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Sample records for toad bufo boreas

  1. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³⁷Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d⁻¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore » affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d⁻¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  2. Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris) Brian S. Metts a, * , Kurt A. Buhlmann a , David E. Scott a , Tracey D. Tuberville a , William A. Hopkins b a Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA b Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 16 August 2011 Received in revised form

  3. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d? and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  4. Boreas E licas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boreas E licas Jump to: navigation, search Name: Boreas Elicas Place: Spain Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project developer References: Boreas Elicas1 This article is...

  5. Within- and among-population level differences in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Within- and among-population level differences in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris Stacey L. Lance * , R. Wesley Flynn, Matthew R. Erickson 1 , David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 5 September 2012 Received in revised form 29 January 2013 Accepted 5 February 2013 Keywords: Anaxyrus (Bufo) terrestris Amphibian Copper Ecotoxicology Metal

  6. Lethal and sublethal measures of chronic copper toxicity in the eastern narrowmouth toad, Gastrophryne carolinensis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL MEASURES OF CHRONIC COPPER TOXICITY IN THE EASTERN NARROWMOUTH TOAD, GASTROPHRYNE CAROLINENSIS R. WESLEY FLYNN,*y DAVID E. SCOTT,y WENDY KUHNE,zx DIANA SOTEROPOULOS,y and STACEY L. LANCEx ySavannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, South Carolina, USA zSavannah River National Laboratory, Department of Energy, University of Georgia,, Aiken, South Carolina, USA xDepartment of Biology, University of South Carolina-Aiken, Aiken, South Carolina, USA

  7. Ba2+-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garty, H.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on /sup 86/Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry.

  8. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Cathyrn, H.; Tanner, George, W.

    2004-08-31

    Cathryn H. Greenberg and George W. Tanner. 2004. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions. J. Herp. 38(4):569-577. Abstract: Eastern Spadefoot Toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) require fish-free, isolated, ephemeral ponds for breeding but otherwise inhabit the surrounding uplands, commonly xeric longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ?wiregrass (Aristida beyrichiana). Hence both pond and upland conditions can potentially affect their breeding biology, and population persistence. Hardwood invasion due to fire suppression in sandhills could alter upland and pond suitability by higher hardwood density and increased transpiration. In this paper we explore breeding and neonatal emigration movements in relation to weather, hydrological conditions of ponds, and surrounding upland matrices. We use 9 years of data from continuous monitoring with drift fences and pitfall traps at 8 ephemeral ponds in 2 upland matrices: regularly-burned, savanna-like sandhills (n = 4), and hardwood-invaded sandhills (n = 4). Neither adult nor neonate captures differed between ponds within the 2 upland matrices, suggesting that they are tolerant of upland heterogeneity created by fire frequency. Explosive breeding occurred during 9 periods and in all seasons; adults were captured rarely otherwise. At a landscape-level rainfall, maximum change in barometric pressure, and an interaction between those 2 variables were significant predictors of explosive breeding. At a pond-level, rainfall, change in pond depth during the month prior to breeding, and days since a pond was last dry were significant predictors of adult captures. Transformation date, rather than weather, was associated with neonatal emigrations, which usually were complete within a week. Movement by first-captured adults and neonates was directional, but adult emigrations were apparently not always toward their origin. Our results suggest that Spadefoot Toads are highly adapted to breeding conditions and upland habitat heterogeneity created by weather patterns and fire frequency in Florida sandhills.

  9. SREL Reprint #3208

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combusion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris) Brian S. Metts1, Kurt A. Buhlmann1, David E. Scott1, Tracey D. Tuberville1, and William A. Hopkins2 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA Abstract: We conducted a mesocosm study to assess the individual and interactive effects of

  10. SREL Reprint #3245

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Maternal transfer of contaminants and reduced reproductive success of southern toads (Bufo [Anaxyrus] terrestris) exposed to coal combustion waste Brian S. Metts1, Kurt A. Buhlmann1, Tracey D. Tuberville1, David E. Scott1, and William A. Hopkins2 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA 2Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA Abstract: Bioaccumulation of contaminants and

  11. SREL Reprint #3158

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a species facing continued destruction of its breeding habitat (small isolated wetlands) as well as fragmentation of upland life zones. Keywords: Scaphiopus, Spadefoot toad,...

  12. SREL Reprint #3002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Role of Substrate Cues in Habitat Selection by Recently Metamorphosed Bufo terrestris and Scaphiopus holbrookii Brooke Baughman and Brian D. Todd University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802,USA Abstract: Amphibians exhibit high rates of evaporative water loss that can affect their distribution, movements, and patterns of habitat use. Forest clearcutting alters habitat and results in environmental changes such as canopy removal and leaf litter

  13. SREL Reprint #3212

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Gastrophyryne carolinensis (Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad). Predation Thomas M. Luhring1,2 and Zachary D. Ross1,3 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA 2University of Missouri, Division of Biological Sciences, 105 Tucker Hall, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA 3New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Summary: Gastrophryne carolinensis are toxic to many predators, which will often refuse to eat them, and few firsthand accounts of G.

  14. SREL Reprint #3247

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Within- and among-population level difference in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris Stacey L. Lance, R. Wesley Flynn, Matthew R. Erickson, and David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA Abstract: Environmental contaminants are implicated in the global decline of amphibian populations. Copper (Cu) is a widespread contaminant that can be toxic at concentrations just above the normal

  15. SREL Reprint #3311

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Lethal and sublethal measures of chronic copper toxicity in the eastern narrowmouth toad, Gastrophryne carolinensis R. Wesley Flynn1, David E. Scott1, Wendy Kuhne2,3, Diana Soteropoulos1, and Stacey L. Lance1 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, South Carolina, USA 2Savannah River National Laboratory, Department of Energy, Aiken, South Carolina, USA 3Department of Biology, University of South Carolina-Aiken, Aiken, South Carolina, USA Abstract: Many metals are

  16. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chapter 5 ▪ Long-Term Environmental Consequences 5-1163 5.3.3 Ecological Risk This section presents the results of the evaluation of long-term impacts on ecological resources of releases to air and groundwater under the Waste Management alternatives. Risk indices-Hazard Quotient and Hazard Index-were calculated by comparing the predicted dose to the benchmark dose (see Appendix P). Risk indices could not be calculated for soil-dwelling invertebrates, lizards, toads, or birds exposed to organic

  17. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTMLmore » JavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Server« less

  18. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTMLmoreJavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Serverless