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Sample records for toiyabe nf lessee

  1. USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Jump to: navigation, search Name: USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Abbreviation: Humbolt-Toiyabe NF Address: 1200 Franklin Way Place:...

  2. NVN-079292 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1980.23 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  3. NVN-074253 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  4. NVN-074250 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1199 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  5. NVN-077646 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 80 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  6. NVN-079352 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1160 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  7. NVN-074254 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  8. NVN-079310 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 655 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  9. NVN-079667 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1920 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  10. NVN-079664 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  11. NVN-079276 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 640 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  12. NVN-079291 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 612006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  13. NVN-079666 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 712005 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  14. NVN-078688 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 REESE RIVER GEO POWER LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012004 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  15. NVN-079665 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 712005 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  16. NVN-079307 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 712006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  17. NVN-079106 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 ORNI 16 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 10% - 5% - 5% Most...

  18. NVN-077647 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 612006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  19. NVN-079662 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 6302015 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  20. NVN-074249 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  1. NVN-079663 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 712005 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  2. NVN-078687 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 REESE RIVER GEO POWER LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012004 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  3. NVN-079668 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 712005 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  4. NVN-080159 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 NGP BLUE MOUNTAIN I LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 7312016 Expire Date Held By...

  5. NVN-079105 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2356.36 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 ORNI 16...

  6. NVN-077739 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1271.82 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 PATUA...

  7. NVN-079305 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1811.109 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  8. NVN-079104 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2480.99 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 ORNI 16...

  9. NVN-080086 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 650.32 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 NGP BLUE...

  10. NVN-079306 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2140.53 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager TOIYABE NF Lessee 1 GRADIENT...

  11. NF Energy Saving Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NF Energy Saving Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: NF Energy Saving Corp Place: Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China Sector: Services Product: China-based company provides...

  12. The REMOTE SENSlNf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REMOTE SENSlNf ' . 1 ARllRllRRv OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY . . . . .a. * ~~&hrEAWWMms Gap ~~&hrEAwwMms Gap ECT FOLLdW-UP REPORT ECT FOLLdW-UP REPORT NOVEMBER 1979 NOVEMBER 1979 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE CURTIS BAY FACILITY OF THE W. FL GRACE COMPANY Baltimore, Maryland t. Kent Hilton Project Scientist APPROVED FORPUBLlCATlON ' : T. P. Stuart, Manager Remote Sensing Sciences Department ATTACHMENT 4- ECT Follow-Up Report AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE

  13. CMRR-NF Supplemental EIS Scoping Comments | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office of General Counsel National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) NEPA Reading Room CMRR-NF Supplemental EIS Scoping Comments CMRR-NF Supplemental EIS Scoping Comments...

  14. ARM - VAP Product - aerich2nf1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsaerinfaerich2nf1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.54391027273 What is this? Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse...

  15. ARM - VAP Product - aerich1nf1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsaerinfaerich1nf1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.54391027272 What is this? Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse...

  16. CACA-011667 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Manager INYO NF Lessee 1 MAMMOTH-PACIFIC LP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 311982 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-Actual HBP Date 12221990...

  17. CACA-011672 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    provided Surface Manager INYO NF Lessee 1 ORNI 10 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 111982 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-Actual HBP Date 12311998...

  18. CACA-014408 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Manager INYO NF Lessee 1 MAMMOTH-PACIFIC LP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 7191983 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-Actual HBP Date 782006...

  19. AZA-009191 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  20. AZA-009190 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  1. AZA-009186 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  2. UTU-085605 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 2441.53 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FISHLAKE NF Lessee 1 ENEL...

  3. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible ... the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-B signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. ...

  4. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  5. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration

  6. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  7. Coal dust contiguity-induced changes in the concentration of TNF- and NF- B p65 on the ocular surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Z.Y.; Hong, J.; Liu, Z.Y.; Jin, X.D.; Gu, C.H.

    2009-07-01

    To observe the influence of coal dust on ocular surface of coal miners and rabbits with coal dust contiguity on expression TNF- and NF- Bp65 and dry eye occurrence. Expression TNF- and NF- Bp65 in ocular surface were determined. Results showed tear production, BUT and lysozyme decreased for coal miners and rabbits with coal dust contiguity. Coal dust exposure was linked to development of xerophthalmia, and induced a higher expression of NF- B p65 and TNF- perhaps as a mechanism to resist coal dust ocular surface injury.

  8. Agreement Execution Process Study: CRADAs and NF-WFO Agreements and the Speed of Business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrer, Bruce J.; Cejka, Cheryl L.; Macklin, Richard; Miksovic, Ann

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a study on the execution of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and Non-Federal Work for Others (NF-WFO) agreements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory complex. The study provides quantitiative estimates of times required to negotiate and execute these agreements across the DOE complex. It identifies factors impacting on cycle times and describes best practicies used at various laboratories and site offices that reduce cycle times.

  9. CACA-014407 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2561.25 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager INYO NF Lessee 1 ORNI 51 LLC...

  10. AZA-009169 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (40 Acres) Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2560 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT W H...

  11. AZA-009170 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (40 Acres) Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1920 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT W H...

  12. AZA-009168 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (40 Acres) Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2005 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT W H...

  13. AZA-009175 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (40 Acres) Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2190 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager COCONINO NF Lessee 1 HUNT W H...

  14. Constitutive NF-?B activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Jin Sil; Lee, Sora; Yoo, Young Do

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-?B. Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-?B activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-?B and transcriptional activity through constitutive I?B? phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-?B activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development.

  15. FY13 Summary Report on the Augmentation of the Spent Fuel Composition Dataset for Nuclear Forensics: SFCOMPO/NF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Lyons, Jennifer A.; Collins, Brian A.; Livingston, James V.

    2014-03-31

    This report documents the FY13 efforts to enhance a dataset of spent nuclear fuel isotopic composition data for use in developing intrinsic signatures for nuclear forensics. A review and collection of data from the open literature was performed in FY10. In FY11, the Spent Fuel COMPOsition (SFCOMPO) excel-based dataset for nuclear forensics (NF), SFCOMPO/NF was established and measured data for graphite production reactors, Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) were added to the dataset and expanded to include a consistent set of data simulated by calculations. A test was performed to determine whether the SFCOMPO/NF dataset will be useful for the analysis and identification of reactor types from isotopic ratios observed in interdicted samples.

  16. Ascorbic acid suppresses endotoxemia and NF-?B signaling cascade in alcoholic liver fibrosis in guinea pigs: A mechanistic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhilash, P.A.; Harikrishnan, R.; Indira, M.

    2014-01-15

    Alcohol consumption increases the small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and intestinal permeability of endotoxin. The endotoxin mediated inflammatory signaling plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. We evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), silymarin and alcohol abstention on the alcohol induced endotoxemia and NF-?B activation cascade pathway in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Guinea pigs were administered ethanol at a daily dose of 4 g/kg b.wt for 90 days. After 90 days, ethanol administration was stopped. The ethanol treated animals were divided into abstention, silymarin (250 mg/kg b.wt) and AA (250 mg/kg b.wt) supplemented groups and maintained for 30 days. The SIBO, intestinal permeability and endotoxin were significantly increased in the ethanol group. The mRNA expressions of intestinal proteins claudin, occludin and zona occludens-1 were significantly decreased in ethanol group. The mRNA levels of inflammatory receptors, activity of IKK? and the protein expressions of phospho-I?B?, NF-?B, TNF-?, TGF-?{sub 1} and IL-6 were also altered in ethanol group. The expressions of fibrosis markers ?-SMA, ?{sub 1} (I) collagen and sirius red staining in the liver revealed the induction of fibrosis. But the supplementation of AA could induce greater reduction of ethanol induced SIBO, intestinal barrier defects, NF-?B activation and liver fibrosis than silymarin. The possible mechanism may be the inhibitory effect of AA on SIBO, intestinal barrier defect and IKK?, which decreased the activation of NF-?B and synthesis of cytokines. This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. - Highlights: Alcohol increases intestinal bacterial overgrowth and permeability of endotoxin. Endotoxin mediated inflammation plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. Ascorbic acid reduces endotoxemia, NF-?B activation and proinflammatory cytokines. AA's action is by inhibition of SIBO, IKK? and alteration of intestinal permeability. This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis.

  17. Interleukin 6 promotes endometrial cancer growth through an autocrine feedback loop involving ERKNF-?B signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, Qi; Liu, Bin-Ya; Wang, Fang-Yuan; He, Yin-Yan; Lu, Wen; Liao, Yun; Gu, Wei; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: IL-6 could promote endometrial cancer cells proliferation. IL-6 promotes its own production through an autocrine feedback loop. ERK and NF-?B pathway inhibitors inhibit IL-6 production and tumor growth. IL-6 secretion relies on the activation of ERKNF-?B pathway axis. An orthotopic nude endometrial carcinoma model confirms the effect of IL-6. - Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-6 as an inflammation factor, has been proved to promote cancer proliferation in several human cancers. However, its role in endometrial cancer has not been studied clearly. Previously, we demonstrated that IL-6 promoted endometrial cancer progression through local estrogen biosynthesis. In this study, we proved that IL-6 could directly stimulate endometrial cancer cells proliferation and an autocrine feedback loop increased its production even after the withdrawal of IL-6 from the medium. Next, we analyzed the mechanism underlying IL-6 production in the feedback loop and found that its production and IL-6-stimulated cell proliferation were effectively blocked by pharmacologic inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) and extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, activation of ERK was upstream of the NF-?B pathways, revealing the hierarchy of this event. Finally, we used an orthotopic nude endometrial carcinoma model to confirm the effects of IL-6 on the tumor progression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-6 promotes endometrial carcinoma growth through an expanded autocrine regulatory loop and implicate the ERKNF-?B pathway as a critical mediator of IL-6 production, implying IL-6 to be an important therapeutic target in endometrial carcinoma.

  18. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Guangkuan; Di, Zhiyong; Zhao, Qingjie

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  19. Thermal Reactions of Uranium Metal, UO2, U3O8, UF4, and UO2F2 with NF3 to Produce UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Edwards, Matthew K.

    2009-11-01

    he objective of this paper is to demonstrate that NF3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO2, UF4, UO3, U3O8, and UO2F22H2O to produce the volatile UF6 at temperatures between 100 and 500?C. Thermogravimetric reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium oxidation state and discrete chemical speciation. Differences in the onset temperatures for each system indicate that NF3-substrate interactions are important for the temperature at which NF3 reacts: U metal > UO3 > UO2 > UO2F2 > UF4 and in fact may indicate different fluorination mechanisms for these various substrates. These studies demonstrate that NF3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in oft-proposed actinide volatility reprocessing.

  20. Microstructural evolution of NF709 (20Cr–25Ni–1.5MoNbTiN) under neutron irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Byoungkoo; Tan, Lizhen; Xu, C.; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Meimei

    2015-12-30

    In this study, because of its superior creep and corrosion resistance as compared with general austenitic stainless steels, NF709 has emerged as a candidate structural material for advanced nuclear reactors. To obtain fundamental information about the radiation resistance of this material, this study examined the microstructural evolution of NF709 subjected to neutron irradiation to 3 displacements per atom at 500 °C. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-energy x-ray diffraction were employed to characterize radiation-induced segregation, Frank loops, voids, as well as the formation and reduction of precipitates. Radiation hardening of ~76% was estimated by nanoindentation, approximately consistent withmore » the calculation according to the dispersed barrier-hardening model, suggesting Frank loops as the primary hardening source.« less

  1. Microstructural evolution of NF709 (20Cr25Ni1.5MoNbTiN) under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byoungkoo; Tan, Lizhen; Xu, C.; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Meimei

    2015-12-30

    In this study, because of its superior creep and corrosion resistance as compared with general austenitic stainless steels, NF709 has emerged as a candidate structural material for advanced nuclear reactors. To obtain fundamental information about the radiation resistance of this material, this study examined the microstructural evolution of NF709 subjected to neutron irradiation to 3 displacements per atom at 500 C. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-energy x-ray diffraction were employed to characterize radiation-induced segregation, Frank loops, voids, as well as the formation and reduction of precipitates. Radiation hardening of ~76% was estimated by nanoindentation, approximately consistent with the calculation according to the dispersed barrier-hardening model, suggesting Frank loops as the primary hardening source.

  2. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O'Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  3. Nuclear NF-?B Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Michel, Yvonne [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Sipek, Florian; Rdel, Franz; Rdel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-?B expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-?B p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-?B and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-?B/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-?B/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  4. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-?B signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-?B p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-?B-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. Gastrodin activates NF-?B activity in CD4 + T cells.

  5. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  6. ROS and NF-{kappa}B are involved in upregulation of IL-8 in A549 cells exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Shefang Wu Yihui; Hou Zhenqing; Zhang Qiqing

    2009-02-06

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential applications in biosensors, tissue engineering, and biomedical devices because of their unique physico-chemical, electronic and mechanical properties. However, there is limited literature data available concerning the biological properties and toxicity of CNTs. This study aimed to assess the toxicity exhibited by multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of MWCNTs in A549 cells. Exposing A549 cells to MWCNTs led to cell death, changes in cell size and complexity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression and nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B activation. Treatment of A549 cells with antioxidants prior to adding MWCNTs decreased ROS production and abrogated expression of IL-8 mRNA. Pretreatment of A549 cells with NF-{kappa}B inhibitors suppressed MWCNTs-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. These results indicate that MWCNTs are able to induce expression of IL-8 in A549 cells, at least in part, mediated by oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B activation.

  7. The plant limonoid 7-oxo-deacetoxygedunin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing activation of the NF-{kappa}B and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisutsitthiwong, Chonnaree; Buranaruk, Chayanit; Pudhom, Khanitha; Palaga, Tanapat

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A gedunin type limonoid from seeds of mangroves, 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin, exhibits strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with this limonoid results in significant decrease in expression of NFATc1 and osteoclast-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mode of action of this limonoid is by inhibiting activation of the NF-{kappa}B and MAPK pathways which are activated by RANKL. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts together with osteoblasts play pivotal roles in bone remodeling. Aberrations in osteoclast differentiation and activity contribute to osteopenic disease. Osteoclasts differentiate from monocyte/macrophage progenitors, a process that is initiated by the interaction between receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL. In this study, we identified 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin (7-OG), a gedunin type limonoid from seeds of the mangrove Xylocarpus moluccensis, as a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. Additionally, 7-OG showed strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity with low cytotoxicity against the monocyte/macrophage progenitor cell line, RAW264.7. The IC50 for anti-osteoclastogenic activity was 4.14 {mu}M. Treatment with 7-OG completely abolished the appearance of multinucleated giant cells with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with RANKL. When the expression of genes related to osteoclastogenesis was investigated, a complete downregulation of NFATc1 and cathepsin K and a delayed downregulation of irf8 were observed upon 7-OG treatment in the presence of RANKL. Furthermore, treatment with this limonoid suppressed RANKL-induced activation of p38, MAPK and Erk and nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65. Taken together, we present evidence indicating a plant limonoid as a novel osteoclastogenic inhibitor that could be used for osteoporosis and related conditions.

  8. Mangiferin exerts hepatoprotective activity against D-galactosamine induced acute toxicity and oxidative/nitrosative stress via Nrf2NF?B pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Roy, Anandita; Sil, Parames C.

    2012-04-01

    Mangiferin, a xanthone glucoside, is well known to exhibit antioxidant, antiviral, antitumor, anti-inflammatory and gene-regulatory effects. In the present study, we isolated mangiferin from the bark of Mangifera indica and assessed its beneficial role in galactosamine (GAL) induced hepatic pathophysiology. GAL (400 mg/kg body weight) exposed hepatotoxic rats showed elevation in the activities of serum ALP, ALT, levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, lipid-peroxidation and reduction in the levels of serum total proteins, albumin and cellular GSH. Besides, GAL exposure (5 mM) in hepatocytes induced apoptosis and necrosis, increased ROS and NO production. Signal transduction studies showed that GAL exposure significantly increased the nuclear translocation of NF?B and elevated iNOS protein expression. The same exposure also elevated TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-12, IL-18 and decreased IL-10 mRNA expressions. Furthermore, GAL also decreased the protein expression of Nrf2, NADPH:quinine oxidoreductase-1, heme oxygenase-1 and GST?. However, mangiferin administration in GAL intoxicated rats or coincubation of hepatocytes with mangiferin significantly altered all these GAL-induced adverse effects. In conclusion, the hepatoprotective role of mangiferin was due to induction of antioxidant defense via the Nrf2 pathway and reduction of inflammation via NF?B inhibition. Highlights: ?Galactosamine induces hepatocytes death via oxidative and nitrosative stress. ?Mangiferin exerts hepatoprotective effect/antioxidant defense via Nrf2 pathway. ?Mangiferin exerts anti-inflammatory responses by inhibiting NF-?B. ?Mangiferin suppresses galactosamine-induced repression of IL-10 mRNA.

  9. OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting AktNF-?B and MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, Hany A.; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; Salama, Samir A.; Arab, Hany H.; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2013-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Aktnuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of AktNF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of AktNF-?B and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. OSU-A9 targeted signaling pathways mediated by Akt-NF-kB, VEGF, and MMP-2. The anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9 supports its clinical promise.

  10. NF_Eder_2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... is directed towards the poles or the waist of the NIF chamber because the response of ... the TMP that is moving outward from the waist of the target and a fraction of this ...

  11. TGF-{beta}1 increases invasiveness of SW1990 cells through Rac1/ROS/NF-{kappa}B/IL-6/MMP-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binker, Marcelo G.; CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires ; Binker-Cosen, Andres A.; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Cosen, Rodica H. de; Cosen-Binker, Laura I.

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Rac1 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced SW1990 invasion through MMP-2 secretion and activation. {yields} NADPH-generated ROS act downstream of Rac1 in TGF-{beta}1-challenged SW1990 cells. {yields} TGF-{beta}1-stimulated ROS activate NF-{kappa}B in SW1990 cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B-induced IL-6 release is required for secretion and activation of MMP-2 in SW1990 cells. -- Abstract: Human pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis have been found to correlate with increased levels of active matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2). The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) has been shown to increase both secretion of MMP-2 and invasion by several pancreatic cancer cell types. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathway involved in TGF-{beta}1-promoted MMP-2 secretion and invasion by human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990. Using specific inhibitors, we found that stimulation of these tumor cells with TGF-{beta}1 induced secretion and activation of the collagenase MMP-2, which was required for TGF-{beta}1-stimulated invasion. Our results also indicate that signaling events involved in TGF-{beta}1-enhanced SW1990 invasiveness comprehend activation of Rac1 followed by generation of reactive oxygen species through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase, activation of nuclear factor-kappa beta, release of interleukin-6, and secretion and activation of MMP-2.

  12. The (3He,tf) as a surrogate reaction to determine (n,f) cross sections in the 10 to 20 MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basunia, M. S.; Clark, R. M.; Goldblum, B. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Phair, L.; Burke, J. T.; Beausang, C. W.; Bleuel, D. L.; Darakchieva, B.; Dietrich, F. S.; Evtimova, M.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Hatarik, R.; Jewett, C. C.; Lesher, S. R.; McMahan, M. A.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Wiedeking, M.

    2009-02-25

    The surrogate reaction 238U(3He,tf) is used to determine the 237Np(n,f) cross section indirectly over an equivalent neutron energy range from 10 to 20 MeV. A self-supporting ~;;761 mu g/cm2 metallic 238U foil was bombarded with a 42 MeV 3He2+ beam from the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Outgoing charged particles and fission fragments were identified using the Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies (STARS), consists of two 140 mu m and one 1000 mu m Micron S2 type silicon detectors. The 237Np(n,f) cross sections, determined indirectly, were compared with the 237Np(n,f) cross section data from direct measurements, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VII.0), and the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL 3.3) and found to closely follow those datasets. Use of the (3He,tf) reaction as a surrogate to extract (n,f) cross section in the 10 to 20 MeV equivalent neutron energy is found to be suitable.

  13. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21{sup ras}, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-{kappa}B pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-11-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-{kappa}B, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-{kappa}B DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-{kappa}B, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements.

  14. NVN-076014 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 MACKIE STUART J Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP)...

  15. NVN-083933 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Managing Field Office BLM Stillwater Field Office Surface Manager BLM Lessee 1 Dusty Miller LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 20070901 Expire Date 20170831 Held By...

  16. NVN-018423 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MGMT Lessee 1 WESTERN STATES GEOTHERMAL Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 12131977 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action BID...

  17. UTU-086781 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 STANDARD STEAM TRUST LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1312019 Expire Date Held By Production...

  18. UTU-086778 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 STANDARD STEAM TRUST LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1312019 Expire Date Held By Production...

  19. NVN-077481 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 WILMINGTON TRUST CO TRUSTEE Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 812005 Expire Date Held By...

  20. NVN-083967 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 WILMINGTON TRUST CO TRUSTEE Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 8142007 Expire Date Held By...

  1. UTU-086779 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 STANDARD STEAM TRUST LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 12192008 Expire Date Held By Production...

  2. UTU-086780 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 STANDARD STEAM TRUST LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 192009 Expire Date Held By Production...

  3. NVN-010922 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 BRADY POWER PARTNERS Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 12181974 Expire Date Held By...

  4. NVN-040353 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 BRADY POWER PARTNERS Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 411986 Expire Date Held By...

  5. NVN-040355 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 BRADY POWER PARTNERS Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 711986 Expire Date Held By...

  6. NVN-065561 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 BRADY POWER PARTNERS Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 7312013 Expire Date Held By...

  7. NVN-065558 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 BRADY POWER PARTNERS Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 911998 Expire Date Held By...

  8. http://www.fs.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsinternet/!ut/p/c5/04_SB8K8x

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Agriculture Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe Welcome The Humboldt-Toiyabe's spectacu largest national forest in the and a small portion of eastern Ca round recreation of all Highlights: Motor Vehicle Use Maps Have You Taken the "Don't Trash Nevada" Pledge? Recent News Subscribe to this feed Correction to Aurora Geothermal Release Dated May 4, 20M VEB6FWOPOOW6 2011 Bridgeport and Carson Ranger Districts Campground Prospectus The Bridgeport and Carson Ranger Districts on the

  9. NVN-075228 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 GERLACH GEOTHERMAL LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1112001 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  10. NVN-085712 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ENEL GEOTHERMAL LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 852008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  11. NVN-060686 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 32 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 6302016 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  12. NVN-085716 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  13. NVN-076823 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 10% - 5% - 5% Most...

  14. NVN-076676 | Open Energy Information

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    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 REESE RIVER GEO POWER LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1112003 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  15. NVN-076299 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP NEW YORK CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1112002 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  16. NVN-077482 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 WILMINGTON TRUST CO TRUSTEE Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 812005 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  17. UTU-086773 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 48 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1122009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  18. NVN-085715 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 43 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  19. NVN-074865 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012002 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  20. NVN-042707 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 USG NEVADA LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 111986 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-ALLOCATED HBP Date 711993...

  1. NVN-088428 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 43 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 5312020 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  2. NVN-060688 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 711996 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  3. NVN-086893 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP NEW YORK CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  4. NVN-077483 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 15 Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 812005 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-ALLOCATED HBP Date 882010...

  5. NVN-085819X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF RECLAMATIO Lessee 1 ORNI 16 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 5312014 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  6. NVN-083966 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 39 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  7. NVN-048022 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 SODA LAKE RESRC PRTNRSHP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 511988 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-ALLOCATED HBP Date 1227...

  8. NVN-083937 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  9. OROR-065720 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 41 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 12192008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  10. NVN-088435 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER CO Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 612010 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  11. NVN-083941 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  12. NVN-086905 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 MAGMA ENERGY US CORP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  13. NVN-086892 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  14. NVN-089603 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 512011 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  15. NVN-083931 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 47 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 9302017 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  16. NVN-074868 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012002 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 10% - 5% - 5% Most...

  17. NVN-011737 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 SODA LAKE RESRC PRTNRSHP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1011975 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-ALLOCATED HBP Date 826...

  18. NVN-088430 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 VENTURE PROSPECTS LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 712010 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  19. NVN-053371 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 SODA LAKE RESRC PRTNRSHP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1011975 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-ALLOCATED HBP Date 811990...

  20. NVN-083929 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 47 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  1. NVN-075233 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 USG NEVADA NORTH LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 10312016 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  2. OROR-065723 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 40 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 212009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  3. UTU-086760 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 48 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 212009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  4. NVN-076827 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912006 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  5. OROR-065722 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 41 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 12192008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  6. NVN-076301 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP NEW YORK CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 10312012 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  7. NVN-086897 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 43 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  8. NVN-083934 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  9. NVN-074881 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 15 Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012002 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-Actual HBP Date 112009...

  10. NVN-085723 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 MAGMA ENERGY US CORP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  11. NVN-053372 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 SODA LAKE RESRC PRTNRSHP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1011975 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY PROD-ALLOCATED HBP Date 811991...

  12. NVN-089605 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 512011 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  13. NVN-083936 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  14. NVN-074883 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 15 Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012002 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  15. NVN-090069 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF RECLAMATIO Lessee 1 GRADIENT RESOURCES INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1112008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  16. NVN-083939 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most...

  17. OROR-065728 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 41 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1312019 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  18. NVN-085725 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 MAGMA ENERGY US CORP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  19. NVN-085724 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 MAGMA ENERGY US CORP Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 912008 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  20. NVN-083935 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORMAT NEVADA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1012007 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  1. UTU-086777 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 ORNI 48 LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 212009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action...

  2. NVN-008394 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TERRA-GEN DIXIE VALLEY LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 911975 Expire Date Held By...

  3. IDI-035812 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 AGUA CALIENTE LLC C-O AMG N Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 812007 Expire Date Held...

  4. IDI-036679 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager PRIVATE LANDS Lessee 1 AGUA CALIENTE LLC C-O AMG N Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 312010 Expire Date Held...

  5. NVN-017283A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1111977 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY LOCATION IN A PRODUCING UNIT HBP Date 6...

  6. NVN-017282 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 1111977 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY LOCATION IN A PRODUCING UNIT HBP Date 6...

  7. AZA-009192 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  8. AZA-009187 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  9. AZA-009189 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  10. AZA-009188 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT OIL USA INC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP...

  11. AZA-009178 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  12. AZA-009177 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  13. AZA-009185 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  14. AZA-009184 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  15. AZA-009183 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  16. AZA-009179 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  17. AZA-009180 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  18. AZA-009176 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 811982 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP)...

  19. AZA-009181 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  20. AZA-009182 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT NELSON B Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Policies for Residential and Commercial Renters The lessor of a dwelling or commercial property must approve written requests from a lessee to install EVSE at a parking space allotted for the lessee on qualified properties. Certain exclusions apply to residential dwellings and commercial properties. All modifications and improvements must comply with federal, state, and local laws and all applicable zoning and land use requirements, covenants, conditions, and restrictions. The lessee of the

  2. NVN-076822 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Withdrawn) for this property. Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2560 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  3. LOPP Example Acceptance Letter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    letter regarding selection of preliminary lessee for lease of power privilege. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  4. NVN-074196 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 640 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  5. NVN-076300 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (section) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASECOMPETITIVE Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  6. NVN-062956 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  7. NVN-086898 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 600 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  8. NVN-086890 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 5120 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  9. NVN-088437 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 2560 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  10. NVN-074309 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 2586 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  11. NVN-076139 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type B Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 630 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF RECLAMATIO Lessee 1...

  12. NVN-074308 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  13. NVN-074854 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 651 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  14. NVN-061705 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 160 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  15. NVN-083483X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOUNITAGREEMENT Total Acreage 8550 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  16. NVN-085705 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1896.28 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF RECLAMATIO Lessee 1...

  17. NVN-076826 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2560 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  18. NVN-061707 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (40 Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASECOMPETITIVE Total Acreage 480 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  19. NVN-085709 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (section) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  20. NVN-077247 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 1020 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  1. NVN-076824 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1920 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  2. NVN-085727 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (section) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1280 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  3. UTU-086756 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 5120 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  4. NVN-077272 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1274 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  5. NVN-085722 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (40 Acres) Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 4360 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  6. AZA-009174 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type 3 Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1820 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT...

  7. AZA-009171 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type 3 Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2520 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT...

  8. NVN-090744 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 560 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  9. NVN-083942 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 4480 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  10. UTU-087777 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 5094 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  11. Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and maintained by the site lessee, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). PDF icon Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift and Pedestrian ...

  12. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    investment (systems and FTE) * This infrastructure investment will be minimized due to: * Economies of scale * Within our core competence * Synergy between lessee and lessor * No...

  13. Materials Data on Ca2NF (SG:141) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Pr3NF6 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Results of radiological measurements taken in the Niagara Falls, New York, area (NF002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.K.; Berven, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of 100 elevated gamma radiation anomalies in the Niagara Falls, New York, area are presented. These radiation anomalies were identified by a mobile gamma scanning survey during the period October 3-16, 1984, and were recommended for an onsite survey to determine if the elevated levels of radiation may be related to the transportation of radioactive waste material to the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works for storage. In this survey, radiological measurements included outdoor gamma exposure rates at 1 m above the surface; outdoor gamma exposure rates at the surface, range of gamma exposure rates during scan; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in biased surface soil samples. The results show 38 anomalies (35 located along Pletcher Road and 3 associated with other unreleated locations) were found to exceed Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) remedial action guidelines and were recommended for formal characterization surveys. (Since the time of this survey, remedial actions have been conducted on the 38 anomalies identified as exceeding FUSRAP guidelines, and the radioactive material above guidelines has been removed.) The remaining 62 anomalies are associated with asphalt driveways and parking lots, which used a phosphate slag material (previously identified as cyclowollastonite, synthetic CaSiO/sub 3/). This rocky-slag waste material was used for bedding under asphalt surfaces and in general gravel applications. Most of the contaminated soil and rock samples collected at the latter anomalies had approximately equal concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U and, therefore, are not related to materials connected with the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), including material that was transported to the NFSS. 13 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Materials Data on TiH12(NF2)4 (SG:56) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on H5NF2 (SG:53) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Cathedral Rock Picnic Area Rehabilitation Environmental Assessment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Region (R4) March 2009 Cathedral Rock Picnic Area Rehabilitation Project Environmental Assessment Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest Clark County, Nevada For further information, contact: Jane Schumacher, Environmental Coordinator Spring Mountains National Recreation Area 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 89130 Phone: (702) 839-5560 The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

  19. Proposed Resource Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Ely District

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Ely District Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan August 2008 COOPERATING AGENCIES: Great Basin National Park Lincoln County Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Nye County Nellis Air Force Base White Pine County Nevada Department of Transportation Duckwater Shoshone Tribe Nevada Division of Minerals Ely Shoshone Tribe Nevada Department of Wildlife Moapa Band of Paiutes Nevada State Historic Preservation Office Yomba Shoshone Tribe BLM Mission Statement It is the mission of the

  20. Property:SurfaceManager | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + COCONINO NF + AZA-009169 + COCONINO NF + AZA-009170 + COCONINO NF + AZA-009171 + FOREST SERVICE + AZA-009172 + FOREST SERVICE + AZA-009173 + FOREST SERVICE + AZA-009174 +...

  1. Pioglitazone inhibits angiotensin II-induced atrial fibroblasts proliferation via NF-?B/TGF-?1/TRIF/TRAF6 pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiao-qing; Liu, Xu; Wang, Quan-xing; Zhang, Ming-jian; Guo, Meng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-feng; Zhou, Li

    2015-01-01

    The exact mechanisms underlying inhibitory effects of pioglitazone (Pio) on Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced atrial fibrosis are complex and remain largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the effect of Pio on AngII-induced mice atrial fibrosis in vivo and atrial fibroblasts proliferation in vitro. In vivo study showed that AngII infusion induced atrial fibrosis and increased expressions of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-? (TRIF) and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in mice models. However, those effects could be attenuated by Pio (P<0.01). As for in vitro experiment, Pio suppressed AngII-induced atrial fibroblasts proliferation via nuclear factor-?B/transforming growth factor-?1/TRIF/TRAF6 signaling pathway in primary cultured mice atrial fibroblasts (P<0.01). In conclusion, suppression of Pio on AngII-induced atrial fibrosis might be related to its inhibitory effects on above signaling pathway. - Highlights: Angiotensin II increased atrial fibrosis and related gene expressions in mice. Angiotensin II induced atrial fibroblasts proliferation by activating signaling pathway. Pioglitazone reversed both aforementioned changes.

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less Note: According to the Ohio Development Services Agency website, the owner or lessee subject to sale leaseback...

  3. UTU-086775 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 4499.48 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  4. NVN-086889 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 5024.506 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  5. UTU-086761 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 799.13 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  6. UTU-086755 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 5119.92 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  7. OROR-065721 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 4071.67 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  8. NVN-076825 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for this property. Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2659.07 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/3-WA-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    payments as determined by WSDNR, or as agreed on by the lessee and WSDNR; and Other terms and conditions as WSDNR deems advisable. RCW 79.13.030. WSDNR may enter into a lease,...

  10. App. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E ATTACHMENT J.5 APPENDIX E AMES LABORATORY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (LESSEE) INGRANTS Applicable to the Operation of AMES Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 J-E

  11. NVN-058196 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 663.76 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  12. NVN-060687 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASECOMPETITIVE Total Acreage 640.36 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  13. AZA-009172 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2220.99 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT...

  14. NVN-085726 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 4435.6 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  15. NVN-086885 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1356.76 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  16. NVN-088436 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 2490.52 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  17. NVN-084604X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Lot Case Status Closed Case Type GEOUNITAGREEMENT Total Acreage 15294.14 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  18. NVN-086899 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 3810.02 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  19. NVN-076291 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 1289.88 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  20. NVN-083928 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 657.6 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  1. NVN-074855 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASENONCOMPETITI Total Acreage 933.5 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  2. NVN-088416 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1263.23 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  3. NVN-086871 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 3113.88 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  4. NVN-083932 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 2549.4 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  5. AZA-009173 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Closed Case Type GEOLSENONCOMPPRE2005 Total Acreage 2503.48 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager FOREST SERVICE Lessee 1 HUNT...

  6. NVN-085708 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1916.36 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee...

  7. NVN-076298 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lot Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLEASECOMPETITIVE Total Acreage 1912.02 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  8. Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects over 250 kW (Payment in Lieu)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: According to the Ohio Development Services Agency website, the owner or lessee subject to sale leaseback transaction must apply to Development Services Agency on or before December 31, 2015 ...

  9. Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: According to the Ohio Development Services Agency website, the owner or lessee subject to sale leaseback transaction must apply to Development Services Agency on or before December 31, 2015 ...

  10. UTU-086774 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Status Authorized Case Type GEOLSECOMPPOST2005 Total Acreage 1314.08 Bid PriceAcre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1...

  11. Ownership questions can stymie development of coalbed methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Counts, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Although the technology exists for commercial recovery of coalbed methane, production has been hindered because of the legal quandary as to ownership. The author discusses how claims to ownership of coalbed methane can and have been made by the coal owner or lessee, the oil and gas owner or lessee, the surface owner, or any combination thereof. The federal perspective on this question of ownership is described and several state rulings are assessed.

  12. Defending mining claims and mineral leases in environmental suits against federal land managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twelker, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Suits in the last 4-5 years jeopardize the title of thousands of mining claims and mineral leases. The cases presenting the most striking examples are National Wildlife Federation v. Burford, Connor v. Burford, Sierra Club V. Watt, and Bob Marshall Alliance v. Watt. From the claimants' and lessees' point of view, these decisions granted environmental groups sweeping, though somewhat ill-defined, relief. The challenges by environmental groups are based on statutes designed to bring environmental considerations before federal decision makers. The claimants and lessees are caught in the middle of the exchange between environmentalists and federal agencies. Lawsuits that indirectly challenge leases and claims are unlike environmental challenges to fixed projects such as highways or dams. Those affected often times do not know exactly what is at stake. When the challenge is indirect, unexplored, or partially explored, proper ties have only speculative value and the claimants and lessees are often unwilling or unable to engage in a fight with well-heeled environmental public interest law firms. While the federal government has defended the suits, their interests and those of the claimants and lessees may diverge. In the context of the four cases mentioned above, this paper addresses the rights and remedies of claimants and lessees before, during, and after environmental procedural suits that indirectly challenge federal mining claims and mineral leases.

  13. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of District Heat by End Use, 1989 District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) Space Water a Total Heating Heating Other RSE Building Row Characteristics Factor 1.0 NF NF NF RSE...

  14. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Consumption of Fuel Oil by End Use, 1989 Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Space Water a Total Heating Heating Other RSE Building Row Characteristics Factor 1.0 NF NF NF RSE...

  15. "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Trifluoride","NF3","NF3",10800,17200 "1 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2001). ...

  16. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J TOC PART III List of Documents, Exhibits and Other Attachments Section J - List of Attachments Table of Contents Attachment No: Attachment: J.1 Appendix A - Advance Understandings on Human Resources J.2 Appendix B - Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan J.3 Appendix C - Special Financial Institution Account Agreement J.4 Appendix D - Budget Program J.5 Appendix E - AMES Laboratory DOE (Lessee) Ingrants J.6 Appendix F - Contractor's Commitments J.7 Appendix G - Purchasing System

  17. APPLICATION OF A CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    optimization of electric power at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Facility to support the Decontamination and Demolition and remediation of the X-530 Switchyard while satisfying the existing electrical needs of site lessees and occupants. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusion Applied: 10 CFR Part 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D. B4.6. Addition and Modification to Transmission Facilities B4.11. Electrical Power Substations and Interconnecting Facilities Determination: The proposed action

  18. Durango CO EOI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REQUEST FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST Lease to construct Solar Photovoltaic System on Federal land INTRODUCTION The S.M. Stoller Corporation (Stoller), operating as the Office of Legacy Management (LM) Support Contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is requesting an Expression of Interest from prospective Lessees (teams, joint ventures, etc.) that would be interested in leasing government-owned land near Durango, CO to construct a solar photovoltaic (PV) system. DOE created LM in 2003

  19. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households, 1997 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 19.7 6.8 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.3 Q -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic

  20. EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this MAP are designed to mitigate potentially adverse environmental consequences associated with the CMRR-NF Project as the CMRR-NF is

  1. EIS-0350-S1: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Supplemental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    facility portion (CMRR-NF) of the CMRR Project to provide the analytical chemistry and materials characterization capabilities currently or previously performed in the existing...

  2. EIS-0350-S1: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEIS examines the potential environmental impacts associated with NNSA's proposed action.The proposed action is to complete the CMRR Project by constructing the CMRR-NF to...

  3. SAND2011-0800

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    leaving frequent blowdowns as the only readily available and effective remedy. Reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) technologies offer the prospect of ancillary control of...

  4. Carbon Free Developments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Free Developments Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Free Developments Place: United Kingdom Zip: W11 3NF Sector: Wind energy Product: UK-based onshore wind project...

  5. ORNI 9, LLC, AND ORMAT NEVADA INC. APPLICATIONS FOR PERMIT TO DRILL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNI 9, LLC, AND ORMAT NEVADA INC. APPLICATIONS FOR PERMIT TO DRILL GEOTHERMAL OBSERVATION WELLS 82-14 AND 55-14 AND GEOTHERMAL PRODUCTION WELL 15-12 AND POSSIBLE FUTURE GEOTHERMAL WELLS LOCATED IN SECTIONS 12, and 14, T22N, R26E, MDB&M BLM Geothermal Leases NVN-065558 and NVN-065561 BLM Environmental Assessment No. NV-020-05-07 CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL 1. This approval is contingent upon the lessee/operator being in receipt of and in compliance with all appropriate federal, state, and local

  6. 3D Model of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    The McGinness Hills geothermal system lies in a ~8.5 km wide, north-northeast trending accommodation zone defined by east-dipping normal faults bounding the Toiyabe Range to the west and west-dipping normal faults bounding the Simpson Park Mountains to the east. Within this broad accommodation zone lies a fault step-over defined by north-northeast striking, west-dipping normal faults which step to the left at roughly the latitude of the McGinness Hills geothermal system. The McGinness Hills 3D model consists of 9 geologic units and 41 faults. The basal geologic units are metasediments of the Ordovician Valmy and Vininni Formations (undifferentiated in the model) which are intruded by Jurassic granitic rocks. Unconformably overlying is a ~100s m-thick section of Tertiary andesitic lava flows and four Oligocene-to-Miocene ash-flow tuffs: The Rattlesnake Canyon Tuff, tuff of Sutcliffe, the Cambell Creek Tuff and the Nine Hill tuff. Overlying are sequences of pre-to-syn-extensional Quaternary alluvium and post-extensional Quaternary alluvium. 10-15 eastward dip of the Tertiary stratigraphy is controlled by the predominant west-dipping fault set. Geothermal production comes from two west dipping normal faults in the northern limb of the step over. Injection is into west dipping faults in the southern limb of the step over. Production and injection sites are in hydrologic communication, but at a deep level, as the northwest striking fault that links the southern and northern limbs of the step-over has no permeability.

  7. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  8. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Natural Gas by End Use, 1989 Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Space Water a Total Heating Heating Cooking Other RSE Building Row Characteristics Factor 1.0 NF...

  9. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: Army W911NF-10-1-0524; AC02-05CH11231 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics Additional Journal...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    300 YEAR 2011 Males 109 Females 191 YEAR 2011 SES 9 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 203 NU (TechAdmin Support) 38 NF (Future Ldrs) 47 YEAR 2011 American Indian...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    86 YEAR 2012 Males 103 Females 183 YEAR 2012 SES 7 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 202 NU (TechAdmin Support) 30 NF (Future Ldrs) 45 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  12. Subject:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rotation reversals, poloidal impurity asymmetries and "non-local" heat transport Gao thesis 2015, Rice NF 2013). We are not yet certain if our RF L-mode target plasmas will...

  13. I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... the clamp, conducted on the basis of lower bound collapse load for faulted loading in accordance with Subsection NF of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code 1, is presented. ...

  14. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=a; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm ; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  15. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050b

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=b; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  16. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=a; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm ; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  17. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050b

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=b; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  18. "Table A17. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Products",5743,5579,6,157,12.2 2011," Meat Packing Plants",71,71,0,"*",23.7 2033," ... Products",352,339,0,"Q",17.1 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,0,"NF" 2033," Canned ...

  19. Systems and methods for treating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheele, Randall D; McNamara, Bruce K

    2014-10-21

    Systems for treating material are provided that can include a vessel defining a volume, at least one conduit coupled to the vessel and in fluid communication with the vessel, material within the vessel, and NF.sub.3 material within the conduit. Methods for fluorinating material are provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to fluorinate at least a portion of the material. Methods for separating components of material are also provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to at least partially fluorinate a portion of the material, and separating at least one fluorinated component of the fluorinated portion from the material. The materials exposed to the NF.sub.3 material can include but are not limited to one or more of U, Ru, Rh, Mo, Tc, Np, Pu, Sb, Ag, Am, Sn, Zr, Cs, Th, and/or Rb.

  20. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  1. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, Michael A.; Hughes, Robert W.; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-15

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  2. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  3. Licensees and economic interest in minerals after Swank and revenue ruling 83-160

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, M.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In the three years since the Supreme Court decided in United States v. Swank that a coal operator mining a coal deposit under a written lease terminable without cause on 30 days notice held an economic interest in the mineral in place, tax literature began noting that this decision rejected a long-held position of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The author assesses the impact of Revenue Ruling 83-88, in which the IRS went beyond Swank in concluding that there is no minimum period during which a lessee must have a legal right to extract minerals as a prerequisite to an economic interest. He examines the proposition that, after Swank and Revenue Ruling 83-160, licensees who previously were considered not to have acquired an economic interest, should now be found to have an economic interest in the mineral deposit they are extracting.

  4. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Peccrdei et .... g:~.g-..o*c *ck .*,- &.-. fi+ E C 7 ---.----.- .-.... 3$rS --------- ixx4!30 F A ~ 953 ' 27565' glla 5tcpEe.l. Peeorder Reception N o . - STATE OF COtOPA00 COUFlTY OF GARFIELD MfEREAS, under date of kcember 7 , 1966, an oil and gas l e a s e was entered i n t o between Claude V. Hayward, lessor, snd Rustrat dl1 Ccmpany Incorporated, Lessee, covering, among other l a n d s , t a t 1 1 , being the Northeast Quarter ~b the Southwest Q u a r t e r o f Section 25, f - 7 4 ,

  5. Crucial role of Toll-like receptors in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Chao, How-Ran

    2013-12-15

    Our previous studies indicated that zinc induced inflammatory response in both vascular endothelial cells and promonocytes. Here, we asked if other metals could cause the similar effect on vascular endothelial cells and tried to determine its underlying mechanism. Following screening of fifteen metals, zinc and nickel were identified with a marked proinflammatory effect, as determined by ICAM-1 and IL-8 induction, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Inhibiting protein expression of myeloid differentiation primary response protein-88 (MyD88), a Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor acting as a TLR-signaling transducer, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, suggesting the critical roles of TLRs in the inflammatory response. Blockage of TLR-4 signaling by CLI-095, a TLR-4 inhibitor, completely inhibited the nickel-induced ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression and NF?B activation. The same CLI-095 treatment significantly blocked the zinc-induced IL-8 expression, however with no significant effect on the ICAM-1 expression and a minor inhibitory effect on the NF?B activation. The finding demonstrated the differential role of TLR-4 in regulation of the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, where TLR-4 played a dominant role in NF?B activation by nickel, but not by zinc. Moreover, inhibition of NF?B by adenovirus-mediated I?B? expression and Bay 11-7025, an inhibitor of cytokine-induced I?B-? phosphorylation, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory responses, indicating the critical of NF?B in the process. The study demonstrates the crucial role of TLRs in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells and herein deciphers a potential important difference in NF?B activation via TLRs. The study provides a molecular basis for linkage between zinc/nickel exposure and pathogenesis of the metal-related inflammatory vascular disease. - Highlights: Both zinc and nickel cause ICAM-1/IL?8 expression in endothelial cells via TLRs. Nickel induces the inflammatory responses via a TLR-4/NF-?B pathway. Zinc causes the inflammatory responses via a broader TLRs/NF-?B signaling. Nickel shows a significantly higher inflammatory effect than zinc. NF-?B activation is the primary mechanism involved in the inflammatory responses.

  6. Life Cycle Nitrogen Trifluoride Emissions from Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.

    2010-10-25

    Amorphous- and nanocrystalline-silicon thin-film photovoltaic modules are made in high-throughput manufacturing lines that necessitate quickly cleaning the reactor. Using NF{sub 3}, a potent greenhouse gas, as the cleaning agent triggered concerns as recent reports reveal that the atmospheric concentrations of this gas have increased significantly. We quantified the life-cycle emissions of NF{sub 3} in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, on the basis of actual measurements at the facilities of a major producer of NF{sub 3} and of a manufacturer of PV end-use equipment. From these, we defined the best practices and technologies that are the most likely to keep worldwide atmospheric concentrations of NF{sub 3} at very low radiative forcing levels. For the average U.S. insolation and electricity-grid conditions, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manufacturing and using NF{sub 3} in current PV a-Si and tandem a-Si/nc-Si facilities add 2 and 7 g CO{sub 2eq}/kWh, which can be displaced within the first 1-4 months of the PV system life.

  7. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollu, Pratap E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D. E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in

    2014-08-04

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100?Oe and 200?Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  8. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and associated mechanical properties during long-term aging at elevated temperatures. Thermal aging experiments at different temperatures and periods of time have been completed: 550 C for up to 5000 h, 600 C for up to 7500 h, and 650 C for more than 10,000 h. Tensile properties were measured on thermally aged specimens and aging effect on tensile behavior was assessed. Effects of thermal aging on deformation and failure mechanisms were investigated by using in-situ straining technique with simultaneous synchrotron XRD measurements.

  9. Nuclear factor-?B is a common upstream signal for growth differentiation factor-5 expression in brown adipocytes exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines and palmitate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Iezaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Yoneda, Yukio

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: GDF5 expression is up-regulated by IL-1?, TNF-? and palmitate in brown pre-adipocytes. NF-?B stimulates promoter activity and expression of GDF5 in brown pre-adipocytes. Recruitment of NF-?B to the GDF5 promoter is facilitated in BAT from ob/ob mice. An NF-?B inhibitor prevents upregulation of GDF5 expression in brown pre-adipocytes. - Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that genetic and acquired obesity similarly led to drastic upregulation in brown adipose tissue (BAT), rather than white adipose tissue, of expression of both mRNA and corresponding protein for the bone morphogenic protein/growth differentiation factor (GDF) member GDF5 capable of promoting brown adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated expression profiles of GDF5 in cultured murine brown pre-adipocytes exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids (FFAs), which are all shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Both interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were effective in up-regulating GDF5 expression in a concentration-dependent manner, while similar upregulation was seen in cells exposed to the saturated FFA palmitate, but not to the unsaturated FFA oleate. In silico analysis revealed existence of the putative nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) binding site in the 5?-flanking region of mouse GDF5, whereas introduction of NF-?B subunits drastically facilitated both promoter activity and expression of GDF5 in brown pre-adipocytes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed significant facilitation of the recruitment of NF-?B to the GDF5 promoter in lysed extracts of BAT from leptin-deficient ob/ob obese mice. Upregulation o GDF5 expression was invariably inhibited by an NF-?B inhibitor in cultured brown pre-adipocytes exposed to IL-1?, TNF-? and palmitate. These results suggest that obesity leads to upregulation of GDF5 expression responsible for the promotion of brown adipogenesis through a mechanism relevant to activation of the NF-?B pathway in response to particular pro-inflammatory cytokines and/or saturated FFAs in BAT.

  10. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2010-09-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2009_DEMO_Career_Paths_DCB_Salaries.ppt...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Band 02 60,989 to 79,280 Band 03 73,100 to 95,026 Band 04 86,927 to 113,007 Future Leader (NF) Band 01 33,269 - 59,333 Band 02 50,408 - 79,280 Band 03 73,100 - 113,007...

  12. "Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ducts",3,0,"*","W","*",0,"W",1,19.3 2011," Meat Packing Plants","*",0,0,"*","*",0,0,"*",30... Products","*",0,0,0,0,0,0,"*",47 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"NF" ...

  13. "Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Products",3,0,1,"W",5,0,"W",1,19.3 2011," Meat Packing Plants","*",0,0,"*","*",0,0,"*",30... Products","*",0,0,0,0,0,0,"*",47 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"NF" ...

  14. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  15. Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes electrodeposited on Ni foam-supported vertically oriented graphene nanosheets for application in asymmetric supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Jiyue; Wang, Yayu; Zhao, Cuimei; Zheng, Weitao

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: Ni(OH){sub 2}/vertically oriented graphene nanosheets (V-GNs) was prepared. Ni(OH){sub 2}/V-GNs had enhanced specific capacitance, cycling reversibility and stability. Performance of Ni(OH){sub 2}/GNs/NF-AC asymmetric supercapacitor was studied. - Abstract: Binderless Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes grown on Ni foam (NF)-supported vertically oriented graphene nanosheets (V-GNs) has been fabricated as a positive electrode material for asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC), coupled with activated carbon (AC) as a counter electrode material. The introduction of V-GNs leads to dense growth of nanocrystalline ?-Ni(OH){sub 2} that is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopic and scanning electron microscopic analyses. The electrochemical performances of the Ni(OH){sub 2}/GNs/NF electrode are characterized by cyclic voltammetry and chargedischarge tests, which exhibit high specific capacitance of 2215 F g{sup ?1} at a scan current density of 2.3 A g{sup ?1}, enhanced cycling stability and high rate capability. The Ni(OH){sub 2}/GNs/NF-AC-based ASC can achieve a cell voltage of 1.4 V and a specific energy density of 11.11 Wh kg{sup ?1} at 0.5 mA cm{sup ?2} with a nearly 100% coulombic efficiency at room temperature.

  16. SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-{kappa}B activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and is implicated in decreased 5 Prime -AMP activated kinase (AMPK) activation, leading to the impairment of autophagy. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, abolishes Sirtinol-induced inflammation and NF-{kappa}B activation associated with p62/Sqstm1 accumulation. In summary, SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation and dysregulates autophagy via nutrient-sensing pathways such as the mTOR and AMPK pathways, in THP-1 cells.

  17. Daily treatment with {alpha}-naphthoflavone enhances follicular growth and ovulation rate in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreiro, Karina A.; Di Yorio, Maria P.; Artillo-Guida, Romina D.; Paz, Dante A.; Faletti, Alicia G.

    2011-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and the first protein involved in a variety of physiological and toxicological processes, including those of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. AhR has been found in the ovary of many species and seems to mediate the ovarian toxicity of many environmental contaminants, which are AhR ligands. However, the role of AhR in the ovarian function is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the action of {alpha}-naphthoflavone ({alpha}NF), known to be an AhR antagonist, on both follicular growth and ovulation. Immature Sprague-Dawley rats were daily injected intraperitoneally with {alpha}NF (0.1-80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 12 days, and primed with gonadotrophins (eCG/hCG) to induce follicular growth and ovulation. Ovaries were obtained 20 h after hCG administration. By means of immunohistochemistry, we found that the numbers of primordial, primary and antral follicles were increased in rats treated with 80 mg/kg {alpha}NF and that there were no differences with other doses. Likewise, the ovarian weight and the ovulation rate, measured by both number of oocytes within oviducts and corpora lutea in ovarian sections, were increased when the rats received either 1 or 10 mg/kg daily. Although further studies are necessary to know the mechanism of action of {alpha}NF, it is possible that the different ovarian processes can be differentially responsive to the presence of different levels of {alpha}NF, and that the same or different endogenous AhR ligands can be involved in these ovarian processes in a cell type-dependent manner.

  18. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-?B)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-?B inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-?B. SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-?B signaling pathway.

  19. Proposed natural gas protection program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    As a result of US Department of Energy (DOE) monitoring activities, it was determined in 1983 that the potential existed for natural gas resources underlying the Naval Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSrs-1 3) to be drained by privately-owned gas wells that were being drilled along the Reserves borders. In 1985, DOE initiated a limited number of projects to protect the Government's interest in the gas resources by drilling its own offset production'' wells just inside the boundaries, and by formally sharing in the production, revenues and costs of private wells that are drilled near the boundaries ( communitize'' the privately-drilled wells). The scope of these protection efforts must be expanded. DOE is therefore proposing a Natural Gas Protection Program for NOSRs-1 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells (including the wells drilled and/or communitized since 1985). Of these, 111 would be offset wells drilled by DOE on Government land inside the NOSRs' boundaries and would be owned either entirely by the Government or communitized with adjacent private land owners or lessees. The remainder would be wells drilled by private operators in an area one half-mile wide extending around the NOSRs boundaries and communitized with the Government. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Mitigation Action Plan: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In April 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957-16 acres (Parcel ED-1) of the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation (ORR) by the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC) for industrial development. DOE plans to issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action, conditional upon the implementation of mitigation and monitoring to protect environmental resources. According to DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations (10 CFR 1021.322), a FONSI shall include {open_quotes}any commitments to mitigations that are essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, beyond those mitigations that are integral elements of the proposed action, and a reference to the Mitigation Action Plan prepared under 10 CTR 1021.331{close_quotes}. Terms of the lease offer DOE the option of terminating the lease with ETEC should the lessee and/or sublessees fail to implement the mitigation defined in the FONSI.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Naval Petroleum Reserves in California site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This summary for Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) is divided into NPR-1 and NPR-2. Monitoring efforts at NPR-1 include handling and disposal of oilfield wastes; environmental preactivity surveys for the protection of endangered species and archaeological resources; inspections of topsoil stockpiling; monitoring of revegetated sites; surveillance of production facilities for hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions; monitoring of oil spill prevention and cleanup; and monitoring of wastewater injection. No major compliance issues existed for NPR-1 during 1989. Oil spills are recorded, reviewed for corrective action, and reported. Environmental preactivity surveys for proposed projects which may disturb or contaminate the land are conducted to prevent damage to the federally protected San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Tipton kangaroo rat and the giant kangaroo rat. Projects are adjusted or relocated as necessary to avoid impact to dens, burrows, or flat-bottomed drainages. A major revegetation program was accomplished in 1989 for erosion control enhancement of endangered species habitat. The main compliance issue on NPR-2 was oil and produced water discharges into drainages by lessees. An additional compliance issue on NPR-2 is surface refuse from past oilfield operations. 17 refs.

  3. Measurement of the EMC effect in the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffioen, Keith A.; Arrington, John R.; Christy, M. Eric; Ent, Rolf; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Kuhn, Sebastian E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Ioana; et al

    2015-07-01

    We have determined the structure function ratiomore » $$R^d_{\\rm EMC}=F_2^d/(F_2^n+F_2^p)$$ from recently published $F_2^n/F_2^d$ data taken by the BONuS experiment using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. This ratio deviates from unity, with a slope $$dR_{\\rm EMC}^{d}/dx= -0.10\\pm 0.05$$ in the range of Bjorken $x$ from 0.35 to 0.7, for invariant mass $W>1.4$ GeV and $Q^2>1$ GeV$^2$. The observed EMC effect for these kinematics is consistent with conventional nuclear physics models that include off-shell corrections, as well as with empirical analyses that find the EMC effect proportional to the probability of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations.« less

  4. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in two dimensional lattice super QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Catterall, Simon; Veernala, Aarti

    2015-10-02

    We report on a non-perturbative study of two dimensional N=(2,2) super QCD. Our lattice formulation retains a single exact supersymmetry at non-zero lattice spacing, and contains Nf fermions in the fundamental representation of a U(Nc) gauge group. The lattice action we employ contains an additional Fayet-Iliopoulos term which is also invariant under the exact lattice supersymmetry. This work constitutes the first numerical study of this theory which serves as a toy model for understanding some of the issues that are expected to arise in four dimensional super QCD. As a result, we present evidence that the exact supersymmetry breaks spontaneouslymore » when Nf < Nc in agreement with theoretical expectations.« less

  6. Section 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NF o N e ' f (N,$,Zb,h,8,u,<) Session Papers 117 (1) (2) A Test of the Validity of Cumulus Cloud Parameterizations for Longwave Radiation Calculations D. Han and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Longwave radiative transfer under broken cloud conditions is often treated as a problem in cloud bulk geometry, especially for cumulus clouds, because individual clouds are nearly black. However, climate models ignore cloud geometry

  7. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by ?-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist ?-naphthoflavone (?NF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 ?M ?NF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: Energetic costs of AhR activation by ?NF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. Exposure to ?NF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  8. EIS-0350-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EIS evaluates the completion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project, which consists of constructing the nuclear facility portion (CMRR-NF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The CMRR Project provides the analytical chemistry and materials characterization capabilities currently or previously performed in the existing Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. Because of recent detailed site geotechnical investigations, certain aspects of the CMRR-NR project have changed resulting in change to the environmental impacts.

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-064 Illinois EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SECTION A. Project Title: Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Modification in Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Advanced Alloys - University of Illinois SECTION B. Project Description The University of Illinois will conduct research that will: (1) establish ion-to-neutron irradiation correlations between available neutron-irradiated reference alloys (Grade 91, Grade 92 and NF709) and the ion irradiations on these materials, and (2) to use these correlations to

  10. Table HC1-10a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England

  11. Table HC1-12a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 --

  12. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library General

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - General Photos related to the Nevada Field Office which do not fall under the other photo categories are located here. Instructions: Click the photograph THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details Click the Category, Number, or Date table header links to sort the information. Thumbnail Category Number Date http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/photos/thumbs/nf1648.jpg General

  13. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 19.4 100.0 -- -- -- NF New England

  14. ER85357_Phase2_Eltron | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unconventional High Temperature Nanofiltration for Produced Water Treatment Last Reviewed 6/25/2013 DE-10ER85357 Goal The project goal is to further develop a proprietary, high-temperature nanofiltration (NF) technology (DurafluxTM) to remove salt and other dissolved solids from produced water originating from domestic oil and gas production. Treated water can be re-used in the extraction process without cooling/re-heating costs or can be recycled as an acceptable supply of source water. Project

  15. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKQROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NfS Cukural Rasowcmr Studks: Background Research for Project Shot11 Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson MAY 1993 DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKGROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NTS Cultural Resources Studies: Background Research for Project Shoal Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Las Vegas, Nevada

  16. outbind://6-000000007B09B0C78182DD468D210820B7D48C0A070041ECF0B

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11/17/2010 Dear Mr. John Tegtmeir, I have attached comments from Tewa Women United for the CMRR-NF. I do hope they are taken seriously and worthy of some more dialogues into the environmental impacts to our health and well being as we do our daily living in our northern New Mexico and indigenous homelands. Thank you Kathy Sanchez, Tewa Women United 028 028 028 028

  17. Correlation ECE diagnostic in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Mikkelsen, D.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C.; Rice, J.; Reinke, M.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J.; Hubbard, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2015-03-12

    Correlation ECE (CECE) is a diagnostic technique that allows measurement of small amplitude electron temperature, Te, fluctuations through standard cross-correlation analysis methods. In Alcator C-Mod, a new CECE diagnostic has been installed[Sung RSI 2012], and interesting phenomena have been observed in various plasma conditions. We find that local Te fluctuations near the edge (ρ ~ 0:8) decrease across the linearto- saturated ohmic confinement transition, with fluctuations decreasing with increasing plasma density[Sung NF 2013], which occurs simultaneously with rotation reversals[Rice NF 2011]. Te fluctuations are also reduced across core rotation reversals with an increase of plasma density in RF heated L-mode plasmas, which implies that the same physics related to the reduction of Te fluctuations may be applied to both ohmic and RF heated L-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, we observe the reduction of core Te fluctuations, which indicates changes of turbulence occur not only in the pedestal region but also in the core across the L/I transition[White NF 2014]. The present CECE diagnostic system in C-Mod and these experimental results are described in this paper.

  18. Protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Weifeng Huang, Huimin; Niu, Xiaofeng Fan, Ting; Mu, Qingli; Li, Huani

    2013-10-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to gastric ulcer and the present work was aimed to examine the protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine (THC) in the model of ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Fasted mice treated with ethanol 75% (0.5 ml/100 g) were pre-treated with THC (10 or 20 mg/kg, ip), cimetidine (100 mg/kg, ip) or saline in different experimental sets for a period of 3 days, and animals were euthanized 4 h after ethanol ingestion. Gross and microscopic lesions, immunological and biochemical parameters were taken into consideration. The results showed that ethanol induced gastric damage, improving nitric oxide (NO) level, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-? and IL-6) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in the ethanol group. Pretreatment of THC at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg bodyweight significantly attenuated the gastric lesions as compared to the ethanol group. These results suggest that the gastroprotective activity of THC is attributed to reducing NO production and adjusting the pro-inflammatory cytokine, inhibited neutrophil accumulation and NF-?B expression. - Highlights: THC decreased ethanol-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release. THC inhibited the production of NO in serum and gastric tissue. THC reduced NF-?B expression and MPO accumulation in ethanol-induced gastric tissue.

  19. Thymosin beta-4 promotes mesenchymal stem cell proliferation via an interleukin-8-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeon, Byung-Joon; Yang, Yoolhee; Kyung Shim, Su; Yang, Heung-Mo; Cho, Daeho; Ik Bang, Sa

    2013-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise for the field of tissue regeneration. Because only a limited number of MSCs can be obtained from each donor site, it is important to establish standard methods for MSC expansion using growth and trophic factors. Thymosin ?4 (T?4) is a novel trophic factor that has antimicrobial effects and the potential to promote tissue repair. T?4 is a ubiquitous, naturally-occurring peptide in the wound bed. Therefore, the relationship between T?4 and MSCs, especially adjacent adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs), merits consideration. Exogenous T?4 treatment enhanced the proliferation of human ASCs, resulting in prominent nuclear localization of PCNA immunoreactivity. In addition, exogenous T?4 also increased IL-8 secretion and blocking of IL-8 with neutralizing antibodies decreased T?4-induced ASC proliferation, suggesting that IL-8 is a critical mediator of T?4-enhanced proliferation. Moreover, T?4 activated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and increased the nuclear translocation of NF-?B. These observation provide that T?4 promotes the expansion of human ASCs via an IL-8-dependent mechanism that involves the ERK and NF-?B pathways. Therefore, T?4 could be used as a tool for MSC expansion in cell therapeutics. - Highlights: This is fundamental information required to correlate T?4 with MSC expansion. MSC expansion by T?4 is involved in enhancement of IL-8 and ERK/NF-?B pathway. T?4 could be used as a tool for MSC expansion in cell therapeutics.

  20. Correlation ECE diagnostic in Alcator C-Mod

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Mikkelsen, D.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C.; Rice, J.; Reinke, M.; et al

    2015-03-12

    Correlation ECE (CECE) is a diagnostic technique that allows measurement of small amplitude electron temperature, Te, fluctuations through standard cross-correlation analysis methods. In Alcator C-Mod, a new CECE diagnostic has been installed[Sung RSI 2012], and interesting phenomena have been observed in various plasma conditions. We find that local Te fluctuations near the edge (ρ ~ 0:8) decrease across the linearto- saturated ohmic confinement transition, with fluctuations decreasing with increasing plasma density[Sung NF 2013], which occurs simultaneously with rotation reversals[Rice NF 2011]. Te fluctuations are also reduced across core rotation reversals with an increase of plasma density in RF heated L-modemore » plasmas, which implies that the same physics related to the reduction of Te fluctuations may be applied to both ohmic and RF heated L-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, we observe the reduction of core Te fluctuations, which indicates changes of turbulence occur not only in the pedestal region but also in the core across the L/I transition[White NF 2014]. The present CECE diagnostic system in C-Mod and these experimental results are described in this paper.« less

  1. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W.

    2012-05-15

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  2. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LIS Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv ; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris; Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-?b activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-?B targets and we show that NF-?B is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  3. Solvothermal synthesis of NiAl double hydroxide microspheres on a nickel foam-graphene as an electrode material for pseudo-capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momodu, Damilola; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Barzeger, Farshad; Taghizadeh, Fatimeh; Fabiane, Mopeli; Manyala, Ncholu; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate excellent pseudo-capacitance behavior of nickel-aluminum double hydroxide microspheres (NiAl DHM) synthesized by a facile solvothermal technique using tertbutanol as a structure-directing agent on nickel foam-graphene (NF-G) current collector as compared to use of nickel foam current collector alone. The structure and surface morphology were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopies respectively. NF-G current collector was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition followed by an ex situ coating method of NiAl DHM active material which forms a composite electrode. The pseudocapacitive performance of the composite electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, constant chargedischarge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The composite electrode with the NF-G current collector exhibits an enhanced electrochemical performance due to the presence of the conductive graphene layer on the nickel foam and gives a specific capacitance of 1252 F g{sup ?1} at a current density of 1 A g{sup ?1} and a capacitive retention of about 97% after 1000 chargedischarge cycles. This shows that these composites are promising electrode materials for energy storage devices.

  4. Baseline Environmental Analysis Report for the K-1251 Barge Facility at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Winkle J.E.

    2007-08-24

    This report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-1251 Barge Facility, which is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to lease the facility to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the use, by a potential lessee, of government-owned facilities at ETTP. This report is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The lease footprint is slightly over 1 acre. The majority of the lease footprint is defined by a perimeter fence that surrounds a gravel-covered area with a small concrete pad within it. Also included is a gravel drive with locked gates at each end that extends on the east side to South First Avenue, providing access to the facility. The facility is located along the Clinch River and an inlet of the river that forms its southern boundary. To the east, west, and north, the lease footprint is surrounded by DOE property. Preparation of this report included the review of government records, title documents, historic aerial photos, visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, and interviews with current and former employees involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products or their derivatives and acutely hazardous wastes were known to have been released or disposed. Radiological surveys were conducted and chemical samples were collected to assess the facility's condition.

  5. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in lactotrophs mediates LPS-induced proliferation in experimental pituitary hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabatino, Mara Eugenia; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Mascanfroni, Ivn Daro; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Gutirrez, Silvina; Torres, Alicia Ins; De Paul, Ana Luca

    2013-11-15

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been characterized for its ability to recognize bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Considering that infections or inflammatory processes might contribute to the progression of pituitary tumors, we analyzed the TLR4 functional role by evaluating the LPS effect on lactotroph proliferation in primary cultures from experimental pituitary tumors, and examined the involvement of PI3K-Akt and NF-?B activation in this effect. In addition, the role of 17?-estradiol as a possible modulator of LPS-induced PRL cell proliferation was further investigated. In estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, LPS triggered lactotroph cell proliferation. However, endotoxin failed to increase the number of lactotrophs taking up BrdU in normal pituitaries. Moreover, incubation with anti-TLR4 antibody significantly reduced LPS-induced lactotroph proliferation, suggesting a functional role of this receptor. As a sign of TLR4 activation, an LPS challenge increased IL-6 release in normal and tumoral cells. By flow cytometry, TLR4 baseline expression was revealed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs, without changes noted in the percentage of double PRL/TLR4 positive cells after LPS stimulus. Increases in TLR4 intracellular expression were detected as well as rises in CD14, p-Akt and NF-?B after an LPS challenge, as assessed by western blotting. The TLR4/PRL and PRL/NF-?B co-localization was also corroborated by immunofluorescence and the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling in lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release was revealed through the PI3K inhibitor Ly-294002. In addition, 17?-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked increase in tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release. Collectively these results demonstrate the presence of functional TLR4 in lactotrophs from estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, which responded to the proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release induced by LPS through TLR4/CD14, with a contribution of the PI3K-Akt and NF-?B signaling pathways. - Highlights: In hyperplastic pituitaries, LPS triggered the lactotroph cell proliferation and IL-6 release. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs. Increases in TLR4 and CD14 intracellular expression levels were detected after an LPS challenge. The proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release involved the PI3K-Akt pathway and NF-?B activation. 17?-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 secretion.

  6. Insights antifibrotic mechanism of methyl palmitate: Impact on nuclear factor kappa B and proinflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantawy, Eman M.; Tadros, Mariane G.; Awad, Azza S.; Hassan, Dina A.A.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis accompanies most chronic liver disorders and is a major factor contributing to hepatic failure. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment is evident. The present study was designed to assess the potential antifibrotic effect of MP and whether MP can attenuate the severity of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in chronic liver injury. Male albino rats were treated with either CCl{sub 4} (1 ml/kg, twice a week) and/or MP (300 mg/kg, three times a week) for six weeks. CCl{sub 4}-intoxication significantly increased liver weight, serum aminotransferases, total cholesterol and triglycerides while decreased albumin level and these effects were prevented by co-treatment with MP. As indicators of oxidative stress, CCl{sub 4}-intoxication caused significant glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation while MP co-treatment preserved them within normal values. As markers of fibrosis, hydroxyproline content and ?-SMA expression increased markedly in the CCl{sub 4} group and MP prevented these alterations. Histopathological examination by both light and electron microscope further confirmed the protective efficacy of MP. To elucidate the antifibrotic mechanisms of MP, the expression of NF-?B, iNOS and COX-2 and the tissue levels of TNF-? and nitric oxide were assessed; CCl{sub 4} increased the expression of NF-?B and all downstream inflammatory cascade while MP co-treatment inhibited them. Collectively these findings indicate that MP possesses a potent antifibrotic effect which may be partly a consequence of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. -- Highlights: ? Methyl palmitate is free fatty acid methyl ester. ? It possesses a strong antifibrotic effect. ? It inhibits NF-?B and the consequent proinflammatory and oxidative stress response.

  7. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in acrolein-induced endothelial activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberzettl, Petra; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Srivastava, Sanjay [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Bhatnagar, Aruni [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States)], E-mail: aruni@louisville.edu

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and an endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. It is also generated during the metabolism of several drugs and amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acrolein on endothelial cells. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 2 to 10 {mu}M acrolein led to an increase in the phosphorylation of eIF-2{alpha} within 10 to 30 min of exposure. This was followed by alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA and an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone genes Grp78 and Herp. Within 2-4 h of treatment, acrolein also increased the abundance and the nuclear transport of the transcription factors ATF3, AFT4, and CHOP. Acrolein-induced increase in ATF3 was prevented by treating the cells with the chemical chaperone - phenylbutyric acid (PBA). Treatment with acrolein increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK. The increase in JNK phosphorylation was prevented by PBA. Acrolein treatment led to activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and an increase in TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1, mRNA. Increased expression of cytokine genes and NF-{kappa}B activation were not observed in cells treated with PBA. These findings suggest that exposure to acrolein induces ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response and that NF-{kappa}B activation and stimulation of cytokine production by acrolein could be attributed, in part, to ER stress. Chemical chaperones of protein-folding may be useful in treating toxicological and pathological states associated with excessive acrolein exposure or production.

  8. Second United Nations International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A/C0NF.15/P/2H57 U.S.A. June 1958 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH Confidential until official release during Conference THE EOLE OF ATOMIC EMERGY IN THE PRCMOTIOH OF INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION By I. I. R a M This Second United Nations Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy with its thousemds of participsmts and its vast and elaborate exhibits is in itself the strongest indication of the importance of the role of atomic energy in stimulating international collaboration for all peaceful purposes. I say

  9. A Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Accelerator for the Final Acceleration Stage of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pasternak, J.; Witte, H.; Bliss, N. Cordwell M.; Jones, T.; Muir, A., Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

    2011-09-04

    The International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) has recently completed its Interim Design Report (IDR), which presents our current baseline design of the neutrino factory. To increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of acceleration, the IDR design uses a linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG) for its final acceleration stage. We present the current lattice design of that FFAG, including the main ring plus its injection and extraction systems. We describe parameters for the main ring magnets, kickers, and septa, as well as the power supplies for the kickers. We present a first pass at an engineering layout for the ring and its subsystems.

  10. Table HC1-11a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- -- NF New England

  11. Table HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 7.1 -- -- -- NF New England

  12. Table HC1-9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 20.3 14.8 5.4 NF New England

  13. Chairman John Deutch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    otnngress nf tlfe Nniteb §fates 11lta111Jington, iiQ! 20.51.5 March 25, 2014 Chairman John Deutch Task Force on Fracfocus 2.0 The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board {SEAB) Neil Kornze Principle Deputy Director Bureau of Land Management Dear Chairman Deutch, Task Force Members, and Mr. Kornze: We would like to thank you for your recent draft analysis of the hydraulic fracturing data repository Fracfocus (FF). 1 We believe that information about chemicals being injected underground should be as

  14. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1997 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF 1997 Household Income Category Less than $5,000 ......................................... 3.8 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 16.2 $5,000 to $9,999 ......................................... 9.6 0.9 1.1 0.6 0.7 14.2 $10,000 to $14,999

  15. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1997 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.5 1.2 0.9 1.3 1.5 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas ................................................. 53.5 3.4 7.8 3.8 0.7 8.6 Central Warm-Air Furnace ........................ 38.4 1.8 4.7 2.3 0.6 12.2 For One Housing Unit ..............................

  16. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1997 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.4 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 73.6 4.3 4.8 6.4 5.7 3.5 Central Equipment Not Used ....................... 0.3 Q 0.1 (*) 0.1 29.3 Room Air Conditioners Not Used ................ 0.7 Q Q Q 0.1 36.9

  17. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1997 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.3 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 80.5 5.4 8.9 5.2 4.7 1.9 Personal Computers ................................... 35.6 2.2 4.6 2.6 2.0 5.9 Number of PCs 1

  18. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households, 1997 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.2 1.1 1.3 1.5 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF Weekday Home Activities Home Used for Business Yes ............................................................ 7.4 0.5 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.5 No .............................................................. 94.1 6.3 10.6 6.5 5.6 2.2

  19. RECIPIENT:Semprius

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Semprius u.s. DEPARTr-IEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMEN T CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: NC PROJECT TITLE: SAl Incubator - Semprius - Massively Parallel Microcell-based Module Array; NREl Tracking No. 09- 036a Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procur~mtnt Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number NREL-09-036a G010337 Based on my review of the information concuning the proposed action, as Nf:PA Compliance Officer (authorized undcr DOE Order 45 I. IA), I have made

  20. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2?-, 3?-cyclic-nucleotide-3?-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase. The retina exhibits diminished neurotrophin levels and cellular differentiation. The toxic effect is apoptotic.

  1. table5.2_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal RSE NAICS Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 2,840

  2. table5.4_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal RSE NAICS for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row Code(a) End Use Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: NF 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,297 208

  3. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 (2004) 162-171 PII: S0029-5515(04)72612-5 Equilibrium reconstruction in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch J.K. Anderson, C.B. Forest, T.M. Biewer a , J.S. Sarff and J.C. Wright b Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 21 December 2002, accepted for publication 18 November 2003 Published 17 December 2003 Online at stacks.iop.org/NF/44/162 (DOI: 10.1088/0029-5515/44/1/018) Abstract A non-linear Grad-Shafranov toroidal equilibrium

  4. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 (2006) 521-531 doi:10.1088/0029-5515/46/5/004 Coupling to the electron Bernstein wave using a phased array of waveguides in MST reversed field pinch M. Cengher, J.K. Anderson, V. Svidzinski and C.B. Forest 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706, USA E-mail: cbforest@wisc.edu Received 31 August 2005, accepted for publication 20 February 2006 Published 23 March 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/NF/46/521 Abstract Coupling to the electron Bernstein

  5. ORNL/RASA-85/1 RESULTS OF THE II4OBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEvl YORK AREA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Nf7 n-q gz75 tLtY r 1 irl,r:'a :.a l: i , l : i l ',:lr.:'. itl:t i .,,::l ' i , t . . ORNL/RASA-85/1 RESULTS OF THE II4OBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEvl YORK AREA Access to the information in this report is limited to thoss indicated on the distribution list and io Department ol Energy ancl Depsrtment of Energy Contractors This report was prepared as an account ol work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the U nited StatesGovernment nor any

  6. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL

  7. ABORATOtiY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ABORATOtiY ., . . . .' _ RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAi SURVEY AT SUMITOMO MACHINERY CORPORATION OF AMERICA, 7 MALCOLM AVENUE, TETERBORO;NEW JERSEY (TJoo~) R. D. Foley L. M. Floyd Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical ' Information Serwce U.S. Department of Commerce 5265 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy:A03 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an aCCo"nf of Work sponsored by an agency 01 Ihe

  8. E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY ,*Eo~UI~ WILMINGTON 99, DELAWARE IQ?. R. L. Kilburn, Director (2) Technical and Production Division Savannah River Operations Office U. S. Atomic Energy Commission -:; ;:~~~~!,~:c';~,~"s-,fi,:-~~~i:~!~~,,,,~~, ,';;'nf;;G;h=;cr;lina :J "'- I Dear IfI. Kilburn: RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN SUPPORT OF SAVANNAH RIVER In a letter to you dated April 19, 1956, ~~14-56-218, we recommended that the Savannah River Operations Office set aside funds to cover certain

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c)&a sw&?u da r/dwl&e ALTERNATE NAME: NAME: --------------------------------------- CITY: 79lA% lo -------------------------- STATE: TYPE OF OPERATION -------------_--_ D Research & Development 0 Production scale tasting ench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Facility Typo * Manuf actul 0 Universijt 0 Reaearcti I 0 Governmfn Cl Other ---. 0 Production p Disposal/Staraqe cwQ @oa&' y, a( L:& 0 Prime 0 Subcontract& cl Other i nf ormi 0

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,,:,z !8,!,. i ,OCT 2 8 1981 .., : $... . ,, .., ., ? conversation of October 14,.1981.~sb&ween Dr. My& A. Whitman regarding the collection of samples and infnm , to'verify the results of the decontamination effortc nf '1.. : asreported in their. final radioloalcal PIIIWW N ^- : .' ..' -:'.& dlSCUS& &ring the me&in; it DOE Headq&&~S on-Se$&&'i, lg& ;' . . ,'~ :~ ' with Dr. R. Wmveen. Mr. W. Smfth. and yourself, we concur wfth the'schedile of actfvftfes

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .., ..6'"w' I, . v -+"+.~ f, :. 6 ~,i.//bJc-iC ' ; 1-i -5' ; i - *> i-i> I ii I-t t n,.,4 ( .I , f ' .I f x c . : ' . ,"", ' C.--c rn ' 2. I _ i ' L :_ ;) --lr>[-0-t. ' I" c j-j! : , :- ) L (, 3 uTALL.URCICAL PROJECT FOmc W-73 The University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois s docurrient consists of--.TL,y. es and ._______ C? . _ - _ _ ._.__ d..nf ______ &?copiesl fig ____________________-----. 2 Series_.. re%~~IC~ 0~ T~WINATI~N OF SUBCONTRACT _ _____ Contract

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Low Dose Update Metting 6 Dec 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low Dose DOE's Low Dose R di ti R h R di ti R h Radiation Research Radiation Research Program Program g g NF Metting, Sc.D., Program Manager Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting L'Enfant Plaza Hotel L'Enfant Plaza Hotel 6 December 2012 Office of Science Office of Biological and Environmental Research DOE's Low Dose Program: DOE s Low Dose Program: Is unique within the U.S. government in focusing on low dose biological research aimed at informing

  13. Microsoft Word - Comments received at White Rock Scoping Mtg.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CMRR-NF Supplemental EIS Scoping Meeting October 19, 2010 / White Rock Town Hall, White Rock, NM Written Comments (transcribed) 061 Joni Arends The meeting format does not work. One of the purposes of the scoping meeting is for the public to hear the concerns of other community members. The people of N. NM have a strong oral tradition where people learn by listening to others. We request a "classroom" type format, such as that used during the draft document hearing process. A format

  14. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, Claudia A.; Fievez, Laurence; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Bureau, Fabrice; Vanbever, Rita

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  15. Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? ligand, prevents abnormal liver function induced by a fastingrefeeding process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon No; Dutta, Raghbendra Kumar; Kim, Seul-Gi; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Se-Jin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Immune-network Pioneer Research Center, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan ; Song, Seung Ryel; Park, Do-Sim; Department of Laboratory of Medicine, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan ; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: A fastingrefeeding high fat diet (HDF) model mimics irregular eating habit. A fastingrefeeding HFD induces liver ballooning injury. A fastingrefeeding HDF process elicits hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Fenofibrate, PPAR? ligand, prevents liver damage induced by refeeding HFD. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) agonist, is an anti-hyperlipidemic agent that has been widely used in the treatment of dyslipidemia. In this study, we examined the effect of fenofibrate on liver damage caused by refeeding a high-fat diet (HFD) in mice after 24 h fasting. Here, we showed that refeeding HFD after fasting causes liver damage in mice determined by liver morphology and liver cell death. A detailed analysis revealed that hepatic lipid droplet formation is enhanced and triglyceride levels in liver are increased by refeeding HFD after starvation for 24 h. Also, NF-?B is activated and consequently induces the expression of TNF-?, IL1-?, COX-2, and NOS2. However, treating with fenofibrate attenuates the liver damage and triglyceride accumulation caused by the fastingrefeeding HFD process. Fenofibrate reduces the expression of NF-?B target genes but induces genes for peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, peroxisome biogenesis and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. These results strongly suggest that the treatment of fenofibrate ameliorates the liver damage induced by fastingrefeeding HFD, possibly through the activation of fatty acid oxidation.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed, Noha M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M.; Algandaby, Mardi M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-?B expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ? Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ? MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ? MP and EP decreased TNF-? and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ? MP and EP reduced NF-?B expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ? MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  17. A multichannel magnetic probe system for analysing magnetic fluctuations in helical axis plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haskey, S. R.; Blackwell, B. D.; Seiwald, B.; Hole, M. J.; Pretty, D. G.; Howard, J.; Wach, J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    The need to understand the structure of magnetic fluctuations in H-1NF heliac [S. Hamberger et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 123 (1990)] plasmas has motivated the installation of a sixteen former, tri-axis helical magnetic probe Mirnov array (HMA). The new array complements two existing poloidal Mirnov arrays by providing polarisation information, higher frequency response, and improved toroidal resolution. The helical placement is ideal for helical axis plasmas because it positions the array as close as possible to the plasma in regions of varying degrees of favourable curvature in the magnetohydrodynamic sense, but almost constant magnetic angle. This makes phase variation with probe position near linear, greatly simplifying the analysis of the data. Several of the issues involved in the design, installation, data analysis, and calibration of this unique array are presented including probe coil design, frequency response measurements, mode number identification, orientation calculations, and mapping probe coil positions to magnetic coordinates. Details of specially designed digitally programmable pre-amplifiers, which allow gains and filters to be changed as part of the data acquisition initialisation sequence and stored with the probe signals, are also presented. The low shear heliac geometry [R. Jimnez-Gmez et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 033001 (2011)], flexibility of the H-1NF heliac, and wealth of information provided by the HMA create a unique opportunity for detailed study of Alfvn eigenmodes, which could be a serious issue for future fusion reactors.

  18. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-?B through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  19. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially MWW_NF) better treatment alternatives from the environmental sustainability perspective since they exhibited minimal contribution to environmental damage from emissions.

  20. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative I?B-? plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-?B, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-?B pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. p38 MAPK/NF-?B signaling pathway modulates ethanol-induced Nox2 expression.

  1. Magnolol protects neurons against ischemia injury via the downregulation of p38/MAPK, CHOP and nitrotyrosine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-09-15

    Magnolol is isolated from the herb Magnolia officinalis, which has been demonstrated to exert pharmacological effects. Our aim was to investigate whether magnolol is able to act as an anti-inflammatory agent that brings about neuroprotection using a global ischemic stroke model and to determine the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with and without magnolol after ischemia reperfusion brain injury by occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The inflammatory cytokine production in serum and the volume of infarction in the brain were measured. The proteins present in the brains obtained from the stroke animal model (SAM) and control animal groups with and without magnolol treatment were compared. Magnolol reduces the total infarcted volume by 15% and 30% at dosages of 10 and 30 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the untreated SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 were attenuated by magnolol. Magnolol was also able to suppress the production of nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), various phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and various C/EBP homologues. Furthermore, this modulation of ischemia injury factors in the SAM model group treated with magnolol seems to result from a suppression of reactive oxygen species production and the upregulation of p-Akt and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). These findings confirm the anti-oxidative properties of magnolol, including the inhibition of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to involve changes in the in vivo activity of Akt, GSK3β and NF-κB. - Graphical abstract: Schematic presentation of the signaling pathways involved in magnolol inhibited transient global ischemia brain apoptosis and inflammation in rats. The effect of magnolol on the scavenger of ROS, which inhibits p38 MAPK and CHOP protein inactivation. These results suggest that another role for the iNOS/Akt pathway may be involved in neuronal survival or plasticity by magnolol after ischemic injury. - Highlights: • Magnolol attenuates brain damage in ischemic rats. • Effects of magnolol on stroke animals in ROS and acute inflammation cytokines. • Oxidants and Akt/NF-κB signaling are involved in the neuroprotection of magnolol.

  2. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  3. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  4. Injection/Extraction Studies for the Muon FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, J.; Berg, J. Scott; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.

    2010-03-30

    The non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG) ring is a candidate muon accelerator in the Neutrino Factory complex according to the present baseline, which is currently being addressed by the International Design Study (IDS-NF). In order to achieve small orbit excursion, motivated by magnet cost reduction, and small time of flight variation, dictated by the need to use high RF frequency, lattices with a very compact cell structure and short straight sections are required. The resulting geometry dictates very difficult constraints on the injection/extraction systems. Beam dynamics in the non-scaling FFAG is studied using codes capable of correctly tracking with large transverse amplitude and momentum spread. The feasibility of injection/extraction is studied and various implementations focusing on minimization of kicker/septum strength are presented. Finally the parameters of the resulting kicker magnets are estimated.

  5. RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2012-07-01

    Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

  6. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, aμhvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of amore » μhvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty aμhvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.« less

  7. Nano-structure multilayer technology fabrication of high energy density capacitors for the power electronic building book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W.; Johnson, G.W.; Wagner, A.V.

    1997-10-21

    Commercially available capacitors do not meet the specifications of the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) concept. We have applied our propriety nanostructure multilayer materials technology to the fabrication of high density capacitors designed to remove this impediment to PEBB progress. Our nanostructure multilayer capacitors will also be enabling technology in many industrial and military applications. Examples include transient suppression (snubber capacitors), resonant circuits, and DC filtering in PEBB modules. Additionally, weapon applications require compact energy storage for detonators and pulsed-power systems. Commercial applications run the gamut from computers to lighting to communications. Steady progress over the last five years has brought us to the threshold of commercial manufacturability. We have demonstrated a working dielectric energy density of > 11 J/cm3 in 20 nF devices designed for 1 kV operation.

  8. Detailed optical characterization of a near diffraction limited xenon fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londono, C. ); Smith, M.J.; Trainor, D.W.; Itzkan, I. ); Berggren, R. ); Fulghum, S.F. )

    1988-12-01

    A 1 m gain length, electron beam pumped xenon fluoride laser (lambda = 353, 351 nm) utilizing two laser mixtures of lean and rich NF/sub 3/, with Xe and balance Ne, was operated with a confocal unstable resonator with magnification of 2.24. The resultant beam quality was diagnosed with both shearing interferometry to measure near-field phase and far-field focal spot evaluation techniques. These measurements resulted in a beam quality of <1.15 times the diffraction limit with no evidence of the wide angle energy loss. This laser device was fully characterized with regard to electron beam deposition uniformity, transient refractive index effects, and optical quality of the resonator and diagnostic components.

  9. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report - July 2007 to December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. T. Stankovich

    2009-04-15

    This report documents the decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of the 105-NB, 163-N, 183-N, 183-NA, 183-NB, 183-NC, 184-N, 184-NA, 184-NB, 184-NC, 184-ND, 184-NE, 184-NF, 1312-N, 1330-N, 1705-N, 1705-NA, 1706-N, 1712-N, 1714-N, 1714-NA, 1714-NB, 1802-N, MO-050, MO-055, MO-358, MO-390, MO-900, MO-911, and MO-950 facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 activities for these facilities include utility disconnection, planning, characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiological contaminated materials, equipment removal, decommissioning, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and removal of the remaining slabs.

  10. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  11. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  12. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  13. Tri And Rot Effects In Ternary Fission: What Can Be Learned?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goennenwein, F.; Gagarski, A.; Petrov, G.; Guseva, I.; Zavarukhina, T.; Mutterer, M.; Kalben, J. von; Kopatch, Yu.; Tiourine, G.; Trzaska, W.; Sillanpaea, M.; Soldner, T.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2010-04-30

    Inducing fission by polarized neutrons allows studying subtle effects of the dynamics of the process. In the present experiments ternary fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu was investigated with cold neutrons in the (n,f) reaction at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. Asymmetries in the emission of ternary particles were discovered by making use of the neutron spin flipping. It was found that two effects are interfering. There is first an asymmetry in the total yields of ternary particles having been called the TRI-effect. Second, it was observed that the angular distributions of ternary particles are shifted back and forth when flipping the neutron spin. This shift was named ROT effect. Guided by trajectory calculations of the three-body decay, the signs and sizes of the ROT effect are interpreted in terms of the K-numbers of the transition states at the saddle point of fission.

  14. Lasing in the UV, IR and visible spectral ranges in a runaway-electron-preionised diffuse dischrage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vil'tovskii, P O; Lomaev, Mikhail I; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Panchenko, N A; Rybka, D V; Tarasenko, Viktor F

    2013-07-31

    Lasers on the mixtures of inert gases, H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and nitrogen with NF{sub 3} and (or) SF{sub 6} are studied under pumping by the volume (diffusive) discharge formed in a nonuniform electric field due to runaway-electron preionisation. Generation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges is obtained on atomic transitions of neon ({lambda} = 585.3 nm), argon (750.3 nm) and fluorine (712.8 and 731.1 nm), and on molecular transitions of N2 (337.1 nm), XeF * (351 and 353 nm), HF (2.8 - 3.2 {mu}m) and DF (3.8 - 4.2 {mu}m). It is shown that in N{sub 2} - SF{sub 6}, H{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} and D{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} mixtures the generation efficiency approaches the limiting values. (lasers)

  15. SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

    2012-09-25

    Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle approaches. Based on current results of the research at SRNL on SF{sub 6} fluoride volatility for UNF separations, SF{sub 6} treatment renders all anticipated volatile fluorides studied to be volatile, and all non-volatile fluorides studied to be non-volatile, with the notable exception of uranium oxides. This offers an excellent opportunity to use this as a head-end separations treatment process because: 1. SF{sub 6} can be used to remove volatile fluorides from a UNF matrix while leaving behind uranium oxides. Therefore an agent such as NF{sub 3} should be able to very cleanly separate a pure UF{sub 6} stream, leaving compounds in the bottoms such as PuF{sub 4}, SrF{sub 2} and CsF after the UNF matrix has been pre-treated with SF{sub 6}. 2. Due to the fact that the uranium oxide is not separated in the volatilization step upon direct contact with SF{sub 6} at moderately high temperatures (? 1000{deg}C), this fluoride approach may be wellsuited for head-end processing for Gen IV reactor designs where the LWR is treated as a fuel stock, and it is not desired to separate the uranium from plutonium, but it is desired to separate many of the volatile fission products. 3. It is likely that removal of the volatile fission products from the uranium oxide should simplify both traditional and next generation pyroprocessing techniques. 4. SF{sub 6} treatment to remove volatile fission products, with or without treatment with additional fluorinators, could be used to simplify the separations of traditional aqueous processes in similar fashion to the FLUOREX process. Further research should be conducted to determine the separations efficiency of a combined SF{sub 6}/NF{sub 3} separations approach which could be used as a stand-alone separations technology or a head-end process.

  16. Helicity evolution at small-x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-13

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of αs ln2(1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of αs ln(1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation efects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc & Nf limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equationsmore » map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for g1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin.« less

  17. P+

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    zt- n.2 - _ ,I ---. -y , _ _._. s ~ .. <; ,. -* a.a----- -_ .S$ P+ -i ,4+y+&: .: ( 4 -fhP ,. I. ,* P 0 ' 9". ' - cn pi: %f . . : =1 - z ; ; (n ;' = g 5 G ," : 5 ; b f . . 4 3 \ . . . I i 8 : i 5 8 > --I n ;: 2-c 3" 5; 2 ? l 14 ? - i? 8 s =! 5 : ID z c! - ,I: -0 ;$ . . . i i I# : ii PM! c sgq, I 2 m Q 4 & 4 iii : -4 al- 2: p n-F! z i?" pw- p 48 $5 h A z r 8 i; 4 0 8 3 m N :a[ IO II i: g! j * / "a---= g : -4 O-IV' @ 42 % if 9 5 ;: 8 z, ,$ z 2 9 ;! 1'0 12 u)

  18. An investigation of meson spectroscopy on isotropic clover lattices at the SU(3) flavor-symmetric point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, David G.; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2014-06-23

    We present an investigation of the excited meson spectrum at the N_f= 3 point obtained on isotropic clover lattices with a plaquette Wilson gauge action, and a NP-improved clover fermion action, at a lattice spacing of a \\simeq 0.08 fm, and compare with corresponding calculations on an anisotropic lattice at fine temporal lattice spacing but a spatial lattice spacing of a_s \\simeq 0.125 fm. The methodology adopted follows that employed in the calculation of the spectrum on anisotropic lattices, and we test the efficacy of that approach for isotropic lattices. In particular, we explore the extent to which rotational symmetry for predominantly single-hadron states is realized. By comparison of the energy levels with that obtained using the anisotropic lattice, we obtain an indication of discretization uncertainties in the single-hadron spectrum.

  19. Imision, Sohmso~ operatlonr Offloe

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    " c:.' ; ' : w. A. f9riokron, ohlrrf, Researoh and ojmrat1onr Imision, Sohmso~ operatlonr Offloe W/6. 1950 8taal.y Et. Roboff, harlatant Dbeotor, Speulal bfatarlalo lmlqioa, mu To* opwatfoar Offiue L I!t?Qm m AToWfZrn URAXIUW - %lb-fiNf---~" ;' RlmisiM \ \ sxlmoLr aO:arr Rafermoa 18 sada to your manozvmd~ datad April uhioh pOU &' @qtuStOd dncbolf pOuad Of SbOUt x)0 uranha powder meida b;r 3$Waaia Eleotrlo Produoto, ho., 3ayslde, Long fElti, 8. Y. Sylvaaia'o prooorr for pa-oduofng

  20. ASN Aircraft accident Beechcraft 1900C N27RA Tonopah-Test Range Airport, NV (XSD)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Accident description languages: Share 0 Statd,LB:5E)(WEWkNF75WLEW)w(Ni7wkE.(wnNa75WLEW)w(Nl7wwkE.()]TJWkbE&bBTLsT/[Dat :5E.(WEWkN16 MLB7,EWLwLNA7WwEW i:5EkwWEWkN04N:7wkE.(w01n7)&&]TJ5WL(,wBTLsT/[Type The Air Force Materiel Command Beech 1900 crashed while on a routine support mission from a remote classified airstrip on the Nellis range to the Tonopah Test Range. It departed at 03:43 for Tonopah. After reporting the runway lights in sight, the pilot configured the airplane for the

  1. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4?,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-?B activity.

  2. New therapeutic aspect for carvedilol: Antifibrotic effects of carvedilol in chronic carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamdy, Nadia; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2012-06-15

    Portal hypertension is a common complication of chronic liver diseases associated with liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. At present, beta-blockers such as carvedilol remain the medical treatment of choice for protection against variceal bleeding and other complications. Since carvedilol has powerful antioxidant properties we assessed the potential antifibrotic effects of carvedilol and the underlying mechanisms that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness using a chronic model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity. Two weeks after CCl4 induction of chronic hepatotoxicity, rats were co-treated with carvedilol (10 mg/kg, orally) daily for 6 weeks. It was found that treatment of animals with carvedilol significantly counteracted the changes in liver function and histopathological lesions induced by CCl4. Also, carvedilol significantly counteracted lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and reduction in antioxidant enzyme activities; glutathione-S-transferase and catalase that was induced by CCl4. In addition, carvedilol ameliorated the inflammation induced by CCl4 as indicated by reducing the serum level of acute phase protein marker; alpha-2-macroglobulin and the liver expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B). Finally, carvedilol significantly reduced liver fibrosis markers including hydroxyproline, collagen accumulation, and the expression of the hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation marker; alpha smooth muscle actin. In conclusion, the present study provides evidences for the promising antifibrotic effects of carvedilol that can be explained by amelioration of oxidative stress through mainly, replenishment of GSH, restoration of antioxidant enzyme activities and reduction of lipid peroxides as well as amelioration of inflammation and fibrosis by decreasing collagen accumulation, acute phase protein level, NF-?B expression and finally HSC activation. -- Highlights: ? Carvedilol is a beta blocker with antioxidant and antifibrotic properties. ? It restores GSH and antioxidant enzyme activities and reduces lipid peroxidation. ? It ameliorates inflammation and nuclear factor kappa-B expression. ? It ameliorates fibrosis by decreasing collagen accumulation and HSC activation.

  3. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Smith, Frances N.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2014-02-10

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (?70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550?C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400?C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500?C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-m crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-m in length.

  4. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  5. Activation of IL-2 receptor {alpha}-chain gene by individual members of the rel oncogene family in association with serum response factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, J.W.; Jamieson, C.A.; Ross, J.L.

    1995-08-15

    Expression of the IL-2R{alpha} gene is regulated by members of the c-Rel/NF-{kappa}B family of transcription factors binding to the {kappa}B site in the promoter. Previous work has not defined the role of individual members of the c-Rel family in the activation of the IL-2R{alpha} gene. Using the COS cell system, we were able to reconstitute the regulation of the IL-2R{alpha} promoter by expressing cloned Rel family members with serum response factor (SRF). We found that c-rel alone activated the IL-2R{alpha} promoter only weakly but worked with the p50 subunit of NF-{kappa}B (NFKB1) to give a higher level of expression. We showed that c-rel heterodimerizes with p50 and the amount of this heterodimer correlated with the level of IL-2R{alpha} gene expression. Our results provide evidence that c-rel/p50 heterodimers activate gene expression in the context of a cellular promoter. We show that c-rel or p65 can cooperate with SRF in the activation of this promoter and the transactivation by c-rel with SRF was enhanced by p50. Synergistic activation required both {kappa}B an CArG sites, and binding studies show that these that these adjacent sites can be occupied simultaneously. The transactivation observed with cloned transcription factors mimics the physiologic induction of the IL-2R{alpha} gene since multiple sequence elements cooperate to give gene activation. The data support the model that c-rel/p50 or p65 can cooperate with SRF to specifically target the expression of the IL-2R{alpha} gene in activated T cells.

  6. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiangtao; Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 ; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-?B-dependent genes, including interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  7. DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick L.T.

    2002-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, this revision applies to both situations.

  8. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William; Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation by E. coli and Y. pestis LPS. The chip revealed an oscillation pattern in translocation of NF-kB indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop involving IKK. Activation of NF-kB is preceded by phosphorylation of many kinases and to correlate the kinase activity with translocation, we performed flow cytometric assays in the PhosphoChip module. Phopshorylated forms of p38. ERK and RelA were measured in macrophage cells challenged with LPS and showed a dynamic response where phosphorylation increases with time reaching a maximum at {approx}30-60min. To allow further downstream analysis on selected cells, we also implemented an optical-trapping based sorting of cells. This has allowed us to sort macrophages infected with bacteria from uninfected cells with the goal of obtaining data only on the infected (the desired) population. The various microfluidic chip modules and the accessories required to operate them such as pumps, heaters, electronic control and optical detectors are being assembled in a bench-top, semi-automated device. The data generated is being utilized to refine existing TLR pathway model by adding kinetic rate constants and concentration information. The microfluidic platform allows high-resolution imaging as well as quantitative proteomic measurements with high sensitivity (

  9. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir pressure can indeed be used to drive the reverse osmosis process. Our initial conclusions from the work to date are encouraging: (1) The concept of aquifer-pressured RO to provide fresh water associated with carbon dioxide storage appears feasible. (2) Concentrated brines such as those found in Wyoming are amenable to RO treatment. We have looked at sodium chloride brines from the Nugget Formation in Sublette County. 20-25% removal with conventional methods is realistic; higher removal appears achievable with NF. The less concentrated sulfate-rich brines from the Tensleep Formation in Sublette County would support >80% removal with conventional RO. (3) Brines from other proposed sequestration sites can now be analyzed readily. An osmotic pressure curve appropriate to these brines can be used to evaluate cost and equipment specifications. (4) We have examined a range of subsurface brine compositions that is potentially pertinent to carbon sequestration and noted the principal compositional trends pertinent to evaluating the feasibility of freshwater extraction. We have proposed a general categorization for the feasibility of the process based on total dissolved solids (TDS). (5) Withdrawing pressurized brine can have a very beneficial effect on reservoir pressure and total available storage capacity. Brine must be extracted from a deeper location in the aquifer than the point of CO{sub 2} injection to prevent CO{sub 2} from migrating to the brine extraction well.

  10. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF/AZ performance. The selection and presentation of contributions are intended to show the iterative development of understand

  11. Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natarajan, Mohan; Xu, Nancy R; Mohan, Sumathy

    2013-06-03

    In this study two novel approaches are proposed to investigate precisely the low dose low LET radiation damage and its effect on bystander cells in real time. First, a flow shear model system, which would provide us a near in vivo situation where endothelial cells in the presence of extra cellular matrix experiencing continuous flow shear stress, will be used. Endothelial cells on matri-gel (simulated extra cellular matrix) will be subjected to physiological flow shear (that occurs in normal blood vessels). Second, a unique tool (Single nano particle/single live cell/single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy; Figure A) will be used to track the molecular trafficking by single live cell imaging. Single molecule chemical microscopy allows one to single out and study rare events that otherwise might be lost in assembled average measurement, and monitor many target single molecules simultaneously in real-time. Multi color single novel metal nanoparticle probes allow one to prepare multicolor probes (Figure B) to monitor many single components (events) simultaneously and perform multi-complex analysis in real-time. These nano-particles resist to photo bleaching and hence serve as probes for unlimited timeframe of analysis. Single live cell microscopy allows one to image many single cells simultaneously in real-time. With the combination of these unique tools, we will be able to study under near-physiological conditions the cellular and sub-cellular responses (even subtle changes at one molecule level) to low and very low doses of low LET radiation in real time (milli-second or nano-second) at sub-10 nanometer spatial resolution. This would allow us to precisely identify, at least in part, the molecular mediators that are responsible of radiation damage in the irradiated cells and the mediators that are responsible for initiating the signaling in the neighboring cells. Endothelial cells subjected to flow shear (2 dynes/cm2 or 16 dynes/cm2) and exposed to 0.1, 1 and 10 cGy on coverslips will be examined for (a) low LET radiation-induced alterations of cellular function and its physiological relevance in real time; and (b) radiation damage triggered bystander effect on the neighboring unirradiated cells. First, to determine the low LET radiation induced alteration of cellular function we will examine: (i) the real time transformation of single membrane transporters in single living cells; (ii) the pump efficiency of membrane efflux pump of live cells in real time at the molecular level; (iii) the kinetics of single-ligand receptor interaction on single live cell surface (Figure C); and (iv) alteration in chromosome replication in living cell. Second, to study the radiation triggered bystander responses, we will examine one of the key signaling pathway i.e. TNF- alpha/NF-kappa B mediated signaling. TNF-alpha specific nano particle sensors (green) will be developed to detect the releasing dynamics, transport mechanisms and ligand-receptor binding on live cell surface in real time. A second sensor (blue) will be developed to simultaneously monitor the track of NF-kB inside the cell. The proposed nano-particle optics approach would complement our DOE funded study on biochemical mechanisms of TNF-alpha- NF-kappa B-mediated bystander effect.

  12. Final Report [The c-Abl signaling network in the radioadaptive response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi-Min, Yuan

    2014-01-28

    The radioadaptive response, or radiation hormesis, i.e. a low dose of radiation can protect cells and organisms from the effects of a subsequent higher dose, is a widely recognized phenomenon. Mechanisms underlying such radiation hormesis, however, remain largely unclear. Preliminary studies indicate an important role of c-Abl signaling in mediating the radioadaptive response. We propose to investigate how c-Abl regulates the crosstalk between p53 and NF?B in response to low doses irradiation. We found in our recent study that low dose IR induces a reciprocal p53 suppression and NF?B activation, which induces HIF-a and subsequently a metabolic reprogramming resulting in a transition from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. Of importance is that this glycolytic switch is essential for the radioadaptive response. This low-dose radiationinduced HIF1? activation was in sharp contrast with the high-dose IR-induced p53 activation and HIF1? inhibition. HIF1? and p53 seem to play distinct roles in mediating the radiation dose-dependent metabolic response. The induction of HIF1?-mediated glycolysis is restricted to a low dose range of radiation, which may have important implications in assessing the level of radiation exposure and its potential health risk. Our results support a dose-dependent metabolic response to IR. When IR doses are below the threshold of causing detectable DNA damage (<0.2Gy) and thus little p53 activation, HIF1? is induced resulting in induction of glycolysis and increased radiation resistance. When the radiation dose reaches levels eliciting DNA damage, p53 is activated and diminishes the activity of HIF1? and glycolysis, leading to the induction of cell death. Our work challenges the LNT model of radiation exposure risk and provides a metabolic mechanism of radioadaptive response. The study supports a need for determining the p53 and HIF1? activity as a potential reliable biological readout of radiation exposure in humans. The exquisite sensitivity of cellular metabolism to low doses of radiation could also serve as a valuable biomarker for estimating the health effects of low-level radiation exposure.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre ; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre ; Shao, Jia; Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre ; Loveren, Henk van; National Institute for Public Health and the Environment , Bilthoven; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre ; Peijnenburg, Ad; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 ?M DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-?B/TNF-? pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 ?M DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ? The human T cell line Jurkat and human PBMCs were exposed to DON. ? Whole-genome microarray experiments were performed. ? Microarray data indicates that DON affects ribosome and RNA/protein synthesis. ? DON treatment induces ER stress, calcium mediated signaling, NFAT and NF-?B. ? Exposure to DON induces T cell activation, oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  14. Case study on the utility of hepatic global gene expression profiling in the risk assessment of the carcinogen furan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Anna Francina; Williams, Andrew; Recio, Leslie; Waters, Michael D.; Lambert, Iain B.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2014-01-01

    Furan is a chemical hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats. Its previously postulated cancer mode of action (MOA) is chronic cytotoxicity followed by sustained regenerative proliferation; however, its molecular basis is unknown. To this end, we conducted toxicogenomic analysis of B3C6F1 mouse livers following three week exposures to non-carcinogenic (0, 1, 2 mg/kg bw) or carcinogenic (4 and 8 mg/kg bw) doses of furan. We saw enrichment for pathways responsible for cytotoxicity: stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and death receptor (DR5 and TNF-alpha) signaling, and proliferation: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and TNF-alpha. We also noted the involvement of NF-kappaB and c-Jun in response to furan, which are genes that are known to be required for liver regeneration. Furan metabolism by CYP2E1 produces cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA), which is required for ensuing cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. NRF2 is a master regulator of gene expression during oxidative stress and we suggest that chronic NFR2 activity and chronic inflammation may represent critical transition events between the adaptive (regeneration) and adverse (cancer) outcomes. Another objective of this study was to demonstrate the applicability of toxicogenomics data in quantitative risk assessment. We modeled benchmark doses for our transcriptional data and previously published cancer data, and observed consistency between the two. Margin of exposure values for both transcriptional and cancer endpoints were also similar. In conclusion, using furan as a case study we have demonstrated the value of toxicogenomics data in elucidating dose-dependent MOA transitions and in quantitative risk assessment. - Highlights: Global gene expression changes in furan-exposed mouse livers were analyzed. A molecular mode of action for furan-induced hepatocarcinogenesis is proposed. Key pathways include NRF2, SAPK, ERK and death receptor signaling. Important roles for TNF-alpha, c-Jun, and NF-?B in tumorigenesis are proposed. BMD and MoE values from transcriptional and apical data are compared.

  15. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition, there is a shift of the {alpha}C3 helix itself upon GDP-Fuc binding.

  16. Structures of NodZ ?1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-02-01

    Crystal structures of the bacterial ?1,6-fucosyltransferase NodZ in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose are presented. Rhizobial NodZ ?1,6-fucosyltransferase (?1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5?-diphosphate-?-l-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two ?1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of ?1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzymeproduct complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-l-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among ?1,2-, ?1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand ?C2 and helix ?C3. In addition, there is a shift of the ?C3 helix itself upon GDP-Fuc binding.

  17. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  18. Two nucleon systems at mπ~450MeV from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass ofmore » $$m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $$B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$$, while the dineutron is bound by $$B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.« less

  19. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfn, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  20. $X(3873$ and $Y(4140)$ using diquark-antidiquark operators with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanath, M.; Lang, C.? B.; Prelovsek Komelj, Sasa

    2015-08-01

    We perform a lattice study of charmonium-like mesons with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ and three quark contents $\\bar cc \\bar du$, $\\bar cc(\\bar uu+\\bar dd)$ and $\\bar cc \\bar ss$, where the later two can mix with $\\bar cc$. This simulation with $N_f=2$ and $m_\\pi=266$ MeV aims at the possible signatures of four-quark exotic states. We utilize a large basis of $\\bar cc$, two-meson and diquark-antidiquark interpolating fields, with diquarks in both anti-triplet and sextet color representations. A lattice candidate for X(3872) with I=0 is observed very close to the experimental state only if both $\\bar cc$ and $D\\bar D^*$ interpolators are included; the candidate is not found if diquark-antidiquark and $D\\bar D^*$ are used in the absence of $\\bar cc$. No candidate for neutral or charged X(3872), or any other exotic candidates are found in the I=1 channel. We also do not find signatures of exotic $\\bar cc\\bar ss$ candidates below 4.3 GeV, such as Y(4140). Possible physics and methodology related reasons for that are discussed. Along the way, we present the diquark-antidiquark operators as linear combinations of the two-meson operators via the Fierz transformations.

  1. Towards the Understanding of Resistance Mechanisms in Clinically Isolated Trimethoprim-resistant, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, K.; Lombardo, M; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutics such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has become an increasing problem in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant strains reveal a double mutation, H30N/F98Y, in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to develop novel and effective therapeutics against these resistant strains, we evaluated a series of propargyl-linked antifolate lead compounds for inhibition of the mutant enzyme. For the propargyl-linked antifolates, the F98Y mutation generates minimal (between 1.2- and 6-fold) losses of affinity and the H30N mutation generates greater losses (between 2.4- and 48-fold). Conversely, trimethoprim affinity is largely diminished by the F98Y mutation (36-fold) and is not affected by the H30N mutation. In order to elucidate a mechanism of resistance, we determined a crystal structure of a complex of this double mutant with a lead propargyl-linked antifolate. This structure suggests a resistance mechanism consistent both for the propargyl-linked class of antifolates and for trimethoprim that is based on the loss of a conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond.

  2. Stability of precipitate phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the and phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the phase at lowmoretemperature. The other is that both the and phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.less

  3. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  4. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed intomore » the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  5. The I=2 ππ S-wave Scattering Phase Shift from Lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2012-02-16

    The π+π+ s-wave scattering phase-shift is determined below the inelastic threshold using Lattice QCD. Calculations were performed at a pion mass of mπ ≈ 390 MeV with an anisotropic nf = 2+1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ≈ 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.9 fm, and with a lattice spacing of bs ≈ 0.123 fm in the spatial direction and bt bs/3.5 in the time direction. The phase-shift is determined from the energy-eigenvalues of π+π+ systems with both zero and non-zero total momentum in the lattice volume using Luscher's method. Our calculations are precise enoughmore »to allow for a determination of the threshold scattering parameters, the scattering length a, the effective range r, and the shape-parameter P, in this channel and to examine the prediction of two-flavor chiral perturbation theory: mπ2 a r = 3+O(mπ2/Λχ2). Chiral perturbation theory is used, with the Lattice QCD results as input, to predict the scattering phase-shift (and threshold parameters) at the physical pion mass. Our results are consistent with determinations from the Roy equations and with the existing experimental phase shift data.« less

  6. Chlorobenzene induces oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feltens, Ralph; Moegel, Iljana; Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen; Simon, Jan-Christoph; Herberth, Gunda; Lehmann, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Chlorobenzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent, degreasing agent and chemical intermediate in many industrial settings. Occupational studies have shown that acute and chronic exposure to chlorobenzene can cause irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Using in vitro assays, we have shown in a previous study that human bronchial epithelial cells release inflammatory mediators such as the cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in response to chlorobenzene. This response is mediated through the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of monochlorobenzene on human lung cells, with emphasis on potential alterations of the redox equilibrium to clarify whether the chlorobenzene-induced inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells is caused via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. We found that expression of cellular markers for oxidative stress, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), glutathione S-transferase pi1 (GSTP1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), were elevated in the presence of monochlorobenzene. Likewise, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased in response to exposure. However, in the presence of the antioxidants N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (MPG) or bucillamine, chlorobenzene-induced upregulation of marker proteins and release of the inflammatory mediator MCP-1 are suppressed. These results complement our previous findings and point to an oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response following chlorobenzene exposure.

  7. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  8. NFkappaB Selectivity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands Revealed By Comparative Crystallographic Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettles, K.W.; Bruning, J.B.; Gil, G.; Nowak, J.; Sharma, S.K.; Hahm, J.B.; Kulp, K.; Hochberg, R.B.; Zhou, H.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Katzenllenbogen, B.S.; Kim, Y.; Joachmiak, A.; Greene, G.L.

    2009-05-22

    Our understanding of how steroid hormones regulate physiological functions has been significantly advanced by structural biology approaches. However, progress has been hampered by misfolding of the ligand binding domains in heterologous expression systems and by conformational flexibility that interferes with crystallization. Here, we show that protein folding problems that are common to steroid hormone receptors are circumvented by mutations that stabilize well-characterized conformations of the receptor. We use this approach to present the structure of an apo steroid receptor that reveals a ligand-accessible channel allowing soaking of preformed crystals. Furthermore, crystallization of different pharmacological classes of compounds allowed us to define the structural basis of NF{kappa}B-selective signaling through the estrogen receptor, thus revealing a unique conformation of the receptor that allows selective suppression of inflammatory gene expression. The ability to crystallize many receptor-ligand complexes with distinct pharmacophores allows one to define structural features of signaling specificity that would not be apparent in a single structure.

  9. Tungsten coating for improved wear resistance and reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Mani, Seethambal S. (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A process is disclosed whereby a 5-50-nanometer-thick conformal tungsten coating can be formed over exposed semiconductor surfaces (e.g. silicon, germanium or silicon carbide) within a microelectromechanical (MEM) device for improved wear resistance and reliability. The tungsten coating is formed after cleaning the semiconductor surfaces to remove any organic material and oxide film from the surface. A final in situ cleaning step is performed by heating a substrate containing the MEM device to a temperature in the range of 200-600 .degree. C. in the presence of gaseous nitrogen trifluoride (NF.sub.3). The tungsten coating can then be formed by a chemical reaction between the semiconductor surfaces and tungsten hexafluoride (WF.sub.6) at an elevated temperature, preferably about 450.degree. C. The tungsten deposition process is self-limiting and covers all exposed semiconductor surfaces including surfaces in close contact. The present invention can be applied to many different types of MEM devices including microrelays, micromirrors and microengines. Additionally, the tungsten wear-resistant coating of the present invention can be used to enhance the hardness, wear resistance, electrical conductivity, optical reflectivity and chemical inertness of one or more semiconductor surfaces within a MEM device.

  10. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The experience base regarding fission product behavior developed during the Rover program, the nuclear rocket development program of 1955--1972, will be useful in planning a renewed nuclear rocket program. During the Rover program, 20 reactors were tested at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Nevada. Nineteen of these discharged effluent directly into the atmosphere; the last reactor tested, a non-flight-prototypic, fuel-element-testing reactor called the Nuclear Furnace (NF-1) was connected to an effluent cleanup system that removed fission products before the hydrogen coolant (propellant) was discharged to the atmosphere. In general, we are able to increase both test duration and fuel temperature during the test series. Therefore fission product data from the later part of the program are more interesting and more applicable to future reactors. We have collected fission product retention (and release) data reported in both formal and informal publications for six of the later reactor tests; five of these were Los Alamos reactors that were firsts of a kind in configuration or operating conditions. We have also, with the cooperation of Westinghouse, included fission product data from the NRX-A6 reactor, the final member of series of developmental reactors with the same basic geometry, but with significant design and fabrication improvements as the series continued. Table 1 lists the six selected reactors and the test parameters for each.

  11. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  12. Neutrino factory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; et al

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  13. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Tseng, Michael; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON ; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, ON ; Weksberg, Rosanna; The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Program in Genetics and Genomic Biology, Toronto, Ontario Canada ; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON ; Audet, Julie; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. $X(3873$ and $Y(4140)$ using diquark-antidiquark operators with lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Padmanath, M.; Lang, C.  B.; Prelovsek Komelj, Sasa

    2015-08-01

    We perform a lattice study of charmonium-like mesons withmore » $$J^{PC}=1^{++}$$ and three quark contents $$\\bar cc \\bar du$$, $$\\bar cc(\\bar uu+\\bar dd)$$ and $$\\bar cc \\bar ss$$, where the later two can mix with $$\\bar cc$$. This simulation with $N_f=2$ and $$m_\\pi=266$$ MeV aims at the possible signatures of four-quark exotic states. We utilize a large basis of $$\\bar cc$$, two-meson and diquark-antidiquark interpolating fields, with diquarks in both anti-triplet and sextet color representations. A lattice candidate for X(3872) with I=0 is observed very close to the experimental state only if both $$\\bar cc$$ and $$D\\bar D^*$$ interpolators are included; the candidate is not found if diquark-antidiquark and $$D\\bar D^*$$ are used in the absence of $$\\bar cc$$. No candidate for neutral or charged X(3872), or any other exotic candidates are found in the I=1 channel. We also do not find signatures of exotic $$\\bar cc\\bar ss$$ candidates below 4.3 GeV, such as Y(4140). Possible physics and methodology related reasons for that are discussed. Along the way, we present the diquark-antidiquark operators as linear combinations of the two-meson operators via the Fierz transformations.« less

  15. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  16. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  17. Two nucleon systems at mπ~450MeV from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass of $m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$, while the dineutron is bound by $B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.

  18. Combination of ascorbate/epigallocatechin-3-gallate/gemcitabine synergistically induces cell cycle deregulation and apoptosis in mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinotti, Simona; Ranzato, Elia; Parodi, Monica; Vitale, Massimo; Burlando, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MMe) is a poor-prognosis tumor in need of innovative therapies. In a previous in vivo study, we showed synergistic anti-MMe properties of the ascorbate/epigallocatechin-3-gallate/gemcitabine combination. We have now focused on the mechanism of action, showing the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through measurements of caspase 3, intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, annexin V, and DNA content. StellArray PCR technology and Western immunoblotting revealed DAPK2-dependent apoptosis, upregulation of cell cycle promoters, downregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and repression of NF?B expression. The complex of data indicates that the mixture is synergistic in inducing cell cycle deregulation and non-inflammatory apoptosis, suggesting its possible use in MMe treatment. - Highlights: Ascorbate/epigallocathechin-gallate/gemcitabine has been tested on mesothelioma cells A synergistic mechanism has been shown for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis PCR-array analysis has revealed the de-regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle genes Maximum upregulation has been found for the Death-Associated Protein Kinase-2 gene Data suggest that the mixture could be used as a clinical treatment.

  19. MCNP Super Lattice Method for VHTR ORIGEN2.2 Nuclear Library Improvement Based on ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Chang; J. R. Parry

    2010-10-01

    The advanced Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) achieves simplification of safety through reliance on innovative features and passive systems. One of the VHTRs innovative features is the reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under extreme accident conditions. The effect of the random fuel kernel distribution in the fuel prismatic block creates a double-heterogeneous lattice, which needs to be addressed through the use of the newly developed prismatic super Kernel-by-Kernel Fuel (KbKF) lattice model method. Based on the new ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross section evaluated data, the developed KbKF super lattice model was then used with MCNP to calculate the material isotopes neutron reaction rates, such as, (n,?); (n,n); (n,2n); (n,f); (n,p); (n,?). Then, the MCNP-calculated results are rearranged to generate a set of new libraries VHTRXS.lib, for the ORIGEN2.2 isotopes depletion and build-up analysis code. The libraries contain one group cross section data for the structural light elements, actinides, and fission products that can be applied in the VHTR related fuel burnup and material transmutation analysis codes. The efficiency and ease of use of the MCNP method to generate and update the ORIGEN2.2 one-group spectrum weighed cross section library for VHTR was demonstrated.

  20. The depletion of Interleukin-8 causes cell cycle arrest and increases the efficacy of docetaxel in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Nan; Chen, Liu-Hua; Ye, Run-Yi; Lin, Ying; Wang, Shen-Ming

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ? IL-8 depletion affects cell cycle distribution. ? Intrinsic IL-8 mediates breast cancer cell migration and invasion. ? IL-8 siRNA down regulates key factors that control survival and metastatic pathway. ? IL-8 depletion reduces integrin ?3 expression. ? IL-8 depletion increases the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. -- Abstract: IL-8 is a multi-functional pro-inflammatory chemokine, which is highly expressed in cancers, such as ER-negative breast cancer. The present study demonstrates the pervasive role of IL-8 in the malignant progression of ER-negative breast cancer. IL-8 siRNA inhibited proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle progression in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. IL-8 silencing resulted in the upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p27, the downregulation of cyclin D1, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Akt and NF-?B activities. IL-8 depletion also increased the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. These results indicate a role for IL-8 in promoting tumor cell survival and resistance to docetaxel and highlight the potential therapeutic significance of IL-8 depletion in ER-negative breast cancer patients.

  1. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2012-06-27

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  2. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baillie, N.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.; Bosted, P.; Bültmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S. E.; et al

    2012-04-01

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ≈< 100 MeV and their angles to ≈> 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less thanmore » a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ≈< x ≈< 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.« less

  3. A PROPOSAL TO MEASURE THE CROSS SECTION OF THE SPACE STAR IN NEUTRON-DEUTERON BREAKUP IN A RECOIL GEOMETRY SETUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin J. Crowe III

    2009-09-30

    Nucleon-deuteron (Nd) breakup is an important tool for obtaining a better understanding of three-nucleon (3N) dynamics and for developing meson exchange descriptions of nuclear systems. The kinematics of the nd breakup reaction enable observables to be studied in a variety of exit-channel configurations that show sensitivity to realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential models and three-nucleon force (3NF) models. Rigorous 3N calculations give very good descriptions of most 3N reaction data. However, there are still some serious discrepancies between data and theory. The largest discrepancy observed between theory and data for nd breakup is for the cross section for the space-star configuration. This discrepancy is known as the Space star Anomaly. Several experimental groups have obtained results consistent with the Space Star Anomaly, but it is important to note that they all used essentially the same experimental setup and so their experimental results are subject to the same systematic errors. We propose to measure the space-star cross-section at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) using an experimental technique that is significantly different from the one used in previous breakup experiments. This technique has been used by a research group from the University of Bonn to measure the neutron-neutron scattering length. There are three possible scenarios for the outcome of this work: 1) the new data are consistent with previous measurements; 2) the new data are not in agreement with previous measurements, but are in agreement with theory; and 3) the new data are not in agreement with either theory or previous measurements. Any one of the three scenarios will provide valuable insight on the Space Star Anomaly.

  4. Setting the Renormalization Scale in QCD: The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Di Giustino, Leonardo; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale {mu} of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}): The purpose of the running coupling in any gauge theory is to sum all terms involving the {beta} function; in fact, when the renormalization scale is set properly, all non-conformal {beta} {ne} 0 terms in a perturbative expansion arising from renormalization are summed into the running coupling. The remaining terms in the perturbative series are then identical to that of a conformal theory; i.e., the corresponding theory with {beta} = 0. The resulting scale-fixed predictions using the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme - a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC is also the theoretical principle underlying the BLM procedure, commensurate scale relations between observables, and the scale-setting method used in lattice gauge theory. The number of active flavors nf in the QCD {beta} function is also correctly determined. We discuss several methods for determining the PMC/BLM scale for QCD processes. We show that a single global PMC scale, valid at leading order, can be derived from basic properties of the perturbative QCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increase the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of collider experiments to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted valuesmore » and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.« less

  6. Axial resonances a$$_{1}$$(1260), b$$_{1}$$(1235) and their decays from the lattice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2014-04-28

    The light axial-vector resonancesmore » $a_1(1260)$ and $b_1(1235)$ are explored in Nf=2 lattice QCD by simulating the corresponding scattering channels $$\\rho\\pi$$ and $$\\omega\\pi$$. Interpolating fields $$\\bar{q} q$$ and $$\\rho\\pi$$ or $$\\omega\\pi$$ are used to extract the s-wave phase shifts for the first time. The $$\\rho$$ and $$\\omega$$ are treated as stable and we argue that this is justified in the considered energy range and for our parameters $$m_\\pi\\simeq 266~$$MeV and $$L\\simeq 2~$$fm. We neglect other channels that would be open when using physical masses in continuum. Assuming a resonance interpretation a Breit-Wigner fit to the phase shift gives the $a_1(1260)$ resonance mass $$m_{a1}^{res}=1.435(53)(^{+0}_{-109})$$ GeV compared to $$m_{a1}^{exp}=1.230(40)$$ GeV. The $a_1$ width $$\\Gamma_{a1}(s)=g^2 p/s$$ is parametrized in terms of the coupling and we obtain $$g_{a_1\\rho\\pi}=1.71(39)$$ GeV compared to $$g_{a_1\\rho\\pi}^{exp}=1.35(30)$$ GeV derived from $$\\Gamma_{a1}^{exp}=425(175)$$ MeV. In the $b_1$ channel, we find energy levels related to $$\\pi(0)\\omega(0)$$ and $b_1(1235)$, and the lowest level is found at $$E_1 \\gtrsim m_\\omega+m_\\pi$$ but is within uncertainty also compatible with an attractive interaction. Lastly, assuming the coupling $$g_{b_1\\omega\\pi}$$ extracted from the experimental width we estimate $$m_{b_1}^{res}=1.414(36)(^{+0}_{-83})$$.« less

  7. Evidence for Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling in rotating stratified turbulence using high-resolution direct numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Duane L; Pouquet, Dr. Annick; Mininni, Dr. Pablo D.; Marino, Dr. Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    We report results on rotating stratified turbulence in the absence of forcing, with large-scale isotropic initial conditions, using direct numerical simulations computed on grids of up to $4096^3$ points. The Reynolds and Froude numbers are respectively equal to $Re=5.4\\times 10^4$ and $Fr=0.0242$. The ratio of the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a to the inertial wave frequency, $N/f$, is taken to be equal to 5, a choice appropriate to model the dynamics of the southern abyssal ocean at mid latitudes. This gives a global buoyancy Reynolds number $R_B=ReFr^2=32$, a value sufficient for some isotropy to be recovered in the small scales beyond the Ozmidov scale, but still moderate enough that the intermediate scales where waves are prevalent are well resolved. We concentrate on the large-scale dynamics and confirm that the Froude number based on a typical vertical length scale is of order unity, with strong gradients in the vertical. Two characteristic scales emerge from this computation, and are identified from sharp variations in the spectral distribution of either total energy or helicity. A spectral break is also observed at a scale at which the partition of energy between the kinetic and potential modes changes abruptly, and beyond which a Kolmogorov-like spectrum recovers. Large slanted layers are ubiquitous in the flow in the velocity and temperature fields, and a large-scale enhancement of energy is also observed, directly attributable to the effect of rotation.

  8. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 4872 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NF?B. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein?1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase?2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ? Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ? Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ? Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated early after ozone. ? Oxidative stress may contribute to regulating macrophage phenotype and function.

  9. Thermal aging modeling and validation on the Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamics of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical knowledge to understand thermal aging effect on the phase stability of Mo-containing austenitic steels, which subsequently facilitates alloy design/improvement and degradation mitigation of these materials for reactor applications. Among the intermetallic phases, Chi (χ), Laves, and Sigma (σ) are often of concern because of their tendency to cause embrittlement of the materials. The focus of this study is thermal stability of the Chi and Laves phases as they were less studied compared to the Sigma phase. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. Thirdly, in situ transformation from Chi phase to Laves phase was directly observed, which increased the local strain field, generated dislocations in the intermetallic phases, and altered the precipitate phase orientation relationship with the austenitic matrix. The thermodynamic models that were developed and validated were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  10. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun; An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm; Moon, Yuseok; Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  11. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia ; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  12. Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  14. Interaction between S100P and the anti-allergy drug cromolyn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penumutchu, Srinivasa R.; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: The interaction between S100Pcromolyn was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The interfacial residues on S100P and cromolyn contact surface were mapped by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC experiments. S100Pcromolyn complex model was generated from NMR restraints using HADDOCK program. The stability of the S100Pcromolyn complex was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. - Abstract: The S100P protein has been known to mediate cell proliferation by binding the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) to activate signaling pathways, such as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-?B) pathways. S100P/RAGE signaling is involved in a variety of diseases, such as cancer, metastasis, and diabetes. Cromolyn is an anti-allergy drug that binds S100P to block the interaction between S100P and RAGE. In the present study, we characterized the properties of the binding between cromolyn and calcium-bound S100P using various biophysical techniques. The binding affinity for S100P and cromolyn was measured to be in the millimolar range by fluorescence spectroscopy. NMR-HSQC titration experiments and HADDOCK modeling was employed to determine the spatial structure of the proposed heterotetramer model of the S100Pcromolyn complex. Additional MD simulation results revealed the important properties in the complex stability and conformational flexibility of the S100Pcromolyn complex. This proposed model has provided an understanding of the molecular level interactions of S100Pcromolyn complex.

  15. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  16. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronco, Ana Maria, E-mail: amronco@inta.cl [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Saez, Daniel [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Sandra [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Zepeda, Ramiro [Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, Miguel N. [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-03-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Tung-Chen; Wang, Liang-Shun; Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of ?-catenin, Tcf4 and ?-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of ?-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-?, JNK, NF-?B, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of I?B?. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of ?-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ? Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ? MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ? DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ? DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components ?-catenin, Tcf4. ? DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  18. Studies of nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Quan-Chiu H.

    1991-08-01

    Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-{Tc} superconductors are studied both theoretically and experimentally. For powdered samples, a novel model is presented in which the metallographically observed superconducting grains in the powder are modeled as superconducting current loops of various areas with weak links. Surprising harmonic generation behavior in an arc field, H{sub 1} cos({omega}t), is predicted by the model; the power at high harmonics show sharp dips almost periodic in a superposing dc magnetic field, revealing flux quantization in the prototype loops in the model. Such oscillation of the harmonic power in dc magnetic field P{sub nf}(H{sub dc}), is indeed experimentally observed in powdered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Other experimental aspects also agree with model predictions. For bulk sintered cylindrical samples, a generalized critical state model is presented. In this model, the nonlinear electrodynamics are due to flux-pinning, somewhat similar to low-temperature type-II superconductors, but with a more generalized critical current densities' dependence on magnetic field -- J{sub c}(H){approximately}H{sub local}{sup -{beta}}, with {beta} being an adjustable parameter. Experiments in ac and dc magnetic fields on a sintered cylindrical rod of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} yield unambiguous evidence of independent inter- and intragranular contributions to the complex harmonic permeability {tilde {mu}}{sub n} = {mu}{prime}{sub n} -i{mu}{double prime}{sub n}. Temperature- dependence measurements reveal that, while the intragranular supercurrents disappear at {Tc}{ge}91.2 K, the intergranular supercurrents disappear at T{ge}86.6 K. This result is, to our knowledge, the first clear measurement of the phase-locking temperature of the 3-D matrix formed by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grains, which are in electrical contact with one another through weak links.

  19. Studies of nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Quan-Chiu H.

    1991-08-01

    Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-{Tc} superconductors are studied both theoretically and experimentally. For powdered samples, a novel model is presented in which the metallographically observed superconducting grains in the powder are modeled as superconducting current loops of various areas with weak links. Surprising harmonic generation behavior in an arc field, H{sub 1} cos({omega}t), is predicted by the model; the power at high harmonics show sharp dips almost periodic in a superposing dc magnetic field, revealing flux quantization in the prototype loops in the model. Such oscillation of the harmonic power in dc magnetic field P{sub nf}(H{sub dc}), is indeed experimentally observed in powdered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Other experimental aspects also agree with model predictions. For bulk sintered cylindrical samples, a generalized critical state model is presented. In this model, the nonlinear electrodynamics are due to flux-pinning, somewhat similar to low-temperature type-II superconductors, but with a more generalized critical current densities` dependence on magnetic field -- J{sub c}(H){approximately}H{sub local}{sup -{beta}}, with {beta} being an adjustable parameter. Experiments in ac and dc magnetic fields on a sintered cylindrical rod of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} yield unambiguous evidence of independent inter- and intragranular contributions to the complex harmonic permeability {tilde {mu}}{sub n} = {mu}{prime}{sub n} -i{mu}{double_prime}{sub n}. Temperature- dependence measurements reveal that, while the intragranular supercurrents disappear at {Tc}{ge}91.2 K, the intergranular supercurrents disappear at T{ge}86.6 K. This result is, to our knowledge, the first clear measurement of the phase-locking temperature of the 3-D matrix formed by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grains, which are in electrical contact with one another through weak links.

  20. Systemic responses to inhaled ozone in mice: cachexia and down-regulation of liver xenobiotic metabolizing genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, Jerold A. . E-mail: jalast@ucdavis.edu; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Mathrani, Vivek C.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2005-10-15

    Rats or mice acutely exposed to high concentrations of ozone show an immediate and significant weight loss, even when allowed free access to food and water. The mechanisms underlying this systemic response to ozone have not been previously elucidated. We have applied the technique of global gene expression analysis to the livers of C57BL mice acutely exposed to ozone. Mice lost up to 14% of their original body weight, with a 42% decrease in total food consumption. We previously had found significant up-regulation of genes encoding proliferative enzymes, proteins related to acute phase reactions and cytoskeletal functions, and other biomarkers of a cachexia-like inflammatory state in lungs of mice exposed to ozone. These results are consistent with a general up-regulation of different gene families responsive to NF-{kappa}B in the lungs of the exposed mice. In the present study, we observed significant down-regulation of different families of mRNAs in the livers of the exposed mice, including genes related to lipid and fatty acid metabolism, and to carbohydrate metabolism in this tissue, consistent with a systemic cachexic response. Several interferon-dependent genes were down-regulated in the liver, suggesting a possible role for interferon as a signaling molecule between lung and liver. In addition, transcription of several mRNAs encoding enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the livers of mice exposed to ozone was decreased, suggesting cytokine-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 expression. This finding may explain a previously controversial report from other investigators more than 20 years ago of prolongation of pentobarbital sleeping time in mice exposed to ozone.

  1. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM), the NRC/Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) raised numerous safety-related issues regarding elevated-temperature structural integrity criteria. Most of these issues remained unresolved today. These critical licensing reviews provide a basis for the evaluation of underlying technical issues for future advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Major materials performance issues and high temperature design methodology issues pertinent to the ARR are addressed in the report. The report is organized as follows: the ARR reference design concepts proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory and four industrial consortia were reviewed first, followed by a summary of the major code qualification and licensing issues for the ARR structural materials. The available database is presented for the ASME Code-qualified structural alloys (e.g. 304, 316 stainless steels, 2.25Cr-1Mo, and mod.9Cr-1Mo), including physical properties, tensile properties, impact properties and fracture toughness, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, microstructural stability during long-term thermal aging, material degradation in sodium environments and effects of neutron irradiation for both base metals and weld metals. An assessment of modified versions of Type 316 SS, i.e. Type 316LN and its Japanese version, 316FR, was conducted to provide a perspective for codification of 316LN or 316FR in Subsection NH. Current status and data availability of four new advanced alloys, i.e. NF616, NF616+TMT, NF709, and HT-UPS, are also addressed to identify the R&D needs for their code qualification for ARR applications. For both conventional and new alloys, issues related to high temperature design methodology are described to address the needs for improvements for the ARR design and licensing. Assessments have shown that there are significant data gaps for the full qualification and licensing of the ARR structural materials. Development and evaluation of structural materials require a variety of experimental facilities that have been seriously degraded in the past. The availability and additional needs for the key experimental facilities are summarized at the end of the report. Detailed information covered in each Chapter is given.

  2. Salvianolic acid A preconditioning confers protection against concanavalin A-induced liver injury through SIRT1-mediated repression of p66shc in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yan; Zhai, Xiaohan; Lin, Musen [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Chen, Zhao; Tian, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Feng [Department of General Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Gao, Dongyan; Ma, Xiaochi [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Lv, Li, E-mail: lv_li@126.com [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yao, Jihong, E-mail: Yaojihong65@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Salvianolic acid A (SalA) is a phenolic carboxylic acid derivative extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza. It has many biological and pharmaceutical activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SalA on concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatic injury in Kunming mice and to explore the role of SIRT1 in such an effect. The results showed that in vivo pretreatment with SalA significantly reduced ConA-induced elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and decreased levels of the hepatotoxic cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-?) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?). Moreover, the SalA pretreatment ameliorated the increases in NF-?B and in cleaved caspase-3 caused by ConA exposure. Whereas, the pretreatment completely reversed expression of the B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL). More importantly, the SalA pretreatment significantly increased the expression of SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, which was known to attenuate acute hypoxia damage and metabolic liver diseases. In our study, the increase in SIRT1 was closely associated with down-regulation of the p66 isoform (p66shc) of growth factor adapter Shc at both protein and mRNA levels. In HepG2 cell culture, SalA pretreatment increased SIRT1 expression in a time and dose-dependent manner and such an increase was abrogated by siRNA knockdown of SIRT1. Additionally, inhibition of SIRT1 significantly reversed the decreased expression of p66shc, and attenuated SalA-induced p66shc down-regulation. Collectively, the present study indicated that SalA may be a potent activator of SIRT and that SalA can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis through SIRT1-mediated repression of the p66shc pathway. - Highlights: We report for the first time that SalA protects against ConA-induced hepatitis. We find that SalA is a potential activator of SIRT1. SalA's protection against hepatitis involves SIRT1-mediated repression of p66shc.

  3. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  4. DHS National Technical Nuclear Forensics Program FY 10 Summary Report: Graduate Mentoring Assistance Program (GMAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha R. Finck Ph.D.

    2011-10-01

    This program provides practical training to DHS graduate fellows in the DOE laboratory complex. It involves coordinating students, their thesis advisors, and their laboratory project mentors in establishing a meaningful program of research which contributes to the graduate student's formation as a member of the nuclear forensics community. The summary report details the student/mentor experience and future plans after the first summer practicum. This program provides practical training to DHS graduate fellows in the DOE laboratory complex. It involves coordinating students, their thesis advisors, and their laboratory project mentors in establishing a meaningful program of research which contributes to the graduate student's formation as a member of the nuclear forensics community. This final written report includes information concerning the overall mentoring experience, including benefits (to the lab, the mentors, and the students), challenges, student research contributions, and lab mentor interactions with students home universities. Idaho National Laboratory hosted two DHS Nuclear Forensics graduate Fellows (nuclear engineering) in summer 2011. Two more Fellows (radiochemistry) are expected to conduct research at the INL under this program starting in 2012. An undergraduate Fellow (nuclear engineering) who worked in summer 2011 at the laboratory is keenly interested in applying for the NF Graduate Fellowship this winter with the aim of returning to INL. In summary, this program appears to have great potential for success in supporting graduate level students who pursue careers in nuclear forensics. This relatively specialized field may not have been an obvious choice for some who have already shown talent in the traditional areas of chemistry or nuclear engineering. The active recruiting for this scholarship program for candidates at universities across the U.S. brings needed visibility to this field. Not only does this program offer critical practical training to these students, it brings attention to a very attractive field of work where young professionals are urgently required in order for the future. The effectiveness of retaining such talent remains to be seen and may be primarily controlled by the availability of DOE laboratory research funding in this field in the years to come.

  5. Twenty-Five Year Site Plan FY2013 - FY2037

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, William H.

    2012-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is the nation's premier national security science laboratory. Its mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the United States (U.S.) nuclear stockpile; reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, and terrorism; and solve national problems in defense, energy, and the environment. The fiscal year (FY) 2013-2037 Twenty-Five Year Site Plan (TYSP) is a vital component for planning to meet the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) commitment to ensure the U.S. has a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear deterrent. The Laboratory also uses the TYSP as an integrated planning tool to guide development of an efficient and responsive infrastructure that effectively supports the Laboratory's missions and workforce. Emphasizing the Laboratory's core capabilities, this TYSP reflects the Laboratory's role as a prominent contributor to NNSA missions through its programs and campaigns. The Laboratory is aligned with Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) modernization activities outlined in the NNSA Strategic Plan (May 2011) which include: (1) ensuring laboratory plutonium space effectively supports pit manufacturing and enterprise-wide special nuclear materials consolidation; (2) constructing the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF); (3) establishing shared user facilities to more cost effectively manage high-value, experimental, computational and production capabilities; and (4) modernizing enduring facilities while reducing the excess facility footprint. Th is TYSP is viewed by the Laboratory as a vital planning tool to develop an effi cient and responsive infrastructure. Long range facility and infrastructure development planning are critical to assure sustainment and modernization. Out-year re-investment is essential for sustaining existing facilities, and will be re-evaluated on an annual basis. At the same time, major modernization projects will require new line-item funding. This document is, in essence, a roadmap that defines a path forward for the Laboratory to modernize, streamline, consolidate, and sustain its infrastructure to meet its national security mission.

  6. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned with respect to time and power to moderate plasma damage to the photo-generating layer. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to analyze the composition and thickness of the emitter layers. AFM studies showed conformal growth on the GaAs substrates. Measurements at SLAC on the photoemitted electrons from high polarization substrates coated with amorphous silicon germanium indicated an ~10% relative drop in spin-polarization at the wavelength corresponding to the maximum spin-polarization when compared to the uncoated material,

  7. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Chunyang; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Aiguo

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. SpragueDawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in testis disorder and germ cell apoptosis. Inflammatory response is implicated in impaired spermatogenesis and germ cell loss.

  8. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

    2012-10-19

    This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ???µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125???°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90???ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The viscosity increase is due to formation of high molecular weight polymeric species over time. Our work also suggests that hydrogenation of the samples is beneficial in eliminating the viscosity increase. Task 6.0 Commercialization Assessment Renewable Oil International LLC (ROI) was responsible for Task 6.0, ????Commercialization Assessment.??? As part of this effort ROI focused on methods to reduce char carryover in the vapor stream from the fast pyrolysis reactor and residence time of the vapor in the reactor. Changes were made in the bio-oil recovery methodology and a reactor sweep gas used to reduce vapor residence time. Cyclones were placed in the vapor stream to reduce char particulate carryover. Microfiltration of the bio-oil was also researched to remove char particulate from the bio-oil. The capital cost for these improvements would be less than 2% of the total plant capital cost.

  9. Interim Design Report for the International Design Study for a Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Berg, J.S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Souchlas, N.; Ellis, M.; /Brunel U. /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Fermilab /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Imperial Coll., London /Jefferson Lab /Saha Inst.

    2011-10-01

    The starting point for the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was the output of the earlier International Scoping Study for a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS). The accelerator facility described in section 2 incorporates the improvements that have been derived from the substantial amount of work carried out within the Accelerator Working Group. Highlights of these improvements include: (1) Initial concepts for the implementation of the proton driver at each of the three example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL; (2) Detailed studies of the energy deposition in the target area; (3) A reduction in the length of the muon beam phase-rotation and bunching systems; (4) Detailed analyses of the impact of the risk that stray magnetic field in the accelerating cavities in the ionization cooling channel will reduce the maximum operating gradient. Several alternative ionization-cooling lattices have been developed as fallback options to mitigate this technical risk; (5) Studies of particle loss in the muon front-end and the development of strategies to mitigate the deleterious effects of such losses; (6) The development of more complete designs for the muon linac and re-circulating linacs; (7) The development of a design for the muon FFAG that incorporates insertions for injection and extraction; and (8) Detailed studies of diagnostics in the decay ring. Other sub-systems have undergone a more 'incremental' evolution; an indication that the design of the Neutrino Factory has achieved a degree of maturity. The design of the neutrino detectors described in section 3 has been optimized and the Detector Working Group has made substantial improvements to the simulation and analysis of the Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) resulting in an improvement in the overall neutrino-detection efficiency and a reduction in the neutrino-energy threshold. In addition, initial consideration of the engineering of the MIND has generated a design that is feasible and a finite element analysis of the toroidal magnetic field to produce a realistic field map has been carried out. Section 3 also contains, for the first time, a specification for the near-detector systems and a demonstration that the neutrino flux can be determined with a precision of 1% through measurements of inverse muon decay at the near detector. The performance of the facility, the work of the Physics and Performance Evaluation Group, is described in section 1. The effect of the improved MIND performance is to deliver a discovery reach for CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, the determination of the mass hierarchy, and of {theta}{sub 13} that extends down to values of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx} 5 x 10{sup -5} and is robust against systematic uncertainties. In addition, the improved neutrino-energy threshold has allowed an indicative analysis of the kind of re-optimization of the facility that could be carried out should {theta}{sub 13} be found close to the current upper bound. The results presented in section 1 demonstrate that the discovery reach as well as the precision with which the oscillation parameters can be measured at the baseline Neutrino Factory is superior to that of other proposed facilities for all possible values of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}.

  10. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is gaining importance for power conversion in the Generation IV fast reactor system because of its high conversion efficiencies. When used in conjunction with a sodium fast reactor, the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle offers additional safety advantages by eliminating potential sodium-water interactions that may occur in a steam cycle. In power conversion systems for Generation IV fast reactors, supercritical CO{sub 2} temperatures could be in the range of 30C to 650C, depending on the specific component in the system. Materials corrosion primarily at high temperatures will be an important issue. Therefore, the corrosion performance limits for materials at various temperatures must be established. The proposed research will have four objectives centered on addressing corrosion issues in a high-temperature supercritical CO{sub 2} environment: Task 1: Evaluation of corrosion performance of candidate alloys in high-purity supercritical CO{sub 2}: The following alloys will be tested: Ferritic-martensitic Steels NF616 and HCM12A, austenitic alloys Incoloy 800H and 347 stainless steel, and two advanced concept alloys, AFA (alumina forming austenitic) steel and MA754. Supercritical CO{sub 2} testing will be performed at 450C, 550C, and 650C at a pressure of 20 MPa, in a test facility that is already in place at the proposing university. High purity CO{sub 2} (99.9998%) will be used for these tests. Task 2: Investigation of the effects of CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} impurities in supercritical CO{sub 2} on corrosion: Impurities that will inevitably present in the CO{sub 2} will play a critical role in dictating the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms. These effects must be understood to identify the level of CO{sub 2} chemistry control needed to maintain sufficient levels of purity to manage corrosion. The individual effects of important impurities CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} will be investigated by adding them separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

  11. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through iron and dissolve into sodium. The method enables addition of dissolved carbon (without carb

  12. Processing and Protection of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Particulate for Bonded Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Kelly Sokolowski

    2007-12-01

    Rapid solidification of novel mixed rare earth-iron-boron, MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (MRE = Nd, Y, Dy; currently), magnet alloys via high pressure gas atomization (HPGA) have produced similar properties and structures as closely related alloys produced by melt spinning (MS) at low wheel speeds. Recent additions of titanium carbide and zirconium to the permanent magnet (PM) alloy design in HPGA powder (using He atomization gas) have made it possible to achieve highly refined microstructures with magnetic properties approaching melt spun particulate at cooling rates of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}K/s. By producing HPGA powders with the desirable qualities of melt spun ribbon, the need for crushing ribbon was eliminated in bonded magnet fabrication. The spherical geometry of HPGA powders is more ideal for processing of bonded permanent magnets since higher loading fractions can be obtained during compression and injection molding. This increased volume loading of spherical PM powder can be predicted to yield a higher maximum energy product (BH){sub max} for bonded magnets in high performance applications. Passivation of RE-containing powder is warranted for the large-scale manufacturing of bonded magnets in applications with increased temperature and exposure to humidity. Irreversible magnetic losses due to oxidation and corrosion of particulates is a known drawback of RE-Fe-B based alloys during further processing, e.g. injection molding, as well as during use as a bonded magnet. To counteract these effects, a modified gas atomization chamber allowed for a novel approach to in situ passivation of solidified particle surfaces through injection of a reactive gas, nitrogen trifluoride (NF{sub 3}). The ability to control surface chemistry during atomization processing of fine spherical RE-Fe-B powders produced advantages over current processing methodologies. In particular, the capability to coat particles while 'in flight' may eliminate the need for post atomization treatment, otherwise a necessary step for oxidation and corrosion resistance. Stability of these thin films was attributed to the reduction of each RE's respective oxide during processing; recognizing that fluoride compounds exhibit a slightly higher (negative) free energy driving force for formation. Formation of RE-type fluorides on the surface was evidenced through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Concurrent research with auger electron spectroscopy has been attempted to accurately quantify the depth of fluoride formation in order to grasp the extent of fluorination reactions with spherical and flake particulate. Gas fusion analysis on coated powders (dia. <45 {micro}m) from an optimized experiment indicated an as-atomized oxygen concentration of 343ppm, where typical, nonpassivated RE atomized alloys exhibit an average of 1800ppm oxygen. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) on the same powder revealed a decreased rate of oxidation at elevated temperatures up to 300 C, compared to similar uncoated powder.