdon, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy Development Jump to: navigation,Langdon, Kansas:

  1. Greenbush Kansas Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrl JumpGreenSourceGreenbush Kansas

  2. Admire, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington,Admire, Kansas: Energy Resources

  3. Agenda, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) |Agawam, Massachusetts: EnergyAgenda, Kansas:

  4. Buhler, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington: Energy ResourcesBuffalo,Buhler, Kansas:

  5. Willard, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird, Idaho:Wildwood Crest, NewKansas: Energy Resources Jump

  6. Shawnee, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Shawnee, Kansas:

  7. Fairway, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to:

  8. Kansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: EnergyKanabec County, Minnesota:KankakeeKansas/Wind

  9. Manhattan, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource HistoryMandaluyong City,Kansas: Energy

  10. Oakley, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,and FeesOaklawn-Sunview, Kansas:2825°,

  11. Derby, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas: Energy Resources Jump to:

  12. Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New Energy CoKERAFOL GmbHEnergyKangdingPageKansas:

  13. Andover, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan2809328°, -95.3102505° ShowTexas:Andover, Kansas:

  14. Auburn, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation,Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to:

  15. Bentley, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBayBelmont County,InformationBenson,Bentley, Kansas:

  16. Gardner, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: Energy ResourcesGang Mills,Plain,Kansas: Energy

  17. University of Kansas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place:2.850084°,Kansas Place: Lawrence,

  18. Tomé wins Distinguished Scientist, Engineer Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-ResolvedTo: Ms.CampbellTomstudyTomé

  19. South Toms River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiverToms River, New

  20. Tom Green County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformation 61Tokamachi Geothermal AreaEnergyTom Green

  1. Toms River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformation 61Tokamachi GeothermalTommyToms River, New

  2. Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the Sandwich Algorithm Tom Rowlands, Paul Thomas, and Stephen Wan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Paul

    , and Stephen Wan CSIRO ICT Centre tom.rowlands@csiro.au, paul.thomas@csiro.au, stephen.wan@csiro.au AbstractWeb Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the Sandwich Algorithm Tom Rowlands, Paul Thomas

  3. What's Right with Kansas? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fuller, Merrian; Jackson, Nancy

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    On Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Berkeley's Repertory Theater, the Lab presented "What's Right with Kansas," an evening of conversation with the Kansas-based Climate and Energy Project's founder and board chair, Nancy Jackson, and Berkeley Lab scientist Merrian Fuller, an electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert. Berkeley Lab will also debut its video "Common Ground," which showcases how CEP has become a Kansas mainstay and an inspiration to environmental organizations across the country. In a state rife with climate-change skepticism, CEP has changed behavior, and some minds, by employing rural values of thrift, independence, conservation, and friendly competition to promote energy efficiency.

  4. What's Right with Kansas? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Merrian; Jackson, Nancy

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    On Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Berkeley's Repertory Theater, the Lab presented "What's Right with Kansas," an evening of conversation with the Kansas-based Climate and Energy Project's founder and board chair, Nancy Jackson, and Berkeley Lab scientist Merrian Fuller, an electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert. Berkeley Lab will also debut its video "Common Ground," which showcases how CEP has become a Kansas mainstay and an inspiration to environmental organizations across the country. In a state rife with climate-change skepticism, CEP has changed behavior, and some minds, by employing rural values of thrift, independence, conservation, and friendly competition to promote energy efficiency.

  5. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

  6. Kansas City Power and Light- Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers towards the cost of an ENERGY STAR Home Energy Assessment and a portion of the installed efficiency improvements....

  7. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This executive summary provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region.

  8. Kansas City Power & Light- Energy Optimizer Programmable Thermostat Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers a free programmable thermostat and free installation to qualifying customers to manage energy usage. Only residential and small commercial customers...

  9. Kansas City Power and Light- Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers to help offset the cost of replacing inefficient central AC and heat pump systems with newer, more efficient models....

  10. Kansas City Power & Light- Home Performance Rebate with ENERGY STAR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers towards the cost of an ENERGY STAR Home Energy Assessment and a portion of the installed efficiency improvements....

  11. Kansas City Power & Light- Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers of KCP&L's Greater Missouri Operations towards the cost of an ENERGY STAR Home Energy Assessment and a portion...

  12. HONEYWELL - KANSAS CITY PLANT FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    HONEYWELL - KANSAS CITY PLANT FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM RESULTS & FORECAST CATEGORY Total Procurement Total SB Small Disad. Bus Woman-Owned SB Hub-Zone SB...

  13. Kansas City Power and Light- Energy Optimizer Programmable Thermostat Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers a free Honeywell programmable thermostat, worth $300, and free installation to qualifying customers to manage energy usage. Only residential and small...

  14. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Roles identified by the state. These three projects included: 1. Measuring ssepage losses from waste treatment-push technology for site characterization investigations. #12;Measuring Seepage Losses from Waste

  15. Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solontoi, Michael; /Adler Planetarium, Chicago; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Harvard Coll. Observ.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /Boston U.; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u, g, r, i, z) photometry is used to determine the comets colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Afp formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

    2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

  17. Oxygen abundance in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Shi; X. Kong; F. Z. Cheng

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present two samples of $\\hii$ galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release 3. The electron temperatures($T_e$) of 225 galaxies are calculated with the photoionized $\\hii$ model and $T_e$ of 3997 galaxies are calculated with an empirical method. The oxygen abundances from the $T_e$ methods of the two samples are determined reliably. The oxygen abundances from a strong line metallicity indicator, such as $R_{23}$, $P$, $N2$, and $O3N2$, are also calculated. We compared oxygen abundances of $\\hii$ galaxies obtained with the $T_e$ method, $R_{23}$ method, $P$ method, $N2$ method, and $O3N2$method. The oxygen abundances derived with the $T_e$ method are systematically lower by $\\sim$0.2 dex than those derived with the $R_{23}$ method, consistent with previous studies based on $\\hii$ region samples. No clear offset for oxygen abundance was found between $T_e$ metallicity and $P$, $N2$ and $O3N2$ metallicity. When we studied the relation between N/O and O/H, we found that in the metallicity regime of $\\zoh > 7.95$, the large scatter of the relation can be explained by the contribution of small mass stars to the production of nitrogen. In the high metallicity regime, $\\zoh > 8.2$, nitrogen is primarily a secondary element produced by stars of all masses.

  18. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Vogeley; Fiona Hoyle; Randall R. Rojas; David M. Goldberg

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wide-angle, moderately deep redshift surveys such as that conducted as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) allow study of the relationship between the structural elements of the large-scale distribution of galaxies -- including groups, cluster, superclusters, and voids -- and the dependence of galaxy formation and evolution on these enviroments. We present a progress report on mapping efforts with the SDSS and discuss recently constructed catalogs of clusters, voids, and void galaxies, and evidence for a 420Mpc/h supercluster or ``Great Wall.'' Analysis of multi-band photometry and moderate-resolution spectroscopy from the SDSS reveals environmental dependence of the star formation history of galaxies that extends over more than a factor of 100 in density, from clusters all the way to the deep interiors of voids. On average, galaxies in the rarified environments of voids exhibit bluer colors, higher specific star formation rates, lower dust content, and more disk-like morphology than objects in denser regions. This trend persists in comparisons of samples in low vs. high-density regions with similar luminosity and morphology, thus this dependence is not simply an extension of the morphology-density relation. Large-scale modulation of the halo mass function and the temperature of the intergalactic medium might explain this dependence of galaxy evolution on the large-scale environment.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 3

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR3 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR1 was the first major data release, providing images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  2. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 4

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR4 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR2 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  4. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 5

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR5 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  5. The Midcontinent rift system in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berendsen, P. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequence of rift-related mafic volcanic rocks, volcanoclastic-, and clastic sedimentary rocks are recognized in cuttings and cores from about seventy wells in Kansas. The age (1,097.5 Ma) for gabbro in the Poersch [number sign]1 well in northern Kansas, as well as the general petrographic characteristics of the sedimentary rocks throughout the area favors a correlation with established Keweenawan stratigraphy in the Lake Superior region. Rift-related northeast-trending faults and older northwest-trending faults divide the area up into a number of orthogonal fault blocks or basins. Depending upon the tectonic history of the individual basin all or part of the Keweenawan section may be preserved. It is believed that large amounts of Keweenawan clastic sedimentary rock were eroded from the nemaha uplift east of the central graben of the rift and transported in an easterly direction. Prior to deposition of Paleozoic rocks the area was peneplaned. Correlation of various stratigraphic units over any distance is complicated by tectonic activity occurring at several times during the Precambrian and Paleozoic. Stratabound or stratiform deposits can occur both in the Precambrian as well as the overlying Paleozoic rocks. The possibility of massive sulfides to occur in the mafic intrusive rocks must not be excluded. In the core from the Poersch [number sign]1 well sulfides are recognized in gabbroic sills or dikes. Dark, fissile shale, similar to the Nonesuch Shale in the [number sign]1--4 Finn well averages 0.75% organic carbon. Thermal maturation within the rift probably ranges from within the oil window to over maturity.

  6. September 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in September 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  7. Washington and Lee Wins Sloan Foundation Grant for Faculty Career Flexibility The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has recognized the need for faculty development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    liberal arts colleges, inviting proposals for best ideas and practices to promote undergraduate career with elder care responsibilities. Accordingly, the Sloan Foundation sponsored an award competition for 287 the demands of their personal lives. The specific goals in W&L's proposal are: 1) Articulate clear

  8. CORRELATIONS AMONG GALAXY PROPERTIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan, E-mail: zhongmu.li@gmail.com [Institute for Astronomy and History of Science and Technology, Dali University, Dali 671003 (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxies are complex systems with many properties. Correlations among galaxy properties can supply important clues for studying the formation and evolution of galaxies. Using principal component analysis and least-squares fitting, this paper investigates the correlations among galactic parameters involving more properties (color, morphology, stellar population, and absolute magnitude) than previous studies. We use a volume-limited sample (whole sample) of 75,423 galaxies that was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 and divided into two subsamples (blue and red samples) using a critical color of (g - r) = 0.70 mag. In addition to recovering some previous results, we also obtain some new results. First, all separators for dividing galaxies into two groups can be related via good parameter-first principal component (PC1) correlations. A critical PC1 that indicates whether or not stellar age (or the evolution of a stellar population over time) is important can be used to separate galaxies. This suggests that a statistical parameter, PC1, is helpful in understanding the physical separators of galaxies. In addition, stellar age is shown to be unimportant for red galaxies, while both stellar age and mass are dominating parameters of blue galaxies. This suggests that the various numbers of dominating parameters of galaxies may result from the use of different samples. Finally, some parameters are shown to be correlated, and quantitative fits for a few correlations are obtained, e.g., log(t) = 8.57 + 1.65 (g - r) for the age (log t) and color (g - r) of blue galaxies and log (M{sub *}) = 4.31 - 0.30 M{sub r} for the stellar mass (log M{sub *}) and absolute magnitude (M{sub r}) of red galaxies. The median relationships between various parameter pairs are also presented for comparison.

  9. A History of Irrigation in the Arkansas River Valley in Western Kansas, 1880-1910

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Conner

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of western Kansas, in particular the community around Garden City, Kansas. This history attempts to relate the development of irrigation in the Arkansas Valley through its formative years, 1880-1910. The term "Arkansas River Valley" as used here refers...

  10. The Attitudes of Teachers in One County in Kansas Toward Their School Improvement Plan Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ubel, Renita Kathleen Pohl

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding their attitudes toward seven types of assessments used in school improvement plans: standardized norm-referenced tests, criterion-referenced tests, the Kansas Reading Assessment, portfolio assessment, the Kansas Writing Assessment, publishers...

  11. Developing an Enterprise GIS for Interdisciplinary Research to Model Farmers’ Land Use Decisions in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Dana

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    for water quality prediction in Kansas reservoirs • Factors Affecting Farmers’ Willingness to Grow Alternative Biomass Feedstocks for Biofuels across Kansas • Crop Supply Dynamics and the Illusion of Partial Adjustment • Opportunities and Constraints: Actor...

  12. Achieving Consensus on the University of Kansas Open-Access Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmett, Ada; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving Consensus on the University of Kansas Open-Access Policy Ada Emmett, Associate Librarian for Scholarly Communications, University of Kansas Town Peterson, Distinguished Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology..., and Senior Curator, Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas I n April of 2009 the University of Kansas (KU) Faculty Senate passed an open-access policy much like Harvard, MIT, and Stanford faculty’s, a decision that was expanded and improved in a second...

  13. Ranching in the Kansas Flint Hills: Exploring the Built Forms of a Family Cattle Ranch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Paula Graves

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appendix A: Data, 1875­1930, Tax Rolls, township 13, range 9, section 4, 226 Wabaunsee County, Kansas. Appendix B: Data, Wabaunsee County Map (Wichita: Kansas Blueprint 233 Company, 1991). Appendix C... up a primary source of information about the construction, demolition, and alterations of the buildings. In addition, the Kansas State Census, the U. S. Federal Census for Kansas, the Wabaunsee County Tax Rolls...

  14. A catalogue of the Ellis collection of ornithological books in the University of Kansas Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mengel, Robert M.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CATALOGUE OF THE ELLIS COLLECTION OF ORNITHOLOGICAL BOOKS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LIBRARIES Compiled by ROBERT M. MENGEL Edited by ALEXANDRA MASON AND JAMES HELYAR Volume 2 C—D Lawrence, Kansas 1983 UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS... PUBLICATIONS Library Series, 48 Edited by James Helyar A CATALOGUE OF THE ELLIS COLLECTION OF ORNITHOLOGICAL BOOKS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LIBRARIES Compiled by ROBERT M. MENGEL Edited by ALEXANDRA MASON AND JAMES HELYAR Volume 2 C—D Lawrence...

  15. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, USD 422 Greensburg K-12 School (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the USD 422 K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas.

  16. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

  17. Managing Secure Survivable Critical Infrastructures To Avoid Vulnerabilities Frederick Sheldon, Tom Potok, Andy Loebl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Managing Secure Survivable Critical Infrastructures To Avoid Vulnerabilities Frederick Sheldon, Tom technologically complex society makes knowing the vulnerability of such systems essential to improving their intrinsic reliability/survivability. Our discussion employs the power transmission grid. 1 Introduction

  18. Software Agents for Dynamic Supply Chain Management Tom Wagner and Valerie Guralnik Honeywell Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Thomas

    Software Agents for Dynamic Supply Chain Management Tom Wagner and Valerie Guralnik Honeywell¢ @htc.honeywell.com and John Phelps Abstract Some dynamic supply chain problems are instances of a class

  19. Turbo Decoding for PR4: Parallel Versus Serial Concatenation Tom Souvignier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    Turbo Decoding for PR4: Parallel Versus Serial Concatenation Tom Souvignier , Arnon Friedmann Diego Quantum Corporation Seagate Technology Abstract -- Recent work on the application of turbo results comparing the parallel and serial concatenation systems will be presented. I. INTRODUCTION Turbo

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas City Kansas Public Schools Invests in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C.TierIdaho County EmploysCNG Buses Kansas

  1. March 2008 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, March 2007, and September 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a, 2008). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2008, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represented the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. The March 2008 sampling begins an extension of the approved monitoring that is to continue until the final site remedy has been implemented and a comprehensive program of performance and compliance monitoring has been established at Centralia (KDHE 2008a).

  2. Microearthquakes in Kansas and Nebraska 1977--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeples, D. W.; Bennett, B.C.; Park, C.; Miller, R.D.; Knapp, R.W. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (USA))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas Geological Survey operated a microearthquake network from August 1977 to August 1989 with station located in eastern Kansas and Nebraska. Locatable microearthquakes with duration magnitudes less than 3.2 occur at the rate of roughly 20 per year in the two-state area, with most of the magnitudes ranging from 1.4 to 2.5. The microearthquake pattern observed during the 12 years of recording is consistent with the pattern of historical earthquakes reported since 1867. Much of the activity occurs along the Precambrian Nemaha Ridge, which has been the site of several earthquakes of MM Intensity VII over the past 125 years. Some seismicity is observed along the northwest flank of the Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly in Kansas, but little is observed in the Nebraska or Iowa portions of this Precambrian feature. The Central Kansas Uplift, a buried anticline similar in age to the Nemaha Ridge, has been the site of several felt earthquakes since 1982. Another trend of earthquakes extends northeastward across central Nebraska and is not associated with any prominent geologic structure. All the seismicity in central and eastern Kansas can be roughly correlated to known geologic structures. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  3. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada); McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Anderson, Scott F. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Chen, Yuguang [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Denney, Kelly D. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Eftekharzadeh, Sarah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Gao, Yang [Department of Engineering Physics and Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Green, Paul J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Horne, Keith [SUPA Physics/Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Jiang, Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Kelly, Brandon C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93107 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ?4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ?2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ?10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  4. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  5. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

  6. A History of Manufactures in the Kansas Fuel District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Richard L.

    1910-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are thus the great coal-producing formations that are found in this section, and produce by far the largest share of the coal mined in Kansas . 2 8 The only other coal-bearing shale of any importance in the state, and it does not extend into any except... Kansas, so far as known, is the Osage shale, 2000 feet above the Cherokee shale, which has been important in that it has both supplied a local demand, and has furnished a great deal of coal to the Santa Fe railroad. 2 9 The output of the mines...

  7. October 2007 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. On the basis of available information, the CCC/USDA believes that one or more third parties operated this facility after termination of the CCC/USDA's lease in 1971. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater has been sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years. The samples are analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 12 monitoring wells and 3 private wells (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE. The scope of the originally approved monitoring has been expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a, 2007c,e). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Little clear pattern of change in the concentrations observed at the individual monitoring points and little plume migration have been observed in previous monitoring events. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon tetrachloride have persistently been detected at monitoring well MW8S, however, along an intermittent tributary to Terrapin Creek. This observation suggests a possible risk of contamination of the surface waters of the creek. In light of these findings, in 2006 the CCC/USDA recommended expansion of the approved monitoring program to include the collection and analysis of surface water samples along Terrapin Creek (Argonne 2007e). At the request of the KDHE (KDHE 2007a), locations for both surface water and shallow sediment sampling were discussed with the KDHE in January 2007. An addendum to the existing monitoring plan and a standard operating procedure (SOP AGEM-15) for sediment sampling were submitted to the KDHE on the basis of these discussions (Argonne 2007a,b). This report presents the results of groundwater, surface water, and sediment sampling performed at Morrill in October 2007, in accord with the monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b) and the addendum to that plan (Argonne 2007a). To supplement these studies, Argonne also sampled natural vegetation along Terrapin Creek in October 2006, April 2007, and July 2007 for analyses for VOCs. The results of the plant tissue analyses are included in this report. The October 2007 groundwater sampling at Morrill represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  8. Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, David. S.

    Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias Department ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially

  9. Tracing luminous and dark matter with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jon Loveday; for the SDSS collaboration

    2001-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize the scientific goals and current status of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, briefly describe the Early Data Release, and discuss some recent scientific results obtained from commissioning data which are apposite to the distribution of luminous and dark matter in the Universe.

  10. Designing and Mining Multi-Terabyte Astronomy Archives: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    will operate a data pump to support sweep searches touching most of the data. The anticipated queries will re management challenges. Keywords Database, archive, data analysis, data mining, astronomy, scaleable, InternetDesigning and Mining Multi-Terabyte Astronomy Archives: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Alexander S

  11. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  12. Final work plan for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas (Figure 1.1). This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Data obtained in this sampling event will be used to (1) evaluate the current status of previously detected contamination at Webber and (2) determine whether the site requires further action. This work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan, approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document should be consulted for complete details of the technical activities proposed at the former CCC/USDA facility in Webber.

  13. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  14. Building Footprints (Shapefile) of University of Kansas, Lawrence Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Data layer geneated with Intention to have basic building dataset for data analysis and generation of maps, for Lawrence Campus of the University of Kansas. Building outlines were digitized using ArcMap in ca. 2007 from aerial photograph to create...

  15. Drinking Water Implications of Cyanobacteria on the Kansas River to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the presence of Blue Green Algae By-products in the river. The data is stimulating further discussion,000 service connections Directly supply 16 cities Treatment capacity of 180 mgd #12;Page 3 Other Utilities products were being transported from Milford Lake to their intakes. Utilities and Kansas Water Office agree

  16. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  17. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  18. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research, and bioavailable P losses in runoff are influenced by a variety of factors. The purpose of this project is to quantify the impact of best management practices on P losses in runoff. The specific objectives are: 1

  19. Imaging Permafrost Velocity Structure Using High Resolution 3D Seismic Tomography K.Ramachandran, The University of Tulsa, Tom Brent, Gilles Bellefleur and Scott Dallimore, Geological Survey of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    .Ramachandran, The University of Tulsa, Tom Brent, Gilles Bellefleur and Scott Dallimore, Geological Survey of Canada, Michael

  20. Geographic Information Systems, Spatial Network Analysis, and Contraceptive Barbara Entwisle; Ronald R. Rindfuss; Stephen J. Walsh; Tom P. Evans; Sara R. Curran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    ; Ronald R. Rindfuss; Stephen J. Walsh; Tom P. Evans; Sara R. Curran Demography, Vol. 34, No. 2. (May, 1997 of social change (Bulatao and Lee 1983). 'Barbara Entwisle, Ronald R. Rindfuss, Stephen J. Walsh, and Tom P J. WALSH, TOM P. EVANS, AND SARA R. CURRAN How does family planning accessibility affect

  1. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in established West Texas carbon dioxide floods. The project is not economic.

  2. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

  3. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Water injection will continue to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

  4. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  5. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas, highlighting the Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database as a source of information for energy-efficient building techniques.

  6. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas, highlighting the Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database as a source of information for energy-efficient building techniques.

  7. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis Re-direct Destination: Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic...

  8. Kansas City Power and Light- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) provides financial incentives for commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are available for...

  9. Surface Energy Balance Measurements Above an Exurban Residential Neighbourhood of Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogun, Ahmed A.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Vezhapparambu, Sajith; Mauder, Matthias; McFadden, Joseph P.; Gallo, Kevin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and energy ?ows within cities and their surrounding areas.energy balance measurements over a new exurban residential area near Kansas City,

  10. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. City of Greensburg SunChips Business Incubator (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed SunChips Business Incubator in Greensburg, Kansas.

  11. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas; High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a summary of how NREL's technical assistance in Greensburg, Kansas, helped the town rebuild green after recovering from a tornado in May 2007.

  12. Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure) (Revised)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave VanderGriend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2003. A water supply well was permitted, drilled, and completed in the shallow, fresh-water, Dakota Sandstone. The pumphouse has been put in place and the long-term injection equipment is being set-up. Although the short-term injectivity test was cut short by power failure following an ice storm, results indicate the well exhibits sufficient injectivity to proceed with the long-term injectivity test, which will start in the beginning of the second quarter. The CO2 Project No.10 and No.12 wells were reworked and the Lansing-Kansas City (LKC) ''C'' interval in both wells isolated. The CO2 Project No.16 well was drilled deeper, cored in the LKC ''C'' and ''G'' zones, and cased to the ''C'' zone and will be perforated and stimulated in the beginning of second quarter. Initial wireline log analysis and examination of the core indicate that the porosity of the ''C'' zone in this location may be lower than in other parts of the pattern by 3-5 porosity units. Log analysis indicates water saturations are near 60% consistent with predicted residual oil saturation to waterflood modeling. Lower porosities may indicate lower permeability may also be present. Core analysis is being conducted and results will be available in the first week of the second quarter. A draft letter agreement has been presented to FLOCO2 Company for supply of CO2 storage and injection pump equipment.

  14. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. MV Energy has received informal notification that GE Capital will approve sale of the portion of the Colliver lease involved in the pilot. Murfin Drilling Company is seeking local small independent partners for the pilot and has received commitment from White Eagle Energy and John O. Farmer Oil Company to date. A Contract was signed between the Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing and Murfin formalizing the KSDOC&H contribution of $88,000 to the pilot project. This money will be used for well rework and testing. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report.

  15. Low-Mass Dwarf Template Spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Bochanski; Andrew A. West; Suzanne L. Hawley; Kevin R. Covey

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present template spectra of low-mass (M0-L0) dwarfs derived from over 4,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. These composite spectra are suitable for use as medium-resolution (R ~ 1,800) radial velocity standards. We report mean spectral properties (molecular bandhead strengths,equivalent widths) and use the templates to investigate the effects of magnetic activity and metallicity on the spectroscopic and photometric properties of low-mass stars.

  16. Data Quality Assessment via Robust Clustering Rong Duan Tom Au Wei Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    and manufacturing processes. For 1 #12;example, although total quality management (TQM) principles and techniquesData Quality Assessment via Robust Clustering Rong Duan Tom Au Wei Jiang AT&T Research Labs to improve the quality of decision making, data quality is long time ignored in many practices so

  17. Cooling laser system for quantum computing with barium-137 ions Tom Chartrand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Boris

    Cooling laser system for quantum computing with barium-137 ions Tom Chartrand Department of Physics University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (Dated: August 29, 2008) The group has made significant progress of a powerful 493 nm laser source for cooling, by the resonant frequency doubling of a 986 nm external cavity

  18. Nearly 20 Years Since Hurricane Iniki by Steven Businger and Tom Schroeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    Nearly 20 Years Since Hurricane Iniki by Steven Businger and Tom Schroeder businger@hawaii.edu, tas@hawaii.edu Professors of Meteorology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa On September 11, 1992 hurricane Iniki scored a direct hit on the island of Kauai. Over a period of only three hours, the category-3 hurricane caused

  19. Indonesia 82 (October 2006) Tom Boellstorff. The Gay Archipelago: Sexuality and Nation in Indonesia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Indonesia 82 (October 2006) Tom Boellstorff. The Gay Archipelago: Sexuality and Nation in Indonesia expression and social enactments of nationhood in postcolonial Indonesia often find themselves, implicitly, too, in the anthropological literature on Indonesia an emphasis on difference has always served

  20. A review of "The Complete Poetry of Robert Herrick" edited by Tom Cain and Ruth Connolly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mardock, James; Rasmussen, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and eric rasmussen, university of nevada. A new Oxford edition of the complete poems of Robert Herrick is long overdue and quite welcome. Tom Cain and Ruth Connolly, two of Herrick’s foremost scholarly champions, have produced a handsome and...

  1. 74 Scientific American, April 2011 Illustration by Tom Whalen Earthquake early-warning networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    earthquake early- warning system that could be extended to all of California. April 2011, Scientific. If an earth- quake early-warning system had existed back then, it could have provided perhaps a 20-second74 Scientific American, April 2011 Illustration by Tom Whalen SEISMOLOGY Earthquake early-warning

  2. Adaptive Evolution of a Stress Response Protein Tom J. Little1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obbard, Darren

    Stress responses classically involve heat shock proteins or molecular chaperones that maintain proteinAdaptive Evolution of a Stress Response Protein Tom J. Little1 *, Lenny Nelson2 , Ted Hupp2 1 of the mammalian stress response gene SEP53, a member of the epidermal differentiation complex fused-gene family

  3. ELECTRONIC TEXTILES FOR IN SITU BIOMECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS Tom Martin*, Thurmon Lockhart, Mark Jones, and Josh Edmison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRONIC TEXTILES FOR IN SITU BIOMECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS Tom Martin*, Thurmon Lockhart, Mark textile (e-textile) system capable of assessing a suite of biomechanical measures. Unlike laboratory- based systems, this system would be worn by a soldier and could be used in a range of environmental

  4. Issues in Comparative Fungal Genomics Tom Hsiang1 and David L. Baillie2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    Issues in Comparative Fungal Genomics Tom Hsiang1 and David L. Baillie2 1 Department. By the middle of 2005, there were almost 300 complete genomes that were publicly accessible. Most of these were archeal or bacterial since prokaryotic genomes are much smaller than eukaryotic genomes. Among eukaryotes

  5. EE527 Standard Operating Procedure: Spin-on-Glass, Surface Level Characterization Tom Christiansen Tami Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    bottle is $725, so it pays to apply glass to several wafers at once!!! #12;EE527 Standard OperatingEE527 Standard Operating Procedure: Spin-on-Glass, Surface Level Characterization Tom Christiansen Tami Erickson FinalProject Standard Operating Procedure: Spin-on-Glass Surface Level Characterization

  6. Energy-aware simulation with DVFS Tom Guerouta,b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calheiros, Rodrigo N.

    Energy-aware simulation with DVFS Tom Gu´erouta,b,c , Thierry Monteila,c , Georges Da Costab are specifically devel- oped for modelling networks and only a few of them simulate energy-efficiency algorithms. This article describes which tools need to be implemented in a simulator in order to compute energy

  7. Energy-aware simulation with DVFS Tom Gurout a,b,c,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Energy-aware simulation with DVFS Tom Guérout a,b,c, , Thierry Monteil a,c , Georges Da Costa b Keywords: Grid computing Cloud computing Simulation Energy-efficiency DVFS a b s t r a c t In recent years, others are specifically developed for modeling networks, but only a few of them simulate energy

  8. REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX 1. A branched polymer of order n in R2 is obtained by plac- ing these disks in the plane in any configuration so at the origin. Branched polymers have been studied in con- nection with molecular chemistry, statistical physics

  9. Rev. of Keaton: The Man Who Wouldn't Lie Down, by Tom Dardis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Stuart

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : No. 41: Janet Lewis by Charles L. Crow; No. 42: Tom Rob bins by Mark Siegel; No. 43: Joaquin Miller by Benjamin S. Lawson; No. 44: Dorothy Johnson by Judy Alter; No. 45: Leslie Marmon Silko by Per Seyersted. KEATON: The Man Who Wouldn't Lie...

  10. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.; Maier, M.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This concludes the sixth quarter that Kansas State University has been under contract to the US Department of Energy and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program to demonstrate electric vehicle technology. The G-Van continues to perform within acceptable limits, although the batteries and the charger have caused some problems. Dave Harris, Chloride, has been working with K-State to correct these problems. It may very well be that the limited mileage (less than 25 miles) can be increased by extending the charge cycle (overcharging) the batteries. Soleq Corp. has failed to deliver contracted vehicles. A dual shaft electric propulsion minivan, built by Eaton Corp. in 1987, will be shipped here. On the infrastructure side, EHV Corp. is developing curbside and home charging stations.

  11. Marketing Communications Plan for Coventry Health Care of Kansas, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Sarah; Kim, Sungtae; Mowder, Alicia; Smith, Carmen; Vaughn, Joshua

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    media from Washburn University, where she was a member of the nation’s second ranked debate team. She will receive her master’s degree in journalism with a concentration in marketing communications from the University of Kansas in May. Carmen... of the importance of screenings and recommended tests if they are overdue. 2. An afterhours HEDIS Push call event each fall to call members who have missed recommended tests or screenings. 3. Automated outreach reminder calls to patients. 4. Print media...

  12. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at the site of a former grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Centralia being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia.

  13. Bryozoan Tabulipora carbonaria in Wreford Megacyclothem (Lower Permian) of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuffey, Roger J.

    1967-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    specimens from different rock types and stratigraphie horizons APPENDIX K. SUITUTIary of numerical data obtained from Tabulipora carbonaria specimens from the four widespread cal- careous shales in Wreford Megacyclo- them APPENDIX L. Summary of numerical... specimens from uppermost part of the Havensville Shale Member collected at localities across Kansas. 71 19. Paleozoogeographic distribution of Tabulipora carbonaria in Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. 72 20. Distribution of Tabulipora...

  14. Suburban Place? Constructing Place in Overland Park, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carey, Daniel

    2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , but instead connect several isolated hubs into a network of residential, commercial, and business zones. This is Overland Park, Kansas. Change the street, highway, and corporation names, however, and this could be a suburb of any major metropolitan area.... In the 1980s, journalist Joel Garreau famously named areas similar to the ones described above, ?Edge Cities.? Garreau uses this term to describe the union of residential, commercial, and office space, because traditionally ?cities? have served all three...

  15. University of Kansas Graduate School theses, 1948-1958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Bessie E.

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    managers with special reference to Kansas. M. A. Pol. Sci. 1948. Allen, William Daniel. Investigations of gas spargers by the air oxidation of sodium sulfite solutions. M, S. Chem. Engin. 1956. Allen, William H., Jr. A.n analysis of school philosophies.... Problems of an interior. M. Fine Arts Draw, and Paint. 1953. Alnutt, John Carl. A first semester senior high school course in American lit erature treated reflectively in the light of historical backgrounds. M. A. Ed. 1948. Alsmiller, Hufard G., Jr...

  16. Evaluation of the Highway Safety Manual Crash Prediction Model for Rural Two-Lane Highway Segments in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubliner, Howard

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    for states other than those the model was developed for. To address this gap the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) commissioned this study to analyze both the accuracy and the practicality of using these crash prediction models on Kansas highways...

  17. Cultures of Dissent: Comparing Populism in Kansas and Texas, 1854-1890

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyworth, Matthew Jerrid

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    in Kansas Territory Written by an Actual Settler,” unpublished essay, (ca. 1856), p. 1 (all quotes), A Twelve Months Practical Life in Kansas Territory Written by an Actual Settler, KSRL. 18 Webb, Information for Kanzas Immigrants, p. 9 (first and third...

  18. Historical Disability Outcomes of Enrollees in the Kansas High Risk Pool: A White Paper presented to CMS by the Kansas DMIE Project January, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper reports the historical rates of disability outcomes (e.g., transition to Social Security disability status) for people enrolled in Kansas' state high-risk health insurance pool.

  19. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2001 to December 31, 2001. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre) CO{sub 2} demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. Testing of present Colliver lease injection water on Lansing-Kansas City (L-KC) oomoldic rock indicates that injection brine must be filtered to < {approx}3-5 um and <15 um to prevent plugging of rocks with permeability as low as 1 md (millidarcy; 0.001 um2) and 10 md (0.01 um2), respectively. Pressure build-up testing on the Carter-Colliver No.7 well is interpreted to indicate the L-KC reservoir surrounding this well is {approx}9 ft (2.7 m) thick having an average effective water permeability of 25-35 md (0.025-0.035 um2) that is connected to the wellbore by either a high permeability fracture, bed, or region with low skin. Reservoir simulation evaluation of gridcell size effect on model oil recovery prediction indicates that, based on the model prediction of distribution of produced oil and CO{sub 2} volumes, oil recovery is strongly influenced by gravity segregation of CO{sub 2} into the upper higher permeability layers and indicates the strong control that vertical permeability and permeability barriers between depositional flood cycles exert on the CO{sub 2} flooding process. Simulations were performed on modifications of the 60-acre, two-injector pattern to evaluate oil recovery using other large-scale patterns. Simulations indicated that several 73-acre patterns with a single injector located near the Colliver No.7 could provide improved economics without increasing the amount of CO{sub 2} injected. The US Energy Partners ethanol plant in Russell, KS began operations in October ahead of schedule.

  20. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. The pilot water injection plant became operational 4/18/03 and began long-term injection in the CO2I No.1 on 4/23/03. The CO2I No.1 exhibits sufficient injectivity for pilot requirements with average absolute permeability surrounding this well equal to {approx}85 millidarcies. Response to injection in the CO2I No.1 has established that conductivity between CO2I No.1 and CO2 No.12, No.10, No.18 and TB Carter No.5 is sufficient for the demonstration. Workovers of the CO2 No.16 and CO2 No.13 were completed in April and May, respectively. Pressure response indicates No.16 communicates with the flood pattern area but core, swab-test, and pressure response data indicate permeability surrounding No.16 is not adequate to maintain the production rates needed to support the original pattern as the well is presently completed. Decisions concerning possible further testing and stimulation have been postponed until after testing of the No.13 is complete. Production rates for the No.13 are consistent with a surrounding reservoir average absolute permeability of {approx}80 md. However, pressure and rate tests results, partially due to the nature of the testing conducted to date, have not confirmed the nature of the CO2I No.1-CO2 No.13 conductivity. A build-up test and conductivity test are planned to begin the first weeks of the next quarter to obtain reservoir properties data and establish the connectivity and conductivity between CO2 I-1 and CO2 No.13. A new geomodel of the pattern area has been developed based on core from No.16 and the new wireline logs from the No.10, No.12, No.16, and No.13. The new geomodel is currently being incorporated into the basic calculations of reservoir volume and flood design and predicted response as well as the reservoir simulators. Murfin signed a letter agreement with FLOCO2 of Odessa, TX for supply of CO2 storage and injection equipment. Technology transfer activities have included presentations to the Environmental Protection Agency, Prof. Accountants Soc. of KS, Am. Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists, and a US Congressional aide staff member. The Associated Press also released a story concerning the project that was picked up by many Kansas newspapers.

  1. Final report : site reclassification investigation for Courtland, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Dennis, C. B.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility in Courtland, Kansas. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain industry to preserve stored grain. In 1999, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) identified the former CCC/USDA operation as the likely source of carbon tetrachloride found in groundwater east of the former CCC/USDA facility in Courtland. Sampling by the KDHE in April 1998 had found carbon tetrachloride in the Garman residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 2.1 {micro}g/L and in the Hoard residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 0.5 {micro}g/L. Subsequent soil and groundwater sampling by the KDHE at the former CCC/USDA facility found no indication of a continuing source, and subsequent sampling of the affected wells showed generally declining contaminant levels. At the request of the KDHE and the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory prepared a Work Plan for Groundwater Sampling for Potential Site Reclassification, Courtland, Kansas (Argonne 2004). The objective of the proposed work was to conduct a single groundwater monitoring event and collect information necessary to update the status of the previously detected groundwater contamination, in support of an evaluation of appropriate actions for reclassification of the status of this site from active to resolved, under the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA). The reclassification would be in accordance with the KDHE's Reclassification Plan (Policy No. BERRS-024, online at http://www.kdhe.state.ks.us/pdf/ber/scp/reclass.pdf). The KDHE approved the Work Plan on August 8, 2005. Sampling was conducted on September 7, 2005.

  2. Magnetic white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Gaensicke; F. Euchner; S. Jordan

    2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have identified 7 new magnetic DA white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our selection strategy has also recovered all the previously known magnetic white dwarfs contained in the SDSS EDR, KUV03292+0035 and HE0330-0002. Analysing the SDSS fibre spectroscopy of the magnetic DA white dwarfs with our state-of-the-art model spectra, we find dipole field strengths 1.5<=B_d<=63MG and effective temperatures 8500<=Teff<=39000K. As a conservative estimate, we expect that the complete SDSS will increase the number of known magnetic white dwarfs by a factor 3.

  3. Automated Classification of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stellar Spectra using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdi Bazarghan; Ranjan Gupta

    2008-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated techniques have been developed to automate the process of classification of objects or their analysis. The large datasets provided by upcoming spectroscopic surveys with dedicated telescopes urges scientists to use these automated techniques for analysis of such large datasets which are now available to the community. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of such surveys releasing massive datasets. We use Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) for automatic classification of about 5000 SDSS spectra into 158 spectral type of a reference library ranging from O type to M type stars.

  4. Galaxy Types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Using Supervised Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas M Ball; Jon Loveday; Masataka Fukugita; Osamu Nakamura; Sadanori Okamura; Jon Brinkmann; Robert J Brunner

    2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Supervised artificial neural networks are used to predict useful properties of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, in this instance morphological classifications, spectral types and redshifts. By giving the trained networks unseen data, it is found that correlations between predicted and actual properties are around 0.9 with rms errors of order ten per cent. Thus, given a representative training set, these properties may be reliably estimated for galaxies in the survey for which there are no spectra and without human intervention.

  5. Relationships between geology and geothermal gradients in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavnes, S.A.; Steeples, D.W.; Ruscetta, C.A. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom hole temperature values from existing oil and gas wells and thermal logging data from geothermal wells are used to determine the factors responsible for geographic variation in the subsurface temperature distribution in Kansas. Geothermal gradient data range from 25/sup 0/C/km to 55/sup 0/C/km in the upper 300 m. The geologic factors proposed to explain this variation are: (1) topography of the crystalline basement surface; (2) variation in rates of heat production in the crystalline basement; (3) variation in thermal conductivity in the sedimentary section; and (4) possible convection upward and eastward from the Denver-Julesberg Basin. (MJF)

  6. A History of the Administration on Education in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Emmet Leslie

    1914-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Centennial Celebration, 1S76. Publications Kansas Historical Society, Vol. I, p. 86. 3. Council Journal, 1655, p. lS. 4. Laws lS55» 6k 1441 Art. IV, #1. 5. Ibid, #2. 6. Ib. ## 2, 7 . Ib. # 3. 8. Ib. #5. 9. Ib. $ 6 10. Act Feb. 20, 1S57. 11. Mostly... Education. 14. Laws 4th Territorial Session, 1858, Ch. VIII., 1. 15. IK # 40, 8 and 9. 16. Ib. Ch. LXXI, #2. 17 . Ib. Ch. VIII, # 71- 18. Ib. # 17 . 19. B>. # 70. 20. Ib. # 40. The district was considered organized upon the acceptance of two /of...

  7. Indian Reservations in Kansas and the Extinguishment of Their Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Annie Heloise

    1900-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1802.*f Her construction of that document was not consistent with the facts in the case; for the federal government had not promised to expel the In­ dians from Georgia, but only to extinguish their title within the reserved limits of the state " a...^ C i^J j ) INDIAN RESERVATIONS IN KANSAS ANI^EHE EXTINGUISHMENT OF THEIR TITLE. Thesis prepared in partial fulfilment of the requirement of the University of Kanowwfey ^ w degree of master of arts, by A N N A H B L O I S B A B E L , * of Salina...

  8. EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

  9. Logan County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpColorado:Kansas:

  10. Lyon County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: Energy ResourcesLyon County, Iowa: EnergyKansas:

  11. Colorado Natural Gas Processed in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecadeDecadeYear(MillionKansas

  12. FTCP Site Specific Information - Kansas City | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAMDepartment ofEnergy Chief ofKansas City

  13. Bourbon County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBoston Heights, Ohio:Boulevard Gardens,Kansas: Energy

  14. Brown County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and InnovativeBrookmont, Maryland:Broome County,Kansas: Energy

  15. Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 |JulianProject PhaseKansas

  16. Wallace County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpage JumpWaikane,(Redirected fromWallace County, Kansas:

  17. Chautauqua County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEICharlotteNorthChautauqua County, Kansas:

  18. Cheyenne County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric SurveyChelanVermont: EnergyView, Maryland:Kansas: Energy

  19. City of Burlingame, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity of Aplington, IowaCity ofBurlingame, Kansas

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration Kansas City Field Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i- DNANuclearKansas

  1. Sheridan County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York: EnergySumoncle Solar Energy IndustrialSherburneKansas:

  2. Silver Lake, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbH JumpSilicium de ProvenceEnergyKansas:

  3. Jackson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar EnergyEnergyKansas: Energy Resources Jump to:

  4. Johnson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind FarmJeffersonJiminy PeakKansas: Energy

  5. Haskell County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville, New York:Haskell County, Kansas:

  6. City of Troy, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCity of Spencer,City ofTroy, Kansas (Utility

  7. City of Waterville, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCity of Spencer,CityWaterville, Kansas (Utility

  8. City of Wathena, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCity of Spencer,CityWaterville, Kansas

  9. City of Winfield, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCity ofInformation CityCity of Winfield, Kansas

  10. Woodson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy ResourcesWoods County, Oklahoma:Woodson County, Kansas:

  11. Overland Park, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachita ElectricOpen EnergyKansas:

  12. Pawnee County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian,Parle Biscuits PvtPaw Paw, Illinois: EnergyPawlet,Kansas:

  13. Phillips County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonika JumpPhilipstown, NewKansas: Energy

  14. Pretty Prairie, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister Area (DOEPrairie, Kansas: Energy

  15. City of Anthony, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City of Ames, Iowa (UtilityAnthony, Kansas

  16. City of Attica, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City of Ames, IowaAshland, OregonAttica, Kansas

  17. City of Coffeyville, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City ofBlueChappell,City of Coffeyville, Kansas

  18. City of Herndon, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCityCity ofCity ofHerndon, Kansas

  19. City of Johnson, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCity ofCity of Johnson, Kansas (Utility

  20. City of Kingman, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCity ofCity ofCity of Kingman, Kansas

  1. City of Lakin, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCity ofCity ofCityLakin, Kansas

  2. City of Meade, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban TransportMartinsville, VirginiaMeade, Kansas (Utility

  3. City of Morrill, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban TransportMartinsville,Minidoka, IdahoCityMorrill, Kansas

  4. City of Robinson, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer, IdahoCity ofRedRobinson, Kansas

  5. Gove County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to:

  6. Graham County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas:Graham County, Arizona:

  7. Gray County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratings Inc JumpGravelKansas:

  8. Greeley County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol JumpKansas: Energy

  9. Greenwood County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa:Greenport,Connecticut: EnergyKansas:

  10. Hamilton County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersvilleHallandale Beach,Indiana: EnergyKansas: Energy

  11. Stanton County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt. Francis(Redirected from Stanford, CA)Kansas: Energy

  12. Stevens County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt.Steep Gradient FlumeEnergyStettin,WintersKansas:

  13. Edwards County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois:Edinburgh University aka WaveKansas: Energy Resources

  14. Oaklawn-Sunview, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,and FeesOaklawn-Sunview, Kansas: Energy

  15. McPherson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°, -88.864698° Show MapMcMinnMcNary, Arizona:Kansas:

  16. Meade County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°, -88.864698° ShowMeade County, Kansas: Energy

  17. Mitchell County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: Energy ResourcesMitchell County, Georgia:Kansas:

  18. Kansas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionalsResearchIdahoKansas Regions National Science

  19. Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC (MKEC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers Inc Jump to: navigation,Mid-Kansas

  20. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Processed in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation, ProvedProcessed (Million Cubic Feet) TexasCubicKansas

  1. Barton County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIMBarnard,Barrow County,Kansas: Energy Resources Jump

  2. Garden Plain, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: Energy ResourcesGang Mills,Plain, Kansas: Energy

  3. Valley Center, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies andVacant Jump to:ValeValleBrook,Kansas:

  4. City of Glen Elder, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity ofInformation CityIowaCityGlen Elder, Kansas

  5. City of Haven, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity ofInformationHarmony, MinnesotaHaven, Kansas

  6. City of Iuka, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity ofInformationHarmony,CityCityIuka, Kansas

  7. City of Marion, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

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  8. Clark County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  9. Clay County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  11. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; An, Deokkeun; /Ewha Women's U., Seoul; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Michigan State U.; Berlind, Andreas A.; /Vanderbilt U.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; /Apache Point Observ.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  12. Basement rift control on oil production in eastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, J.B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved understanding of the central North American rift system (CNARS) offers a new interpretation of the basement structure in certain parts of the Mid-Continent. In eastern Kansas, basement structure can be shown to control oil production from some producing fields. Structural control includes rotated blocks along faults created by horst and graben tectonics typically associated with rift zones. A distinctive gravity signature, the Mid-Continent geophysical anomaly (MGA) is related directly to the CNARS and provides good data for interpretation of the basement structure. Some oil fields can be correlated directly with gravity-interpreted basement structure. Aeromagnetic and Landsat information, combined with the gravity data, further define exploration targets along the general trend of basement features. Migration of thermally matured hydrocarbons into pre-Pennsylvanian, rift generated traps in the ancestral north Kansas basin is postulated. The Nemaha ridge subsequently divided that basin into two smaller basins, the present Salina and Forest City basins. Several exploration targets could exist in this area, with the Arbuckle, Simpson, and Viola units being primary targets. The source of hydrocarbons also may lie in the deep but distant Anadorko basin. An additional totally untested hydrocarbons potential exists in the deep Precambrian/Cambrian sedimentary subbasins created along the flanks of the CNARS. Recent data points to sedimentary columns with depths of approximately 15,000 ft (4500 m) which might be hosts to gas reserves similar to the Rome trough potential of the Appalachian region.

  13. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000000 (0000) Printed 14 October 2009 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Cosmological Constraints from the Clustering of the Sloan Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skibba, Ramin A.

    .2) Cosmological Constraints from the Clustering of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 Luminous Red Galaxies Beth A derived from a sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Seventh Data Re

  14. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. Assessment of the demonstration site has defined many aspects of the reservoir. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. Further analysis of the pilot site by the partners has indicated that a staged demonstration is considered optimal. A phased approach to implementation of the demonstration is proposed to reduce the risk of uncertainties as to whether the reservoir has basic properties (connectivity and ability to pressure-up) conducive to a meaningful CO2 flood demonstration. The proposed plan is to flood a 10+-acre pattern. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale ({approx}60-acre) demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. In general, the following significant modifications to the original Statement of Work are proposed: (1) The proposed plan would extend the period of Budget Period 1 to May 7, 2003. (2) Redefine the period of Budget Period 2 from 3/7/01-3/7/05 to 5/7/03-3/7/08. (3) Redefine the period of Budget Period 3 from 3/7/05-3/7/06 to 3/7/08-3/7/09. (4) To allow initial verification of the viability of the process before proceeding into the flood demonstration, move activities involved with preparing wells in the flood pattern (Task 5.1), repressurizing the pattern (Task 5.2), and constructing surface facilities (Task 5.3) from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1. (5) Allow US Energy Partners (USEP) to be a supplier of carbon dioxide from the ethanol plant in Russell, Kansas. (6) Change the pilot flood pattern, including the number and location of wells involved in the pilot. (7) Expenses are shifted from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1 to cover costs of additional reservoir characterization. All modified activities and tasks would maintain the existing required industry match of 55% in Budget Period 1, 65% in Budget Period 2, and 90% in Budget Period 3. Carbon dioxide supplied by the USEP ethanol facility would be valued such that the total cost of CO2 delivered to the demonstration site injection wellhead would not exceed the $3.00/MCF cost of supplying CO2 from Guymon, OK. Total cost of the modified project is $4,415,300 compared with $5,388,064 in the original project. The modified project would require no additional funding from US DOE.

  15. The look of the fair : Kansas county fairscapes, 1854-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambler, Cathy J.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE LOOK OF THE FAIR: KANSAS COUNTY F AIRSCAPES, 1854-1994 Volume 2 by Cathy J. Ambler iff B. S., University of Kansas, 1969 M. A., University of Kansas, 1990 Submitted to the Department of American Studies and the Faculty of the Graduate... Fairs Figure 101. Transitional Era Fairs. 2 Figure 102. Transitional Building / Greeley County 4-H, c. 1938. Photo by author. ^Figure 101 gives the types of fairs held during the transitional period. Figure 102 is an example of a transitional era...

  16. Kansas City Board of Public Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kansas City Board of Public Utilities provides incentives for commercial customers to install, or upgrade to, energy efficiency equipment in new and existing facilities.Rebates are available...

  17. Kansas City Power and Light- ENERGY STAR New Homes Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers towards the cost of an ENERGY STAR Home Energy Assessment and a portion of the installed efficiency improvements....

  18. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency Improvements in Oil Production in Kansas: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbert, R. I.; King, J. E.

    In 1993 investigators from the Center for Energy Studies at Wichita State University (WSU) and Meridian Corporation in Overland Park, Kansas began a study to investigate whether there were any technical modifications and/or improvements that could...

  19. THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD FUNCTIONALITIES IN THE STATE OF KANSAS WITH REGARD TO NURSING PRACTICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menninger-Corder, Mary Lynn

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to identify the electronic health record functionalities of acute care hospitals in the state of Kansas with regard to nursing practice. From the perspective of the Chief Nursing Officer, what ...

  20. Reconstituting Lives: Somali Women's Efforts to Reformulate Household and Community Values in Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippi-Franz, Melissa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research addresses what Somali women living in Kansas City, Missouri do to assist their households and communities to come to terms with the consequences of forced migration. Women's contributions to wellbeing are found ...

  1. Out of the Rubble and Towards a Sustainable Future: The “Greening” of Greensburg, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stacey Swearingen

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a devastating tornado there in 2007, the tiny city of Greensburg, Kansas has engaged in a sustainability-oriented recovery process through which it hopes to serve as a model for other communities planning for a ...

  2. THE CHIMERA OF KANSAS: AN EXPLORATION OF PLACE, POLITICS, AND CULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Henry Alexander

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation first examines the role of geography in Kansas state politics, focusing on the years 2005 to 2008. A "spatial dialectics" is seen in the politics and policy-making process. This insight drives a ...

  3. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent.

  4. Interleaver Design for Turbo Codes H. R. Sadjadpour, N. J. A. Sloane, M. Salehi, and G. Nebe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane, Neil J. A.

    1 Interleaver Design for Turbo Codes H. R. Sadjadpour, N. J. A. Sloane, M. Salehi, and G. Nebe H DRAFT #12; 2 Abstract The performance of a Turbo code with short block length depends critically corresponding to its parity bits. This paper describes a new interleaver design for Turbo codes with short block

  5. Interleaver Design for Turbo Codes H. R. Sadjadpour, N. J. A. Sloane, M. Salehi, and G. Nebe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane, Neil J. A.

    1 Interleaver Design for Turbo Codes H. R. Sadjadpour, N. J. A. Sloane, M. Salehi, and G. Nebe H DRAFT #12;2 Abstract The performance of a Turbo code with short block length depends critically corresponding to its parity bits. This paper describes a new interleaver design for Turbo codes with short block

  6. Revised technical action plan at former Commodity Credit Corporation grain storage sites in Nebraska and Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA/CCC) to provide an outline for a multiyear plan for technical investigations at sites in Kansas and Nebraska that have been identified as having groundwater contamination. Carbon tetrachloride is the primary contaminant of concern at sites in Nebraska and Kansas where former USDA/CCC grain storage facilities were located.

  7. A Library for Engineering Education: Frank O. Marvin and the University of Kansas, 1875-1915

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neeley, James D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    notable colleagues at Kansas were advocates of the seminar method. In 1887 the electrical engineering program was begun under Lucien I. Blake, who had studied physics at the University of Berlin. He was ambitious and quickly added new courses, lectured... and recognition. At Kansas, the more important factors were those magnified by Marvin’s personal associations: the standard set by scientist colleagues Lucien I. Blake and Erasmus Haworth, the competition with other schools led by chancellor Frank Strong...

  8. Environment of deposition of the Pennsylvanian Bartlesville Sandstone, Labette County, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles Truman Lars

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were available for study. Published reports on the Bartlesville Sandstone in Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma (Bass, 1936, Howe, 1956j Weirich, 1953; Hayes, 1963; Pharos, 1969; Visher, Saitta B. and Phares, 1971) provided additional information..., with the Chautauqua Arch forming a connection between the two uplifts (Figure 2). By Late Devonian time the Chautaugua Arch was no longer active, Eastern Kansas was divided by the Bourbon Arch into the Forest City and Cherokee Basins in Late Mississippian time...

  9. Pavement Through the Prairie, Wheels in the Wetlands: The battle over a road in Lawrence, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiman, Kelly

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Haskell-Baker Wetlands and the South Lawrence Trafficway." Genuine Kansas. No date. http://www.genuinekansas.com/history_baker_w etlands_controversy_timeline_kansas.htm 113 contemporaneous with the initial release of the Draft Environmental Impact...." Environmental History. (2010) 15 (2): 194. that recognized the environment as a critical national issue, historian Ann Vileisis argues, "... citizen activists in their communities dealt with broad choices facing the society at large: to embrace boundless...

  10. Two extremely metal-poor emission-line galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. I. Izotov; P. Papaderos; N. G. Guseva; K. J. Fricke; T. X. Thuan

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopic observations with the 3.6m ESO telescope of two emission-line galaxies, J2104-0035 and J0113+0052, selected from the Data Release 4 (DR4) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From our data we determine the oxygen abundance of these systems to be respectively 12+logO/H = 7.26+/-0.03 and 7.17+/-0.09, making them the two most metal-deficient galaxies found thus far in the SDSS and placing them among the five most metal-deficient emission-line galaxies ever discovered. Their oxygen abundances are close to those of the two most metal-deficient emission-line galaxies known, SBS0335-052W with 12+logO/H = 7.12+/-0.03 and I Zw 18 with 12+logO/H = 7.17+/-0.01.

  11. A Flight Through the Universe, by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel Aragon; Mark Subbarao

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This animated flight through the universe was made by Miguel Aragon of Johns Hopkins University with Mark Subbarao of the Adler Planetarium and Alex Szalay of Johns Hopkins. There are close to 400,000 galaxies in the animation, with images of the actual galaxies in these positions (or in some cases their near cousins in type) derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. Vast as this slice of the universe seems, its most distant reach is to redshift 0.1, corresponding to roughly 1.3 billion light years from Earth. SDSS Data Release 9 from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), led by Berkeley Lab scientists, includes spectroscopic data for well over half a million galaxies at redshifts up to 0.8 -- roughly 7 billion light years distant -- and over a hundred thousand quasars to redshift 3.0 and beyond.

  12. Mapping the Heavens: Probing Cosmology with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frieman, Josh (University of Chicago) [University of Chicago

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk will provide an overview of results from the on-going Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the most ambitious mapping of the Universe yet undertaken, focusing on those with implications for cosmology. It will include a virtual fly-through of the survey that reveals the 3-dimensional large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution. Recent measurements of this large-scale structure, in combination with observations of the cosmic microwave background, have provided independent evidence for a Universe dominated by dark matter and dark energy as well as insights into how galaxies and larger-scale structures formed. I will also describe early results from the SDSS Supernova Survey, which aims to provide more precise constraints on the nature of dark energy. Future planned surveys from the ground and from space will build on these foundations to probe the history of the cosmic expansion--and thereby the dark energy--with even greater precision.

  13. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

  16. Kansas City`s Union Station redevelopment opportunity -- Environmental challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, M.G. [Black and Veatch Waste Science, Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Scott, A. [Union Station Assistance Corp., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Kansas City`s Union Station, located at the center of a 1.7 million metropolitan population, is the second largest train station in the United States. The Station ceased to operate as a train station in 1983 and has since been falling into an increasing state of disrepair. This paper provides an insight into ``brownfield`` redevelopment and renovation for adaptive reuse of major turn of the century facilities such as Union Station. Substantial assessment and investigation activities have been conducted at Union Station for compliance and corrective action under RCRA, TSCA, and associated state regulations encompassing remediation estimated at more than $3 million. Recognized environmental conditions identified at Union Station included potential underground storage tanks; solid wastes, special wastes, and potentially hazardous wastes located inside the building; free liquids in sumps and elevator pits; asbestos-containing materials; lead-based paint; and potential for soil contamination on the surrounding property.

  17. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tom Walsh & Co., Portland, OR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |New TechnologyNelsonWithTom Walsh & Co.

  18. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  19. 2014; doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a016725Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol Tom Kirchhausen, David Owen and Stephen C. Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2014; doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a016725Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol Tom Kirchhausen, David Owen and Stephen C. Harrison Membrane Traffic Molecular Structure, Function, and Dynamics of Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Traffic Molecular Structure, Function, and Dynamics of Harrison Tom Kirchhausen, David Owen

  20. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town- Green? April 2009 (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas, highlighting the Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database as a source of information for energy-efficient building techniques.

  1. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas in 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Everest, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 300) located in the southeast corner of Brown County, in the northeastern corner of Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination in groundwater at Everest was initially identified in 1997 as a result of testing performed under the Commodity Credit Corporation/U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) private well sampling program conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The KDHE collected samples from seven private wells in and near Everest. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were found in only one of the wells, the Donnie Nigh domestic well (owned at that time by Tim Gale), approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were detected at 121 {mu}g/L and 4 {mu}g/L, respectively. Nitrate was found at 12.62 mg/L. The USDA subsequently connected the Nigh residence to the Everest public water supply system. The findings of the 2011 monitoring at Everest support the following conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually during annual monitoring in 2009-2011 (and through the use of automatic recorders in 2002-2010) have consistently indicated an initial direction of groundwater flow from the former CCC/USDA facility to the north-northwest and toward the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) At most of the monitored locations, carbon tetrachloride concentrations decreased in April 2011 relative to 2010 results. Noteworthy decreases of > 50% occurred at locations MW4, MW60, and MW88, in the most concentrated part of the plume. (3) Comparison of accumulated data demonstrates that the area of the carbon tetrachloride plume with concentrations > 200 {mu}g/L has decreased markedly over time and suggests a generally decreasing trend in contaminant levels. (4) The trace increases in carbon tetrachloride concentrations observed in 2010 at locations SB63 and SB64 were notable because of the locations proximity to the downgradient intermittent creek. However, these increases were not confirmed in sampling in 2011. (5) The results of the April 2011 monitoring event continue to support the interpretation, made during the 9-yr observation period from 2001 to 2010, that the migration rate for contamination in groundwater toward the intermittent creek is very slow. (6) No carbon tetrachloride was detected in five samples of surface water collected from the intermittent creek west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property, or in tree branch tissue samples collected at locations along the banks of the creek. These observations indicate that the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified at Everest has, to date, not impacted the surface waters of the intermittent creek.

  2. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining what future CCC/USDA actions may be necessary, with the ultimate goal of achieving classification of the Sylvan Grove site at no further action status. The proposed activities are to be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA concerning environmental site characterization and remediation at former grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. That document should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove.

  3. Annual report of monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area's topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes of the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. The findings of the monitoring events at Barnes in 2011 continued to support the following previous conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders have consistently indicated that the flow direction is strongly influenced by pumping of the public water supply wells. The results have demonstrated an apparent groundwater flow direction to the northeast when the public wells are not pumping and a northwesterly groundwater flow trend when the public wells are pumping. (2) Evaluation of manual water level measurements and carbon tetrachloride concentrations continues to suggest that three vertically distinguishable aquifer zones are present at Barnes: shallow, intermediate, and deep (Table 4.1). The highest concentration of carbon tetrachloride occurs in the intermediate zone, in wells near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Lower concentrations have been detected in the deep aquifer zone (where the public water supply wells are screened), and no carbon tetrachloride has been detected in the shallow zone. (3) The conceptual model of the groundwater flow system at Barnes, as postulated on the basis of the accumulated results, suggests that the observed vertical hydraulic gradients and higher carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the intermediate zone might reflect generally lower permeability and hence less effective groundwater and contaminant migration in the intermediate zone than in the deep aquifer zone. (4) As it has since March 2008, intermediate-zone well MW10S, in the eastern portion of the former CCC/USDA facility, contained the highest concentrations of carbon tetrachloride. (5) Overall, the lateral distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in 2011 is similar to the distribution during previous sampling events. The accumulated data, including a trend analysis conducted in 2009, indicate stable contaminant concentrations, with no imminent impact to the public wells.

  4. REMEMBERING TOM PHELAN ~ THE FUTURE OF ENERGY ~ RECREATING A CROSS-COUNTRY JOURNEY Alumni Magazine~Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    REMEMBERING TOM PHELAN ~ THE FUTURE OF ENERGY ~ RECREATING A CROSS-COUNTRY JOURNEY Alumni Magazine was renovated extensively in the 1990s, earning the 1996 Historical Education Building Award from and organizations. 22 The Future of Energy As calls for energy independence increase, Rensselaer alumni explore

  5. Ecosystem Informatics Strategic Initiative Final Report 2009 Julia Jones, Geosciences; Tom Dietterich, Computer Science; Enrique Thomann, Mathematics; Ed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Ecosystem Informatics Strategic Initiative Final Report 2009 Julia Jones, Geosciences; Tom over the last five years. The Ecosystem Informatics program at Oregon State University has established a presence here at the University and on a global scale. The OSU Ecosystem Informatics IGERT Program (with

  6. EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

  7. Developing Alternative Markets for peach cull fruit --A new Michigan State University GREEEN project -Bill Shane and Tom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Alternative Markets for peach cull fruit -- A new Michigan State University GREEEN project - Bill Shane and Tom Zabadal, Michigan State University Michigan's fresh market peach crop Michigan peaches to make wine and brandy but the high costs of removing pits by hand have hampered this use

  8. Mitochondrial DNA evolution in the Anaxyrus boreas species group Anna M. Goebel a,b,*, Tom A. Ranker c,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Richard

    Mitochondrial DNA evolution in the Anaxyrus boreas species group Anna M. Goebel a,b,*, Tom A. Ranker c,1 , Paul Stephen Corn d , Richard G. Olmstead e,2 a University of Colorado Museum of Natural not recognized by taxonomy (Graybeal, 1993; Shaffer et al., 2000; Stephens, 2001; Masta et al., 2002; Smith

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 7, including the Legacy Survey

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.

  10. Structural load inventory database for the Kansas City federal complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, P.S.; Johnson, M.W.; Nakaki, D.K. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Lynch, D.T.; Drury, M.A. [AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Division

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural load inventory database (LID) has been developed to support configuration management at the DOE Kansas City Plant (KCP). The objective of the LID is to record loads supported by the plant structures and to provide rapid assessments of the impact of future facility modifications on structural adequacy. Development of the LID was initiated for the KCP`s Main Manufacturing Building. Field walkdowns were performed to determine all significant loads supported by the structure, including the weight of piping, service equipment, etc. These loads were compiled in the LID. Structural analyses for natural phenomena hazards were performed in accordance with UCRL-15910. Software to calculate demands on the structural members due to gravity loads, total demands including both gravity and seismic loads, and structural member demand-to-capacity ratios were also developed and integrated into the LID. Operation of the LID is menu-driven. The LID user has options to review and print existing loads and corresponding demand-to-capacity ratios, and to update the supported loads and demand-to-capacity ratios for any future facility modifications.

  11. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  12. Multi-wavelength study of 14000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38-0.92 micron and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1-22 micron. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. We derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. The luminosities and stellar masses range within the sample over ~5 orders of magnitude, thereby linking low-mass and low-luminosity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies to luminous galaxies, which are similar to high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). The lumi...

  13. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7 SPECTROSCOPIC M DWARF CATALOG. I. DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Andrew A.; Morgan, Dylan P.; Andersen, Jan Marie; Covey, Kevin R.; Schluns, Kyle; Jones, David O. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Bochanski, John J.; Pineda, J. Sebastian [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Bell, Keaton J.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bernat, David; Muirhead, Philip; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Schlawin, Everett [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 610 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gooding, Mary [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Wells College, 170 Main Street, Aurora, NY 13026 (United States); Dhital, Saurav, E-mail: aawest@bu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6301 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectroscopic catalog of 70,841 visually inspected M dwarfs from the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For each spectrum, we provide measurements of the spectral type, a number of molecular band heads, and the H{alpha}, H{beta}, H{gamma}, H{delta}, and Ca II K emission lines. In addition, we calculate the metallicity-sensitive parameter {zeta} and identify a relationship between {zeta} and the g - r and r - z colors of M dwarfs. We assess the precision of our spectral types (which were assigned by individual examination), review the bulk attributes of the sample, and examine the magnetic activity properties of M dwarfs, in particular those traced by the higher order Balmer transitions. Our catalog is cross-matched to Two Micron All Sky Survey infrared data, and contains photometric distances for each star. Finally, we identify eight new late-type M dwarfs that are possibly within 25 pc of the Sun. Future studies will use these data to thoroughly examine magnetic activity and kinematics in late-type M dwarfs and examine the chemical and dynamical history of the local Milky Way.

  14. Bright Lyman Break Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Weinberg, D H; Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Weinberg, David H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of six compact, starburst galaxies with redshifts 2.3 < z < 2.8 and r-band magnitudes 19.8-20.5 in the Quasar Catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release (SDSS DR1). The SDSS spectra of these objects resemble the composite spectrum of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z \\approx 3, but the galaxies are 4-5 magnitudes brighter than an ``L*'' LBG and 2-3 magnitudes brighter than the most luminous objects in typical LBG spectroscopic surveys. Star formation rates inferred from the UV continuum luminosities are about 300-1000 M_sun yr^-1 with no correction for dust extinction. Such rates are similar to those inferred for ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but in these UV-bright objects the star formation is evidently not obscured by high dust column densities. The SDSS images show no evidence of multiple imaging or foreground lensing structures, but amplification by gravitational lensing (as in the case of MS 1512-cB58) cannot be ruled out with the present data. Assuming tha...

  15. Galaxy Zoo : Morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan van den Berg

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting the general public to visually inspect and classify these galaxies via the internet. The project has obtained more than 40,000,000 individual classifications made by ~100,000 participants. We discuss the motivation and strategy for this project, and detail how the classifications were performed and processed. We find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified by professional astronomers, thus demonstrating that our data provides a robust morphological catalogue. Obtaining morphologies by direct visual inspection avoids introducing biases associated with proxies for morphology such as colour, concentration or structual parameters. In addition, this catalogue can be used to directly compare SDSS morphologies with older data sets. The colour--magnitude diagrams for each morphological class are shown, and we illustrate how these distributions differ from those inferred using colour alone as a proxy for morphology.

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  17. Discovery of Eight z ~ 6 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Overlap Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; Cai, Zheng; Clement, Benjamin; Wang, Ran; Fan, Zhou

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of eight quasars at z~6 identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) overlap regions. Individual SDSS imaging runs have some overlap with each other, leading to repeat observations over an area spanning >4000 deg^2 (more than 1/4 of the total footprint). These overlap regions provide a unique dataset that allows us to select high-redshift quasars more than 0.5 mag fainter in the z band than those found with the SDSS single-epoch data. Our quasar candidates were first selected as i-band dropout objects in the SDSS imaging database. We then carried out a series of follow-up observations in the optical and near-IR to improve photometry, remove contaminants, and identify quasars. The eight quasars reported here were discovered in a pilot study utilizing the overlap regions at high galactic latitude (|b|>30 deg). These quasars span a redshift range of 5.86

  18. Spectroscopic Target Selection for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: The Luminous Red Galaxy Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Eisenstein; J. Annis; J. E. Gunn; A. S. Szalay; A. J. Connolly; R. C. Nichol; N. A. Bahcall; M. Bernardi; S. Burles; F. J. Castander; M. Fukugita; D. W. Hogg; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; R. H. Lupton; V. Narayanan; M. Postman; D. E. Riechart; M. Richmond; D. P. Schneider; D. J. Schlegel; M. A. Strauss; M. SubbaRao; D. L. Tucker; D. Vanden Berk; M. S. Vogeley; D. H. Weinberg; B. Yanny

    2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the target selection and resulting properties of a spectroscopic sample of luminous, red galaxies (LRG) from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These galaxies are selected on the basis of color and magnitude to yield a sample of luminous, intrinsically red galaxies that extends fainter and further than the main flux-limited portion of the SDSS galaxy spectroscopic sample. The sample is designed to impose a passively-evolving luminosity and rest-frame color cut to a redshift of 0.38. Additional, yet more luminous, red galaxies are included to a redshift of 0.5. Approximately 12 of these galaxies per square degree are targeted for spectroscopy, so the sample will number over 100,000 with the full survey. SDSS commissioning data indicate that the algorithm efficiently selects luminous (M_g=-21.4), red galaxies, that the spectroscopic success rate is very high, and that the resulting set of galaxies is approximately volume-limited out to z=0.38. When the SDSS is complete, the LRG spectroscopic sample will fill over 1h^-3 Gpc^3 with an approximately homogeneous population of galaxies and will therefore be well suited to studies of large-scale structure and clusters out to z=0.5.

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF MAXIMAL LUMINOSITY OF GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taghizadeh-Popp, M.; Szalay, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ozogany, K.; Racz, Z. [Institute for Theoretical Physics-HAS, Eoetvoes University, Pazmany setany 1/a, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Regoes, E., E-mail: mtaghiza@pha.jhu.edu [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme value statistics is applied to the distribution of galaxy luminosities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We analyze the DR8 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS), as well as the luminous red galaxies (LRGs). Maximal luminosities are sampled from batches consisting of elongated pencil beams in the radial direction of sight. For the MGS, results suggest a small and positive tail index {xi}, effectively ruling out the possibility of having a finite maximum cutoff luminosity, and implying that the luminosity distribution function may decay as a power law at the high-luminosity end. Assuming, however, {xi} = 0, a non-parametric comparison of the maximal luminosities with the Fisher-Tippett-Gumbel distribution (limit distribution for variables distributed by the Schechter fit) indicates a good agreement provided that uncertainties arising from both the finite batch size and the batch-size distribution are accounted for. For a volume-limited sample of LRGs, results show that they can be described as being the extremes of a luminosity distribution with an exponentially decaying tail, provided that the uncertainties related to batch-size distribution are taken care of.

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mouyuan; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D; Hall, Patrick B; Ho, Luis C; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the variability of quasars in the MgII and Hbeta broad emission lines and UV/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over $6$ months, containing 357 quasars with MgII and 41 quasars with Hbeta . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional $2854$ quasars with MgII and 572 quasars with Hbeta. The MgII emission line is significantly variable ($\\Delta f/f$ 10% on 100-day timescales), indicating that it is feasible to use the broad MgII line for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of $\\gtrsim 5$ days. We compare the emission-line and...

  1. Dependence of Galaxy Shape on Environment in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick Kuehn; Barbara S. Ryden

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4, we study the trends relating surface brightness profile type and apparent axis ratio to the local galaxy environment. We use the SDSS parameter `fracDeV' to quantify the profile type. We find that galaxies with M_r > -18 are mostly described by exponential profiles in all environments. Galaxies with -21 environments and de Vaucouleurs profiles in high density environments. The most luminous galaxies, with M_r environments. For galaxies with M_r environment. As the local density of galaxies increases, we find that for -20 < M_r < -18, galaxies of all profile types become slightly rounder, on average; for -22 < M_r < -20, galaxies with exponential profiles tend to become flatter, while galaxies with de Vaucouleurs profiles become rounder; for M_r < -22, galaxies with exponential profiles become flatter, while the de Vaucouleurs galaxies become rounder in their inner regions, yet exhibit no change in their outer regions. We comment on how the observed trends relate to the merger history of galaxies.

  2. An Initial Survey of White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; J. Liebert; S. J. Kleinman; A. Nitta; S. F. Anderson; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; G. Schmidt; M. A. Strauss; D. Vanden Berk; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; N. M. Silvestri; A. Smith; P. Szkody; M. J. Collinge; C. C. Dahn; X. Fan; P. B. Hall; D. P. Schneider; J. Brinkmann; S. Burles; J. E. Gunn; G. S. Hennessy; R. Hindsley; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. Q. Lamb; R. H. Lupton; R. C. Nichol; J. R. Pier; D. J. Schlegel; M. SubbaRao; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny; D. G. York

    2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial assessment is made of white dwarf and hot subdwarf stars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In a small area of sky (190 square degrees), observed much like the full survey will be, 269 white dwarfs and 56 hot subdwarfs are identified spectroscopically where only 44 white dwarfs and 5 hot subdwarfs were known previously. Most are ordinary DA (hydrogen atmosphere) and DB (helium) types. In addition, in the full survey to date, a number of WDs have been found with uncommon spectral types. Among these are blue DQ stars displaying lines of atomic carbon; red DQ stars showing molecular bands of C_2 with a wide variety of strengths; DZ stars where Ca and occasionally Mg, Na, and/or Fe lines are detected; and magnetic WDs with a wide range of magnetic field strengths in DA, DB, DQ, and (probably) DZ spectral types. Photometry alone allows identification of stars hotter than 12000 K, and the density of these stars for 15

  3. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Hippel, Ted von [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Physical Sciences, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin [University of Oklahoma, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Liebert, James W. [University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Williams, Kurtis A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, P.O. Box 3011, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States); DeGenarro, Steven [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Jeffery, Elizabeth, E-mail: jam@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu, E-mail: kilic@ou.edu, E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com, E-mail: kurtis.williams@tamuc.edu, E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com, E-mail: ejeffery@byu.edu [BYU Department of Physics and Astronomy, N283 ESC, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup ?1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup ?1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup ?1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup ?1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  4. The Oxygen Abundance of Nearby Galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan

    2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived the oxygen abundance for a sample of nearby galaxies in the Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which possess at least two independent spectra of one or several HII regions with a detected [OIII]4363 auroral line. Since, for nearby galaxies, the [OII]3727 nebular line is out of the observed wavelength range, we propose a method to derive (O/H)_ff abundances using the classic Te method coupled with the ff relation. (O/H)_7325 abundances have also been determined, based on the [OII]7320,7330 line intensities, and using a small modification of the standard Te method. The (O/H)_ff and (O/H)_7325 abundances have been derived with both the one- and two-dimensional t_2 - t_3 relations. It was found that the (O/H)_ff abundances derived with the parametric two-dimensional t_2 - t_3 relation are most reliable. Oxygen abundances have been determined in 29 nearby galaxies, based on 84 individual abundance determinations in HII regions. Because of our selection methods, the metallicity of our galaxies lies in the narrow range 8.2 oxygen abundances in the disk of the spiral galaxy NGC 4490 is determined for the first time.

  5. An Efficient Algorithm for Positioning Tiles in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Blanton; R. H. Lupton; F. Miller Maley; N. Young; I. Zehavi; J. Loveday

    2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will observe around 10^6 spectra from targets distributed over an area of about 10,000 square degrees, using a multi-object fiber spectrograph which can simultaneously observe 640 objects in a circular field-of-view (referred to as a ``tile'') 1.49 degrees in radius. No two fibers can be placed closer than 55'' during the same observation; multiple targets closer than this distance are said to ``collide.'' We present here a method of allocating fibers to desired targets given a set of tile centers which includes the effects of collisions and which is nearly optimally efficient and uniform. Because of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution (which form the bulk of the SDSS targets), a naive covering the sky with equally-spaced tiles does not yield uniform sampling. Thus, we present a heuristic for perturbing the centers of the tiles from the equally-spaced distribution which provides more uniform completeness. For the SDSS sample, we can attain a sampling rate greater than 92% for all targets, and greater than 99% for the set of targets which do not collide with each other, with an efficiency greater than 90% (defined as the fraction of available fibers assigned to targets).

  6. The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, N; Seljak, U; Makarov, A; Bahcall, Neta A; Blanton, M R; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Finkbeiner, D P; Gunn, J E; Hogg, D W; Ivezic, Z; Knapp, G R; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Nichol, R C; Schneider, D P; Strauss, M A; Tegmark, M; York, D G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the 3D real space clustering power spectrum of a sample of \\~600,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using photometric redshifts. This sample of galaxies ranges from redshift z=0.2 to 0.6 over 3,528 deg^2 of the sky, probing a volume of 1.5 (Gpc/h)^3, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clustering power spectrum in eight redshift slices and combine these into a high precision 3D real space power spectrum from k=0.005 (h/Mpc) to k=1 (h/Mpc). We detect power on gigaparsec scales, beyond the turnover in the matter power spectrum, on scales significantly larger than those accessible to current spectroscopic redshift surveys. We also find evidence for baryonic oscillations, both in the power spectrum, as well as in fits to the baryon density, at a 2.5 sigma confidence level. The statistical power of these data to constrain cosmology is ~1.7 times better than previous clustering analyses. Varying t...

  7. Rhabdomesid bryozoans of the Wreford Megacyclothem (Wolfcampian, Permian) of Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, G. B.

    1971-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Wreford of Kansas, I propose that these Oklahoma sand- stones be recognized as a distinct rock type, herein termed a "tan quartzose sandstone," within the Wreford Megacyclothem. Massive to thin-bedded, weathering dark brown, this rock type when fresh... in the Wreford of Kansas, I propose that these Oklahoma sand- stones be recognized as a distinct rock type, herein termed a "tan quartzose sandstone," within the Wreford Megacyclothem. Massive to thin-bedded, weathering dark brown, this rock type when fresh...

  8. Bibliography of Publications from Research Based on Mammal Specimens in the University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the West Indies. Mammalia, 24:67–75. Jones, J. K., Jr. 1960. The hispid cotton rat in Nebraska. Journal of Mammalogy, 41:132. Jones, J. K., Jr., and G. L. Cortner. 1960. The subspecific identity of the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) in Kansas... Museum, 4:89–100. Jones, J. K., Jr., and T. Alvarez. 1962. Taxonomic status of the free-tailed bat, Tadarida yucatanica Miller. University of Kansas Publications, Museum of Natural History, 14(9):125–133. Jones, J. K., Jr., T. Alvarez, and M. R. Lee...

  9. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations What’s Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

  10. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation processes (reductive dechlorination) in the subsurface environment (Argonne 2006, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was talking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination in the injection test area (Argonne 2009a). The KDHE (2008a) requested that sitewide monitoring continue until a final remedy is selected (as part of a Corrective Action Study [CAS] evaluation) and implemented. In response to this request, the established sampling across the site and additional sampling in the IM pilot test area continued in 2008 (Argonne 2008b, 2009a,b). On the basis of results of the 2005-2008 sitewide monitoring and the 2008 IM pilot test monitoring, the CCC/USDA recommended a revised sampling program for both the wider site and the IM pilot test area (Section 4.2 in Argonne 2009b). The elements of this interim monitoring plan are as follows: (1) Annual sampling of twelve monitoring points across the site (Figure 1.1) and five outlying IM pilot test monitoring points (PMP4, PMP5, PMP6, PMP7, PMP9; Figure 1.2); and (2) Twice yearly sampling of five IM pilot test monitoring points inside the injection area (PMP1-PMP3, PMP8, MW02; Figure 1.2). With the approval of the KDHE (2009), the initial groundwater sampling for VOCs and geochemical analyses under the interim monitoring plan outlined above was conducted in 2009 (Argonne 2010). The present report documents the findings of the 2010 monitoring events, conducted on April 5 and September 19-21, 2010.

  11. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination in the injection test area (Argonne 2009a). The KDHE (2008a) has requested that sitewide monitoring continue at Centralia until a final remedy has been selected (as part of a Corrective Action Study [CAS] evaluation) and implemented for this site. In response to this request, twice-yearly sampling of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1) previously approved by the KDHE for monitoring of the groundwater at Centralia (KDHE 2005a,b) was continued in 2008. The sampling events under this extension of the two-year (2005-2007) monitoring program occurred in March and September 2008 (Argonne 2008b, 2009b). Additional piezometers specifically installed to evaluate the progress of the IM pilot test (PMP1-PMP9; Figure 1.2) were also sampled in 2008; the results of these analyses were reported and discussed separately (Argonne 2009a). On the basis of results of the 2005-2008 sitewide monitoring and the 2008 IM pilot test monitoring, the CCC/USDA recommended a revised sampling program to address both of the continuing monitoring objectives until a CAS for Centralia is developed (Section 4.2 in Argonne 2009b). The elements of this interim monitoring plan are as follows: (1) Annual sampling of twelve previously established (before the pilot test) monitoring points (locations identified in Figure 1.3) and the five outlying pilot test monitoring points (PMP4, PMP5, PMP6, PMP7, PMP9; Figure 1.4); and (2) Sampling twice yearly at the five pilot test monitoring points inside the injection area (PMP1-PMP3, PMP8, MW02; Figure 1.4). With the approval of the KDHE (2009), groundwater sampling for analyses of VOCs and selected other geochemical parameters was conducted at Centralia under the interim monitoring program outlined above in April and October 2009. This report documents the findings of the 2009 monitoring events.

  12. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the vadose zone by soil vapor extraction (SVE). (4) Volatilization of contaminants from portions of the affected aquifer that can be accessed from the former CCC/USDA property. The primary objective of the proposed removal action is removal of mass quantities of carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area, to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. This objective will be the basis for evaluating system performance. The scope of action outlined in the IMWP/D is limited to the five treatment zones defined by the LDB/SVE/AS locations. Surrounding soils and groundwater will benefit; however, remedial benefits to groundwater will be limited to the area of influence associated with the five treatment zones. While treatment should be aggressive in the vicinity of the LDB locations, the heterogeneity, clay content, and low permeability of the soils will place inherent limits on the area of influence.

  13. Implementation of deep soil mixing at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, F.G.; Korte, N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Strong-Gunderson, J.; Siegrist, R.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Baker, J. [AlliedSignal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted field-scale tests of in situ soil mixing and treatment technologies within the Northeast Area (NEA) of the KCP at the Former Ponds site. This demonstration, testing, and evaluation effort was conducted as part of the implementation of a deep soil mixing (DSM) innovative remedial technology demonstration project designed to test DSM in the low-permeability clay soils at the KCP. The clay soils and groundwater beneath this area are contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE). The demonstration project was originally designed to evaluate TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency using soil mixing coupled with vapor stripping. Treatability study results, however, indicated that mixed region vapor stripping (MRVS) coupled with calcium oxide (dry lime powder) injection would improve TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency in saturated soils. The scope of the KCP DSM demonstration evolved to implement DSM with the following in situ treatment methodologies for contaminant source reduction in soil and groundwater: DSM/MRVS coupled with calcium oxide injection; DSM/bioaugmentation; and DSM/chemical oxidation using potassium permanganate. Laboratory treatability studies were started in 1995 following collection of undisturbed soil cores from the KCP. These studies were conducted at ORNL, and the results provided information on optimum reagent concentrations and mixing ratios for the three in situ treatment agents to be implemented in the field demonstration.

  14. Counts-in-Cylinders in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with Comparisons to N-Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrier, Heather D.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; /UC, Irvine; Berrier, Joel C.; /Arkansas U.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /Pittsburgh U.; Wechsler, Risa H. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental statistics provide a necessary means of comparing the properties of galaxies in different environments and a vital test of models of galaxy formation within the prevailing, hierarchical cosmological model. We explore counts-in-cylinders, a common statistic defined as the number of companions of a particular galaxy found within a given projected radius and redshift interval. Galaxy distributions with the same two-point correlation functions do not necessarily have the same companion count distributions. We use this statistic to examine the environments of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 4. We also make preliminary comparisons to four models for the spatial distributions of galaxies, based on N-body simulations, and data from SDSS DR4 to study the utility of the counts-in-cylinders statistic. There is a very large scatter between the number of companions a galaxy has and the mass of its parent dark matter halo and the halo occupation, limiting the utility of this statistic for certain kinds of environmental studies. We also show that prevalent, empirical models of galaxy clustering that match observed two- and three-point clustering statistics well fail to reproduce some aspects of the observed distribution of counts-in-cylinders on 1, 3 and 6-h{sup -1}Mpc scales. All models that we explore underpredict the fraction of galaxies with few or no companions in 3 and 6-h{sup -1} Mpc cylinders. Roughly 7% of galaxies in the real universe are significantly more isolated within a 6 h{sup -1} Mpc cylinder than the galaxies in any of the models we use. Simple, phenomenological models that map galaxies to dark matter halos fail to reproduce high-order clustering statistics in low-density environments.

  15. Star-Formation in Low Radio Luminosity AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Vries, W H; Hodge, J A; Becker, R H; White, R L; Helfand, D J

    2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate faint radio emission from low- to high-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Their radio properties are inferred by coadding large ensembles of radio image cut-outs from the FIRST survey, as almost all of the sources are individually undetected. We correlate the median radio flux densities against a range of other sample properties, including median values for redshift, [O III] luminosity, emission line ratios, and the strength of the 4000{angstrom} break. We detect a strong trend for sources that are actively undergoing star-formation to have excess radio emission beyond the {approx} 10{sup 28} ergs s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} level found for sources without any discernible star-formation. Furthermore, this additional radio emission correlates well with the strength of the 4000{angstrom} break in the optical spectrum, and may be used to assess the age of the star-forming component. We examine two subsamples, one containing the systems with emission line ratios most like star-forming systems, and one with the sources that have characteristic AGN ratios. This division also separates the mechanism responsible for the radio emission (star-formation vs. AGN). For both cases we find a strong, almost identical, correlation between [O III] and radio luminosity, with the AGN sample extending toward lower, and the star-formation sample toward higher luminosities. A clearer separation between the two subsamples is seen as function of the central velocity dispersion {sigma} of the host galaxy. For systems at similar redshifts and values of {sigma}, the star-formation subsample is brighter than the AGN in the radio by an order of magnitude. This underlines the notion that the radio emission in star-forming systems can dominate the emission associated with the AGN.

  16. The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Padmanabhan; D. J. Schlegel; U. Seljak; A. Makarov; N. A. Bahcall; M. R. Blanton; J. Brinkmann; D. J. Eisenstein; D. P. Finkbeiner; J. E. Gunn; D. W. Hogg; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; J. Loveday; R. H. Lupton; R. C. Nichol; D. P. Schneider; M. A. Strauss; M. Tegmark; D. G. York

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the 3D real space clustering power spectrum of a sample of \\~600,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using photometric redshifts. This sample of galaxies ranges from redshift z=0.2 to 0.6 over 3,528 deg^2 of the sky, probing a volume of 1.5 (Gpc/h)^3, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clustering power spectrum in eight redshift slices and combine these into a high precision 3D real space power spectrum from k=0.005 (h/Mpc) to k=1 (h/Mpc). We detect power on gigaparsec scales, beyond the turnover in the matter power spectrum, on scales significantly larger than those accessible to current spectroscopic redshift surveys. We also find evidence for baryonic oscillations, both in the power spectrum, as well as in fits to the baryon density, at a 2.5 sigma confidence level. The statistical power of these data to constrain cosmology is ~1.7 times better than previous clustering analyses. Varying the matter density and baryon fraction, we find \\Omega_M = 0.30 \\pm 0.03, and \\Omega_b/\\Omega_M = 0.18 \\pm 0.04, The detection of baryonic oscillations also allows us to measure the comoving distance to z=0.5; we find a best fit distance of 1.73 \\pm 0.12 Gpc, corresponding to a 6.5% error on the distance. These results demonstrate the ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric surveys (abridged).

  17. AUTOMATIC UNSUPERVISED CLASSIFICATION OF ALL SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7 GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, J. Sanchez; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Munoz-Tunon, C.; De Vicente, A., E-mail: jos@iac.e, E-mail: jalfonso@iac.e, E-mail: cmt@iac.e, E-mail: angelv@iac.e [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the k-means cluster analysis algorithm, we carry out an unsupervised classification of all galaxy spectra in the seventh and final Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release (SDSS/DR7). Except for the shift to rest-frame wavelengths and the normalization to the g-band flux, no manipulation is applied to the original spectra. The algorithm guarantees that galaxies with similar spectra belong to the same class. We find that 99% of the galaxies can be assigned to only 17 major classes, with 11 additional minor classes including the remaining 1%. The classification is not unique since many galaxies appear in between classes; however, our rendering of the algorithm overcomes this weakness with a tool to identify borderline galaxies. Each class is characterized by a template spectrum, which is the average of all the spectra of the galaxies in the class. These low-noise template spectra vary smoothly and continuously along a sequence labeled from 0 to 27, from the reddest class to the bluest class. Our Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) classification separates galaxies in colors, with classes characteristic of the red sequence, the blue cloud, as well as the green valley. When red sequence galaxies and green valley galaxies present emission lines, they are characteristic of active galactic nucleus activity. Blue galaxy classes have emission lines corresponding to star formation regions. We find the expected correlation between spectroscopic class and Hubble type, but this relationship exhibits a high intrinsic scatter. Several potential uses of the ASK classification are identified and sketched, including fast determination of physical properties by interpolation, classes as templates in redshift determinations, and target selection in follow-up works (we find classes of Seyfert galaxies, green valley galaxies, as well as a significant number of outliers). The ASK classification is publicly accessible through various Web sites.

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 4. Fifth Data Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester,; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 5740 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2-minutes rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss,; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U.,

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

  20. Properties of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Barber; A. Meiksin; T. Murphy

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform population synthesis modelling of a magnitude-limited sample of 4391 Luminous Red Galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4). We fit measured spectral indices using a large library of high resolution spectra, covering a wide range of metallicities and assuming an exponentially decaying star-formation rate punctuated by bursts, to obtain median-likelihood estimates for the light-weighted age, metallicity, stellar mass and extinction for the galaxies. The ages lie in the range 4-10 Gyr, peaking near 6 Gyr, with metallicities in the range -0.4<[Z/H]<0.4, peaking at [Z/H] ~ 0.2. Only a few per cent of the spectra are better fit allowing for a burst in addition to continuous star-formation. The total stellar masses of all the galaxies are confined to a very narrow range. Our results broadly agree with those of previous groups using an independent population synthesis code. We find, however, that our choice in priors results in ages 1-2 Gyr smaller, decreasing the peak star formation epoch from z=2.3 to z=1.3. We develop a metal evolution model incorporating stochastic star-formation quenching motivated by recent attempts to solve the `anti-hierarchical' formation problem of ellipticals. Two scenarios emerge, a closed box with an effective stellar yield of 0.26, and an accreting box with an effective stellar yield of 0.10. Both scenarios require an IMF weighted towards massive stars and characteristic star-formation quenching times of about 100 Myr, the expected lifetime of luminous QSOs. The models predict an anti-correlation between the age and mean metallicity similar to that observed.

  1. A plausible (overlooked) super-luminous supernova in the Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Koz?owski, Szymon; Wyrzykowski, ?ukasz [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Djorgovski, S. George; Mahabal, Ashish A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Koposov, Sergey, E-mail: zkostrzewa@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wyrzykow@astrouw.edu.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of a plausible super-luminous supernova (SLSN), found in the archival data of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, called PSN 000123+000504. The supernova (SN) peaked at m {sub g} < 19.4 mag in the second half of 2005 September, but was missed by the real-time SN hunt. The observed part of the light curve (17 epochs) showed that the rise to the maximum took over 30 days, while the decline time lasted at least 70 days (observed frame), closely resembling other SLSNe of SN 2007bi type. The spectrum of the host galaxy reveals a redshift of z = 0.281 and the distance modulus of ? = 40.77 mag. Combining this information with the SDSS photometry, we found the host galaxy to be an LMC-like irregular dwarf galaxy with an absolute magnitude of M{sub B} = –18.2 ± 0.2 mag and an oxygen abundance of 12+log?[O/H]=8.3±0.2; hence, the SN peaked at M {sub g} < –21.3 mag. Our SLSN follows the relation for the most energetic/super-luminous SNe exploding in low-metallicity environments, but we found no clear evidence for SLSNe to explode in low-luminosity (dwarf) galaxies only. The available information on the PSN 000123+000504 light curve suggests the magnetar-powered model as a likely scenario of this event. This SLSN is a new addition to a quickly growing family of super-luminous SNe.

  2. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term, Class I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Reynolds, Rodney R.; McCune, A. Dwayne; Michnick, Michael J.; Walton, Anthony W.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involved two demonstration projects, one in a Marrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the state and the second in the Cherokee Group in eastern Kansas. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Morrow in Kansas is over 400,000,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining state of that in the Cherokee. The Cherokee Group has produced about 1 billion bbls of oil since the first commercial production began over a century ago. It is a billion-barrel plus resource that is distributed over a large number of fields and small production units. Many of the reservoirs are operated close to the economic limit, although the small units and low production per well are offset by low costs associated with the shallow nature of the reservoirs (less than 1000 ft. deep).

  3. EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NNSA/DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO. NNSA previously decided in a separate NEPA review (EA-1592) to relocate its operations from the Bannister Federal Complex to a newly constructed industrial campus eight miles from the current location.

  4. Bound Together: Masters and Slaves on the Kansas-Missouri Border, 1825-1865

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epps, Kristen Kimberly

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    “Bound Together” chronicles the rise and fall of the slave system on the Kansas-Missouri border from the earliest years of American settlement in the 1820s to the end of the Civil War. This work uses nineteen counties along ...

  5. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  6. The Life of Charles O. Fuller in Central Kansas, 1855-1879.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratton, John M.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article presents a biography of Charles Oscar Fuller, 1928-1979, who established a ranch on Running Turkey Creek along the Santa Fe Trail n what is now McPherson County, Kansas. Fuller went on to other pursuits later in life, and served a term...

  7. Taxonomy of asteroid families among the Jupiter Trojans: Comparison between spectroscopic data and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey colors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Roig; A. O. Ribeiro; R. Gil-Hutton

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comparative analysis of the spectral slope and color distributions of Jupiter Trojans, with particular attention to asteroid families. We use a sample of data from the Moving Object Catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, together with spectra obtained from several surveys. A first sample of 349 observations, corresponding to 250 Trojan asteroids, were extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and we also extracted from the literature a second sample of 91 spectra, corresponding to 71 Trojans. The spectral slopes were computed by means of a least-squares fit to a straight line of the fluxes obtained from the Sloan observations in the first sample, and of the rebinned spectra in the second sample. In both cases the reflectance fluxes/spectra were renormalized to 1 at 6230 $\\textrm{\\AA}$. We found that the distribution of spectral slopes among Trojan asteroids shows a bimodality. About 2/3 of the objects have reddish slopes compatible with D-type asteroids, while the remaining bodies show less reddish colors compatible with the P-type and C-type classifications. The members of asteroid families also show a bimodal distribution with a very slight predominance of D-type asteroids, but the background is clearly dominated by the D-types. The L4 and L5 swarms show different distributions of spectral slopes, and bimodality is only observed in L4. These differences can be attributed to the asteroid families since the backgraound asteroids show the same slope distribtuions in both swarms. The analysis of individual families indicates that the families in L5 are taxonomically homogeneous, but in L4 they show a mixture of taxonomic types. We discuss a few scenarios that might help to interpret these results.

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 6, including Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (see www.sdss.org for general information) will map one-quarter of the entire sky and perform a redshift survey of galaxies, quasars and stars. The DR6 is the sixth major data release and provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download. It is the first data release of SDSS-II, an extension of the original SDSS consisting of three subprojects: Legacy, SEGUE and a Supernova survey. Be sure to check out the separate page for SEGUE also at http://classic.sdss.org/dr6/start/aboutsegue.html.

  9. Interesting features in the combined Galex and Sloan color diagrams of solar-like galactic populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Myron A.; Shiao, Bernard [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana, E-mail: myronmeister@gmail.com, E-mail: shiao@stsci.edu, E-mail: bianchi@pha.jhu.edu [Johns Hopkins University, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on intriguing photometric properties of Galactic stars observed in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite's far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) bandpasses, as well as from the ground-based Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Kepler Input Catalog. The first property is that the (FUV – NUV) color distribution of stars in the Kepler field consists of two well-separated peaks. A second and more perplexing property is that for stars with spectral types G or later the mean (FUV – NUV) color becomes much bluer, contrary to expectation. Investigating this tendency further, we found in two samples of mid-F through K type stars that 17%-22% of them exhibit FUV excesses relative to their NUV fluxes and spectral types. A correction for FUV incompleteness of the FUV magnitude-limited star sample brings this ratio to 14%-18%. Nearly the same fractions are also discovered among members of the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog and in the published list of Kepler Objects of Interest. These UV-excess ('UVe') colors are confirmed by the negative UV continuum slopes in GALEX spectra of members of the population. The SDSS spectra of some UVe stars exhibit metallic line weakening, especially in the blue. This suggests an enhanced contribution of UV flux relative to photospheric flux of a solar-type single star. We consider the possibility that the UV excesses originate from various types of hot stars, including white dwarf DA and sdB stars, binaries, and strong chromosphere stars that are young or in active binaries. The space density of compact stars is too low to explain the observed frequency of the UVe stars. Our model atmosphere-derived simulations of colors for binaries with main-sequence pairs with a hot secondary demonstrate that the color loci conflict with the observed sequence. As a preferred alternative we are left with the active chromospheres explanation, whether in active close binaries or young single stars, despite the expected paucity of young, chromospherically active stars in the field. We also address a third perplexing color property, namely, the presence of a prominent island of 'UV red' stars surrounded by 'UV blue' stars in the diagnostic (NUV–g), (g – i) color diagram. We find that the subpopulation composing this island is mainly horizontal branch stars. These objects do not exhibit UV excesses and therefore have UV colors typical for their spectral types. This subpopulation appears 'red' in the UV only because the stars' colors are not pulled to the blue by the inclusion of UVe stars.

  10. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These galaxies were identified by their extremely weak (< 150) [N {pi}] {lambda}6584 to H{alpha} emission line ratios. Abundance analysis from emission line fluxes reveals that these galaxies have gas phase oxygen abundances 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 7.7 to 7.9, not remarkably low, and near infrared imaging detects an old stellar population. However, the measured nitrogen to oxygen ratios log(N/O) < 1.7 are anomalously low for blue compact dwarf galaxies. These objects may be useful for understanding the chemical evolution of nitrogen.

  11. AUTOMATED UNSUPERVISED CLASSIFICATION OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STELLAR SPECTRA USING k-MEANS CLUSTERING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Allende Prieto, C., E-mail: jos@iac.es, E-mail: callende@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Large spectroscopic surveys require automated methods of analysis. This paper explores the use of k-means clustering as a tool for automated unsupervised classification of massive stellar spectral catalogs. The classification criteria are defined by the data and the algorithm, with no prior physical framework. We work with a representative set of stellar spectra associated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) SEGUE and SEGUE-2 programs, which consists of 173,390 spectra from 3800 to 9200 A sampled on 3849 wavelengths. We classify the original spectra as well as the spectra with the continuum removed. The second set only contains spectral lines, and it is less dependent on uncertainties of the flux calibration. The classification of the spectra with continuum renders 16 major classes. Roughly speaking, stars are split according to their colors, with enough finesse to distinguish dwarfs from giants of the same effective temperature, but with difficulties to separate stars with different metallicities. There are classes corresponding to particular MK types, intrinsically blue stars, dust-reddened, stellar systems, and also classes collecting faulty spectra. Overall, there is no one-to-one correspondence between the classes we derive and the MK types. The classification of spectra without continuum renders 13 classes, the color separation is not so sharp, but it distinguishes stars of the same effective temperature and different metallicities. Some classes thus obtained present a fairly small range of physical parameters (200 K in effective temperature, 0.25 dex in surface gravity, and 0.35 dex in metallicity), so that the classification can be used to estimate the main physical parameters of some stars at a minimum computational cost. We also analyze the outliers of the classification. Most of them turn out to be failures of the reduction pipeline, but there are also high redshift QSOs, multiple stellar systems, dust-reddened stars, galaxies, and, finally, odd spectra whose nature we have not deciphered. The template spectra representative of the classes are publicly available in the online journal.

  12. A Report on Library-Museum collaboration at the University of Kansas: The Spencer Museum of Art and KU Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Brian

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report stems from the author's semester as Keeler Family Intra-University Professor at the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas during the Fall 2010 semester. The report provides some background information about library...

  13. ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Nicholas Victor

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on valley fills in the upper Driftwood Creek basin, a 3rd order drainage network in south-central Kansas to determine the geologic potential for stratified cultural material and to reconstruct a record of Late...

  14. Elevated blood glucose recommendation guidelines that produce positive maternal and perinatal outcomes at the University of Kansas Obstetrics Clinic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumberg, Erin M.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    and management practices at the University of Kansas Obstetrics (KUMC OB) clinic in regard to perinatal outcomes, and adherence to recommendations from the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). Design: In this retrospective...

  15. SWORDS INTO PLOUGHSHARES: The Struggle to Build an Ordered Community of Liberty on the southeast Kansas Frontier 1867-1876

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John N.

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a study of the settlement of southeast Kansas in the years immediately following the Civil War. It begins with the first settlers who arrived in 1867 and concludes with the triumph of the settlers in ...

  16. Spatializing social equity through place-based policies : lessons from the Green Impact Zone of Missouri, in Kansas City, MO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozorg, Leila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kansas City Green Impact Zone of Missouri is a regionally administered, place-based initiative that emerged in direct response to the 2009 "federal moment" symbolized by the creation of the White House Office of Urban ...

  17. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2009 .

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for monitoring events in April and September 2009. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill from September 2005 to October 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007, 2008a,b, 2009). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon tetrachloride were persistently detected at monitoring well MW8S, on the bank of an intermittent tributary to Terrapin Creek. This observation suggested a possible risk of contamination of the surface waters of the creek. That concern is the regulatory driver for ongoing monitoring. In light of the early findings, in 2006 the CCC/USDA recommended expansion of the approved monitoring program to include the collection and analysis of surface water samples along Terrapin Creek (Argonne 2006a). At the request of the KDHE (2007a), locations for both surface water and shallow sediment sampling were discussed with the KDHE in January 2007. An addendum to the existing monitoring plan (Appendix A) and a standard operating procedure (SOP AGEM-15; Appendix B) for sediment sampling were submitted to the KDHE on the basis of these discussions and were subsequently approved (KDHE 2008b). Results of sediment sampling prior to 2009 were reported previously (Argonne 2008a,b; 2009). To supplement the original scope of the monitoring, Argonne also sampled natural vegetation along Terrapin Creek in October 2006, April 2007, and July 2007 for analyses for VOCs. The results of these plant tissue analyses were reported previously (Argonne 2008a, 2009). The April and September 2009 sampling events reported here represent a continuation of the two-year monitoring program, as requested by the KDHE (2007b). The groundwater sampling is presently conducted, in accord with the monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b) and the addendum to that plan (Appendix A in this report), in a network of 12 monitoring wells and 3 private wells (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (2008b). The findings of the April and September 2009 monitoring events at Morrill support the following conclusions: (1) Groundwater flow during the early spring and the later part of this review period was predominantly to the south-southeast, from the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility toward Terrapin Creek. In late spring, a slight shift occurred toward more southerly groundwater flow (possibly southwesterly in the immediate vicinity of the intermittent tributary that flows into Terrapin Creek). This shift in the late spring reflected transient seasonal precipitation and recharge that resulted in higher groundwater levels at this time. (2) No significant changes were observed in the levels or distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater at

  18. Stratigraphic and Geographic Bryozoan Abundance Gradients in the Calcareous Shales of the Wreford Megacyclothem (Lower Permian, Kansas)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachut, J. F.; Cuffey, Roger J.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August 1999 Number 10 STRATIGRAPHIC AND GEOGRAPHIC BRYOZOAN ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN THE CALCAREOUS SHALES OF THE WREFORD MEGACYCLOTHEM (LOWER PERMIAN, KANSAS) Joseph F. Pachut and Roger J... or taphonomic processes. With minor exceptions involving the uppermost Speiser Shale and Schroyer Limestone Member of the Wreford Limestone, detrended correspondence analysis did not segregate any distinctive groupings of beds or lithologies. Speiser assemblages...

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  20. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

  1. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. The findings of the April 2011 and October 2011 monitoring events at Morrill support the following conclusions: (1) Groundwater flow during the 2011 review period (as in prior years) was predominantly to the south, from the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility toward Terrapin Creek. Automatic water level monitoring data suggest that spring precipitation and recharge represent the predominant factors affecting the local groundwater level patterns. (2) No significant changes were observed in the concentration or distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater during the spring and fall 2011 monitoring events versus the spring and fall 2010 monitoring events. In October 2011, a maximum carbon tetrachloride concentration of 49 {micro}g/L was identified in groundwater at well MW3S on the former CCC/USDA facility, with concentrations decreasing downgradient toward Terrapin Creek. (3) Since 2004, the accumulated results of 15 sampling events have demonstrated a significant decline in the maximum detected concentration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater. In 1995, the contaminant was detected at the former CCC/USDA facility at 390 {micro}g/L, while the current maximum levels are < 50 {micro}g/L. The residual contaminant plume extending from the former CCC/USDA facility southward toward Terrapin Creek is well-defined and slowly declining in concentration naturally. (4) No carbon tetrachloride contamination was detected in 2011 in surface waters or shallow streambed sediments sampled at five locations along Terrapin Creek, downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. These results indicate that Terrapin Creek remains unaffected by the carbon tetrachloride plume. (5) Since 2007, the accumulated results of 10 monitoring events for surface water and sediment in Terrapin Creek have demonstrated no impact to the sediment and surface waters of the creek by carbon tetrachloride and no imminent risk for further degradation of the creek. (6) Terrapin Creek (tributary segment 308 to Walnut Creek) receives discharge from the Morrill wastewater treatment plant and several confined animal feeding operations regulated by the KDHE. The Walnut Creek watershed is designated by the KDHE as impaired by fecal coliform bacteria. Terrapin Creek is classified by the KDHE as not open to or accessible by the public for contact recreation and does not support the food procurement designated use (KDHE 2010b). (7) In July 2011, trace concentrations of carbon tetrachloride were detected in vegetation samples collected from trees at 2 of the 42 sampled locations south (downgradient) of the former CCC/USDA facility. (8) Sampling of indoor air in August 2010 to evaluate the potential for vapor intrusion into homes overlying and within 100 ft laterally of the identified carbon tetrachloride plume resulted in no detections of carbon tetrachloride. Low concentrations of chloroform, indicative of indoor air sources, were detected. Low radon levels were also detected. The results indicate no evidence of upward migration of vapors from the low-level carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater to indoor air.

  2. Common Ground - Kansas Climate and Energy Project connects with the Heartland.

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    n 2010, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert Merrian Fuller singled out a small environmental organization in Kansas-- the Climate and Energy Project (CEP)-- as an outstanding example of how you change behavior on energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions through an apolitical emphasis on heartland values. In the summer of 2011, a team from LBNL, seeking to capture what Fuller had featured in her report "Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvement," visited Kansas. Speaking with CEP's Nancy Jackson and Dorothy Barnett, as well as farmers, small business owners, politicians and others, the team produced this video, which shows how and why CEP has become an inspiration to other environmental organizations that are seeking to change behavior where climate-change skepticism abounds.

  3. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

    1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  4. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  5. 2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGIC TRANSITION AMONG A NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY IN KANSAS DURING THE 20TH CENTURY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbett, Steve

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    to work directly for the tribe as the diabetes project manager at the Prairie Band Potawatomi Health Center. Primary duties of the position included coordinating grant funded initiatives aimed at reducing the incidence and impact of diabetes... disease in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Two small grants from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment allowed for the establishment of Chronic Disease Electronic Management Systems (CDEMS) for diabetes and hypertension. CDEMS is a software...

  7. An Army of Amazons: The Language of Protest in a Kansas Mining Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Ann M.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Warren Van Tine, John L. Lewis: A Biography (New York: Quadrangle, 1979), 115. See also Joseph Skubitz, Jr., "A History of the Development of Deep Mine Production in Crawford County and the Factors that Have Influenced It," M.S. Thesis, Kansas State... of American communities are John Benson, British Coal Mining in the Nineteenth Century: A Social History (New York: Holmes and Meier Publishers, Inc., 1980) and Michael Hanies, "Fertility, Nuptiality, and Occupation: A Study of Coal Mining Populations...

  8. EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA was to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposed to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus. This EA has been canceled.

  9. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  10. Kansas Journal of Sociology, Volume 2, Number 4 (Fall, 1966): Back Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1966-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• State •••••••••••••••••••••Zip••••••••••• I':>.lease make checks payabl.e to the KANSAS JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY. -154- The Journal of SOCIAL ISSUES spesi October 1966 vei, XXII lio. 4 MAI~ISRESPO~lSETO THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT Issue Editors: R.W. Kates... what you need! • • • socio logical abstracts has developed 21 information files on specific areas of interest • • • • these are: 0100 methodology- and research technology 0200 sociology: history, theory, etc. 0300 social psychology 0400 group...

  11. Image-Based Proxy Accumulation for Real-Time Soft Global Illumination Peter-Pike Sloan Naga K. Govindaraju Derek Nowrouzezahrai John Snyder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montréal, Université de

    Image-Based Proxy Accumulation for Real-Time Soft Global Illumination Peter-Pike Sloan Naga K. It accumulates over relatively few spherical proxies which approximate the light blocking and re-radiating ef- fect of dynamic geometry. Soft shadows are computed by accumulating log visibility vectors for each

  12. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work to be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Powhattan, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the property; (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination; and (3) provide recommendations for future action, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. It should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Powhattan.

  13. Stewart field, Finney County, Kansas: Seismic definition of thin channel reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluvial channel sandstones of Early Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) age comprise regional reservoirs in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. In southwestern Kansas, these reservoirs commonly exist at depths of 4000-5000 ft (1200-1500 m) and have reserves of 150,000-200,000 bbl of oil per well, making them highly economical. Reservoir sandstones form part of transgressive valley-fill sequences deposited within channels incised into underlying Mississippian carbonates. Thickness of the fill varies up to 60 ft (18 m), is commonly 10-30 ft (3-9 m), and displays rapid changes along channel length. As a result, detailed mapping of channel trends is difficult. Stewart field, located in Finney County, Kansas, is a good example of this type of reservoir. Maximum reservoir quality exists in very fine to fine-grained fluvial sandstones reworked by tidal action. Early attempts to extend the field to the east failed because existing two-dimensional seismic and well data did not help workers properly resolve channel orientation. A three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey, shot prior to initiation of waterflood operations, helped (1) locate the channel between existing dry holes and (2) identify prospective locations that were then successfully drilled. Further extrapolation of the 3-D data resulted in a dry hole that established the limits of interpretation in this area. Stewart field thus provides an important case study regarding the capabilities and limitation of 3-D data in exploring the interwell frontier.

  14. Statewide plan for utilization of scrap tires in Kansas. Final report, September 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.G.; Hossain, M.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to determine the current and future supply of scrap tire rubber and the feasibility of using scrap tires in Kansas for various purposes. The goal was to determine if a sufficient quantity of recycled rubber existed and what the cost would be to meet the ISTEA (Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act) requirements for 1995 and thereafter. The four tasks included in the study were: surveying scrap tire utilization plans in other states; inventory scrap tires in Kansas; estimating scrap tire generation in the future; and determiming cost effectiveness of various uses of scrap tires. Currently there are 4.5 to 5.5 million scrap tires in Kansas and the annual generation of scrap tires is estimated to be 2 to 3 million. The ISTEA mandate would require an estimated 367,000 scrap tires be recycled annually. KDOT has used more rubber in 1993 and 1994 than will be required by 1997 when the 20% required by ISTEA is in effect.

  15. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, R. M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar heating and cooling system installed at the headquarters of Citizens Mutual Savings Association in Leavenworth, Kansas, is described in detail. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program and became operational in March, 1979. The designer was TEC, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri and contractor was Norris Brothers, Inc., Lawrence, Kansas. The solar system is expected to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2200 square feet. Five, 3-ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two, 3000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  16. Galaxy Zoo: The large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kate Land; Anze Slosar; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Steven Bamford; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the evidence for a violation of large-scale statistical isotropy in the distribution of projected spin vectors of spiral galaxies. We have a sample of $\\sim 37,000$ spiral galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with their line of sight spin direction confidently classified by members of the public through the online project Galaxy Zoo. After establishing and correcting for a certain level of bias in our handedness results we find the winding sense of the galaxies to be consistent with statistical isotropy. In particular we find no significant dipole signal, and thus no evidence for overall preferred handedness of the Universe. We compare this result to those of other authors and conclude that these may also be affected and explained by a bias effect.

  17. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CO-ADD: CROSS-CORRELATION WEAK LENSING AND TOMOGRAPHY OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simet, Melanie; Dodelson, Scott [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Annis, James T.; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Reis, Ribamar R. R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics and Berkeley Lab, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shapes of distant galaxies are sheared by intervening galaxy clusters. We examine this effect in Stripe 82, a 275 deg{sup 2} region observed multiple times in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and co-added to achieve greater depth. We obtain a mass-richness calibration that is similar to other SDSS analyses, demonstrating that the co-addition process did not adversely affect the lensing signal. We also propose a new parameterization of the effect of tomography on the cluster lensing signal which does not require binning in redshift, and we show that using this parameterization we can detect tomography for stacked clusters at varying redshifts. Finally, due to the sensitivity of the tomographic detection to accurately marginalize over the effect of the cluster mass, we show that tomography at low redshift (where dependence on exact cosmological models is weak) can be used to constrain mass profiles in clusters.

  18. White paper on power-efficient current drive and current profile control Tom Jarboe, Brian Nelson, George Marklin, Brian Victor, Cihan Akcay, Aaron Hossack, Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White paper on power-efficient current drive and current profile control Tom Jarboe, Brian Nelson power-efficient current drive and current profile control. Conventional RF and neutral beam current high recirculating power fraction in a fusion reactor.3 Lack of profile control causes disruptions,4

  19. The day the Dam Busters returned... in Canada Tom Chivers learns why Channel 4 asked engineers to rebuild Barnes Wallis's bouncing bomb.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    The day the Dam Busters returned... in Canada Tom Chivers learns why Channel 4 asked engineers to rebuild Barnes Wallis's bouncing bomb. Explosive: a scene from Channel 4?s new documentary about the Dam, at scale, under a plane, building a dam and blowing it up, is much more of an engineering exercise than

  20. 2546 IEEE 1`RANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. ED-32, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1985 their high-current drivability. However, their structure is so tom-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    2546 IEEE 1`RANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. ED-32, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1985 their high-current drivability. However, their structure is so tom- plicated that it is difficult to fabricate fine devices and high-deltsity IC's. This paper reports a new high-speed device utilizing a 21XEG heterostrucure, which

  1. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque CZO, suppldment au n012, Tom 41, ddcembre 1980, page C10-1 F.S. Stephens.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque CZO, suppldment au n012, Tom 41, ddcembre 1980, page C10-1 F.S. Stephens. NucZear Science Division, kwrence BerkeZey Laboratory, University of CaZifomzia, BerkeZey, CA

  2. Final report : results of the 2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Powhattan, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2006a). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The primary purposes of the investigation were to evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the former CCC/USDA property, determine the horizontal and vertical extent of potential contamination, conduct groundwater monitoring, and provide recommendations for future action.

  3. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  4. Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  5. Interim measure conceptual design for remediation of source area contamination at Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a conceptual design for the implementation of a non-emergency interim measure (IM) at the site of the grain storage facility formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Agra, Kansas. The IM is recommended to mitigate localized carbon tetrachloride contamination in the vadose zone soils at the former CCC/USDA facility and eliminate ongoing soil-to-groundwater contamination. The objectives of this IM conceptual design report include the following: 1. Obtain written acknowledgement from the Kansas Department of Health and the Environment (KDHE) that remediation on the former CCC/USDA property is required. 2. Provide information (IM description, justification for the IM, and project schedule) that the KDHE can include in a pending fact sheet. 3. Obtain KDHE approval for the IM conceptual design, so that the CCC/USDA can initiate a formal request for access to the privately owned property and proceed with preparation of a remedial design plan (RDP). Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne 2006) have demonstrated that soil and groundwater at the Agra site are contaminated with carbon tetrachloride. The levels in groundwater exceed the Kansas Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The soil and groundwater contamination identified at the former CCC/USDA facility currently poses no unacceptable health risks.

  6. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small independent producer to identify efficiently candidate reservoirs and also to predict the performance of horizontal well applications.

  7. Kansas Public radio Ticket Giveaway E-blast, 2012-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ," "Getting to Know You," "Hello Young Lovers," and "Shall We Dance." CLICK HERE to enter. Heather Styka, Saturday, June 14, 7:30 p.m., in Topeka When listeners describe singer-songwriter Heather Styka as an "old soul," the term applies to more than... in search of answers. From Kansas City Rep's new playwright-in-residence Nathan Louis Jackson. Winner can choose which performance to attend. CLICK HERE to enter. Bela Fleck, 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 15, Stiefel Theatre in Salina Banjoists Béla Fleck...

  8. Automated accountability of hazardous materials at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Depew, P.L.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), currently operated by AlliedSignal Inc. has developed a comprehensive Hazardous Material Information System (HMIS). The purpose of this system is to provide a practical and automated method to collect, analyze and distribute hazardous material information to DOE, KCP associates, and regulatory agencies. The drivers of the HMIS are compliance with OSHA Hazard Communications, SARA reporting, pollution prevention, waste minimization, control and tracking of hazards, and emergency response. This report provides a discussion of this system.

  9. A History of the Social Phases of the Temperance Movement in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacy, Lester D.

    1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    staff in the KU Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu S u b m i t t e d t o t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f Sociology and the Faculty of the Graduate School in part ial ful f i l lment of the requirements... Riot. (3) The First Laws. (4) A Petition to the Topeka Movement. (5) The First Liquor Vote in Lawrence, (6) The Liquor Law of 1859. (7) How the Liquor Business Fared under the License Lav;. (8) The First Temperance Organization in Kansas. (9...

  10. Argentine, Kansas: The Evolution of a Mexican American Community, 1905-1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Judith Fincher

    1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Gilmore end Theodore Wilson, further facilitated my training and research. Finally, 1 wish to thank my husband, Larry, for his penetrating critique of my work and his loving support* TABLE OF C O M T E N T S Page PREFACE il TABLE OF CONTENTS * v...'s Mexican population and that of other Mexican enclaves in Kansas City, as well as to Mexican-American bar- rios elsewhere in the United States. This study argues that w a v e s of immigration to Argen- tine varied in composition, largely because...

  11. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsberger, R.; Mosey, G.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing biomass at the Kansas City, Missouri, Municipal Farm site, a group of City-owned properties, is explored. The study that none of the technologies we reviewed--biomass heat, power and CHP--are economically viable options for the Municipal Farms site. However, if the site were to be developed around a future central biomass heating or CHP facility, biomass could be a good option for the site.

  12. Kansas City, Missouri, Summary of Reported Data From July 1, 2010 - September 30, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 |JulianProject PhaseKansas City,

  13. Co-evolution of Extreme Star Formation and Quasar: hints from {\\it Herschel} and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the public data from the Herschel very wide field surveys, we study the far-infrared properties of optical-selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Within the common area of $\\sim 172~deg^2$, we have identified the far-infrared counterparts for 372 quasars, among which 134 are highly secure detections in the Herschel 250$\\mu$m band (signal-to-noise ratios $\\geq 5$). This sample is the largest far-infrared quasar sample of its kind, and spans a wide redshift range of $0.14\\leq z \\leq 4.7$. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions are consistent with heated dust emission due to active star formation, and the vast majority of them ($\\gtrsim 80$\\%) have total infrared luminosities $L_{IR}>10^{12}L_{\\odot}$ and thus qualify as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. Their infrared luminosities are not correlated with the absolute magnitudes or the black hole masses of the quasars, which further support the interpretation that their far-infrared emissions are not due to their active galactic nucl...

  14. THE SLOAN BRIGHT ARCS SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF SEVEN NEW STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES FROM z = 0.66-2.94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Allam, Sahar S.; Drabek, Emily; Lin, Huan; Tucker, Douglas; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Diehl, H. Thomas; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Hao Jiangang; Kubik, Donna; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Wiesner, Matthew [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); West, Anderson [The Illinois Math and Science Academy, Aurora, IL 60506 (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of seven new, very bright gravitational lens systems from our ongoing gravitational lens search, the Sloan Bright Arcs Survey (SBAS). Two of the systems are confirmed to have high source redshifts z = 2.19 and z = 2.94. Three other systems lie at intermediate redshift with z = 1.33, 1.82, 1.93 and two systems are at low redshift z = 0.66, 0.86. The lensed source galaxies in all of these systems are bright, with i-band magnitudes ranging from 19.73 to 22.06. We present the spectrum of each of the source galaxies in these systems along with estimates of the Einstein radius for each system. The foreground lens in most systems is identified by a red sequence based cluster finder as a galaxy group; one system is identified as a moderately rich cluster. In total, SBAS has now discovered 19 strong lens systems in the SDSS imaging data, 8 of which are among the highest surface brightness z {approx_equal} 2-3 galaxies known.

  15. The Eleventh and Twelfth Data Releases of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final Data from SDSS-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Shadab; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F; Anderson, Scott F; Andrews, Brett H; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E; Beaton, Rachael L; Bender, Chad F; Berlind, Andreas A; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A Shelden; Brandt, W N; Brauer, D E; Brinkmann, J; Brown, Peter J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A C; Cuesta, Antonio J; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N; Da Rio, Nicola; Davenport, James R A; Dawson, Kyle S; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L; Edmondson, Edward M; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, J G; García-Hernández, D A; Pérez, Ana E García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Hernández, Jonay I González; Grebel, Eva K; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P; Lam, Charles R; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H; Mack, Claude E; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A G; Majewski, Steven R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L; McBride, Cameron K; McGehee, Peregrine M; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D; Newman, Jeffrey A; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C; Nidever, David L; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E; O'Connell, Julia E; O'Connell, Robert W; O'Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Audrey E; Oravetz, Daniel J; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K; Park, Changbom; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Pinsonneault, Marc H; de Mello, Gustavo F Porto; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Raddick, M Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C; Rockosi, Constance M; Rodrigues, Thaíse S; Rodríguez-Rottes, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Schlegel, David J; Schmidt, Sarah J; Schneider, Donald P; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D; Scóccola, C G; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Skrutskie, M F; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V; Sobreira, Flávia; Stassun, Keivan G; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E C; Tan, Jonathan C; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P; Wake, David A; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Weiner, Benjamin J; White, Martin; Wilson, John C; Wisniewski, John P; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 sq. deg of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 s...

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguri, Masamune [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); et al.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  18. Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    @BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

  19. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress is described for the Stewart field on the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress for the Savonburg Field includes: water plant development; profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); field operations; and technology transfer.

  20. A Case Study of American Bicycle Culture: How Cycling to Work Works in a Small Town in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carolina

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    reports on the results of a case study aimed at understanding how a small group of bicyclists make it work in a small military town in Kansas. The cyclists interviewed make it work by committing to biking to work, planning their lives around cycling...

  1. Carbon Sequestration in Turfgrass: An Eco-Friendly Benefit of Your Lawn Dale Bremer, Kansas State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration in Turfgrass: An Eco-Friendly Benefit of Your Lawn Dale Bremer, Kansas State read this have no doubt heard of carbon sequestration and may even be well versed on the topic. Others't the slightest clue about carbon sequestration and others may not even care. After all, what does carbon

  2. Empirical Assessment of Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms Designs under Aggressive Savings Goals: Case Study of a Kansas"Super-Utility"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving significant reductions in retail electric sales is becoming a priority for policymakers in many states and is echoed at the federal level with the introduction of legislation to establish a national energy efficiency resource standard. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. In response to an information request from the Kansas Corporation Commission staff, we conducted a financial analysis to assess the utility business case in Kansas for pursuing more aggressive energy efficiency that complies with recent state legislation. Kansas' utilities are vertically integrated and don't face retail competition. With historically low retail rates and modest experience with energy efficiency, the achievement of rapid and substantial sales reductions from energy efficiency will require a viable utility business model. Using a conglomerate of the three largest utilities in Kansas, we quantitatively illustrate the tradeoff between ratepayer and shareholder interests when a 1percent reduction in incremental sales is achieved through energy efficiency both with and without the impact of future carbon regulation. We then assess if the utility can be compensated in a manner that produces a sufficient business case but leaves an adequate amount of net resource benefits for ratepayers at a cost that is not overly burdensome. Finally, we show how several common shareholder incentive mechanisms would be designed to achieve this balance.

  3. The X-ray Properties of the Most-Luminous Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Just; W. N. Brandt; O. Shemmer; A. T. Steffen; D. P. Schneider; G. Chartas; G. P. Garmire

    2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing 21 new Chandra observations as well as archival Chandra, ROSAT, and XMM-Newton data, we study the X-ray properties of a representative sample of 59 of the most optically luminous quasars in the Universe (M_i~~-29.3 to -30.2) spanning a redshift range of z~~1.5-4.5. Our full sample consists of 32 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 (DR3) quasar catalog, two additional objects in the DR3 area that were missed by the SDSS selection criteria, and 25 comparably luminous quasars at z>~4. This is the largest X-ray study of such luminous quasars to date. By jointly fitting the X-ray spectra of our sample quasars, excluding radio-loud and broad absorption line (BAL) objects, we find a mean X-ray power-law photon index of Gamma=1.92^{+0.09}_{-0.08} and constrain any neutral intrinsic absorbing material to have a mean column density of N_Hluminous quasars. Our sample, excluding radio-loud and BAL quasars, has a mean X-ray-to-optical spectral slope of a_ox=-1.80+/-0.02, as well as no significant evolution of a_ox with redshift. We also comment upon the X-ray properties of a number of notable quasars, including an X-ray weak quasar with several strong narrow absorption-line systems, a mildly radio-loud BAL quasar, and a well-studied gravitationally lensed quasar.

  4. MEAN-FLUX-REGULATED PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS CONTINUUM FITTING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY Ly{alpha} FOREST SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Spergel, David N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Suzuki, Nao, E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuum fitting is an important aspect of Ly{alpha} forest science, since errors in the derived optical depths scale with the fractional continuum error. However, traditional methods of estimating continua in noisy and moderate-resolution spectra (e.g., Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS; S/N {approx}< 10 pixel{sup -1} and R {approx} 2000), such as power-law extrapolation or dividing by the mean spectrum, achieve no better than {approx}15% rms accuracy. To improve on this, we introduce mean-flux-regulated principal component analysis (MF-PCA) continuum fitting. In this technique, PCA fitting is carried out redward of the quasar Ly{alpha} line in order to provide a prediction for the shape of the Ly{alpha} forest continuum. The slope and amplitude of this continuum prediction is then corrected using external constraints for the Ly{alpha} forest mean flux. This requires prior knowledge of the mean flux, (F), but significantly improves the accuracy of the flux transmission, F {identical_to} exp (- {tau}), estimated from each pixel. From tests on mock spectra, we find that MF-PCA reduces the errors to 8% rms in S/N {approx} 2 spectra, and <5% rms in spectra with S/N {approx}> 5. The residual Fourier power in the continuum is decreased by a factor of a few in comparison with dividing by the mean continuum, enabling Ly{alpha} flux power spectrum measurements to be extended to {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign larger scales. Using this new technique, we make available continuum fits for 12,069 z > 2.3 Ly{alpha} forest spectra from SDSS Data Release 7 for use by the community. This technique is also applicable to future releases of the ongoing Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey, which obtains spectra for {approx}150, 000 Ly{alpha} forest spectra at low signal-to-noise (S/N {approx} 2).

  5. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009 (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This comprehensive case study describes technical assistance provided by NREL to help Greensburg, Kansas, rebuild as a green community after an EF-5 tornado nearly leveled the town in 2007.

  6. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This comprehensive case study describes technical assistance provided by NREL to help Greensburg, Kansas, rebuild as a green community after an EF-5 tornado nearly leveled the town in 2007.

  7. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in groundwater only at well GW01. No evidence of contamination was found in other monitoring wells and piezometers. This pattern is consistent with findings of previous investigations. The findings of the 2007 targeted investigation clearly demonstrate that the former CCC/USDA facility at Hilton was not the source of the carbon tetrachloride contamination persistently detected in well GW01. Well GW01 is approximately 300 ft upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. This well is the only sampling location at Hilton where carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater has ever been identified. The CCC/USDA never operated grain storage facilities on the property on which well GW01 is located.

  8. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

    1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were 1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, 2) design and construction of a water injection system, 3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, 4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and 5) technology transfer. Tasks 1-3 have been completed and water injection began in October 1995. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) identification of operational problems, 3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, 4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) waterplant optimization, 3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and 4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period is subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were 1) waterplant development, 2) profile modification treatments, 3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, 4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), 5) field operations, and 6) technology transfer.

  9. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were (1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, (2) design and construction of a water injection system, (3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, (4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and (5) technology transfer. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) waterplant optimization, (3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and (4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were (1) waterplant development, (2) profile modification treatments, (3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, (4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), (5) field operations, and (6) technology transfer.

  10. Radionuclide site survey report, Ashland, Kansas (RN-74). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, F.; Lucas, J.; Owen, M.; McKethan, E.M.; MacCartney, J.

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to validate that the Ashland, Kansas site will fulfill treaty requirements as set forth by the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization. The team performing the site survey followed accepted scientific methods in collecting air and soil samples near the proposed site. The samples were analyzed by the McClellan Central Laboratory and the results forwarded to AFTAC/TM for review. The team included meteorological and technical staff. Possible sources of radionuclides were examined, as well as meteorological conditions that might affect the validity of recorded data at the site. All necessary background information required by the Commission was researched and is included in the report. The analysis of the samples identifies all radionuclide isotopes and their sources that might affect future samples at the site. There are no significant findings that would prevent this site from meeting treaty requirements.

  11. Stratigraphic architecture of the Tonganoxie Paleovalley Fill (Lower Virgilian) in Northeastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, H.R. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Gibling, M.R.; Wightman, W.G. [Dalhousie Univ., Nova Scotia (Canada)] [and others

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower Pennsylvanian paleovalley-confined sandstones are important petroleum reservoirs in the Midwest. In Kansas, such reservoirs have produced approximately 220 million bbl of oil and 1.7 tcf of gas. Valley-fill successions tend to become muddy upward, but there can be considerable local heterogeneity in which reservoir sandstones pass laterally into muddy sandstones or nonreservoir shales. The lack of understanding of this reservoir heterogeneity can lead to low drilling success rates. The Tonganoxie paleovalley (Upper Pennsylvanian, northeastern Kansas) contains facies very similar to Lower Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) valley fills, and can provide an outcrop- and subsurface-based model of sandstone deposition. The Tonganoxie paleovalley was incised during lowered sea level and filled during the subsequent transgression. Sandstones occur in four distinct architectural elements that were deposited during different phases of transgression. Type I sandstone consists of a belt of sandstone and conglomerate 3-18 m thick and confined to the trunk valley and wider portions of tributary valleys. Type I sandstone consists of amalgamated channel fills, has little or no mud, and has the highest porosity and permeability. The type I sandstone is overlain by estuarine deposits of sandstone (type II sandstones), rippled argillaceous sandstone to sandy mudstone, and coal. Most of the paleovalley was filled during this stage. The type II sandstones are narrow (1.5 km wide) arcuate bodies up to 8 km long and were likely deposited in tidal point bars near the fluvial to tidal transition, are either isolated sandstone bodies or are incised into type I sandstone. Type III sandstone bodies occur at the upstream limits of narrow tributaries and are probably bay-head deltas. Well logs indicate a range of mud content. Type IV sandstone is a thin (3 m) discontinuous sheet of marine sandstone deposited after most of the paleovalley had been filled.

  12. Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

  13. Naturally occurring hydrogen gas from a borehole on the western flank of Nemaha anticline in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goebel, E.D.; Coveney, R.M. Jr.; Angino, E.E.; Zeller, E.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since August 1982, the CFA 1 Scott well in Sec. 20, T14S, R6E, Morris County, Kansas, located about 14 mi (23 km) south of Junction City, has yielded a gas composed of 50 +/- 10% free hydrogen, 50 +/- 10% nitrogen, and only traces of hydrocarbons. This analysis has been ascertained by gas chromatography and mass spectrography of samples taken over a period of 6 months. The reservoir rock is a Kinderhook sand from 2176 to 2196 ft (663 to 669m) depth. The gas samples analyzed are accumulating in the head space above a fluid level (salt water) of 1805 ft (550m) from a botton-hole depth of 2197 ft (670m). The Scott well is located on the western flank of the complexly faulted Nemaha anticline, updip from the central North American rift system and 30 mi (48 km) south of Riley County where serpentinized kimberlites occur. The geothermal gradient is 30/sup 0/C/km (87/sup 0/F/mi). Basement rock beneath the well is granite, probably overlying deeply buried magnetic rocks. No single mechanism is responsible solely for generating this H/sub 2/-rich gas from the Scott well; rather, a combination of fortuitous geologic and possibly biologic processes are contributing in various proportions to the production of the H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/. Conceivably, the local geologic setting merely is circumstantial and unrelated to the genesis of the gases. However, in view of its spatial association with the central North American rift Zone, a major geologic feature with similarity to the East Pacific Rise, the Kansas gas occurrence warrants additional study.

  14. Depositional environments of Wood Siding Formation and Onaga Shale (Pennsylvanian-Permian), northeast Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisby, C.G.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eastern Kansas sedimentary deposits of the Wood Siding Formation and the Onaga Shale are recognized as products of Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian cyclic sedimentation. Reconstruction of depositional events associated with the units is important in understanding cyclic sedimentation in the Mid-Continent. In Kansas, the Wood Siding Formation-Onaga Shale outcrop belt trends nearly parallel to the Nemaha anticline in an approximately northeast-southwest direction. Detailed field studies of 26 stratigraphic sections (nine measured and described in detail) in the northeastern part of this belt provide the basis for interpretation of the depositional environments of the two formations. Results of this study indicate that variations in water depth/distance from shore, controlled by late Paleozoic structural features and eustatic sea level changes, were the major factors controlling sedimentation. On the basis of lithologic and paleontologic characteristics, four fifth-order transgressive-regressive (T-R) units, with periodicities of 300,000 to 500,000 years, have been identified within the Wood Siding Formation and the Onaga Shale. At least five sixth-order T-R units, with periodicities of 50,000 to 130,000 years or less, have also been identified within the two formations. The boundaries between sixth-order T-R units are represented by thin, laterally persistent marine units or by climate change surfaces. Paleogeographic reconstructions, based on the correlation of sixth-order T-R units, provide strong evidence for a northeast-southwest-trending shoreline during Wood Siding-Onaga time. The most marine sedimentary rocks are in the southern part of the study area and contain a diverse marine fossil assemblage. Channel facies with pyritized and coalified plant fossils are more common in the northern part of the outcrop belt and suggest marshy to swampy depositional conditions.

  15. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

  16. The quest for Type 2 quasars: Chandra observations of luminous obscured quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Vignali; D. M. Alexander; A. Comastri

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on new Chandra exploratory observations of six candidate Type 2 quasars at z=0.49-0.73 selected among the most [OIII] luminous emitters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Under the assumption that [OIII] is a proxy for the intrinsic luminosity of the central source, their predicted rest-frame X-ray luminosities are L(2-10keV)~10^45 erg/s. For two of the targets, the photon statistics are good enough to allow for basic X-ray spectral analyses, which indicate the presence of intrinsic absorption (~10^{22-23} cm^-2) and luminous X-ray emission (L_X>10^44 erg/s). Of the remaining four targets, two are detected with only a few (3-6) X-ray counts, and two are undetected by Chandra. If these four sources have the large intrinsic X-ray luminosities predicted by the [OIII] emission, then their nuclei must be heavily obscured (N_H>few 10^23 cm^-2) and some might be Compton thick (N_H>1.5 10^24 cm^-2). We also present the results for two Type 2 quasar candidates serendipitously lying in the fields of the Chandra targets, and provide an up-to-date compilation of the X-ray properties of eight additional SDSS Type 2 quasars from archival Chandra and XMM-Newton observations (five with moderate-quality X-ray data). The combined sample of 16 SDSS Type 2 quasars (10 X-ray detections) provides further evidence that a considerable fraction of optically selected Type 2 quasars are obscured in the X-ray band (at least all the objects with moderate-quality X-ray spectra), lending further support to the findings presented in Vignali, Alexander and Comastri (2004a) and unification schemes of Active Galactic Nuclei, and confirms the reliability of [OIII] emission in predicting the X-ray emission in obscured quasars.

  17. THE BARYONIC ACOUSTIC FEATURE AND LARGE-SCALE CLUSTERING IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY LUMINOUS RED GALAXY SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazin, Eyal A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Scoccimarro, Roman [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); McBride, Cameron K.; Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Czarapata, Paul [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kent, Stephen M. [MS 127, Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Szalay, Alexander S., E-mail: eyalkazin@gmail.co [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the correlation function xi of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy sample at large scales (60 h {sup -1} Mpc < s < 400 h {sup -1} Mpc) using the final data release (DR7). Focusing on a quasi-volume-limited (0.16 < z < 0.36) subsample and utilizing mock galaxy catalogs, we demonstrate that the observed baryonic acoustic peak and larger scale signal are consistent with LAMBDACDM at 70%-95% confidence. Fitting data to a non-linear, redshift-space, template-based model, we constrain the peak position at s{sub p} = 101.7+- 3.0 h {sup -1} Mpc when fitting the range 60 h {sup -1} Mpc < s < 150 h {sup -1} Mpc (1sigma uncertainties). This redshift-space distance s{sub p} is related to the comoving sound horizon scale r{sub s} after taking into account matter-clustering non-linearities, redshift distortions, and galaxy-clustering bias. Mock catalogs show that the probability that a DR7-sized sample would not have an identifiable peak is at least {approx}10%. As a consistency check of a fiducial cosmology, we use the observed s{sub p} to obtain the distance D{sub V}{identical_to}((1+z){sup 2}D{sup 2}{sub A}cz/H(z)){sup 1/3} relative to the acoustic scale. We find r{sub s} /D{sub V} (z = 0.278) = 0.1389 +- 0.0043. This result is in excellent agreement with Percival et al., who examine roughly the same data set, but use the power spectrum. Comparison with other determinations in the literature are also in very good agreement. The signal of the full sample at 125 h {sup -1} Mpc < s < 200 h {sup -1} Mpc tends to be high relative to theoretical expectations; this slight deviation can probably be attributed to sample variance. We have tested our results against a battery of possible systematic effects, finding all effects are smaller than our estimated sample variance.

  18. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near-term. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites, Stewart Field, and Savonburg Field, operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. General topics to be addressed are: (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization; and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. For the Stewart Field project, work is summarized for the last quarter on waterflood operations and reservoir management. For the Savonburg Field project, work on water plant development, and pattern changes and wellbore cleanup are briefly described.

  19. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 2, Second quarter report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.; Maier, M.A.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This concludes the sixth quarter that Kansas State University has been under contract to the US Department of Energy and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program to demonstrate electric vehicle technology. The G-Van continues to perform within acceptable limits, although the batteries and the charger have caused some problems. Dave Harris, Chloride, has been working with K-State to correct these problems. It may very well be that the limited mileage (less than 25 miles) can be increased by extending the charge cycle (overcharging) the batteries. Soleq Corp. has failed to deliver contracted vehicles. A dual shaft electric propulsion minivan, built by Eaton Corp. in 1987, will be shipped here. On the infrastructure side, EHV Corp. is developing curbside and home charging stations.

  20. Structure of the southern Keweenawan rift from COCORP surveys across the Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly in northeastern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serpa, L.; Setzer, T.; Farmer, H.; Brown, L.; Oliver, J.; Kaufman, S.; Sharp, J.; Steeples, Don W.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    survey also provided information on other aspects of the cratonic basement, such as the struc- ture of the Nemaha ridge and the distribu- tion of major horizons within the deep crust. These subjects are mentioned here but are discussed more... they may provide additional information on the nature of crustal rocks [L. Serpa, manu- Serpa et al.: Structure of Southern Keweenawan Rift 371 KANSAS LI -80 west Nemaha Uplift Big Springs vp no 2000 4 3 0  1000  2 o  ; --'r...

  1. BETTY ANN TITTLE TATTLE REPRODUCES THE UPPER CLASS: GENDER AND BOUNDARY WORK IN KANSAS CITY, 1924-1934

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Nicole Kristin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than they did men's, reflecting power inequalities within Kansas City's upper class. Theory As I will argue, upper-class women drew moral boundaries against people from other classes in order to justify the exclusivity of elite organizations... through these networks; (3) economic capital, or wealth; and (4) symbolic capital, or "the power to 5 define the worth and legitimacy of various kinds of capital" (Beisel 1997: 214). Individuals and families attempt to maximize their holdings...

  2. Paleoecology and depositional environment of Fort Hays Limestone Member, Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1972-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Sigma Xi, and Indiana University. STRATIGRAPHY AND PETROGRAPHY PHYSICAL STRATIGRAPHIC SETTING The Niobrara Chalk, as presently defined, is the uppermost formation of the Colorado Group (Zeller, 1968, pl. 1). Units of this group comprise about 900 ) feet... each unit of the Colorado Group. It may therefore be present at any stratigraphie level of the Niobrara. In west-central Kansas the Ogallala has been stripped away by erosion along the major stream valleys, except for scattered lag deposits...

  3. Kansas Air Quality Act (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person shall construct, own, operate, install, alter or use any air contaminant emission stationary source which, in accordance with rules and regulations, the secretary finds may cause or...

  4. Kansas Air Quality Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All new air contaminant emission sources or alterations to emission sources that are required to be reported shall be in compliance with all applicable emission control regulations at the time that...

  5. Technical action plan at former Commodity Credit Corporation grain storage sites in Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the US Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), to provide an outline for a multiyear plan for technical investigations at sites in Kansas and Nebraska that have been identified as having groundwater contamination. Carbon tetrachloride is the primary contaminant of concern at sites in Nebraska and Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. At this time, no former CCC/USDA grain bin sites in Iowa and Missouri have been determined to have contamination at or above the maximum concentration level (MCL). This document represents a second revision to an original plan proposed by the CCC/USDA in January 1992 (Technical Action Plan at Former Commodity Credit Corporation Grain Storage Sites in Nebraska and Kansas). The CCC/USDA recognizes the need to address the reported groundwater contamination problems in a timely manner. Doing so will protect public drinking water supplies, public health, and the environment. To address these groundwater contamination problems, the CCC/USDA has committed and continues to commit resources and funding to investigate the contaminated sites further.

  6. Final report : results of aquifer pumping and groundwater sampling at Everest, Kansas, in January-March 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 8-9, 2005, representatives of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), and Argonne National Laboratory met at the KDHE's offices in Topeka to review the status of the CCC/USDA's environmental activities in Kansas. As a result of this meeting, the KDHE recommended several additional activities to augment the CCC/USDA's investigations at Everest, Kansas, and assist in the selection of remedial approaches to be evaluated as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for this site. The requested actions included the following: (1) Construction of several additional interpretive cross sections illustrating the hydrogeologic setting along the apparent main plume migration pathway to the north-northwest of the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the Nigh property. (2) Installation of additional permanent monitoring wells, to better constrain the apparent western, northern, and northwestern margins of the existing groundwater plume. (3) Development of technical recommendations for a phased pumping study of the Everest aquifer unit in the area near and to the north of the Nigh property.

  7. Final Phase II Report : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. (Environmental Research)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia from 1949 until 1971. Subsequently, a concrete mixing plant operated on the site (FSA 1997). None of the CCC/USDA structures remain, though belowgrade foundations related to structures associated with the concrete mixing operations are evident. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility (Figure 1.1). The property on which the former facility was located is currently owned by Jeanne Burdett Lacky of Seneca, Kansas. In August-September 1998 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility, on the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the domestic well at the Don Morris residence (north of the former CCC/USDA facility). Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. The details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of the findings were reported previously (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE detected carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might be related to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the former facility near Centralia and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The town of Centralia and all residents near the former CCC/USDA facility currently obtain their water from Rural Water District No.3. Therefore, local residents are not drinking or using the contaminated groundwater detected at the former facility. The Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory is performing the investigation at Centralia on behalf of the CCC/USDA. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these former facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite{reg_sign} environmental site characterization methodology. QuickSite is Argonne's proprietary implementation system for the expedited site characterization process. This methodology has been applied successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Nebraska and Kansas and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. Argonne's investigations are conducted with a phased approach. Phase I focuses primarily on the investigation and evaluation of geology, hydrogeology, and hydrogeochemistry to identify potential contaminant pathways at a site. Phase II focuses on delineating the contamination present in both soil and aquifers along the potential migration pathways. Phase I of Argonne's investigation was conducted in March-April 2002. The results and findings of the Phase I investigation at Centralia were reported previously (Argonne 2003). This report documents the findings of the Phase II activities at Centralia. Section 1 provides a brief history of the area, a review of the Phase I results and conclusions, technical objectives for the Phase II investigation, and a brief description of the sections contained in this report. Section 2 describes the investigative methods used during the Phase II investigation. Section 3 presents all of the data obtained during the investigation. Se

  8. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

  9. Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado, UCB 419, Boulder, CO 80309; kenneth.younge@colorado.edu MIT Sloan School of Management, 100 Main Street, E62-478, Cambridge, MA 02142; mmarx@mit.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    that they capture value from the knowledge that they create. Firms earn supranormal returns only to the extent.younge@colorado.edu MIT Sloan School of Management, 100 Main Street, E62-478, Cambridge, MA 02142; mmarx@mit.edu The Market Value of Knowledge Protection: Evidence from a Natural Experiment Kenneth A. Younge Matt Marx

  10. The utility of continual reservoir description: An example from Bindley Field, Western Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.A. (Energy Foundation Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)); Budd, D.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continual revision of geologic reservoir description is an important component of reservoir management. New data should be incorporated into existing reservoir models in light of evolving geologic concepts. Revisions may have significant impacts on the approach and success of reservoir management strategies. A reevaluation of Bindley field (Mississippian), Hodgeman County, Kansas, serves as an illustration of this process. Prior study of this field suggested that the reservoir interval is comprised of a single, relatively uniform facies (bryozoan dolomite) having no apparent internal structure. A waterflood attempt based on this concept of reservoir architecture resulted in minimal response. A revised model of reservoir architecture and petrophysics resulted from integration of new core data, a new stratigraphic correlation scheme, updated well production histories, and capillary pressure data. The revised geologic model reveals specific methods to improve primary recovery and rectify the poor waterflood performance. These methods include selective perforation of all oil-saturated type I flow units to optimize primary recovery and remedial waterflood design to assure continuity of fluid flow between injection and production wells. 19 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Eighteen. Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Kansas governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectroscopic Lens Search. I. Discovery of Intermediate-Redshift Star-Forming Galaxies Behind Foreground Luminous Red Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam S. Bolton; Scott Burles; David J. Schlegel; Daniel J. Eisenstein; J. Brinkmann

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a catalog of 49 spectroscopic strong gravitational lens candidates selected from a Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample of 50996 luminous red galaxies. Potentially lensed star-forming galaxies are detected through the presence of background oxygen and hydrogen nebular emission lines in the spectra of these massive foreground galaxies. This multiline selection eliminates the ambiguity of single-line identification and provides a very promising sample of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems at low to intermediate redshift, with foreground redshifts ranging from 0.16 to 0.49 and background redshifts from 0.25 to 0.81. Any lenses confirmed within our sample would be important new probes of early-type galaxy mass distributions, providing complementary constraints to those obtained from currently known lensed high-redshift quasars.

  13. The life cycle of Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi S. A. Forbes in Leavenworth County State Lake, Kansas, U.S.A. (Copepoda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE LIFE CYCLE OF CYCLOPS BICUSPIDATUS THOMASI S. A. FORBES IN LEAVENWORTH C O U N T Y STATE LAKE, KANSAS, U.S.A. (COPEPODA) BY KENNETH B. ARMITAGE and JERRY C. TASH *) Department of Zoology, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, U....S.A. LIFE CYCLE OF CYCLOPS 95 (1956), who collected from Woods Reservoir, Tennessee, concluded that C. b. thomasi is a cold water copepod that appears in winter and early spring collections and disappears before mid May. The aestival season is spent...

  14. A Comparison of E-book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Julie; Roach, Jennifer; Emde, Judith; McEathron, Scott R.; Russell, Keith

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee Lawrence Campus (HSCL), University of Kansas, 2385 Irving Hill Road, Lawrence, Kansas 66045­ 7563, email irb@ku.edu. Judith Emde (785)864­4931 jemde@ku.edu Scott McEathron (785)864­4662 macmap68@ku.edu Jennifer Roach (785)864­5532 jwroach@ku.edu Keith Russell (785... Julie Waters Physics-Math-Astronomy Librarian jwaters@ku.edu Jennifer Roach E-Sciences Librarian for Engineering jwroach@ku.edu Judith Emde Assistant Dean for Content and Access Services jemde@ku.edu Scott McEathron Head, Center for Graduate...

  15. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  16. Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranz, Dwight Stanley

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are replaced lat- er ally by channel-fill sequences. The channel-fi 11 sequence is aener- ally 50 to 90 ft (16. 4 to 29. 5 m) thick and is composed of interlami- nated siltstones and shale. The channel-fill sediments are fine grained to clay size... structures, shale character, and soft sediment deformational features in the Middle Bartles- ville Sandstone, J. Lips 1 (JL 1) and Henry Smith 1 (HS 1), South Bartlett Area, LaBette County, Kansas. LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page 12 13 14...

  17. Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranz, Dwight Stanley

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are replaced lat- er ally by channel-fill sequences. The channel-fi 11 sequence is aener- ally 50 to 90 ft (16. 4 to 29. 5 m) thick and is composed of interlami- nated siltstones and shale. The channel-fill sediments are fine grained to clay size... structures, shale character, and soft sediment deformational features in the Middle Bartles- ville Sandstone, J. Lips 1 (JL 1) and Henry Smith 1 (HS 1), South Bartlett Area, LaBette County, Kansas. LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page 12 13 14...

  18. Kansas Populist Newspaper Editorial Response to the Homestead and Pullman Strikes: An Application of Sewell’s Theory of Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carruthers, Bruce

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    years, rainfall was insufficient to produce crops at all (Hicks 1931; McNall 1988; miller, worth robert 1996; miner 2002, 171; miner 1986). if the drought was not bad enough, falling crop prices soon added to the region’s woes. u.s. overproduction.... hese conditions continued well into the 1890s (miller, worth obert 1996:246; farmer 1924; Goodwyn 1978; miner 1986). the combination of drought and falling prices was a calamity for Kansas. land values and real estate transactions decreased pre...

  19. Color No Longer A Sign of Bondage: Race, Identity and the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment (1862-1865)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringquist, John Paul

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fremont’s Proclamation, Lincoln modified it, but not before large numbers of Missouri slaves flooded the Union lines, and crossed into Kansas. Lane, who was campaigning in Missouri as part of Fremont’s forces, eagerly distributed copies of Fremont... arguments of black timidity and cowardice in the face of white soldiers, as well as the racist demon of black savagery and danger of bloody slave uprisings. John Brown’s ghost haunted Americans on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, and the possibility...

  20. Fourier Analysis Tom Leinster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    functions. (For recall that every power series is infinitely differen- tiable inside its disk of convergence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 D2 The dual of a finite abelian group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 D3 Fourier transforms The algebraist thinks: `Analysis is hard. Can we reduce it to algebra?' Idea Use power series. 1 Many functions f