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  1. Tokyo Ohka Kogyo TOK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohka Kogyo TOK Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tokyo Ohka Kogyo (TOK) Place: Tokyo, Japan Product: TOK makes photoresists for semiconductor, flat panel display, printed wiring...

  2. Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and...

  3. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project meets the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) need to expand weatherization services and jobs for tribal members in southeast Alaska.

  4. Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project meets the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) need to expand weatherization services and jobs for tribal members in southeast Alaska.

  5. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2010 Weatherization Training Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project meets the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) need to expand weatherization services and jobs for tribal members in southeast Alaska.

  6. Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority Energy Cents Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Review March 26 th , 2014 Tasha McKoy * Tlingit Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) is the largest housing provider in Southeast, AK * Program focus is small household energy efficiency upgrades and region wide energy conservation education * Program deliverables: - Train 28 field assessors to conduct energy assessments in 400 homes throughout Southeast, AK - Energy fairs/community meetings in 14 communities - K-12 education * 28 field assessors conduct home assessments * 81 donators, *

  7. FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM ...

  8. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (CCTHITA or Central Council), headquartered in Juneau, Alaska, authorized a Level II energy audit of its Juneau facilities. The Level II audit was completed in August 2010.

  9. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2011 Energy Retrofit Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (CCTHITA or Central Council), headquartered in Juneau, Alaska, authorized a Level II energy audit of its Juneau facilities. The Level II audit was completed in August 2010.

  10. Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (CCTHITA or Central Council), headquartered in Juneau, Alaska, authorized a Level II energy audit of its Juneau facilities.

  11. Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) will conduct a three-year project to provide energy efficiency audits, energy monitoring, energy usage assessments, and energy conservation proposed upgrades for approximately 51 low-income, multifamily residences (292 units) in 14 southeast Alaska communities and rural communities with extremely high energy costs; identify funding options for potential energy upgrades, if found to be viable, to implement the resultant project.

  12. FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM Authors: Soderlind, P ; Landa, A ; Yang, L H ; Teweldebrhan, A Publication Date: 2013-04-11 OSTI Identifier: 1108866 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-635374 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, vol. 581, na, December 25, 2013,

  13. A comparative study of precipitation effects in Ti only and Ti-V Ultra Low Carbon (ULC) strip steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooi, S.W.; Fourlaris, G. . E-mail: g.fourlaris@swansea.ac.uk

    2006-04-15

    Two ULC steel grades were investigated, one based on combined vanadium and titanium additions and the other based on titanium only additions. It has been established that TiC formation during interphase precipitation retards grain growth of the {l_brace}111{r_brace} texture grains during continuous annealing and hence positively affects the r value of the Ti only steel. The formation of newly formed TiC precipitates on dislocations during continuous annealing has been found to result in an increase of the yield strength in both steel grades, as the annealing temperature is increased. It is also confirmed that VC particles formed during the coiling process dissolve during the continuous annealing cycles. Suitable continuous annealing cycles can be adopted to produce high formable steels with a bake hardening potential using the beneficial effects of combined Ti-V additions.

  14. Central Council Tlingit Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Positions * 300+ WX Audits and Homes Weatherized * Native Elder Participation * Energy consumption and Costs Reduced Alaska Native WX Training Program Training House Alaska ...

  15. Project Reports for Northwest Alaska Native Association (NANA) Regional

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project | Department of Energy Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project This project meets the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) need to expand weatherization services and jobs for tribal

  16. Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tok School's use of a biomass combined heat and power system is helping the school to save on energy costs.

  17. Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    savings, Tok School has been able to rehire three staff members for the school: music teacher, counselor, and boiler operator. Once more savings are realized and biomass...

  18. EERE Success Story-Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Because of the biomass CHP project's anticipated and realized savings, Tok School has been able to rehire three staff members for the school: music teacher, counselor, and boiler ...

  19. Tribal Energy Program: 2015 Tribal Clean Energy Projects Selected...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (CA) Solar Electric 132,952 132,953 265,905 2 Bishop Paiute Tribe (CA) Solar Electric 218,557 218,621 437,178 3 Central Council Tlingit ...

  20. Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Funding Source: Department of Energy Port Isabel, TX Baryonyx Corporation, based in ... t - - 4 90 DP 2 DBB Jack-Up Services Wind II TIV Under constr. - Nordic Yards (Germany) ...

  1. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 3.0 Alterna Alterna tiv tiv es es 3-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter describes the alternatives for waste processing and facility disposi- tion analyzed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) as well as alter- natives eliminated from detailed analy- sis. As required by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regula- tions implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a No Action alternative is also included. This chapter identifies the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's)

  2. Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority Alaska Native Weatherization Training & Jobs Program University of Alaska Southeast Marquam George Associate Professor Construction Technology marquam.george@uas.alaska.edu 907 796 6124 Juneau Southeast Alaska Weatherization Training Center Southeast Climate Data - HDD * Yakutat 9,485 * Angoon 8,450 * Haines 8,505 * Juneau (Airport) 9,105 * Ketchikan 7,084 * Sitka 8,011 * Tenakee Springs 8,180 Annual Water Equivalent Precipitation - 1971-2000 *

  3. Tribal Facilities Retrofits

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    up resources through reduced demand" Elias Duran - Property Manager  Day to day operations of facilities  Budget control over facilities  Project needs for future space requirements  Maintenance  Capital improvements  Brief history of the Tlingit & Haida Tribes  Tour of our Juneau facilities  Historical utility cost data  Summary of Project Objectives  Expected cost and emission reductions  Strategic planning for future implementation Two separate

  4. Tribal Facilities Retrofits: Freeing Up Resources through Reduced Demand

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    up resources through reduced demand" Elias Duran - Facilities Manager ¡ Day to day operations of facilities ¡ Budget control over facilities ¡ Project needs for future space requirements ¡ Maintenance ¡ Capital improvements ¡ Brief history of the Tlingit & Haida Tribes ¡ Tour of our existing facilities ¡ Historical utility cost data ¡ Summary of Project Objectives ¡ Expected cost and emission reductions ¡ Strategic planning for future implementation Two separate Tribes United

  5. Southeast Alaska Energy Efficiency Audit, Assessment, and Alternative Energy Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alaska Energy Efficiency Audit, Assessment, and Alternative Energy Study Craig Moore V.P. Planning and Development Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority TEP May 6, 2015 Denver 2015 Program Review Tribal Energy Program (TEP) Denver CO. May 6, 2015 TEP May 6, 2015 Denver SE Alaska Energy Efficiency Audit, Assessment, and Alternative Energy Study Project Description: "The project will provide energy efficiency audits, energy monitoring, and energy conservation proposed upgrades for about 51

  6. L:\Projects - Active\2003\2003 ETTP OA-30&50\ETTP Summary\ETTP Summary.PDF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation Kootznoowoo Incorporated 1+ MW Thayer Creek Hydro-electric Development Project Peter Naoroz General Manager Kootznoowoo, Inc. Final Design Grant No Construction Previous work done by HDR, Alaska Cost Reduction  Angoon Community Association  City of Angoon  Sealaska Corporation  Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska  Inside Passage Electrical Cooperative  Our Neighboring Communities  Our First Nation Brothers and Sisters  DOE, USDA FS,

  7. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  8. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈more » 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.« less

  9. J R eport CC-579

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J R eport CC-579 M e ta lliirg ic a l L aboratory A. H. Compton, P r o je c t D ire c to r * * * CliELlIGAL RESEARCH ~ RADIQCHB.1ISTRY J . Franck, D iv isio n D ire c to rj C. D. C o ry e ll, S ectio n C hief REPORT FOR M ONTH EHDIKG APRIL 17. 19A3 *Jt * Table o f C ontents 00, A b stra c t 0 . G eneral A c tiv itie s o f th e S ectio n This document is PUBLICLY REL^SABLE ciaiT _ Date: 1 , Elem entary Breakdown o f F iss io n A c tiv ity in th e P ile O peration up to 170 Days a . D is tr ib u

  10. The National Carbon Capture Center

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Topical Report Budget Period Four Ja n u a r y 1, 2013 - D e c e m b e r 31, 2013 DOE C o o p e ra tiv e A g r e e m e n t DE-NT0000749 The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Developm ent Facility Topical Report Budget Period Four Ja n u a r y 1, 2013 - D e c e m b e r 31, 2013 DOE C o o p e ra tiv e A g r e e m e n t DE-NT0000749 P r e p a r e d by: S o u t h e r n C o m p a n y Services, Inc. P o w e r S

  11. EERE Success Story-Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Power | Department of Energy Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power EERE Success Story-Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power May 7, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In Tok, Alaska, the economic impact of high fuel prices was crippling the community's economy€, especially for the Alaska Gateway School District, with staff laid off and double duties assigned to many. To help offset high energy costs, the school district decided to replace its

  12. Isolation of cellulolytic anaerobic extreme thermophiles from New Zealand thermal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sissons, C.H.; Sharrock, K.R.; Daniel, R.M.; Morgan, H.W.

    1987-04-01

    Avicel enrichment cultures from 47 thermal-pool sites in the New Zealand Rotorua-Taupo region were screened for growth and carboxymethyl cellulase activity at 75/sup 0/C. Eight anaerobic cellulolytic cultures were obtained. The effect of temperature on carboxymethyl cellulase activity was measured, and bacteria were isolated from the five best cultures. Bacteria from two sources designated TP8 and TP10 grew at 75/sup 0/C, accumulated reducing sugar in the growth medium and gave free cellulases with avicelase activity. Bacteria from sources designated Tok4, Tok8, and Wai21 grew at 75/sup 0/C, accumulated no free sugars in the medium, and gave free carboxymethyl cellulases with virtually no avicelase activity. All were obligate anaerobic nonsporeforming rods which stained gram pentoses as well as hexoses, and gave ethanol and acetate as major fermentation end products. The isolated strain which produced the most active and stable cellulases had lower rates of free endocellulase accumulation at 75/sup 0/C than did Clostridium thermocellum at 60/sup 0/C, but its cellulase activity against avicel and filter paper in culture supernatants was comparable. Tested at 85/sup 0/C, TP8.T carboxymethyl cellulases included components which were very stable, whereas C. thermocellum carboxymethyl cellulases were all rapidly inactivated. The TP8.T avicelase activity was relatively unaffected by Triton X-100, EDTA, and dithiothreitol. Evidence was obtained for the existence of unisolated, cellulolytic extreme thermophiles producing cellulases which were more stable and active than those from TP8.T.

  13. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dana Bryson River Corridor Division Director and DDFO to the Hanford Advisory Board S a fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r  Re du ce s the Ac tiv e Sit e Fo otp rin t of Cle an up to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (58 6 to 75 )  Sig nif ica ntl y Re du ce s Lo ng -Te rm Mo rtg ag e Co sts  At Co mp let ion , Sh ifts Em ph as is an d Re so urc es to Fu ll Sc ale Cle an up of the Ce ntr al Pla tea u (75 sq ua re mi les )  Re du ce s Co sts by

  14. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan A. Dowell DOE-RL Assistant Manager for River and Plateau S a fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r  Re du ce s the Ac tiv e Sit e Fo otp rin t of Cle an up to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (58 6 to 75 )  Sig nif ica ntl y Re du ce s Lo ng -Te rm Mo rtg ag e Co sts  At Co mp let ion , Sh ifts Em ph as is an d Re so urc es to Fu ll Sc ale Cle an up of the Ce ntr al Pla tea u (75 sq ua re mi les )  Re du ce s Co sts by "R igh t Siz ing

  15. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron radiation light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and often exhibit poor reliability. Two technical approaches to solving this problem will be investigated. Firstly, inverted ceramics offer solutions for reduced gradients between the electrodes and ground. An inverted design will be presented for 350 kV, with maximum gradients in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Secondly, novel ceramic manufacturing processes will be studied, in order to protect triple junction locations from emission, by applying a coating with a bulk resistivity. The processes for creating this coating will be optimized to provide protection as well as be used to coat a ceramic with an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of an HV standoff ceramic cylinder. Example insulator designs are being computer modelled, and insulator samples are being manufactured and tested

  16. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  17. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  18. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB 2012 Final.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r Re du ce s th e Ac tiv e Sit e Fo ot pr int of Cl ea nu p to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (5 86 to 75 ) Sig ni fic an tly Re du ce s Lo ng -T erm Mo rtg ag e Co st s At Co m pl eti on , Sh ift s Em ph as is an d Re so ur ce s to Fu ll of th e Ce nt ra l Pla tea u (7 5 sq ua re m ile s) Re du ce s Co st s by "R i Mi ss io Ri ch la nd O pe ra tio ns Of fic e B & C Ar ea Inte rim Saf e Sto rag e f N Ar ea Inte rim

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB1111-Dowellfinalnobu.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r ¾ Re du ce s th e Ac tiv e Sit e Fo ot pr int of Cl ea nu p to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (5 86 to 75 ) ¾ Sig ni fic an tly Re du ce s Lo ng -T erm Mo rtg ag e Co st s ¾ At Co m pl eti on , Sh ift s Em ph as is an d Re so ur ce s to Fu ll of th e Ce nt ra l Pla tea u (7 5 sq ua re m ile s) ¾ Re du ce s Co st s by "R i Mi ss io Ri ch la nd O pe ra tio ns Of fic e B & C Ar ea 9 Inte rim Saf e Sto rag e f 9 N

  1. Quantitative multiplex detection of biomarkers on a waveguide-based biosensor using quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Hongzhi; Mukundan, Harshini; Martinez, Jennifer S; Swanson, Basil I; Anderson, Aaron S; Grace, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative, simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity is critical for biomedical diagnostics, drug discovery and biomarker characterization [Wilson 2006, Tok 2006, Straub 2005, Joos 2002, Jani 2000]. Detection systems relying on optical signal transduction are, in general, advantageous because they are fast, portable, inexpensive, sensitive, and have the potential for multiplex detection of analytes of interest. However, conventional immunoassays for the detection of biomarkers, such as the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assays (ELISAs) are semi-quantitative, time consuming and insensitive. ELISA assays are also limited by high non-specific binding, especially when used with complex biological samples such as serum and urine (REF). Organic fluorophores that are commonly used in such applications lack photostability and possess a narrow Stoke's shift that makes simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores with a single excitation source difficult, thereby restricting their use in multiplex assays. The above limitations with traditional assay platforms have resulted in the increased use of nanotechnology-based tools and techniques in the fields of medical imaging [ref], targeted drug delivery [Caruthers 2007, Liu 2007], and sensing [ref]. One such area of increasing interest is the use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for biomedical research and diagnostics [Gao and Cui 2004, Voura 2004, Michalet 2005, Chan 2002, Jaiswal 2004, Gao 2005, Medintz 2005, So 2006 2006, Wu 2003]. Compared to organic dyes, QDs provide several advantages for use in immunoassay platforms, including broad absorption bands with high extinction coefficients, narrow and symmetric emission bands with high quantum yields, high photostablility, and a large Stokes shift [Michalet 2005, Gu 2002]. These features prompted the use of QDs as probes in biodetection [Michalet 2005, Medintz 2005]. For example, Jaiswal et al. reported long term multiple color imaging of live cells using QD-bioconjugates [Jaiswal 2003]. Gao [Gao 2004] and So [So 2006] have used QDs as probes for in-vivo cancer targeting and imaging. Medintz et al. reported self-assembled QD-based biosensors for detection of analytes based on energy transfer [Medintz 2003]. Others have developed an approach for multiplex optical encoding of biomolecules using QDs [Han 2001]. Immunoassays have also benefited from the advantages of QDs. Recently, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) capped-QDs have been attached to antibodies and used as fluorescence reporters in plate-based multiplex immunoassays [Goodman 2004]. However, DHLA-QDs are associated with low quantum efficiency and are unstable at neutral pH. These problems limit the application of this technology to the sensitive detection of biomolecules, especially in complex biological samples. Thus, the development of a rapid, sensitive, quantitative, and specific multiplex platform for the detection of biomarkers in difficult samples remains an elusive target. The goal stated above has applications in many fields including medical diagnostics, biological research, and threat reduction. The current decade alone has seen the development of a need to rapidly and accurately detect potential biological warfare agents. For example, current methods for the detection of anthrax are grossly inadequate for a variety of reasons including long incubation time (5 days from time of exposure to onset of symptoms) and non-specific ('flu-like') symptoms. When five employees of the United State Senate were exposed to B. anthracis in the mail (2001), only one patient had a confirmed diagnosis before death. Since then, sandwich immunoassays using both colorimetric and fluorescence detectors have been developed for key components of the anthrax lethal toxin, namely protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and the edema factor [Mourez 2001]. While these platforms were successful in assays against anthrax toxins, the sensitivity was poor. Furthermore, no single platform exists for the simultaneous and quantitative detection of mul