National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tin selenium nanoparticle

  1. Ionic liquid-induced synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langi, Bhushan; Shah, Chetan; Singh, Krishankant; Chaskar, Atul; Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, Parma N.

    2010-06-15

    A simple wet chemical method has been used to synthesize selenium nanoparticles by the reaction of ionic liquid with sodium selenosulphate, a selenium precursor, in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol stabilizer, in aqueous medium. The method is capable of producing spherical selenium nanoparticles in the size range of 76-150 nm under ambient conditions. This is a first report on the production of nano-selenium assisted by an ionic liquid. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sol by a high-speed centrifuge machine, and can be re-dispersed in an aqueous medium. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  2. AC electrokinetic manipulation of selenium nanoparticles for potential nanosensor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoodi, Seyed Reza; Bayati, Marzieh; Hosseinirad, Somayeh; Foroumadi, Alireza; Gilani, Kambiz; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Se nanoparticles were synthesized using a reverse-microemulsion process. ? AC osmotic fluid flow repulses the particles from electrode edges. ? Dielectrophoretic force attracts the particles to electrode edges. ? Dielectrophoresis electrode showed non-ohmic behavior. ? The device can potentially be used as a nanosensor. - Abstract: We report the AC electrokinetic behavior of selenium (Se) nanoparticles for electrical characterization and possible application as micro/nano devices. selenium Se nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a reverse-microemulsion process and investigated structurally using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Interdigitated castellated ITO and non-castellated platinum electrodes were employed for manipulation of suspended materials in the fluid. Using ITO electrodes at low frequency limits resulted in deposition of Se particles on electrode surface. When Se particles exposed to platinum electrodes in the 10 Hz–1 kHz range and V {sub p?p}> 8, AC osmotic fluid flow repulses the particles from electrode edges. However, in 10 kHz–10 MHz range and V {sub p?p}> 5, dielectrophoretic force attracts the particles to electrode edges. As the Se particle concentration increased, the trapped Se particles were aligned along the electric field line and bridged the electrode gap. The device was characterized and can potentially be useful in making micro/nano electronic devices.

  3. Riley oxidation: A forgotten name reaction for synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chetan P.; Dwivedi, Charu; Singh, Krishan K.; Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, Parma N.

    2010-09-15

    A simple wet chemical method, involving reaction of acetone with selenium dioxide, has been developed, to synthesize polyvinyl alcohol-stabilized selenium nanoparticles. The method is capable of producing nanoparticles in the size range of about 100-300 nm, under ambient conditions. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sols by a high-speed centrifuge, and can be re-dispersed in aqueous medium by a sonicator. The effect of concentrations of selenium dioxide, acetone and PVA on the size of the selenium nanoparticles has been studied. The size of the selenium nanoparticles has been found to increase with increase in the reaction time as well as the concentration of selenium dioxide, while it decreases with increase in the concentration of the stabilizer, PVA. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  4. Monomer-Capped Tin Metal Nanoparticles for Anode Materials in Lithium Secondary Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    Monomer-Capped Tin Metal Nanoparticles for Anode Materials in Lithium Secondary Batteries Mijung Graphite can store 372 mAh/g corresponding to LiC6, and tin can store 970 mAh/g corresponding to Li4.4Sn close to graphite. The reason for failure is believed to be the inhomogeneous volume expansion

  5. Mechanism for the formation of tin oxide nanoparticles and nanowires inside the mesopores of SBA-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satishkumar, G.; Titelman, L. [Blechner Center for Industrial Catalysis and Process Development, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Landau, M.V., E-mail: mlandau@bgu.ac.i [Blechner Center for Industrial Catalysis and Process Development, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2009-10-15

    The formation of polycrystalline tin oxide nanoparticles (NP) and nanowires was investigated using nanocasting approach included solid-liquid strategy for insertion of SnCl{sub 2} precursor and SBA-15 silica as a hard template. HR-TEM and XRD revealed that during the thermal treatment in air 5 nm tin oxide NP with well defined Cassiterite structure were formed inside the SBA-15 matrix mesopores at 250 deg. C. After air calcination at 700 deg. C the NP assembled inside the SBA-15 mesopores as polycrystalline nanorods with different orientation of atomic layers in jointed nanocrystals. It was found that the structure silanols of silica matrix play a vital role in creating the tin oxide NP at low temperature. The pure tin chloride heated in air at 250 deg. C did not react with oxygen to yield tin oxide. Tin oxide NP were also formed during the thermal treatment of the tin chloride loaded SBA-15 in helium atmosphere at 250 deg. C. Hence, it is well evident that silanols present in the silica matrix not only increase the wetting of tin chloride over the surface of SBA-15 favoring its penetration to the matrix pores, but also react with hydrated tin chloride according to the proposed scheme to give tin oxide inside the mesopores. It was confirmed by XRD, N{sub 2}-adsorption, TGA-DSC and FTIR spectra. This phenomenon was further corroborated by detecting the inhibition of SnO{sub 2} NP formation at 250 deg. C after inserting the tin precursor to SBA-15 with reduced silanols concentration partially grafted with tin chloride. - Graphical abstract: The mechanism of formation of polycrystalline tin oxide nanoparticles (NP) and nanowires was investigated using nanocasting approach included solid-liquid strategy for insertion of SnCl{sub 2} precursor and SBA-15 silica as a hard template. It was found that the structure silanols of silica matrix play a vital role in creating the tin oxide NP during thermal treatment.

  6. Gas Sensors Based on Tin Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized from a Mini-Arc Plasma Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Ganhua; Huebner, Kyle L.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Chen, Junhong

    2006-01-01

    Miniaturized gas sensors or electronic noses to rapidly detect and differentiate trace amount of chemical agents are extremely attractive. In this paper, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a functional tin oxide nanoparticle gas sensor. Tin oxide nanoparticles are first synthesized using a convenient and low-cost mini-arc plasma source. The nanoparticle size distribution is measured online using a scanning electrical mobility spectrometer (SEMS). The product nanoparticles are analyzed ex-situ by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for morphology and defects, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy for elemental composition, electron diffraction for crystal structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)more »for surface composition. Nonagglomerated rutile tin oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles as small as a few nm have been produced. Larger particles bear a core-shell structure with a metallic core and an oxide shell. The nanoparticles are then assembled onto an e-beam lithographically patterned interdigitated electrode using electrostatic force to fabricate the gas sensor. The nanoparticle sensor exhibits a fast response and a good sensitivity when exposed to 100 ppm ethanol vapor in air.« less

  7. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ? Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ? Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ? CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage and impairs steroidogenesis. ? Nano-Se retained sperm quality against CIS-induced free radicals toxic stress.

  8. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marcinek, Marek (Warszawa, PL); Kostecki, Robert (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Energy Deposition and Nanodosimetry of Iodine-125 and Tin-117m Labeled Gold Nanoparticles: A Computational Model Using Geant4-DNA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulley, Marina Lee

    2015-08-12

    of metastatic cancer is evolving, and therapeutic strategies need to evolve with it. Gold nanoparticles have been extensively used in the medical field. In this study, gold nanoparticles containing Auger emitting radionuclides of 125I or 117mSn were modeled...

  10. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  11. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, D.R.

    1993-04-20

    Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  12. Discovery of the Tin Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Amos; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Thirty-eight tin isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  14. Artificial fireball generation via an erosive discharge with tin alloy electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirozerski, A L; Lebedeva, E L; Borisov, B F; Khomutova, A S; Mavlonazarov, I O

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for generation of long-living autonomous fireball-like objects via a pulse erosive discharge between tin alloy electrodes. The objects are similar to the natural ball lightning in some properties, in particular, they have high energy density and are capable to burn through thin metal foils. The dynamics of the objects are studied using high speed videorecording. During their lifetime the fireballs generate aerogel threads. The studies of their structure by scanning electron microscopy reveal the presence of tin oxide nanoparticles and nanowhiskers.

  15. Enhanced electron collection in TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle-based dye-sensitized solar cells by an array of metal micropillars on a planar fluorinated tin oxide anode.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z.; Xu, T.; Gao, S.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Charge collection efficiency exhibits a strong influence on the overall efficiency of nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells. It highly depends on the quality of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticulate layer in the photoanode, and hence most efforts have been directed on the improvement and deliberate optimization of the quality the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline layer. In this work, we aim to reduce the electron collection distance between the place of origin in the TiO{sub 2} layer to the electron-collecting TCO anode as an alternative way to enhance the charge collection efficiency. We use an array of metal micropillars on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) as the collecting anode. Under the same conditions, the Ni micropillar-on-FTO-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) exhibit a remarkably enhanced current density, which is approximately 1.8 times greater compared with the bare FTO-based DSSCs. Electron transport was investigated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. Our results reveal that the electron collection time in Ni micropillar-on-FTO-based DSSCs is much shorter than that of bare FTO-based DSSCs, indicating faster electron collection due to the Ni micropillars buried in TiO{sub 2} nanoparticulate layer that serve as electron transport shortcuts. As a result, the charge collection efficiency was enhanced by 15?20% with respect to that of the bare FTO-based DSSCs. Consequently, the overall energy conversion efficiency was found to increase from 2.6% in bare FTO-based DSSCs to 4.8% in Ni micropillar-on-FTO-based DSSCs for a 6 {micro}m-thick TiO{sub 2} NP film.

  16. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-12-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

  17. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  18. Effect of selenium and vitamin E on risk of prostate cancer and other cancers: The selenium and vitamin E cancer prevention trial (SELECT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    PR, Albanes D. Selenium, vitamin E, and prostate cancer--Effect of Selenium and Vitamin E on Risk of Prostate CancerOther Cancers: The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention

  19. Therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

    2003-01-01

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  20. Tin electroplating/stripping evaluation. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHenry, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    An evaluation was conducted to determine possible replacement chemistries for electroplating and stripping of tin-lead. The driver for this project was two-fold. Our first goal dealt with hazardous waste reduction. It was desired to eliminate lead (a heavy metal) from the electroplating process and thiourea (a known carcinogen) from the stripping process. We also sought to reduce the cost of nonconformance (CONC) realized by this process in the form of rough plating, broken paths, poor solderability, and overetching. Three suppliers` tin chemistries were evaluated as replacements for electroplating and stripping of tin-lead. Based on preliminary testing, one chemistry was chosen, evaluated, and approved for production use.

  1. High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: a localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinouski, M.; Kehr, S.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; Carlson, B.A.; Seravalli, J.; Jin, R.; Handy, D.E.; Park, T.J.; Loscalzo, J.; Hatfield, D.L.; Gladyshev, V.N.

    2012-04-17

    Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA{sup [Ser]Sec} and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution.

  2. Part I Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) Enter your TIN in the appropriate box. The TIN provided must match the name given on the "Name" line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part I Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) Enter your TIN in the appropriate box. The TIN provided To : Requester Payroll Department Form W-9 Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification. The number shown on this form is my correct taxpayer identification number (or I am waiting for a number

  3. Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English...

  4. Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System inStatus of theSciTechin a diironusage

  5. What You Need to Know about Selenium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    of crude oil; mining of coal, phosphate, copper, and uranium~ and irrigated agriculture. Because 3.8.2 Selenium as a Global Problem............................................................ 32 3 is a common by-product of several core economic activities: coal- fired generation of electricity; refining

  6. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  7. Selenium Partitioning and Food-Chain Transfer at the Salton Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jennifer Marie

    2011-01-01

    and R.A. Engberg. Environmental Chemistry of Selenium. NewWorld Examples. ” Environmental Chemistry of Selenium. Ed.and R.A. Engberg. Environmental Chemistry of Selenium. New

  8. Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

    2011-01-01

    A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

  9. The leaching characteristics of selenium from coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.; Wang, J.; Burken, J.G.; Ban, H.; Ladwig, K.

    2007-11-15

    The leaching characteristics of selenium from several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes under different pH conditions were investigated using batch methods. Results indicated that pH had a significant effect on selenium leaching from bituminous coal ash. The minimum selenium leaching occurred in the pH range between 3 and 4, while the maximum selenium leaching occurred at pH 12. The release of selenium from subbituminous coal ashes was very low for the entire experimental pH range, possibly due to the high content of calcium which can form hydration or precipitation products as a sink for selenium. The adsorption results for different selenium species indicated that Se(VI) was hardly adsorbable on either bituminous coal ashes or subbitumminous coal ashes at any pH. However, Se(I) was highly adsorbed by bituminous coal ashes under acidic pH conditions and was mostly removed by subbitumminous coal ashes across the entire pH range. This result suggests that the majority of selenium released from the tested fly ashes was Se(IV). A speciation-based model was developed to simulate the adsorption of Se(IV) on bituminous coal fly ash, and the pH-independent adsorption constants of HSeO{sup 3-} and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} were determined. The modeling approach is useful for understanding and predicting the release process of selenium from fly ash.

  10. TIN--2001 78.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIN--2001 78.1 TIN By James F. Carlin, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Elsie D firms consumed 83% of the reported primary tin used domestically in 2001. The major uses were as follows. The recycling rate for steel cans was 58% in 2001 and 2000, compared with 56% in 1995 and 15% in 1988

  11. TIN--1999 78.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIN--1999 78.1 TIN By James F. Carlin, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Elsie D, international data coordinator. Tin was not mined in the United States during 1999. Twenty-five firms consumed at landfills. The recycling rate for steel cans was 58% in 1999, compared with 56% in 1998, 61% in 1997, 58

  12. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  13. From Soil Aggregate to Watershed, from California's Central Valley to the Salton Sea - Agricultural Selenium Contamination across Ecosystems, Scales, and Disciplines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kausch, Matteo Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation of selenium-contaminated sediments and water.1997a. Bioremediation of selenium in soil and water. SoilBioremediation of selenium-contaminated sediments and water.

  14. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  15. DESIGN OF A 10-T SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNET USING NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2011-01-01

    NIOBIUM-TIN CONOOCTOR' C. Taylor, R. Meuser. S. Caspi. W.NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR C. Taylor, R. Meuser, S. Caspi, W.NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR* C. Taylor, R. Meuser, S. Caspi, W.

  16. Amorphous tin-cadmium oxide films and the production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaonan; Gessert, Timothy A

    2013-10-29

    A tin-cadmium oxide film having an amorphous structure and a ratio of tin atoms to cadmium atoms of between 1:1 and 3:1. The tin-cadmium oxide film may have an optical band gap of between 2.7 eV and 3.35 eV. The film may also have a charge carrier concentration of between 1.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3 and 2.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3. The tin cadmium oxide film may also exhibit a Hall mobility of between 40 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1 and 60 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1. Also disclosed is a method of producing an amorphous tin-cadmium oxide film as described and devices using same.

  17. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, Richard A. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support the liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide films using tetrakis,,dimethylamino... tin Jeffrey W. Elam,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide films using tetrakis,,dimethylamino... tin Jeffrey W. Elam for preparing thin films of SnO2 by atomic layer deposition ALD using alternating exposures to tetrakis sputtering,5 chemi- cal vapor deposition,15 spray pyrolysis,11 and atomic layer deposition ALD .16­18 ALD

  19. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell response.

  20. Tin-silver-bismuth solders for electronics assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1995-08-08

    A lead-free solder alloy is disclosed for electronic assemblies composed of a eutectic alloy of tin and silver with a bismuth addition, x, of 0tin effective to depress the melting point of the tin-silver composition to a desired level. Melting point ranges from about 218 C down to about 205 C depending an the amount of bismuth added to the eutectic tin-silver alloy as determined by DSC analysis, 10 C/min. A preferred alloy composition is 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi (weight percent based on total alloy weight). 4 figs.

  1. Antimony-Doped Tin(II) Sulfide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Rupak

    Thin-film solar cells made from earth-abundant, inexpensive, and nontoxic materials are needed to replace the current technologies whose widespread use is limited by their use of scarce, costly, and toxic elements. Tin ...

  2. Tin-silver-bismuth solders for electronics assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vianco, Paul T. (Albuquerque, NM); Rejent, Jerome A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A lead-free solder alloy for electronic assemblies composed of a eutectic alloy of tin and silver with a bismuth addition, x, of 0tin effective to depress the melting point of the tin-silver composition to a desired level. Melting point ranges from about 218.degree. C. down to about 205.degree. C. depending an the amount of bismuth added to the eutectic tin-silver alloy as determined by DSC analysis, 10.degree. C./min. A preferred alloy composition is 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi (weight percent based on total alloy weight).

  3. JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2009-03-30

    Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

  4. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2015-11-20

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  5. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  6. Precision Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    John Hemminger

    2010-01-08

    A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

  7. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  8. Vitamin E and the risk of prostate cancer: Updated results of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    10.1001/jama.2011.1437. Vitamin E and the Risk of Prostateof The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (Effect of Selenium and Vitamin E on Risk of Prostate Cancer

  9. Evaluation of Tin Plating for Multi Canister Overpack Seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-12-07

    The Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) incorporates plated seals for use with (1) the port cover plates, (2) process valves of the shield plug, and (3) test plug ofthe cover cap. These seals are required to maintain leakage rates as low as 10{sup -7} scc/atm-sec. in the cover cap to test plug seal. The seals are manufactured by EG&G division of Perkin Elmer. Currently, the MCO design calls for use of silver or gold plated seals in these locations. The seal plating materials are deposited on Inconel 718 or X-750 substrates. Some of these seals are reused several times in service on the MCO. The MCO manufacturer has built several MCOs and is in the leak testing stage and has had great difficulty obtaining acceptable leakage rates at their plant in Camden, New Jersey. The seal manufacturer was called in to evaluate the situation and now the seal manufacturer recommends tin plated seals. This evaluation examines the Corrosion resistance and thermal stability of tin plating on the seals. The use of tin plating on MCO seals was evaluated for corrosion resistance and thermal stability. The corrosion resistance of tin in the expected MCO environments is acceptable. The effect of radiation hardening will offset creep deformation results. However, a low melting point indicates unsuitability at significantly elevated temperatures.

  10. What controls selenium release during shale weathering? Adriana Matamoros-Veloza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    What controls selenium release during shale weathering? Adriana Matamoros-Veloza , Robert J can clearly separate the proportions of Se present in the sulphide versus the organic pools in shales and pyrite oxidation will control the release of selenium during shale weathering. Ó 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological on sele- nium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer

  12. Microstructure of amorphous indium oxide and tin oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauf, I.A.; Brown, L.M. (Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1994-03-15

    Indium oxide, tin oxide, and some other doped and undoped oxide semiconductors show an interesting and technologically important combination of properties. They have high luminous transparency, good electrical conductivity and high infrared reflectivity. Numerous techniques for depositing these materials have been developed and have undergone a number of changes during last two decades. An understanding of the basic physics of these materials has begun to dawn. Most of the literature on transparent conducting oxides consists of studying the dependence of the properties on the composition, preparation conditions, such as deposition rate, substrate temperature or post-deposition heat treatment. In this paper the authors have employed the transmission electron microscopy to study the microstructure of reactively evaporated, electron beam evaporated, ion-beam sputtered amorphous indium oxide and reactively evaporated amorphous tin oxide thin films. These films, which have received little attention in the past, can have enormous potential as transparent conductive coatings on heat-sensitive substrates and inexpensive solar cells.

  13. Inorganic arrangement crystal beryllium, lithium, selenium and silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobato, Ricardo; Fedrigo, Desire Francine Gobato

    2015-01-01

    The use of inorganic crystals technology has been widely date. Since quartz crystals for watches in the nineteenth century, and common way radio in the early twentieth century, to computer chips with new semiconductor materials. Chemical elements such as beryllium, lithium, selenium and silicon, are widely used in technology. The development of new crystals arising from that arrangement can bring technological advances in several areas of knowledge. The likely difficulty of finding such crystals in nature or synthesized, suggest an advanced study of the subject. A study using computer programs with ab initio method was applied. As a result of the likely molecular structure of the arrangement of a crystal was obtained.

  14. Thermally Activated, Inverted Interfacial Electron Transfer Kinetics: High Driving Force Reactions between Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activation limit as: where In the equations, G* is the activation free energy, Hab is the coupling constant to the interest in these systems for solar energy conversion.10-12 In such systems, the two important interfacial behavior can also be observed via pH-induced manipulation of the conduction band-edge energy and, therefore

  15. Electromechanical properties of freestanding graphene functionalized with tin oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    -type inorganic nanocrystals formed from materials such as ZnO, TiO2, SnO2, etc.2,3 In particular, SnO2,8 Single-walled carbon nanotubes promise even more efficient conversion due to their potentially large sur carbon nanotubes by a chemical solution route.10 Nanotubes have proved difficult to work with, however

  16. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural. Freeman*,,#, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California, Water Management Research Division, Parlier, California 93648, United States Biological Sciences

  17. Lag and ghosting in a clinical flat-panel selenium digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, Aili K.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Hunter, David M.; Beideck, Daniel J. [Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Fletcher Allan Health Care, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    We present measurements of lag and ghosting in a FDA-approved digital mammography system that uses a dielectric/selenium based detector structure. Lag is the carryover of signal from a previous image, whereas ghosting is the reduction of sensitivity caused by previous exposure history of the detector. Data from six selenium units were acquired. For the type of selenium detector tested, and under typical clinical usage conditions, the lag was as high as 0.15% of source signal and the ghosting could be as high as 15%. The amount of lag and ghosting varied from unit to unit. Results were compared with data acquired on a phosphor-based full-field digital mammography system. Modifications in the technology of the selenium detectors appear to have resulted in a marked decrease in both lag and ghosting effects in more recent systems.

  18. Field-Measured Oxidation Rates of Biologically Reduced Selenium in Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.; Daggett, John; Zawislansi, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Reduced Selenium in Sludge Sally M. Benson, John Daggett andCalifornia 94720 U.S.A. Sludge generated during surface-Finding safe and economical sludge disposal methods requires

  19. Potential for selenium migration at a lignite power plant solid waste disposal facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Steven Douglas

    1986-01-01

    . All groundwater that recharges on the disposal site is slightly saline and flows east, probably discharging into the Gibbons Creek Reservoir. Selenium, arsenic, boron, iron, manganese, and sulfate in the lignite waste effluent exceed either EPA... ( 1975) drinking water standards or EPA (1973) recommended livestock water standards. Since the natural groundwater contains higher concentrations of selenium, iron, manganese, and sulfate than the waste effluent, only arsenic and boron should...

  20. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  1. Modeling the behavior of selenium in Pulverized-Coal Combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senior, Constance; Otten, Brydger Van; Wendt, Jost O.L.; Sarofim, Adel

    2010-11-15

    The behavior of Se during coal combustion is different from other trace metals because of the high degree of vaporization and high vapor pressures of the oxide (SeO{sub 2}) in coal flue gas. In a coal-fired boiler, these gaseous oxides are absorbed on the fly ash surface in the convective section by a chemical reaction. The composition of the fly ash (and of the parent coal) as well as the time-temperature history in the boiler therefore influences the formation of selenium compounds on the surface of the fly ash. A model was created for interactions between selenium and fly ash post-combustion. The reaction mechanism assumed that iron reacts with selenium at temperatures above 1200 C and that calcium reacts with selenium at temperatures less than 800 C. The model also included competing reactions of SO{sub 2} with calcium and iron in the ash. Predicted selenium distributions in fly ash (concentration versus particle size) were compared against measurements from pilot-scale experiments for combustion of six coals, four bituminous and two low-rank coals. The model predicted the selenium distribution in the fly ash from the pilot-scale experiments reasonably well for six coals of different compositions. (author)

  2. Silicon-tin oxynitride glassy composition and use as anode for lithium-ion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neudecker, Bernd J. (Knoxville, TN); Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions which are especially useful in the construction of anode material for thin-film electrochemical devices including rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, electrochromic mirrors, electrochromic windows, and actuators. Additional applications of silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions include optical fibers and optical waveguides.

  3. Sputtered TiN films for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators S. Ohya,1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    Sputtered TiN films for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators S. Ohya,1, a) B. Chiaro,2 A control the energy of these particles to obtain high-quality TiN films. Superconducting coplanar waveguideN in larger circuits. I. INTRODUCTION Superconducting coplanar-waveguide (SCPW) res- onators are used

  4. P-7 / D. R. Cairns P-7: Wear Resistance of Indium Tin Oxide Coatings on Polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Darran

    P-7 / D. R. Cairns P-7: Wear Resistance of Indium Tin Oxide Coatings on Polyethylene Terephthalate The wear mechanisms of the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) topsheet). The bottom substrate is typically glass and the top sheet a polyester such as Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET

  5. Femtosecond laser ablation of indium tin-oxide narrow grooves for thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Femtosecond laser ablation of indium tin-oxide narrow grooves for thin film solar cells Qiumei Bian in the fabrication and assembly of thin film solar cells. Using a femtosecond (fs) laser, we selectively removed a unique scheme to ablate the indium tin-oxide layer for the fabrication of thin film solar cells

  6. TESLA Report 2004-02 Anti-multipactor TiN coating of RF power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N layers generation on surfaces which were not protected in this way previously. Thin TiN films on ceramicTESLA Report 2004-02 1 Anti-multipactor TiN coating of RF power coupler components for TESLA performance of couplers) J. Lorkiewicz1 , The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Pl 05-400 Otwock

  7. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01

    RA, editors. Environmental chemistry of Selenium. New York (approach. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 25( 7):USA. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 23(12):3003–

  8. Plasma Vitamin D and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers & Prevention Plasma Vitamin D and Prostate Cancerfrom the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial Alanwho are using supplemental vitamin D should limit their dose

  9. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, R.A.

    1980-12-19

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  10. A novel approach to lead isotope provenance studies of tin and bronze: applications to South African, Botswanan and Romanian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of cassiterite, the dominant ore of tin, evolve after crystallization through decay of uranium (U) and thorium on this isochron, we deduce that they were made with tin from either the Rooiberg deposits or similar age deposits to a Variscan age (~0.3 Ga), suggesting a central or western European tin deposit as its source, since

  11. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer; Porto, Arilza de Oliveira; Magela de Lima, Geraldo; Paniago, Roberto; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ? Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ? Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ? Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  12. Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

  13. THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC SELENIUM SUPPLEMENTATION AND DIETARY ENERGY MANIPULATION ON MARES AND THEIR FOALS: SELENIUM CONCENTRATIONS, GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY, FOALING PARAMETERS AND FOAL PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karren, Brady

    2010-01-16

    Quarter Horse mares (n=28, 465-612 kg BW, 6-19 yrs of age) were used to investigate the effect of organic selenium (Se) supplementation (Selenosource, Diamond V Mills, Inc. Cedar Rapids, IA (SeM)) and DE manipulation on ...

  14. Potential Moderating Effects of Selenium on Mercury Uptake and Selenium:Mercury Molar Ratios in Fish From Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site - 12086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Donio, Mark; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-07-01

    Mercury contamination is an important remediation issue at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and to a lesser extent at other DOE sites because of the hazard it presents, potential consequences to humans and eco-receptors, and completed pathways, to offsite receptors. Recent work has emphasized that selenium might ameliorate the toxicity of mercury, and we examine the selenium:mercury (Se:Hg) molar ratios in fish from Oak Ridge, and compare them to Se:Hg molar ratios in fish from the Savannah River. Selenium/mercury molar ratios varied considerably among and within fish species. There was considerable variation in the molar ratios for individual fish (as opposed to mean ratios by species) for freshwater fish from both sites. The inter-individual variation in molar ratios indicates that such that the molar ratios of mean Se and Hg concentrations may not be representative. Even for fish species with relatively low mercury levels, some individual fish have molar ratios less than unity, the value sometime thought to be protective. Selenium levels varied narrowly regardless of fish size, consistent with homeostatic regulation of this essential trace element. The data indicate that considerable attention will need to be directed toward variations and variances, as well as the mechanisms of the interaction of selenium and mercury, before risk assessment and risk management policies can use this information to manage mercury pollution and risk. Even so, if there are high levels of selenium in the fish from Poplar Creek on Oak Ridge, then the potential exists for some amelioration of adverse health effects, on the fish themselves, predators that eat them, and people who consume them. This work will aid DOE because it will allow managers and scientists to understand another aspect that affects fate and transport of mercury, as well as the potential effects of methylmercury in fish for human and ecological receptors. The variability within fish species, however, suggests that the relative Se:Hg molar ratios in fish are not stable enough to be used in risk assessment at this time. Nor is it known how much excess selenium is required to confer any degree of protectiveness. That is, in conducting risk assessments, it is not possible to determine the spread of ratios, which would be needed for probabilistic risk assessment. Significantly more fish samples per species are required to begin to generate data that would allow it use in risk assessment. Adding Se:Hg molar ratios seems to complicate risk assessment for the potential adverse effects of mercury exposure, and using mercury levels at this time remains the most viable option. (authors)

  15. Optical and Structural Characterizations of Tin Phthalocvanine Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherian, Regimol C.; Menon, C. S. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University Priyadarshini Hills P.O., Kottayam-686560, Kerala (India)

    2008-04-23

    Phthalocyanines are today regarded as optical materials, which applies to organic dye lasers. The analysis of the optical properties of these thin films enforces the application in the field of thin film optics. Tin phthalocyanine (SnPc) thin films used for the characterization studies are prepared by thermal evaporation technique. The variation of optical band gap with irradiation of heat radiation and post deposition heat treatment are studied from the absorption spectra. Structural properties have been analyzed using the X-ray diffractogram of SnPc powder and thin films. The structure is identified as monoclinic with a = 12.132 A, b = 8.712 A, c = 10.806 A and {beta} = 108.85 deg. The grain size increases with increase of annealing temperature. The SEM images show a rough corrugated surface. Due to heat treatment, crystallites grow into bigger size.

  16. Simulation studies for Tin Bolometer Array for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Singh; N. Dokania; S. Mathimalar; V. Nanal; R. G. Pillay

    2015-07-31

    It is important to identify and reduce the gamma radiation which can be a significant source of background for any double beta decay experiment. The TIN.TIN detector array, which is under development for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in $^{124}$Sn, has the potential to utilize the hit multiplicity information to discriminate the gamma background from the events of interest. Monte Carlo simulations for optimizing the design of a Tin detector module has been performed by varying element sizes with an emphasis on the gamma background reduction capabilities of the detector array.

  17. Simulation studies for Tin Bolometer Array for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Singh; N. Dokania; S. Mathimalar; V. Nanal; R. G. Pillay

    2014-08-20

    It is important to identify and reduce the gamma radiation which can be a significant source of background for any double beta decay experiment. The TIN.TIN detector array, which is under development for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in $^{124}$Sn, has the potential to utilize the hit multiplicity information to discriminate the gamma background from the events of interest. Monte Carlo simulations for optimizing the design of a Tin detector module has been performed by varying element sizes with an emphasis on the gamma background reduction capabilities of the detector array.

  18. Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

  19. Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul N.; Lombi, Enzo; Sun, Guo-Xin; Scheckel, Kirk; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Feng, Xinbin; Zhu, Jianming; Carey, Anne-Marie; Adomako, Eureka; Lawgali, Youseff; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A.; (UCopenhagen); (Aberdeen); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (US EPA)

    2009-08-13

    For up to 1 billion people worldwide, insufficient dietary intake of selenium (Se) is a serious health constraint. Cereals are the dominant Se source for those on low protein diets, as typified by the global malnourished population. With crop Se content constrained largely by underlying geology, regional soil Se variations are often mirrored by their locally grown staples. Despite this, the Se concentrations of much of the world's rice, the mainstay of so many, is poorly characterized, for both total Se content and Se speciation. In this study, 1092 samples of market sourced polished rice were obtained. The sampled rice encompassed dominant rice producing and exporting countries. Rice from the U.S. and India were found to be the most enriched, while mean average levels were lowest in Egyptian rice: {approx}32-fold less than their North American equivalents. By weighting country averages by contribution to either global production or export, modeled baseline values for both were produced. Based on a daily rice consumption of 300 g day{sup -1}, around 75% of the grains from the production and export pools would fail to provide 70% of daily recommended Se intakes. Furthermore, Se localization and speciation characterization using X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) techniques were investigated in a Se-rich sample. The results revealed that the large majority of Se in the endosperm was present in organic forms.

  20. The Effects of pH Variation on Whisker Growth on Tin Plated Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    the effects of changing the pH levels in the electroplating solution on tin whisker growths. Procedures, 2, and 3 showing the Same matte surface finish Diagram of the electroplating apparatus Table

  1. Tin induced a-Si crystallization in thin films of Si-Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neimash, V. E-mail: oleks.goushcha@nuportsoft.com; Poroshin, V.; Goushcha, A. O. E-mail: oleks.goushcha@nuportsoft.com; Shepeliavyi, P.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Melnyk, V.; Kuzmich, A.; Makara, V.

    2013-12-07

    Effects of tin doping on crystallization of amorphous silicon were studied using Raman scattering, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence techniques. Formation of silicon nanocrystals (2–4?nm in size) in the amorphous matrix of Si{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x}, obtained by physical vapor deposition of the components in vacuum, was observed at temperatures around 300?°C. The aggregate volume of nanocrystals in the deposited film of Si{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} exceeded 60% of the total film volume and correlated well with the tin content. Formation of structures with ?80% partial volume of the nanocrystalline phase was also demonstrated. Tin-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon occurred only around the clusters of metallic tin, which suggested the crystallization mechanism involving an interfacial molten Si:Sn layer.

  2. Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winiarz, Christine Eve

    2007-01-01

    Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

  3. Three-dimensional defect characterization : focused ion beam tomography applied to tin sulfide thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youssef, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Porosity is postulated to be one of the reasons for the low efficiency of tin sulfide-based devices. This work is a preliminary investigation of the effects of two film growth parameters deposition rate and substrate ...

  4. Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israeli, Navot

    on cutting tools, diffusion-barriers in microelectronic devices, corrosion- resistant layers on mechanicalCl-structure TiN and related transition-metal (TM) nitrides are widely used as hard wear- resistant coatings

  5. Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

  6. Automated Morphology Analysis of Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chiwoo

    2012-10-19

    The functional properties of nanoparticles highly depend on the surface morphology of the particles, so precise measurements of a particle's morphology enable reliable characterizing of the nanoparticle's properties. ...

  7. Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees; Feinerman, Alan; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2014-01-15

    In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1?±?0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300?°C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

  8. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  9. The distribution of selenium and other trace elements in Texas waters and soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Desheng

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of selenium in aquatic systems has not been widely investigated. For example, there is very little reliable Se data for Texas river waders. This thesis aims to draw a first order picture of the Se distribution in several Texas...

  10. Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ladwig

    2005-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (principally arsenic and selenium) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion products (CCPs). Specific objectives of the project were: (1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCP management sites, including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; (2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic species at three CCP sites; and (3) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of selenium species at three CCP sites. Each of these objectives was accomplished using a combination of field sampling and laboratory analysis and experimentation. All of the methods used and results obtained are contained in this report. For ease of use, the report is subdivided into three parts. Volume 1 contains methods and results for the field leachate characterization. Volume 2 contains methods and results for arsenic adsorption. Volume 3 contains methods and results for selenium adsorption.

  11. Nanoparticle growth Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    on complex support geometries, such as aerogels, porous structures, and other nanoparticles. Efficient

  12. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

  13. Thermally evaporated mechanically hard tin oxide thin films for opto-electronic apllications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathy, Sumanta K.; Rajeswari, V. P. [Centre for Nano Science and Technology, GVP College of Engineering (Autonomous), Visakhapatnam- 530048 (India)

    2014-01-28

    Tungsten doped tin oxide (WTO) and Molybdenum doped tin oxide (MoTO) thin film were deposited on corn glass by thermal evaporation method. The films were annealed at 350°C for one hour. Structural analysis using Xray diffraction data shows both the films are polycrystalline in nature with monoclinic structure of tin oxide, Sn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, corresponding to JCPDS card number 01-078-6064. SEM photograph showed that both the films have spherical grains with size in the range of 20–30 nm. Compositional analysis was carried out using EDS which reveals the presence of Sn, O and the dopant Mo/W only thereby indicating the absence of any secondary phase in the films. The films are found to contain nearly 6 wt% of Mo, 8 wt% of W as dopants respectively. The transmission pattern for both the films in the spectral range 200 – 2000 nm shows that W doping gives a transparency of nearly 80% from 380 nm onwards while Mo doping has less transparency of 39% at 380nm. Film hardness measurement using Triboscope shows a film hardness of about 9–10 GPa for both the films. It indicates that W or M doping in tin oxide provides the films the added advantage of withstanding the mechanical wear and tear due to environmental fluctuations By optimizing the optical and electrical properties, W/Mo doped tin oxide films may be explored as window layers in opto-electronic applications such as solar cells.

  14. Selenium nutrition of Morone hybrids including dietary requirements, bioavailability, toxicity and effects on immune responses and disease resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Francisco , Jr

    2006-08-16

    enhance immunocompetence and disease resistance of HSB. In the first experiment, purified and practical diets were supplemented with ?-glucan and selenium in a factorial arrangement and fed to juvenile HSB for 6 wk followed by a S. iniae challenge...

  15. Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albin, David S.; Noufi, Rommel

    2015-06-09

    Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating a thin film device comprises: providing a semiconductor film comprising indium (In) and selenium (Se) upon a substrate; heating the substrate and the semiconductor film to a desired temperature; and performing a mass transport through vapor transport of a copper chloride vapor and se vapor to the semiconductor film within a reaction chamber.

  16. Cluster formation probability in the trans-tin and trans-lead nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Santhosh; R. K. Biju; Sabina Sahadevan

    2010-05-10

    Within our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) cluster formation probabilities are calculated for different clusters ranging from carbon to silicon for the parents in the trans-tin and trans- lead regions. It is found that in trans-tin region the 12^C, 16^O, 20^Ne and 24^Mg clusters have maximum cluster formation probability and lowest half lives as compared to other clusters. In trans-lead region the 14^C, 18, 20^O, 23^F, 24,26^Ne, 28,30^Mg and 34^Si clusters have the maximum cluster formation probability and minimum half life, which show that alpha like clusters are most probable for emission from trans-tin region while non-alpha clusters are probable from trans-lead region. These results stress the role of neutron proton symmetry and asymmetry of daughter nuclei in these two cases.

  17. State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2008-06-01

    Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

  18. Tin-117m-labeled stannic (Sn.sup.4+) chelates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Richards, Powell (Bayport, NY)

    1985-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical reagents of this invention and the class of Tin-117m radiopharmaceuticals are therapeutic and diagnostic agents that incorporate gamma-emitting nuclides that localize in bone after intravenous injection in mammals (mice, rats, dogs, and rabbits). Images reflecting bone structure or function can then be obtained by a scintillation camera that detects the distribution of ionizing radiation emitted by the radioactive agent. Tin-117m-labeled chelates of stannic tin localize almost exclusively in cortical bone. Upon intravenous injection of the reagent, the preferred chelates are phosphonate compounds, preferable, PYP, MDP, EHDP, and DTPA. This class of reagents is therapeutically and diagnostically useful in skeletal scintigraphy and for the radiotherapy of bone tumors and other disorders.

  19. Tin Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries Using Natural Wood Fiber as a Mechanical Buffer and Electrolyte Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Tin Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries Using Natural Wood Fiber as a Mechanical Buffer and Electrolyte Information ABSTRACT: Sodium (Na)-ion batteries offer an attractive option for low cost grid scale storage due to the abundance of Na. Tin (Sn) is touted as a high capacity anode for Na-ion batteries with a high theoretical

  20. Conductive indium-tin oxide nanowire and nanotube arrays made by electrochemically assisted deposition in template membranes: switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Additionally, transparent semiconductor oxide NWs and NTs, such as tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), TiO2 and ZnConductive indium-tin oxide nanowire and nanotube arrays made by electrochemically assisted) and nanotubes (NTs) were grown from acidic aqueous solutions of inorganic precursors in a simple one

  1. Crystal chemistry and self-lubricating properties of monochalcogenides gallium selenide and tin selenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, A.

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes the fundamentals of the crystal chemistry and self-lubricating mechanisms of two monochalcogenides; tin selenide and gallium selenide. Specifically, it enumerates their inter-atomic array and bond structure in crystalline states, and correlates this fundamental knowledge with their self-lubricating capacity. Friction tests assessing the self-lubricating performance of gallium and tin selenides were carried out on a pin-on-disk machine. Specifically, large crystalline pieces of gallium selenide and tin selenide were cut and cleaved into flat squares and subsequently rubbed against the sapphire balls. In another case, the fine powders (particle size {approx} 50--100 {mu}m) of gallium selenide and tin selenide were manually fed into the sliding interfaces of 440C pins and 440C disks. For the specific test conditions explored, it was found that the friction coefficients of the sapphire/gallium selenide and sapphire/tin selenide pairs were {approx} 0.23 and {approx} 0.35, respectively. The friction coefficients of 440C pin/440C disk test pairs with gallium selenide and tin selenide powders were on the orders of {approx} 0.22 and {approx} 0.38, respectively. For comparison, a number of parallel friction tests were performed with MoS{sub 2} powders and compacts and the results of these tests were also reported. The friction data together with the crystal-chemical knowledge and the electron microscopic evidence supported the conclusion that the lubricity and self-lubricating mechanisms of these solids are closely related to their crystal chemistry and the nature of interlayer bonding.

  2. Tridentate ligated heteronuclear tin(II) alkoxides for use as base catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Tin alkoxide compounds are provided with accessible electrons. The tin alkoxide compound have the general formula (THME).sub.2 Sn.sub.3 (M(L).sub.x).sub.y, where THME is (O--CH.sub.2).sub.3 C(CH.sub.3), M is a metal atom selected from Sn and Ti, L is an organic/inorganic ligand selected from an alkoxide, a phenoxide or an amide, x is selected from 2 and 4 and y is selected from 0 and 1. These compounds have applicability as base catalysts in reactions and in metal-organic chemical vapor depositions processes.

  3. From Soil Aggregate to Watershed, from California's Central Valley to the Salton Sea - Agricultural Selenium Contamination across Ecosystems, Scales, and Disciplines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kausch, Matteo Francesco

    2013-01-01

    2003. Distribution of chromium contamination and microbialassessment of worldwide contamination of air, water andKrynitsky. 1987. Selenium contamination of the grasslands, a

  4. Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  5. Thermally Polymerized Rylene Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Trisha Lionel

    Rylene dyes functionalized with varying numbers of phenyl trifluorovinyl ether (TFVE) moieties were subjected to a thermal emulsion polymerization to yield shape-persistent, water-soluble chromophore nanoparticles. Perylene ...

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  7. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  8. Selenium And Arsenic Speciation in Fly Ash From Full-Scale Coal-Burning Utility Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.E.; Senior, C.L.; Chu, P.; Ladwig, K.; Huffman, G.P.; /Kentucky U. /Reaction Engin. Int. /Elect. Power Res. Inst., Palo Alto

    2007-07-09

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the post-combustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  9. Engineering Pharmaceutical Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkland, Cory

    2006-10-26

    Engineering Pharmaceutical Nanoparticles Cory Berkland Assistant Professor Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry Assistant Professor Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering The University of Kansas 2 Acknowledgements Postdocs: David Shi... Technology #0;z Supercritical Fluids #0;z Polymer Nanoparticles #0;z Molecular Technology/Polyplexes #0;z Block copolymers ? micelles #0;z Liposomes/Polymersomes #0;z Polymer/Drug conjugates #0;z Berkland Lab 14 Milling/Spraying Technology 15 Wet milling...

  10. Microstructure development in Nb3Sn(Ti) internal tin superconducting wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    drawing, increase Nb3Sn layer growth rate and improve Jc at high magnetic fields [4, 5]. In the wires have studied the phase formation sequences in a Nb3Sn `internal tin' process superconductor. Heat and Nb3Sn. Specimens were quenched at different points of the heat treatment, followed by metallography

  11. Naked Clusters of 56 Tin Atoms in the Solid State Svilen Bobev and Slavi C. Sevov*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naked Clusters of 56 Tin Atoms in the Solid State Svilen Bobev and Slavi C. Sevov* Contribution naked cluster in the solid state besides the fullerenes. Also occurring in the structure are two other discovered main group naked clusters in the solid state has grown immensely in recent years. Many large

  12. DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic Rennes, UMR 6226, 35042 Rennes, France KeywordsPerovskite, photovoltaic, first-principles calculations, k these hybrid semiconductor photovoltaic cells(HSPC) maydiffer from the one of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC

  13. Correlation between the Indium Tin Oxide morphology and the performances of polymer light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : This paper reports on performance enhancement of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) based on poly(2,5-bis. Keywords : Polymer light emitting diode; Indium tin oxide; Atomic force microscopy; Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy 1. Introduction Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have received worldwide

  14. SnO2 Filled Mesoporous Tin Phosphate High Capacity Negative Electrode for Lithium Secondary Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    SnO2 Filled Mesoporous Tin Phosphate High Capacity Negative Electrode for Lithium Secondary Battery insulators, and optics.1-6 On the other hand, their applications to electrode materials in lithium secondary batteries have received little attention because of the very limited candidates.7,8 Recently

  15. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-04-05

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  16. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  17. Growth of CrO[subscript 2] coated single crystalline (SnO[subscript 2]) tin oxide nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Guo-Xing

    Single crystalline tin oxide (SnO[subscript 2]) nanowires have been synthesized by carbothermal reduction of SnO[subscript 2] nanopowder followed by thermal evaporation of the reduced precursor and growth via the ...

  18. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  19. Absolute orientation-dependent TiN(001) step energies from two-dimensional equilibrium island shape and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    ; Adatoms B1 NaCl-structure TiN is widely used for de- positing hard wear-resistant coatings on cutting tools, diffusion-barrier layers in microelectronic devices, corrosion-resistant coatings on mechani- cal

  20. Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    . INTRODUCTION NaCl-structure TiN is widely used as a hard wear-resistant coating on cutting tools, as a diffusion-barrier layer in micro- electronic devices, as a corrosion-resistant coating on me- chanical

  1. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  2. Some effects of selenium on the growth and survival of larval stages of the american oyster, Crassostrea virginica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Wendy S

    1979-01-01

    SOME EFFECTS OF SELENIUM ON THE GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF LARVAL STAGES OF THE AMERICAN OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA A Thesis by WENDY S. SMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Univeristy in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Biology SOME EFFECTS OF SELENIUM ON Tl-IE GROLJTH AND SURVIVAL OF LARVAL STAGES OF THE ANJERICAN OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA A Thesis by NENDY S. SMITH Approved as to style and content by...

  3. Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Joseph

    2007-10-11

    In this book chapter, we review the recent advances in nanoparticles based bioassay. The nanoparticles include quantum dots, silica nanoparticles and apoferritin nanoparticles. The new nanoparticles-based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassays.

  4. Interactions of Copper Nanoparticles with the Microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spitzmiller, Melissa Rae

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles with the Microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtiiNanoparticles with the Microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtiifor Microalgae . 4 2.

  5. Molybdenum as a contact material in zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, W.; Peterson, R. L., E-mail: blpeters@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2014-05-12

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are of increasing interest for a variety of thin film electronics applications. Here, the contact properties of different source/drain electrode materials to solution-processed amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors are studied using the transmission line method. The width-normalized contact resistance between ZTO and sputtered molybdenum is measured to be 8.7 ?-cm, which is 10, 20, and 600 times smaller than that of gold/titanium, indium tin oxide, and evaporated molybdenum electrodes, respectively. The superior contact formed using sputtered molybdenum is due to a favorable work function lineup, an insulator-free interface, bombardment of ZTO during molybdenum sputtering, and trap-assisted tunneling. The transfer length of the sputtered molybdenum/ZTO contact is 0.34??m, opening the door to future radio-frequency sub-micron molybdenum/ZTO thin film transistors.

  6. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Taus, Rhys; Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloymore »(Ti-6AI-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached -225 kV bias voltage while generating less than 100 pA of field emission (« less

  7. Selenium Bioaccumulation in Stocked Fish as an Indicator of Fishery Potential in Pit Lakes on Reclaimed Coal Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hontela, Alice

    on Reclaimed Coal Mines in Alberta, Canada L. L. Miller · J. B. Rasmussen · V. P. Palace · G. Sterling · A to selenium (Se) and other metals and metalloids in pit lakes formed by open pit coal mining in Tertiary (thermal coal) and in Cretaceous (metallurgical coal) bedrock. Juvenile hatchery rainbow trout

  8. Evaluation of monolayer protected metal nanoparticle technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Diana J

    2005-01-01

    Self assembling nanostructured nanoparticles represent a new class of synthesized materials with unique functionality. Such monolayer protected metal nanoparticles are capable of resisting protein adsorption, and if utilized ...

  9. Dietary vitamin E requirement of sunshine bass (Morone chrysops [] x M. saxatilis []) and apparent lack of interactions between vitamin E and selenium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocabas, Arif Murat

    1996-01-01

    A 12-week feeding trial was conducted to determine the dietary vitamin E requirement of juvenile sunshine bass (Morone chrysops @ x M saxatilis d), and to investigate the possible interactions between dietary vitamin E and selenium. Sunshine bass...

  10. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Taus, Rhys; Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew

    2015-05-15

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached ?225?kV bias voltage while generating less than 100?pA of field emission (<10?pA) using a 40?mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to field strength of 13.7?MV/m. Smaller gaps were studied to evaluate electrode performance at higher field strength with the best performing TiN-coated aluminum electrode reaching ?22.5 MV/m with field emission less than 100?pA. These results were comparable to those obtained from our best-performing electrodes manufactured from stainless steel, titanium alloy and niobium, as reported in references cited below. The TiN coating provided a very smooth surface and with mechanical properties of the coating (hardness and modulus) superior to those of stainless steel, titanium-alloy, and niobium electrodes. These features likely contributed to the improved high voltage performance of the TiN-coated aluminum electrodes.

  11. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Taus, Rhys; Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloy (Ti-6AI-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached -225 kV bias voltage while generating less than 100 pA of field emission (<10 pA) using a 40 mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to field strength of 13.7 MV/m. Smaller gaps were studied to evaluate electrode performance at higher field strength with the best performing TiN-coated aluminum electrode reaching ~22.5 MV/m with field emission less than 100 pA. These results were comparable to those obtained from our best-performing electrodes manufactured from stainless steel, titanium alloy and niobium, as reported in references cited below. The TiN coating provided a very smooth surface and with mechanical properties of the coating (hardness and modulus) superior to those of stainless steel, titanium-alloy, and niobium electrodes. These features likely contributed to the improved high voltage performance of the TiN-coated aluminum electrodes.

  12. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual report, October 1, 1995--December 31,1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E.; Benson, S.M.

    1997-10-01

    Selenium geochemistry in tidal wetlands is a topic of continuing study at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The program of studies described in this report was initiated in the fall of 1994 in response to concerns about elevated Se concentrations in waters, sediments, and biota in the Carquinez Strait. Processes by which selenium is introduced and potentially released from the sediment system have been the focus of research in 1996.

  13. Using indium tin oxide material to implement the imaging of microwave plasma ignition process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Hou, Lingyun; Zhang, Guixin Zhang, Boya; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Zhi; Huang, Jian

    2014-02-17

    In this paper, a method is introduced to get global observation of microwave plasma ignition process at high pressure. A microwave resonator was designed with an indium tin oxide coated glass at bottom. Microwave plasma ignition was implemented in methane and air mixture at 10 bars by a 2?ms-3?kW-2.45?GHz microwave pulse, and the high speed images of the ignition process were obtained. The images visually proved that microwave plasma ignition could lead to a multi-point ignition. The system may also be applied to obtain Schlieren images, which is commonly used to observe the development of flame kernel in an ignition process.

  14. Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Masatoshi Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency , Honcho Kawaguchi, 332–0012 Saitama

    2013-12-09

    Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436?V, short-circuit current of 24.8?mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5?G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

  15. I HC HAWAI`I TI MNOA THNG TIN CHO SINH VIN QUC T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bang Hawai`i, Hoa K NM THŔNH LP: 1907 KIM NH CHT LNG: Hip Hi các trng Ph thông vŕ i hc Min Tây Hoa K DIN TÍCH: 1,3 km2 S LNG SINH VIĘN NHP HC: 20.006 S LNG SINH VIĘN QUC T: 2.351 QUY MÔ LP HC: 21 sinh vięn T L SINH VIĘN/GING VIĘN: 14/1 S LNG GING VIĘN TRĚNH TIN S: 85% CHNG TRĚNH ŔO TO H C NHÂN*: 112

  16. Highly efficient inverted organic solar cells using amino acid modified indium tin oxide as cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Aiyuan; Nie, Riming; Deng, Xianyu; Wei, Huaixin; Li, Yanqing; Tang, Jianxin; Zheng, Shizhao; Wong, King-Young

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report that highly efficient inverted organic solar cells were achieved by modifying the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) using an amino acid, Serine (Ser). With the modification of the ITO surface, device efficiency was significantly enhanced from 0.63% to 4.17%, accompanied with an open circuit voltage (Voc) that was enhanced from 0.30?V to 0.55?V. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the work function reduction induced by the amino acid modification resulting in the decreased barrier height at the ITO/organic interface played a crucial role in the enhanced performances.

  17. Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Chan-Shan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tang, Tsung-Ta [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ru-Pin [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Yu, Peichen [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ci-Ling, E-mail: clpan@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Science of Matters, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-07

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding ?/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ?517??m-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (?78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66?V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

  18. Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar Technologies JumpTiSol JumpOffshoreOpen EnergyTin

  19. Nanoparticle "theranostic" platforms for applications in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Jason Michael

    2011-01-01

    addressed by oscillating magnetic fields and produce aa rapidly oscillating external magnetic field, nanoparticles

  20. Novel, Low-Cost Nanoparticle Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    Fact sheet describing a modular hybrid plasma reactor and process to manufacture low-cost nanoparticles

  1. The influence of ammonia on rapid-ther al low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposited TIN, films from tetrakis (dimethylamido) titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    The influence of ammonia on rapid-ther al low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposited TIN, and stress of rapid- thermal low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposited (RT-LPMOCVD) TiN, films on In) liquid precursors, were studied. Enhanced deposition rates of l-3 nm s- ' at total chamber pressures

  2. Nondestructive characterization of a TiN metal gate: Chemical and structural properties by means of standing-wave hard x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fadley, Charles

    N, it is used as a protective coating on metals, including tools used for surgery and vari- ous high speed cutting applications. For instance, TiN coat- ings with thicknesses of about 2­10 lm are generally found to increase tool life by several hundred per cent.1 TiN also has important applications in the semiconduc- tor

  3. Elastic properties of sulphur and selenium doped ternary PbTe alloys by first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bali, Ashoka, E-mail: rcmallik@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Chetty, Raju, E-mail: rcmallik@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Mallik, Ramesh Chandra, E-mail: rcmallik@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Thermoelectric Materials and Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Lead telluride (PbTe) is an established thermoelectric material which can be alloyed with sulphur and selenium to further enhance the thermoelectric properties. Here, a first principles study of ternary alloys PbS{sub x}Te{sub (1?x)} and PbSe{sub x}Te{sub (1?x)} (0?x?1) based on the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) is presented for different ratios of the isoelectronic atoms in each series. Equilibrium lattice parameters and elastic constants have been calculated and compared with the reported data. Anisotropy parameter calculated from the stiffness constants showed a slight improvement in anisotropy of elastic properties of the alloys over undoped PbTe. Furthermore, the alloys satisfied the predicted stability criteria from the elastic constants, showing stable structures, which agreed with the previously reported experimental results.

  4. Investigation of fluorine-doped tin oxide based optically transparent E-shaped patch antenna for terahertz communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, S., E-mail: anand.s.krishna@gmail.com, E-mail: darak.mayur@gmail.com, E-mail: srk@nitt.edu; Darak, Mayur Sudesh, E-mail: anand.s.krishna@gmail.com, E-mail: darak.mayur@gmail.com, E-mail: srk@nitt.edu; Kumar, D. Sriram, E-mail: anand.s.krishna@gmail.com, E-mail: darak.mayur@gmail.com, E-mail: srk@nitt.edu [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, a fluorine-doped tin oxide based optically transparent E-shaped patch antenna is designed and its radiation performance is analyzed in the 705 – 804 GHz band. As optically transparent antennas can be mounted on optical display, they facilitate the reduction of overall system size. The proposed antenna design is simulated using electromagnetic solver - Ansys HFSS and its characteristics such as impedance bandwidth, directivity, radiation efficiency and gain are observed. Results show that the fluorine-doped tin oxide based optically transparent patch antenna overcomes the conventional patch antenna limitations and thus the same can be used for solar cell antenna used in satellite systems.

  5. Proton elastic scattering from tin isotopes at 295 MeV and systematic change of neutron density distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Terashima; H. Sakaguchi; H. Takeda; T. Ishikawa; M. Itoh; T. Kawabata; T. Murakami; M. Uchida; Y. Yasuda; M. Yosoi; J. Zenihiro; H. P. Yoshida; T. Noro; T. Ishida; S. Asaji; T. Yonemura

    2008-02-02

    Cross sections and analyzing powers for proton elastic scattering from $^{116,118,120,122,124}$Sn at 295 MeV have been measured for a momentum transfer of up to about 3.5 fm$^{-1}$ to deduce systematic changes of the neutron density distribution. We tuned the relativistic Love-Franey interaction to explain the proton elastic scattering of a nucleus whose density distribution is well known. Then, we applied this interaction to deduce the neutron density distributions of tin isotopes. The result of our analysis shows the clear systematic behavior of a gradual increase in the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes with mass number.

  6. Reduction And Stabilization (Immobilization) Of Pertechnetate To An Immobile Reduced Technetium Species Using Tin(II) Apatite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, J. B.

    2012-11-02

    Synthetic tin(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 to a non-mobile oxidation state and sequesters the technetium, preventing re-oxidization to mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions. Previous work indicated technetium reacted Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index of 12.8 in Cast Stone. An effect by pH is observed on the distribution coefficient, the highest distribution coefficient being l70,900 observed at pH levels of 2.5 to 10.2. The tin apatite was resistant to releasing technetium under test conditions.

  7. Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2011-11-17

    A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

  8. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  9. Sensing behaviour of nanosized zinc-tin composite oxide towards liquefied petroleum gas and ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ravi Chand; Singh, Onkar; Singh, Manmeet Pal; Chandi, Paramdeep Singh; Thangaraj, R.

    2010-09-15

    A chemical route has been used to synthesize composite oxides of zinc and tin. An ammonia solution was added to equal amounts of zinc and tin chloride solutions of same molarities to obtain precipitates. Three portions of these precipitates were annealed at 400, 600 and 800 {sup o}C, respectively. Results of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy clearly depicted coexistence of phases of nano-sized SnO{sub 2}, ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and ZnSnO{sub 3}. The effect of annealing on structure, morphology and sensing has been observed as well. It has been observed that annealing promoted growth of Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and ZnSnO{sub 3} at the expense of zinc. The sensing response of fabricated sensors from these materials to 250 ppm LPG and ethanol has been investigated. The sensor fabricated from powder annealed at 400 {sup o}C responded better to LPG than ethanol.

  10. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seifter, Achim; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Obst, Andrew W; Payton, J R; Stone, J B; Tabaka, L J; Grover, M; Macrum, G; Stevens, G D; Swift, D C; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  11. Metallography and microstructure interpretation of some archaeological tin bronze vessels from Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudbashi, Omid; Davami, Parviz

    2014-11-15

    Archaeological excavations in western Iran have recently revealed a significant Luristan Bronzes collection from Sangtarashan archaeological site. The site and its bronze collection are dated to Iron Age II/III of western Iran (10th–7th century BC) according to archaeological research. Alloy composition, microstructure and manufacturing technique of some sheet metal vessels are determined to reveal metallurgical processes in western Iran in the first millennium BC. Experimental analyses were carried out using Scanning Electron Microscopy–Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Optical Microscopy/Metallography methods. The results allowed reconstructing the manufacturing process of bronze vessels in Luristan. It proved that the samples have been manufactured with a binary copper–tin alloy with a variable tin content that may relates to the application of an uncontrolled procedure to make bronze alloy (e.g. co-smelting or cementation). The presence of elongated copper sulphide inclusions showed probable use of copper sulphide ores for metal production and smelting. Based on metallographic studies, a cycle of cold working and annealing was used to shape the bronze vessels. - Highlights: • Sangtarashan vessels are made by variable Cu-Sn alloys with some impurities. • Various compositions occurred due to applying uncontrolled smelting methods. • The microstructure represents thermo-mechanical process to shape bronze vessels. • In one case, the annealing didn’t remove the eutectoid remaining from casting. • The characteristics of the bronzes are similar to other Iron Age Luristan Bronzes.

  12. Nanoparticle toxicity testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergy Storage EnergyNanomaterialsNanoparticle

  13. Selenium Accumulation, Distribution, and Speciation in Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus: A Drought- and Salt-Tolerant, Selenium-Enriched Nutraceutical Fruit Crop for Biofortified Foods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banuelos, Gary S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Walse, Spencer S.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Yang, Soo In; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.; Freeman, John L.

    2011-07-01

    The organ-specific accumulation, spatial distribution, and chemical speciation of selenium (Se) were previously unknown for any species of cactus. We investigated Se in Opuntia ficus-indica using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, microfocused x-ray fluorescence elemental and chemical mapping ({micro}XRF), Se K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). {micro}XRF showed Se concentrated inside small conic, vestigial leaves (cladode tips), the cladode vasculature, and the seed embryos. Se K-edge XANES demonstrated that approximately 96% of total Se in cladode, fruit juice, fruit pulp, and seed is carbon-Se-carbon (C-Se-C). Micro and bulk XANES analysis showed that cladode tips contained both selenate and C-Se-C forms. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry quantification of Se in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions followed by LC-MS structural identification showed selenocystathionine-to-selenomethionine (SeMet) ratios of 75:25, 71:29, and 32:68, respectively in cladode, fruit, and seed. Enzymatic digestions and subsequent analysis confirmed that Se was mainly present in a 'free' nonproteinaceous form inside cladode and fruit, while in the seed, Se was incorporated into proteins associated with lipids. {micro}XRF chemical mapping illuminated the specific location of Se reduction and assimilation from selenate accumulated in the cladode tips into the two LC-MS-identified C-Se-C forms before they were transported into the cladode mesophyll. We conclude that Opuntia is a secondary Se-accumulating plant whose fruit and cladode contain mostly free selenocystathionine and SeMet, while seeds contain mainly SeMet in protein. When eaten, the organic Se forms in Opuntia fruit, cladode, and seed may improve health, increase Se mineral nutrition, and help prevent multiple human cancers.

  14. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  15. JV Task 124 - Understanding Multi-Interactions of SO3, Mercury, Selenium, and Arsenic in Illinois Coal Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Zhuang; Christopher Martin; John Pavlish

    2009-03-31

    This project consisted of pilot-scale combustion testing with a representative Illinois basin coal to explore the multi-interactions of SO{sub 3}, mercury, selenium and arsenic. The parameters investigated for SO{sub 3} and mercury interactions included different flue gas conditions, i.e., temperature, moisture content, and particulate alkali content, both with and without activated carbon injection for mercury control. Measurements were also made to track the transformation of selenium and arsenic partitioning as a function of flue gas temperature through the system. The results from the mercury-SO{sub 3} testing support the concept that SO{sub 3} vapor is the predominant factor that impedes efficient mercury removal with activated carbon in an Illinois coal flue gas, while H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol has less impact on activated carbon injection performance. Injection of a suitably mobile and reactive additives such as sodium- or calcium-based sorbents was the most effective strategy tested to mitigate the effect of SO{sub 3}. Transformation measurements indicate a significant fraction of selenium was associated with the vapor phase at the electrostatic precipitator inlet temperature. Arsenic was primarily particulate-bound and should be captured effectively with existing particulate control technology.

  16. The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Application for Tuition Rebate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Application for Tuition Rebate Name) _________ / _________ General Information An undergraduate may be eligible for a tuition rebate of up to $1,000 at graduation documentation, you may submit an application for a rebate. If you answered yes to question 3a., you

  17. Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfidegraphene nanocomposites with small crystal size for high performance lithium ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfide­graphene nanocomposites with small September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2jm34864k This study reports a novel strategy of preparing graphene composites by employing graphene oxide as precursor and oxidizer. It is demonstrated that graphene oxide can oxidize

  18. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced tin plasma S. S. Harilal,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    using singly ionized Sn lines, while density measurements were made using the Stark broadening method deposition,5 nanoparticle and cluster production,6,7 and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy LIBS .8 Laser setup very simple and adaptable to automation and remote sensing. Using OES one can obtain fundamental

  20. Hugoniot Measurements at Low Pressures in Tin Using 800 MeV proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Cynthia; Hogan, Gary E; King, Nicholas S. P.; Kwiathowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; McNeil, Wendy Vogan; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher; Rightley, Paul; Saunders, Alexander

    2009-08-05

    A 2cm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure in the region of the {beta} {yields} {gamma} phase change using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically as the shock wave moved through the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record of the equations of state along the Hugoniot for the P1 wave from a shock velocity of 3.25 km/sec down to near the sound speed. Edge release effects were removed from the data using tomographic techniques. The data show evidence for a phase transition that extends over a broad pressure range. The data and analysis will be presented.

  1. HUGONIOT MEASUREMENTS AT LOW PRESSURES IN TIN USING 800 MeV PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G. E.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; McNeil, W. V.

    2009-12-28

    A 20 mm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure just below the beta->gamma phase change, using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a thin stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically at multiple points as the shock wave moved though the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record along the principal Hugoniot from a peak shock velocity of 3.27 km/sec to a minimum of 3.09 km/sec. Edge release effects were removed from the data using simple tomographic reconstruction techniques. The data and analysis are presented.

  2. Very high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices by using rough indium tin oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Aziz, Hany, E-mail: h2aziz@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-07-07

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) is shown to significantly depend on the roughness of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. By using rougher ITO, light trapped in the ITO/organic wave-guided mode can be efficiently extracted, and a light outcoupling enhancement as high as 40% is achieved. Moreover, contrary to expectations, the lifetime of OLEDs is not affected by ITO roughness. Finally, an OLED employing rough ITO anode that exhibits a current efficiency of 56?cd/A at the remarkably high brightness of 10{sup 5}?cd/m{sup 2} is obtained. This represents the highest current efficiency at such high brightness to date for an OLED utilizing an ITO anode, without any external light outcoupling techniques. The results demonstrate the significant efficiency benefits of using ITO with higher roughness in OLEDs.

  3. Ferromagnetism of manganese-doped indium tin oxide films deposited on polyethylene naphthalate substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Toshihiro; Isozaki, Shinichi; Tanabe, Kohei; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2009-04-01

    Mn-doped indium tin oxide (ITO) films were deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates using radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The magnetic, electrical, and optical properties of the films deposited on PEN substrates were investigated by comparing with the properties of films grown on glass substrates at the same growth conditions. Thin films on PEN substrates exhibited low electrical resistivity of the order of 10{sup -4} {omega} cm and high optical transmittance between 75% and 90% in the visible region. Ferromagnetic hysteresis loops were observed at room temperature for the samples grown on PEN substrates. Mn-doped ITO films can be one of the most promising candidates of transparent ferromagnetic materials for flexible spintronic devices.

  4. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

    1998-12-29

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  5. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

    1998-12-29

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

  6. Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticle ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jin Sung; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Jongeun; Thomas Hahn, H.; Jang, Seonhee; Joung, Jae Woo

    2010-01-01

    diagram of drop on demand copper nanoparticle inkjet printerdemand inkjet printing system 2 Experimental details 2.1 Specimen preparation The conductive coppercopper nanoparticles at room temperature. Using drop on demand

  7. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nenoff, Tina M. (Sandia Park, NM); Powers, Dana A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zhang, Zhenyuan (Durham, NC)

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  8. Stochastic modelling of silicon nanoparticle synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menz, William Jefferson

    2014-01-07

    - ical and chemical processes in the soil may form inorganic nanoparticles [9], and organic structures such as viruses are often considered to be a type of nanoparticle [43]. Regardless of their origin, nanoparticles are of intense interest due... reported [75, 113]. Despite this, the product properties can be tightly con- trolled [56], and highly spherical particles, such as those in Figure 2.5, can be obtained. Production of silicon nanoparticles through laser pyrolysis typically uses a CO2 laser...

  9. Annealing for intrinsic point-defect control and enhanced solar cell performance : the case of H?S and tin sulfide (SnS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Katherine, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the possibility of tin monosulfide (SnS) as a new and promising solar cell absorber material. Out of many other Earth-abundant binary semiconductors, it was selected for study because it has a strong ...

  10. Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

    2013-08-06

    A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

  11. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  12. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  13. Selective etching of TiN over TaN and vice versa in chlorine-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Hyungjoo; Zhu Weiye; Liu Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J. [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 (United States); Lenox, Chet; Lii, Tom [Texas Instruments Inc., Dallas, Texas 75243 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Selectivity of etching between physical vapor-deposited TiN and TaN was studied in chlorine-containing plasmas, under isotropic etching conditions. Etching rates for blanket films were measured in-situ using optical emission of the N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}) bandhead at 337 nm to determine the etching time, and transmission electron microscopy to determine the starting film thickness. The etching selectivity in Cl{sub 2}/He or HCl/He plasmas was poor (<2:1). There was a window of very high selectivity of etching TiN over TaN by adding small amounts (<1%) of O{sub 2} in the Cl{sub 2}/He plasma. Reverse selectivity (10:1 of TaN etching over TiN) was observed when adding small amounts of O{sub 2} to the HCl/He plasma. Results are explained on the basis of the volatility of plausible reaction products.

  14. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  15. Leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium from coal fly ash: role of calcium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian Wang; Jianmin Wang; Yulin Tang; Honglan Shi; Ken Ladwig

    2009-05-15

    Understanding the leaching behavior of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in coal fly ash is important in evaluating the potential environmental impact of coal fly ash. Batch experiments were employed to systematically investigate the leaching behavior of As and Se in two major types of coal fly ashes, bituminous coal ash and sub-bituminous coal ash, and to determine the underlying processes that control As and Se leaching. The effects of pH, solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, calcium addition, and leaching time on the release of As and Se were studied. Overall, bituminous coal ash leached significantly more As and Se than sub-bituminous coal ash, and Se was more readily leachable, in both absolute concentration and relative fraction, than As for both types of fly ashes. Adsorption/desorption played a major role on As and Se leaching from bituminous coal ashes. However, calcium precipitation played the most important role in reducing As and Se leaching from sub-bituminous coal ashes in the entire experimental pH range. The leaching of As and Se from bituminous coal ashes generally increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. However, for sub-bituminous coal ashes, the leaching of As was not detected under most experimental conditions, while the leaching of Se increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. As{sup V} and Se{sup IV} were found to be the major species in all ash leachates in this study. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Lead Exposure: A Contributing Cause of the Current Breast Cancer Epidemic in Nigerian Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Schrauzer, Gerhard N.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords Breast cancer . Lead . Cadmium . Tin . Chromium .selenium and low doses of lead on mammary tumor development2001) Prevalence of elevated blood lead levels in Nigerian

  17. Groundwater Quality and Groundwater Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    bromide gallium magnesium strontium cadmium gold chromium indium cobalt lanthanum anions phosphate tin rubidium tungsten selenium ytterbium titanium yttrium uranium zirconium vanadium zinc #12;are

  18. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  19. Ag-Pd-Cu alloy inserted transparent indium tin oxide electrodes for organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyo-Joong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Han-Ki, E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics, Kyung-Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yong-Jin; Na, Seok-In [Graduate School of Flexible and Printable Electronics, Chonbuk National University, 664-14, Deokjin-dong, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    The authors report on the characteristics of Ag-Pd-Cu (APC) alloy-inserted indium tin oxide (ITO) films sputtered on a glass substrate at room temperature for application as transparent anodes in organic solar cells (OSCs). The effect of the APC interlayer thickness on the electrical, optical, structural, and morphological properties of the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer were investigated and compared to those of ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer electrodes. At the optimized APC thickness of 8?nm, the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer exhibited a resistivity of 8.55?×?10{sup ?5} ? cm, an optical transmittance of 82.63%, and a figure-of-merit value of 13.54?×?10{sup ?3} ?{sup ?1}, comparable to those of the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer. Unlike the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer, agglomeration of the metal interlayer was effectively relieved with APC interlayer due to existence of Pd and Cu elements in the thin region of the APC interlayer. The OSCs fabricated on the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer showed higher power conversion efficiency than that of OSCs prepared on the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer below 10?nm due to the flatness of the APC layer. The improved performance of the OSCs with ITO/APC/ITO multilayer electrodes indicates that the APC alloy interlayer prevents the agglomeration of the Ag-based metal interlayer and can decrease the thickness of the metal interlayer in the oxide-metal-oxide multilayer of high-performance OSCs.

  20. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2014-10-30

    Silicon (Si) has a very high lithium storage capacity and is being explored as a negative electrode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Si nanowires can exhibit relatively stable performance for many cycles of charging; however, conductive carbon must often be added to the electrode layer to improve the rate capability due to the relatively low electrical conductivity of Si. The added carbon lowers the capacity of the electrode. Here, we show that the rate capability of Si in LIBs can be substantially enhanced by incorporating tin (Sn) into Si nanowires. The solubility of Sn in Si is very low (0.015 at%); yet, Sn used as a seed for supercritical fluid–liquid–solid (SFLS) growth can be trapped in Si nanowires with relatively high concentration (10 at%). Such Sn-containing Si nanowires and no added conductive carbon in the electrode layer, could be cycled in LIBs with high capacity (*1000 mA h g*1 over 100 cycles) at a current density of 2.8 A g*1 (1 C). Capacities exceeding that of graphite could still be reached at cycle rates as high as 2 C. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that lithiation occurs five times faster in Si nanowires with significant amounts of Sn than in the Si nanowires without Sn, and twice as fast as in nanowires that were coated with carbon.

  1. Investigation into the semimagic nature of the tin isotopes through electromagnetic moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allmond, J. M.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Radford, D. C.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, M. E.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; et al

    2015-10-19

    A complete set of electromagnetic moments, B(E2;0+1 2+1), Q(2+1), and g(2+1), have been measured from Coulomb excitation of semi-magic 112,114,116,118,120,122,124Sn (Z = 50) on natural carbon and titanium targets. The magnitude of the B(E2) values, measured to a precision of ~4%, disagree with a recent lifetime study [Phys. Lett. B 695, 110 (2011)] that employed the Doppler- shift attenuation method. The B(E2) values show an overall enhancement compared with recent theoretical calculations and a clear asymmetry about midshell, contrary to naive expectations. A new static electric quadrupole moment, Q(2+1), has been measured for 114Sn. The static quadrupole moments are generallymore »consistent with zero but reveal an enhancement near midshell; this had not been previously observed. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous measurements and show a near monotonic decrease in value with neutron number. The current theory calculations fail to reproduce the electromagnetic moments of the tin isotopes. The role of 2p-2h and 4p-4h intruders, which are lowest in energy at mid shell and outside of current model spaces, needs to be investigated in the future.« less

  2. Interfacial reactions between indium tin oxide and triphenylamine tetramer layers induced by photoirradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Toshikazu; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ichiro; Murasaki, Takanori; Kato, Yoshifumi [Toyota Industries Corporation, 8 Chaya, Kyowa, Obu, Aichi 474-8601 (Japan)

    2008-05-01

    The effects of photoirradiation on the interfacial chemical reactions between indium tin oxide (ITO) films and layers of triphenylamine tetramer (TPTE) were investigated by using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin TPTE layers deposited onto sputter-deposited ITO films were irradiated with violet light-emitting diodes (peak wavelength: 380 nm). Shifts in the peak positions of spectral components that originated in the organic layer toward the higher binding-energy side were observed in the XPS profiles during the early stages of irradiation. No further peak shifts were observed after additional irradiation. An increase in the ratio of the organic component in the O 1s spectra was also observed during the photoirradiation. The ratio of the organic component increased in proportion to the cube root of the irradiation time. These results suggest that photoirradiation induces an increase in the height of the carrier injection barrier at the interface between TPTE and ITO in the early stages of the irradiation, possibly due to the rapid diffusion controlled formation and growth of an oxidized TPTE layer, which is considered to act as a high resistance layer.

  3. Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2011-02-28

    Surface Ni/Sb and Ni/Sb alloys were found to efficiently minimize the negative effects of sulfur on the performance of Ni/zirconia anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Prior to operating on fuel gas containing low concentrations of H2S, the nickel/zirconia anodes were briefly exposed to antimony or tin vapor, which only slightly affected the SOFC performance. During the subsequent exposures to 1 and 5 ppm H2S, increases in anodic polarization losses were minimal compared to those observed for the standard nickel/zirconia anodes. Post-test XPS analyses showed that Sb and Sn tended to segregate to the surface of Ni particles, and further confirmed a significant reduction of adsorbed sulfur on the Ni surface in Ni/Sn and Ni/Sb samples compared to the Ni. The effect may be the result of weaker sulfur adsorption on bimetallic surfaces, adsorption site competition between sulfur and Sb or Sn on Ni, or other factors. The use of dilute binary alloys of Ni-Sb or Ni-Sn in the place of Ni, or brief exposure to Sb or Sn vapor, may be effective means to counteract the effects of sulfur poisoning in SOFC anodes and Ni catalysts. Other advantages, including suppression of coking or tailoring the anode composition for the internal reforming, are also expected.

  4. Three-dimensional photonic crystal fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes : synthesis and optical and electrical properties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z.; Gao, S.; Li, W.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.-K.; Xu, T.

    2011-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) schemes often encounter a pair of fundamentally opposing requirements on the thickness of semiconductor layer: a thicker PV semiconductor layer provides enhanced optical density, but inevitably increases the charge transport path length. An effective approach to solve this dilemma is to enhance the interface area between the terminal electrode, i.e., transparent conducting oxide (TCO) and the semiconductor layer. As such, we report a facile, template-assisted, and solution chemistry-based synthesis of 3-dimensional inverse opal fluorinated tin oxide (IO-FTO) electrodes. Synergistically, the photonic crystal structure possessed in the IO-FTO exhibits strong light trapping capability. Furthermore, the electrical properties of the IO-FTO electrodes are studied by Hall effect and sheet resistance measurement. Using atomic layer deposition method, an ultrathin TiO{sub 2} layer is coated on all surfaces of the IO-FTO electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry study indicates that the resulting TiO{sub 2}-coated IO-FTO shows excellent potentials as electrodes for electrolyte-based photoelectrochemical solar cells.

  5. PALLADIUM DOPED TIN OXIDE BASED HYDROGEN GAS SENSORS FOR SAFETY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra; Nadig, D. S.

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogen is considered to be a hazardous gas since it forms a flammable mixture between 4 to 75% by volume in air. Hence, the safety aspects of handling hydrogen are quite important. For this, ideally, highly selective, fast response, small size, hydrogen sensors are needed. Although sensors based on different technologies may be used, thin-film sensors based on palladium (Pd) are preferred due to their compactness and fast response. They detect hydrogen by monitoring the changes to the electrical, mechanical or optical properties of the films. We report the development of Pd-doped tin-oxide based gas sensors prepared on thin ceramic substrates with screen printed platinum (Pt) contacts and integrated nicrome wire heaters. The sensors are tested for their performances using hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to a maximum of 4%H{sub 2} in N{sub 2}. The sensors detect hydrogen and their response times are less than a few seconds. Also, the sensor performance is not altered by the presence of helium in the test gas mixtures. By the above desired performance characteristics, field trials of these sensors have been undertaken. The paper presents the details of the sensor fabrication, electronic circuits, experimental setup for evaluation and the test results.

  6. Calculation of room temperature conductivity and mobility in tin-based topological insulator nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandenberghe, William G. Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2014-11-07

    Monolayers of tin (stannanane) functionalized with halogens have been shown to be topological insulators. Using density functional theory (DFT), we study the electronic properties and room-temperature transport of nanoribbons of iodine-functionalized stannanane showing that the overlap integral between the wavefunctions associated to edge-states at opposite ends of the ribbons decreases with increasing width of the ribbons. Obtaining the phonon spectra and the deformation potentials also from DFT, we calculate the conductivity of the ribbons using the Kubo-Greenwood formalism and show that their mobility is limited by inter-edge phonon backscattering. We show that wide stannanane ribbons have a mobility exceeding 10{sup 6} cm{sup 2}/Vs. Contrary to ordinary semiconductors, two-dimensional topological insulators exhibit a high conductivity at low charge density, decreasing with increasing carrier density. Furthermore, the conductivity of iodine-functionalized stannanane ribbons can be modulated over a range of three orders of magnitude, thus rendering this material extremely interesting for classical computing applications.

  7. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2013-04-19

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  8. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF NANOPARTICLESOF NANOPARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandini, Giulio

    TECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF NANOPARTICLESOF NANOPARTICLES Monica Distaso #12;Optical transitions;#12;H2 gas at 1 atm. DOE Target (by 2010) 6.5 wt.% 62 kg/m3 CDC for H2 Storage A hydrogen fuel cell IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES? #12;TOP 10 APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES #12;AGRICULTURAL

  10. Methods of making copper selenium precursor compositions with a targeted copper selenide content and precursor compositions and thin films resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Leisch, Jennifer (Denver, CO); Taylor, Matthew (West Simsbury, CT); Stanbery, Billy J. (Austin, TX)

    2011-09-20

    Precursor compositions containing copper and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semi-conductor applications. Methods of forming the precursor compositions using primary amine solvents and methods of forming the thin films wherein the selection of temperature and duration of heating controls the formation of a targeted species of copper selenide.

  11. JOUKNAI, OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 98. NO. D7. PAGES 12.673-12.685, JULY 20. 1993 Aerosol Selenium at Bermuda and Barbados

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    Selenium at Bermuda and Barbados W. G.ELLIS,JR.',~, R. ARIMOTO', D.L.SAVOIE~,J. T.MERRILL~,R. A. D U C E ~ ,AND J. M. PROSPBRO~ Daily aerosol samples collected at Bermuda and Barbados as part of the Atmospherc source. Our results indicatedthat a marine biogenicsource of Se accounted for 60-80%of the Se at Barbados

  12. Methods for producing nanoparticles using palladium salt and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Siu-Wai; Liang, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The disclosed subject matter is directed to a method for producing nanoparticles, as well as the nanoparticles produced by this method. In one embodiment, the nanoparticles produced by the disclosed method have a high defect density.

  13. Investigation of Nanoparticles for Use in Microwave Systems in Biomedicine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taghavi, Houra

    2013-04-30

    . These nanoparticles could enable the use of a hybrid microwave/acoustic technique known as thermoacoustic tomography. Here, quantitative measurements of the heat generation in super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIONs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and gold...

  14. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  15. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  16. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emrick, Todd S. (South Deerfield, MA); Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA); Dinsmore, Anthony (Amherst, MA); Skaff, Habib (Amherst, MA); Lin, Yao (Amherst, MA)

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  17. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  18. Characterization and Surface Reactivity of Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Ferritin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Characterization and Surface Reactivity of Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Ferritin Gang of the nanoparticles were characterized by AFM and STM. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements suggested

  19. Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

  20. Biomimetic Catalysts of Graphene Conjugates and Palladium Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Stahl, S. S. Ligand-modulated palladium oxidation catalysis:BINAP-stabilized gold and palladium nanoparticles with smallsize and their palladium nanoparticle-catalyzed asymmetric

  1. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method...

  2. Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus > Archived...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus January 24th, 2013 A Nature Materials paper on ordered nanoparticle catalysts has been highlighted as an "Energy...

  3. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical...

  4. A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel Process Employing Heterometallic Alkoxides A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel...

  5. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

  6. Tin removal from extreme ultraviolet collector optics by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, H.; Srivastava, S. N.; Ruzic, D. N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Tin (Sn) has the advantage of delivering higher conversion efficiency compared to other fuel materials (e.g., Xe or Li) in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, a necessary component for the leading next generation lithography. However, the use of a condensable fuel in a lithography system leads to some additional challenges for maintaining a satisfactory lifetime of the collector optics. A critical issue leading to decreased mirror lifetime is the buildup of debris on the surface of the primary mirror that comes from the use of Sn in either gas discharge produced plasma (GDPP) or laser produced plasma (LPP). This leads to a decreased reflectivity from the added material thickness and increased surface roughness that contributes to scattering. Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with halide ions is one potential solution to this problem. This article presents results for etch rate and selectivity of Sn over SiO{sub 2} and Ru. The Sn etch rate in a chlorine plasma is found to be much higher (of the order of hundreds of nm/min) than the etch rate of other materials. A thermally evaporated Sn on Ru sample was prepared and cleaned using an inductively coupled plasma etching method. Cleaning was confirmed using several material characterization techniques. Furthermore, a collector mock-up shell was then constructed and etching was performed on Sn samples prepared in a Sn EUV source using an optimized etching recipe. The sample surface before and after cleaning was analyzed by atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The results show the dependence of etch rate on the location of Sn samples placed on the collector mock-up shell.

  7. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  8. Nanoparticle modifications of photodefined nanostructures for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fabrication methods to produce highly porous (meso, micro, and nano) 3-D electrode structures, and (2) conducting polymer and nanoparticle-modification strategies on these...

  9. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waychunas, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    true for nanoparticle goethite and hematite, where bulkcrystals, would have goethite stoichiometry. In effect,Figure 4, submicron sized goethite particles show a pattern

  10. Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticle ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jin Sung; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Jongeun; Thomas Hahn, H.; Jang, Seonhee; Joung, Jae Woo

    2010-01-01

    providing printed electronics using copper nanoparticles.0049-3 Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticleand quality of the printed electronics. In this paper, we

  11. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  12. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-06-21

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

  13. The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-31

    The order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Admin Chg 1, dated 2-14-13, supersedes DOE O 456.1.

  14. The tin impurity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 alloys | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific Measures 5 U.S. C. § 552.The tin

  15. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Haw (Moraga, CA); Cang, Hu (Berkeley, CA); Xu, Cangshan (Berkeley, CA); Wong, Chung M. (San Gabriel, CA)

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  16. Tin-117m-labeled stannic (Sn/sup 4 +/) chelate of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) for application in diagnosis and therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Richards, P.

    1983-08-25

    The radiopharmaceutical reagents of this invention and the class of Tin-117m radiopharmaceuticals are therapeutic and diagnostic agents that incorporate gamma-emitting nuclides that localize in bone after intravenous injection in mammals (mice, rats, dogs, and rabbits). Images reflecting bone structure or function can then be obtained by a scintillation camera that detects the distribution of ionizing radiation emitted by the radioactive agent. Tin-117m-labeled chelates of stannic tin localize almost exclusively in cortical bone. Upon intravenous injection of the reagent, the preferred chelates are phosphonate compounds, preferable, PYP, MDP, EHDP, and DTPA. This class of reagents is therapeutically and diagnostically useful in skeletal scintigraphy and for the radiotherapy of bone tumors and other disorders.

  17. An Alternative Interpretation of Plasma Selenium Data from Endangered Patagonian Huemul Deer ( Hippocamelus bisulcus )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flueck, Werner T.; Smith-Flueck, Jo Anne M.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Winkel, Lenny H. H.E.

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of osteopathology in 57% in the endangered adult Patagonian huemul deer (Hippocamelus bisulcus), malformed antler development, and general lack of recovery were previously suggested to possibly be related to mineral imbalances like selenium (Se) deficiency, and not to stem from fluorosis. From recent bone analyses of these diseased huemul, fluoride levels averaged 58 ppm (SE=10.7), thus eliminating fluorosis as a causal factor for the osteopathology reported in huemul. In contrast, when analyzing high-elevation sites commonly used by extant populations, we found soils deficient in Se. Ashes from recent volcanism also were very low in Se. As Se-responsive diseases in livestock have been documented in Chile, we reclassified recently published Se levels in huemul and determined that 73% were deficient and 18% marginal. Together with these several lines of indirect evidence, we conclude that Se deficiency plays a role in the lack of recovery of huemul populations.

  18. ?{sup (3)} measurements of axial ligand modified high valent tin(IV) porphyrins using degenarete four wave mixing at 532nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narendran, N. K. Siji, E-mail: sijinarendran@gmail.com; Chandrasekharan, K. [Laser and nonlinear optics laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut-673601, Kerala (India); Soman, Rahul; Arunkumar, Chellaiah [Bioinorganic materials laboratory, Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut-673601, Kerala (India); Sudheesh, P. [Department of Physics, VTM NSS College, Dhanuvachapuram, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2014-10-15

    Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins are unique class of molecules for Nonlinear Optical applications because of their unique structure of altering the central metal atom, large extended ?-system, high thermal stability, tunable shape, symmetry and synthetic versatility Here, we report ?{sup (3)} Measurements of a simple phenyl porphyrins and its highvalent tin(IV) porphyrins with Bromination characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopic method. In this study, we employed the Degenerate Four Wave Mixing technique using forward Boxcar geometry with an Nd:YAG nano second pulsed laser as source and it was found that the tin(IV) porphyrin with Bromination exhibits good ?{sup (3)} value and figure of merit.

  19. Fine Particle (Nanoparticle) Emissions on Minnesota Highways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of Minnesota 7th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Office Aerosol - Particle Size Distribution Nanoparticle Formation - History Typical Engine Exhaust - Particulate Exposure Increasing Time Nanoparticle Formation History From the Start of Combustion to the Nose

  20. Biomedical Application of Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fakhari, Amir

    2012-05-31

    nanoparticles composed of 17 kDa HA in deionized water at different concentrations (15%, 30%, and 45% w/v) formed a stable 3-D colloidal gel as a result of physical entanglement of free polymer chains on the surfaces of nanoparticles. Mechanical and rheological...

  1. Stability and Aggregation of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    .g., sunscreens, paints, coatings, catalysts). A simplified con- ceptual model of a typical nanoparticle life

  2. Adhesion evaluation of TiN and (Ti, Al)N coatings on titanium 6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, R.D.; Gruss, K.A.; Horie, Y.; Davis, R.F.; Paisley, D.L.; Parthasarthi, S.; Tittmann, B.R.

    1996-12-31

    The metallic components of gas turbine engines are continually subjected to hostile atmospheres. Nitride coatings improve the performance of the metallic compressor blades in these engines. To assess the adhesion of nitride coatings on metals, titanium 6% aluminum 4% vanadium substrates were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) using both cathodic arc and electron beam evaporation. Titanium aluminum nitride ((Ti, Al)N) was also deposited using cathodic arc evaporation. The interfaces of the coated samples were loaded in tension using a high speed shock wave which caused spallation either at the interface, in the coating or in the metal. Scanning acoustic microscopy analysis of the spalled samples detected delaminations at the interface in the samples deposited by cathodic arc evaporation. DYNA2D modeling of plate impact spallation experiments revealed the tensile adhesion strength for TiN deposited by both techniques was {approx} 2.0 GPa. The tensile adhesion strength for (Ti, Al)N was less than 1.5 GPa.

  3. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore »is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  4. Enzyme Nanoparticles-Based Electronic Biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe; Ostatna, V.; Wang, Joseph

    2005-06-28

    A novel method for fabricating electronic biosensors based on coupling enzyme nanoparticles and self assembly technology is illustrated. Redox horseradish peroxidase nanoparticles were prepared by desolvation with ethanol and subsequent crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The cross-linked enzyme nanoparticles were functionalized by cysteine to introduce thiol groups on the nanoparticle surface. Immobilized enzyme nanoparticle on the gold electrode by self-assembly kept redox and electrocatalytic activities, and was used to develop reagentless biosensors for H2O2 detection without promoters and mediators. The new approach is simple, low cost and circumvents complications associated with solution systems. It is a universal immobilization method for biosensor, biomedical devices, biofuel cells and enzymatic bioreactors fabrication and expected to open new opportunities for biosensor, clinical diagnostics, and for bioanalysis, in general.

  5. Experimental Substantiation of the Possibility of Developing Selenium- and Iodine-Containing Pharmaceuticals Based on Blue-Green Algae Spirulina Platensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosulishvili, L M; Belokobylsky, A I; Khisanishvili, L A; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, C C; Gundorina, S F

    2001-01-01

    The great potential of using blue-green algae Spirulina platensis as a matrix for the production of selenium- and iodine-containing pharmaceuticals is shown experimentally. The background levels of 31 major, minor and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni (using -reaction), As, Br, Zn, Rb, Mo, Ag, Sb, I, Ba, Sm, Tb, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th) in Spirulina platensis biomass were determined by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis. The dependence of selenium and iodine accumulation in spirulina biomass on a nutrient medium loding of the above elements was characterised. To demonstrate the possibilities of determining toxic element intake by spirulina biomass, mercury was selected. The technological parameters for production of iodinated treatment-and-prophylactic pills are developed.

  6. Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-10-15

    Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning process and offers suggestions as to how the technical and institutional issues could have been resolved faster through early adoption of some of the core principles of sound EDSS design.

  7. Influence of nanoparticle-graphene separation on the localized surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadabad, Reza Masoudian; Shirdel-Havar, Amir Hushang; Havar, Majid Shirdel

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theory to model the interaction of graphene substrate with localized plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles. The influence of a graphene substrate on the surface plasmon resonances is described using an effective background permittivity that is derived from a pseudoparticle concept using the electrostatic method. For this purpose, the interaction of metal nanoparticle with graphene sheet is studied to obtain the optical spectrum of gold nanoparticles deposited on a graphene substrate. Then, we introduce a factor based on dipole approximation to predict the influence of the separation of nanoparticles and graphene on the spectral position of the localized plasmon resonance of the nanoparticles. We applied the theory for a 4 nm radius gold nanosphere placed near 1.5 nm graphene layer. It is shown that a blue shift is emerged in the position of plasmon resonance when the nanoparticle moves away from graphene.

  8. In situ electro-mechanical experiments and mechanics modeling of tensile cracking in indium tin oxide thin films on polyimide substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    In situ electro-mechanical experiments and mechanics modeling of tensile cracking in indium tin Lou1,b) 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Jeffrey W. Elam,*, David A. Baker, Alex B. F. Martinson,, Michael J. Pellin, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Precursors Jeffrey W: NoVember 8, 2007 This article describes a new atomic layer deposition (ALD) method for preparing,2 sol-gel methods,3 chemical vapor deposition,4 pulsed laser deposition,5 and atomic layer

  10. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

    2007-07-17

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  11. Morphology Tuning of Strontium Tungstate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, S.; George, T. [Nirmala College, Muvattupuzha, 686 661, Kerala (India); George, K. C. [S.B. College, Changanacherry, 686 101, Kerala (India); Sunny, A. T.; Mathew, S. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, 686 560, Kerala (India)

    2007-08-22

    Strontium tungstate nanocrystals in two different morphologies are successfully synthesized by controlled precipitation in aqueous and in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. Structural characterizations are carried out by XRD and SEM. The average particle size calculated for the SrWO4 prepared in the two different solvents ranges 20-24 nm. The SEM pictures show that the surface morphologies of the SrWO4 nanoparticles in aqueous medium resemble mushroom and the SrWO4 nanoparticles in PVA medium resemble cauliflower. Investigations on the room temperature luminescent properties of the strontium tungstate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous and PVA medium shows strong emissions around 425 nm.

  12. Polar state in freestanding strontium titanate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, Trevor A. E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov Yu, Tian; Croft, Mark; Scofield, Megan E.; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Wong, Stanislaus S. E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov

    2014-09-01

    Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ?10?nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (possibly with ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization, is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10?nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300?K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO{sub 3} may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability, and low toxicity are critical issues.

  13. Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles and carbon encapsulated nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Jipeng . E-mail: mseem@zju.edu.cn; Zhang Xiaobin; Ye Ying

    2006-01-15

    Nickel nanoparticles were prepared and uniformly supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by reduction route with CNTs as a reducing agent at 600 deg. C. As-prepared nickel nanoparticles were single crystalline with a face-center-cubic phase and a size distribution ranging from 10 to 50 nm, and they were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These nickel nanoparticles would be coated with graphene layers, when they were exposed to acetylene at 600 deg. C. The coercivity values of nickel nanoparticles were superior to that of bulk nickel at room temperature.

  14. Resistive switching and conductance quantization in Ag/SiO{sub 2}/indium tin oxide resistive memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, S.; Chen, C.; Liu, H. Y.; Lin, Y. S.; Li, S. Z.; Lu, S. H.; Wang, G. Y.; Song, C.; Zeng, F., E-mail: zengfei@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Pan, F., E-mail: panf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhai, Z. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2014-08-11

    The Ag/SiO{sub 2}/indium tin oxide (ITO) devices exhibit bipolar resistive switching with a large memory window of ?10{sup 2}, satisfactory endurance of >500 cycles, good retention property of >2000?s, and fast operation speed of <100?ns, thus being a type of promising resistive memory. Under slow voltage sweep measurements, conductance plateaus with a conductance value of integer or half-integer multiples of single atomic point contact have been observed, which agree well with the physical phenomenon of conductance quantization. More importantly, the Ag/SiO{sub 2}/ITO devices exhibit more distinct quantized conductance plateaus under pulse measurements, thereby showing the potential for realizing ultra-high storage density.

  15. Large-scale patterning of indium tin oxide electrodes for guided mode extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geyer, Ulf; Hauss, Julian; Riedel, Boris; Gleiss, Sebastian; Lemmer, Uli; Gerken, Martina

    2008-11-01

    We describe a cost-efficient and large area scalable production process of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with photonic crystals (PCs) as extraction elements for guided modes. Using laser interference lithography and physical plasma etching, we texture the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode layer of an OLED with one- and two-dimensional PC gratings. By optical transmission measurements, the resonant mode of the grating is shown to have a drift of only 0.4% over the 5 mm length of the ITO grating. By changing the lattice constant between 300 and 600 nm, the OLED emission angle of enhanced light outcoupling is tailored from -24.25 deg. to 37 deg. At these angles, the TE emission is enhanced up to a factor of 2.14.

  16. Enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a silicon nanocrystal light-emitting diode by indium tin oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Chul, E-mail: chuh@etri.re.kr; Kim, Bong Kyu; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob [IT Convergence Technology Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chel-Jong [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-21

    We report an enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a Si nanocrystal (NC) light-emitting diode (LED) by employing indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs). The formed ITO NWs (diameter?

  17. Low-cost electrochemical treatment of indium tin oxide anodes for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui Cheng, Chuan, E-mail: chengchuanhui@dlut.edu.cn; Shan Liang, Ze; Gang Wang, Li; Dong Gao, Guo; Zhou, Ting; Ming Bian, Ji; Min Luo, Ying [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Tong Du, Guo, E-mail: dugt@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a simple low-cost approach as an alternative to conventional O{sub 2} plasma treatment to modify the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for use in organic light-emitting diodes. ITO is functionalized with F{sup ?} ions by electrochemical treatment in dilute hydrofluoric acid. An electrode with a work function of 5.2?eV is achieved following fluorination. Using this electrode, a maximum external quantum efficiency of 26.0% (91?cd/A, 102?lm/W) is obtained, which is 12% higher than that of a device using the O{sub 2} plasma-treated ITO. Fluorination also increases the transparency in the near-infrared region.

  18. Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    to 30 fold! HOWEVER, 1979 roadway measurments made on behind a truck powered by an engine of the same Mainly Light-Duty Spark Ignition Mainly Heavy-Duty Diesel Nanoparticles in the atmosphere appear

  19. Nanoparticle derived contacts for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.S.

    1999-10-20

    Contacts are becoming increasingly important as PV devices move to higher efficiency and lower cost. The authors present an approach to developing contacts using nanoparticle-based precursors. Both elemental, alloy and compound nanoparticles can be employed for contacts. Ink based approaches can be utilized at low temperatures and utilize direct write techniques such as ink jet and screen printing. The ability to control the composition of the nanoparticle allows improved control of the contact metallurgy and the potential for thermodynamically stable interfaces. A key requirement is the ability to control the interface between particles and between particles and the substrate. The authors illustrate some of these principals with recent results on Al, Cu and (Hg,Cu)Te. They show that for the elemental materials control of the surface can prevent oxide formation and act as glue to control the reactivity of the nanoparticles.

  20. Annealing of single lamella nanoparticles of polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe N. Rochette; Sabine Rosenfeldt; Katja Henzler; Frank Polzer; Matthias Ballauff; Qiong Tong; Stefan Mecking; Markus Drechsler; Theyencheri Narayanan; Ludger Harnau

    2011-07-05

    We study the change of the size and structure of freely suspended single lamella nanoparticles of polyethylene during thermal annealing in aqueous solutions. Using small-angle x-ray scattering and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that a doubling of the crystalline lamella sandwiched between two amorphous polymer layers is obtained by annealing the nanoparticles at 125 C. This thickening of the crystalline lamella can be understood in terms of an unlooping of polymer chains within a single nanoparticle. In addition a variation of the annealing temperature from 90 C to 115 C demonstrates that the inverse of the crystalline lamellar thickness increases linearly with the annealing temperatures leading to a recrystallization line in a Gibbs-Thomson graph. Since the nanoparticles consist of about only eight polymer chains, they can be considered as a ideal candidates for the experimental realization of equilibrium polymer crystals.

  1. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  2. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles : Sources and toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzea, Cristina; Robbie, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This review is written with the goal of informing public health concerns related to nanoscience, while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to nanoparticles and dust from natural sources and human activities, the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation profoundly increasing anthropogenic nanoparticulate pollution. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size, smaller than cells and cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. Among diseases associated with nanoparticles are asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson`s and Alzheimer`s diseases), Crohn`s disease, colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are related to occurrence of arteriosclerosis, and blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately cardiac d...

  3. Nanoparticles for Enhanced Sensitivity in Electrochemical Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Hong; Tang, Zhiwen

    2008-10-12

    In this manuscript, we report on electrochemical biosensors based on various nanoparticles (NPs) as labels for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers. We used silica nanoparticle as a carrier to loading a large amount of electroactive species such as poly(guanine) for sensitive immunoassay of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). We took the advantages of the unique hollow structure and reconstruction properties of apoferritin to prepare Cd3(PO4)2 nanoparticles as labels for sensitive assay of TNF-a. A novel immunochromatographic/electro-chemical biosensor based on quantum dots as labels has also been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. These biosensors are quite sensitive with the detection limit at pM level and these approaches based on nanoparticle labels offer a new avenue for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers.

  4. ANTI-CANCER NANOPARTICLE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANTI-CANCER NANOPARTICLE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION Fan Mei1 , Da-Ren Chen2 and Yin-Nan Lee1 1, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from Green tea, Irresa and resveratrol have been shown to exhibit cancer

  5. Continuous Nanoparticle Sizing and Characterization via Microfluidics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Fanxu

    2015-04-27

    conductivity measurements can be exploited to instantaneously obtain size and species information in oxide nanoparticle suspensions. This approach is readily implemented in an easy to build platform that can be employed either online to provide real...

  6. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  7. Air stable organic-inorganic nanoparticles hybrid solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Lei; Yang, Jihua; Xue, Jiangeng; Holloway, Paul H.

    2015-09-29

    A solar cell includes a low work function cathode, an active layer of an organic-inorganic nanoparticle composite, a ZnO nanoparticle layer situated between and physically contacting the cathode and active layers; and a transparent high work function anode that is a bilayer electrode. The inclusion of the ZnO nanoparticle layer results in a solar cell displaying a conversion efficiency increase and reduces the device degradation rate. Embodiments of the invention are directed to novel ZnO nanoparticles that are advantageous for use as the ZnO nanoparticle layers of the novel solar cells and a method to prepare the ZnO nanoparticles.

  8. A first-principles study of the electronic structure of Iron-Selenium; Implications for electron-phonon superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koufos, Alexander P; Mehl, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    We have performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the linearized augmented plane wave method (LAPW) with the local density approximation (LDA) functional to study the electronic structure of the iron-based superconductor Iron-Selenium (FeSe). In our study, we have performed a comprehensive set of calculations involving structural, atomic, and spin configurations. All calculations were executed using the tetragonal lead-oxide or P4/nmm structure, with various volumes, c/a ratios and internal parameters. Furthermore, we investigated the spin polarization using the LDA functional to assess ferromagnetism in this material. The paramagnetic LDA calculations find the equilibrium configuration of FeSe in the P4/nmm structure to have a volume of 472.5au$^3$ with a c/a ratio of 1.50 and internal parameter of 0.255, with the ferromagnetic having comparable results to the paramagnetic case. In addition, we calculated total energies for FeSe using a pseudopotential method, and found comparable results ...

  9. Indium tin oxide (ITO) was used as a hole conductor for quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC) and optimization of the deposition of ITO was investigated. To determine optimal voltage for electrochemically assisted deposition (EAD) of ITO, linear swee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Indium tin oxide (ITO) was used as a hole conductor for quantum dot sensitized solar cells sensitized solar cells - Quantum dot sensitized solar cells could be much less costly than traditional solar

  10. In Situe Synthesis of Iron Oxide within Polyvinylamine nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadi, Zahra

    2008-07-17

    Magnetic nanoparticles that display high saturation magnetization and high magnetic susceptibility with a size less than 200 nm are of great interest for medical applications. Investigations of magnetic nanoparticles have been increasing over...

  11. Nanoparticle amplification via photothermal unveiling of cryptic collagen binding sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Justin H.

    The success of nanoparticle-based cancer therapies ultimately depends on their ability to selectively and efficiently accumulate in regions of disease. Outfitting nanoparticles to actively target tumor-specific markers has ...

  12. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 using nanoparticle self-assembly mediated by molecular interactions, including polynucleotide Directed self-assembly of nanostructures into microstructures through intermolecular interactions

  13. Anomalous solubility behavior of mixed monolayer protected metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myerson, Jacob W

    2005-01-01

    The solubility of mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles was studied. Monolayer protected metal nanoparticles are attractive materials because of the optical and electronic properties of their metal cores and because ...

  14. Nanostructure fabrication by electron and ion beam patterning of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, David Sun, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Two modes of energetic beam-mediated fabrication have been investigated, namely focused ion beam (FIB) direct-writing of nanoparticles, and a technique for electrostatically patterning ionized inorganic nanoparticles, ...

  15. FORMATION OF COLLOIDAL CRYSTALS FROM NANOPARTICLE STABILIZED COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    FORMATION OF COLLOIDAL CRYSTALS FROM NANOPARTICLE STABILIZED COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS BY WENDY WOONYEE.....................................................................8 2.2 Colloid Stability in Suspension .......................................................................................9 2.3 Nanoparticle-Stabilized Colloidal Suspensions...............................................13

  16. Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xiao

    2012-07-16

    Hydrophobic drug paclitaxel nanoparticles (PAX NPs) and pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared in this study to build a colon targeting nanoparticle based drug delivery system for oral administration. Negative charged PAX NPs at the size of 110...

  17. Biosensors Based on Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes, Nanoparticles, and Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    In this book chapter, we will review recent progress in functionalization of nanotubes, nanoparticles, and nanowires for sensing applications.

  18. Tubular Organization of SnO? Nanocrystallites for Improved Lithium Ion Battery Anode Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong

    Porous tin oxide nanotubes were obtained by vacuum infiltration of tin oxide nanoparticles into porous aluminum oxide membranes, followed by calcination. The porous tin oxide nanotube arrays so prepared were characterized ...

  19. ME 379M Polymer Nanoparticles ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    ME 379M ­ Polymer Nanoparticles Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 379M ­ Polymer Nanoparticles Spring 2010 Required or Elective: Elective 2008-2010 Catalog Data: Course Topics Vary: Polymer Nanoparticles Prerequisite(s): Basic undergraduate level of materials science background Textbook(s): J.H. Koo, Polymer

  20. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-07

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Chen, Gang (Carlisle, MA); Poudel, Bed (West Newton, MA); Kumar, Shankar (Newton, MA); Wang, Wenzhong (Beijing, CN); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Arlington, MA)

    2009-09-08

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  2. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, Anand

    2009-05-26

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

  3. Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan

    2009-09-15

    A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Khi i hc k thut thng tin (Undergraduateds School of IES) http://www.uec.ac.jp/ies/faculty/index.html (Jpns)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    lng Lng t hc Vt liu hc Cht bán dn - Sięu bán dn Thit b in t - Thit b quang in t - T - Vt liu quang Thông tin quang Vt lý rn Sinh hc - Thn kinh hc H thng sinh hc o lng sinh hc Tęn thng qun lý doanh nghip... nh hng ngh nghip: K s h thng, K s qun lý sn xut - cht lng sn phm, Chuyęn

  5. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  6. Volume-labeled nanoparticles and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2015-04-21

    Compositions comprising nanosized objects (i.e., nanoparticles) in which at least one observable marker, such as a radioisotope or fluorophore, is incorporated within the nanosized object. The nanosized objects include, for example, metal or semi-metal oxide (e.g., silica), quantum dot, noble metal, magnetic metal oxide, organic polymer, metal salt, and core-shell nanoparticles, wherein the label is incorporated within the nanoparticle or selectively in a metal oxide shell of a core-shell nanoparticle. Methods of preparing the volume-labeled nanoparticles are also described.

  7. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  8. Cooperative wrapping of nanoparticles by membrane tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Raatz; Reinhard Lipowsky; Thomas R. Weikl

    2014-01-08

    The bioactivity of nanoparticles crucially depends on their ability to cross biomembranes. Recent simulations indicate the cooperative wrapping and internalization of spherical nanoparticles in tubular membrane structures. In this article, we systematically investigate the energy gain of this cooperative wrapping by minimizing the energies of the rotationally symmetric shapes of the membrane tubes and of membrane segments wrapping single particles. We find that the energy gain for the cooperative wrapping of nanoparticles in membrane tubes relative to their individual wrapping as single particles strongly depends on the ratio of the particle radius and the range of the particle-membrane adhesion potential. For a potential range of the order of one nanometer, the cooperative wrapping in tubes is highly favorable for particles with a radius of tens of nanometers and intermediate adhesion energies, but not for particles that are significantly larger.

  9. Electrochemistry on Alternate Structures of Gold Nanoparticles Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2004, Vol. 25, No. 11 1681 Electrochemistry on Alternate Structures of Gold Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Juhyoun

    Electrochemistry on Alternate Structures of Gold Nanoparticles Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2004, Vol. 25, No. 11 1681 Electrochemistry on Alternate Structures of Gold Nanoparticles and Ferrocene

  10. Stability improvement of organic light emitting diodes by the insertion of hole injection materials on the indium tin oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jung-Hung; Liu, Shang-Yi; Wu, I-Wen; Chen, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Chia-Wei [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-I, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-28

    The degradation of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a very complex issue, which might include interfacial charge accumulation, material diffusion, and electrical-induced chemical reaction during the operation. In this study, the origins of improvement in device stability from inserting a hole injection layer (HIL) at the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode are investigated. The results from aging single-layer devices show that leakage current increases in the case of ITO/hole transport layer contact, but this phenomenon can be prevented by inserting molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) or 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN{sub 6}) as an HIL. Moreover, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy suggests that the diffusion of indium atoms and active oxygen species can be impeded by introducing MoO{sub 3} or HAT-CN{sub 6} as an HIL. These results reveal that the degradation of OLEDs is related to indium and oxygen out-diffusion from the ITO substrates, and that the stability of OLEDs can be improved by impeding this diffusion with HILs.

  11. Hydrogen Sensor Based on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Electrolyte and Tin-Doped Indium Oxide Sensing Electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L P; Glass, R S

    2004-03-26

    A solid state electrochemical sensor has been developed for hydrogen leak detection in ambient air. The sensor uses an yttria-stabilized electrolyte with a tin-doped indium oxide sensing electrode and a Pt reference electrode. Excellent sensitivity, and response time of one second or less, are reported for hydrogen gas over the concentration range of 0.03 to 5.5% in air. Cross-sensitivity to relative humidity and to CO{sub 2} are shown to be low. The response to methane, a potentially significant source of interference for such a sensor, is significantly less than that for hydrogen. The sensor shows good reproducibility and was unaffected by thermal cycling over the course of this investigation. The effects of sensing electrode thickness and thermal aging are also reported, and the sensing mechanism is discussed. The sensor is intended for use in vehicles powered by hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen internal combustion engines. Those vehicles will use and/or store significant quantities of hydrogen, and will require safety sensor for monitoring potential hydrogen leakage in order to ensure passenger safety.

  12. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  13. Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2013-08-20

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  14. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  15. Polyaniline Stabilized Magnetite Nanoparticle Reinforced Epoxy Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    ,|| Suying Wei,*,§ and Zhanhu Guo*, Integrated Composites Lab (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical ABSTRACT: Magnetic epoxy polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) reinforced with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs by conductive polyaniline (PANI) is achieved via a surface initiated polymerization (SIP) approach. The effects

  16. Nanoparticle halos: A new colloid stabilization mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Nanoparticle halos: A new colloid stabilization mechanism Valeria Tohver*, James E. Smay*, Alan, 2001 (received for review February 7, 2001) A new mechanism for regulating the stability of colloidal for tailoring the behavior of com- plex fluids. Colloidal suspensions enjoy widespread use in applications

  17. Magnetic Susceptibility of NiO Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Tiwari; K. P. Rajeev

    2004-08-19

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles of different sizes are prepared and characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A.C. susceptibility measurements as a function of temperature are carried out for various particle sizes and frequencies. We find that the behavior of the system is spin glass like.

  18. The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-06

    To establish requirements and assign responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Cancels DOE N 456.1. Superseded by DOE O 456.1 Admin Chg 1.

  19. The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-05

    This Notice establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles activities. DOE N 251.79 extends this Notice until 4-19-2011. Canceled by DOE O 456.1.

  20. Biomedical Applications of Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized Using Hetero-Bifunctional Poly(ethylene glycol) Spacer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Biomedical Applications of Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized Using Hetero-Bifunctional Poly potential, circulation time, and the flexibility of surface-attached biomedically-relevant ligands on gold varieties of nanoparticles with biomedical relevance are available including, polymeric nanoparticles, metal

  1. Effects of varying ethanol and water concentrations as a gold nanoparticle gel solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Thomas Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Striped gold nanoparticles are unique in several of their characteristics and applications. Recent experiments have determined a new medium with which contain the nanoparticles is that of a chemical gel. The nanoparticles ...

  2. Study of levitating nanoparticles using ultracold neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; A. Yu. Voronin; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

    2012-05-07

    Physical adsorption of atoms, molecules and clusters on surface is known. It is linked to many phenomena in physics, chemistry, and biology. Usually the studies of adsorption are limited to the particle sizes of up to ~10^2-10^3 atoms. Following a general formalism, we apply it to even larger objects and discover qualitatively new phenomena. A large particle is bound to surface in a deep and broad potential well formed by van der Waals/ Casimir-Polder forces. The well depth is significantly larger than the characteristic thermal energy. Nanoparticles in high-excited bound states form two-dimensional gas of objects quasi-freely traveling along surface. A particularly interesting prediction is small-energy-transfer scattering of UCN on solid/ liquid surfaces covered by such levitating nanoparticles/ nano-droplets. The change in UCN energy is due to the Doppler shift induced by UCN collisions with nanoparticles; the energy change is about as small as the UCN initial energy. We compare theoretical estimations of our model to all relevant existing data and state that they agree quite well. As our theoretical formalism provides robust predictions and the experimental data are rather precise, we conclude that the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon of small heating of UCN in traps is due to their collisions with such levitating nanoparticles. Moreover, this new phenomenon might be relevant to the striking contradiction between results of the neutron lifetime measurements with smallest reported uncertainties as it might cause major false effects in these experiments; thus it affects fundamental conclusions concerning precision checks of unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, cosmology, astrophysics. Dedicated measurements of UCN up-scattering on specially prepared surfaces and nanoparticles levitating above them might provide a unique method to study surface potentials.

  3. Tuning structure of oppositely charged nanoparticle and protein complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sugam, E-mail: sugam@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: sugam@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Callow, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, DS/LSS, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-04-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to probe the structures of anionic silica nanoparticles (LS30) and cationic lyszyme protein (M.W. 14.7kD, I.P. ? 11.4) by tuning their interaction through the pH variation. The protein adsorption on nanoparticles is found to be increasing with pH and determined by the electrostatic attraction between two components as well as repulsion between protein molecules. We show the strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticles and protein molecules leads to protein-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles which are characterized by fractal structures. At pH 5, the protein adsorption gives rise to nanoparticle aggregation having surface fractal morphology with close packing of nanoparticles. The surface fractals transform to open structures of mass fractal morphology at higher pH (7 and 9) on approaching isoelectric point (I.P.)

  4. Communication: Nanosize-induced restructuring of Sn nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabet, Sareh; Kaghazchi, Payam

    2014-05-21

    Stabilities and structures of ?- and ?-Sn nanoparticles are studied using density functional theory. Results show that ?-Sn nanoparticles are more stable. For both phases of Sn, nanoparticles smaller than 1 nm (?48 atoms) are amorphous and have a band gap between 0.4 and 0.7 eV. The formation of band gap is found to be due to amorphization. By increasing the size of Sn nanoparticles (1–2.4 nm), the degree of crystallization increases and the band gap decreases. In these cases, structures of the core of nanoparticles are bulk-like, but structures of surfaces on the faces undergo reconstruction. This study suggests a strong size dependence of electronic and atomic structures for Sn nanoparticle anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  5. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D., E-mail: debes@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: debes@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  6. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    ng. có thông tin chi ti t vŕ c p nh t, xin vui lňng tra c u t i website c a chúng tôi : http Loan Chng trěnh ŕo t o c p b ng cho sinh vięn qu c t Lięn h v i chúng tôi International Student Taiwan University ( i h c qu c gia ŕi Loan) Room 419, 4F, 2nd Administration Building (Phňng 419, T ng 4

  7. Selective heating of multiple nanoparticles as a new strategy for controlled release applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijaya, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Utilization of nanoparticle heating for controlled release application was proposed and its feasibility was explored. The proposed method was formulated by realizing that biomolecule - nanoparticle conjugation is heat ...

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of transport phenomena in nanoparticle colloids (nanofluids)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Wesley Charles, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the thermal transport behavior of nanoparticle colloids or nanofluids. The major efforts are: to determine methods to characterize a nanoparticle colloid's mass loading, chemical constituents, ...

  9. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  10. Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions November 25, 2013 Bookmark and Share...

  11. Sandia Energy - Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells Home Energy Solid-State Lighting Facilities Capabilities CINT News Energy Efficiency News &...

  12. Oxide-Nanoparticle Containing Coatings for High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose objective is to examine the feasibility of using Electromagnetic Stirring (EMS) techniques in dispersing the oxide nanoparticles uniformly within the liquid steel.

  13. Princeton Plasma Lab funded to explore nanoparticles with plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for research into the role of plasma in synthesizing nanoparticles, in PPPL's nanotechnology laboratory. (Photo by Elle StarkmanPPPL Office of Communications) Physicist...

  14. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Inger M

    2008-08-15

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  15. Nanoparticle Superlattices by Self-Assembly | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticle Superlattices by Self-Assembly The project involves using state of the art computational tools: Python programming and Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) to develop...

  16. Prediction of ordered arrays of nanoparticle superlattices by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prediction of ordered arrays of nanoparticle superlattices by self-assembly Engineering the interfaces that will solve the technological challenges of this century requires an...

  17. Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Michael S. (Houston, TX); Wachs, Israel E. (Bethlehem, PA); Knowles, William V. (Pearland, TX)

    2010-11-02

    A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

  18. Microfluidic Reactors for the Controlled Synthesis of Monodisperse Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Emine Yegan

    2013-01-01

    particles by using microfluidics: control over size, shape,nanoparticles using microfluidics," Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. ,particles by using microfluidics: control over size, shape,

  19. METAL NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH METAL-LIGAND COVALENT BONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Xiongwu

    2012-01-01

    Formation of catalytic metal-molecule contacts. Science,of Organotransition Metal Compounds. Advances inof highly monodisperse metal nanoparticles. Journal of the

  20. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New Medical Innovations Technology available for licensing: novel nanometer-sized metal oxide semiconductors that allow...

  1. Structure-function relationships in dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Orla Mary

    2006-04-12

    The synthesis, characterization and structure-function relationships of mono- and bimetallic dendrimerencapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) are described. Control over the factors influencing the structure of bimetallic DENs ...

  2. High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric materials with embedded particles are evaluated shakouri.pdf More Documents &...

  3. Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Zhang, Chuanlun (Columbia, MO); Roh, Yul (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-09-03

    Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

  4. Nanoparticle flow, ordering and self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Brown, William Michael; Plimpton, Steven James; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-10-01

    Nanoparticles are now more than ever being used to tailor materials function and performance in differentiating technologies because of their profound effect on thermo-physical, mechanical and optical properties. The most feasible way to disperse particles in a bulk material or control their packing at a substrate is through fluidization in a carrier, followed by solidification through solvent evaporation/drying/curing/sintering. Unfortunately processing particles as concentrated, fluidized suspensions into useful products remains an art largely because the effect of particle shape and volume fraction on fluidic properties and suspension stability remains unexplored in a regime where particle-particle interaction mechanics is prevalent. To achieve a stronger scientific understanding of the factors that control nanoparticle dispersion and rheology we have developed a multiscale modeling approach to bridge scales between atomistic and molecular-level forces active in dense nanoparticle suspensions. At the largest length scale, two 'coarse-grained' numerical techniques have been developed and implemented to provide for high-fidelity numerical simulations of the rheological response and dispersion characteristics typical in a processing flow. The first is a coupled Navier-Stokes/discrete element method in which the background solvent is treated by finite element methods. The second is a particle based method known as stochastic rotational dynamics. These two methods provide a new capability representing a 'bridge' between the molecular scale and the engineering scale, allowing the study of fluid-nanoparticle systems over a wide range of length and timescales as well as particle concentrations. To validate these new methodologies, multi-million atoms simulations explicitly including the solvent have been carried out. These simulations have been vital in establishing the necessary 'subgrid' models for accurate prediction at a larger scale and refining the two coarse-grained methodologies.

  5. INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

    2012-03-30

    Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

  6. Electrostatic trapping of single conducting nanoparticles between nanoelectrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    nanoparticle show single electron tunneling coexisting with tunnel-barrier suppression. © 1997 AmericanElectrostatic trapping of single conducting nanoparticles between nanoelectrodes A. Bezryadina Received 4 June 1997; accepted for publication 8 July 1997 For molecular electronics, one needs the ability

  7. Electronic Supplementary Material Scalable preparation of porous silicon nanoparticles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Nano Res. Electronic Supplementary Material Scalable preparation of porous silicon nanoparticles with reduced graphene oxide Figure S2 TEM image of porous silicon nanoparticles after carbon coating and graphene wrapping. #12;www.theNanoResearch.comwww.Springer.com/journal/12274 | Nano R

  8. Physics Contribution Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Physics Contribution Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined of brachytherapy spacers for in situ release of drug eluting nanoparticles to provide tissue residence therapy to enhance the therapeutic ratio Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source

  9. Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics A thesis presented Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics Eric Mazur Brian R. Tull Abstract irradiated surface layer to the grain boundaries. #12;iv Lastly, we measure the photovoltaic properties

  10. Gold nanoparticle assemblies: Interplay between thermal effects and optical response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Department of Physics, University of Sistan and Baluchistan, Zahedan, Iran c Université Paris Sorbonne-order nonlinear properties of gold nanoparticles: The influence of the generalized thermal lens in the long laser of an embedded gold nanoparticle subsequent to ultrafast pulsed laser excitation. 1. Introduction The remarkable

  11. Delivery Vehicles for Zerovalent Metal Nanoparticles in Soil and Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Vehicles for Zerovalent Metal Nanoparticles in Soil and Groundwater Bettina Schrick hydrocarbons in groundwater and soils. The transport of Fe/C nanoparticles was studied by elution through and the groundwater level, in some cases reaching the underlying saturated zone. As hydrophobic sparingly soluble

  12. Nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam for CO? EOR application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Lee, Robert; Yu, Jianjia; Li, Liangxiong; Bustamante, Elizabeth; Khalil, Munawar; Mo, Di; Jia, Bao; Wang, Sai; San, Jingshan; An, Cheng

    2015-01-31

    The purpose of this project was to develop nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam for CO? -EOR application, in which nanoparticles instead of surfactants are used for stabilizing CO? foam to improve the CO? sweep efficiency and increase oil recovery. The studies included: (1) investigation of CO? foam generation nanoparticles, such as silica nanoparticles, and the effects of particle concentration and surface properties, CO?/brine ratio, brine salinity, pressure, and temperature on foam generation and foam stability; (2) coreflooding tests to understand the nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam for waterflooded residual oil recovery, which include: oil-free coreflooding experiments with nanoparticle-stabilized CO? foam to understand the transportation of nanoparticles through the core; measurements of foam stability and CO? sweep efficiency under reservoir conditions to investigate temperature and pressure effects on the foam performance and oil recovery as well as the sweep efficiency in different core samples with different rock properties; and (3) long-term coreflooding experiments with the nanoparticle- stabilized CO? foam for residual oil recovery. Finally, the technical and economical feasibility of this technology was evaluated.

  13. Luminescence properties of the hybrid Si-Ni nanoparticles system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lalayan, A A; Movsesyan, H A

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of the colloidal hybrid Si - Ni nanoparticles system fabricated in the pure water by pulsed laser ablation is considered. The red-shifted photoluminescence of this system because of the Stark effect in the Coulomb field of the charged Ni nanoparticles has been registered in the blue range of the spectrum.

  14. SIMULATION MODELLING OF NANOPARTICLE ASSEMBLIES FORMED BY SPRAY DEPOSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargiela, Andrzej

    processing we have been developing retinal models in order to better understand the structure and function Nanoparticle Assemblies, Roughness, Contact Angle, Superhydrophobicity, Retinal Prosthesis. ABSTRACT This paper nanoparticles via a semi-mechanistic process, which in spite of its simplicity generates morphologies

  15. Optimization of particle size for PLGA nanoparticles prepared by the Ouzo effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rytting, Erik

    2006-10-25

    Optimization of Particle Size for PLGA Nanoparticles Prepared by the Ouzo Effect Erik Rytting, Tobias Lebhardt, and Thomas Kissel Philipps-Universit?tMarburg Why Nanoparticles? ? Nanoparticles can be the right tool for the job ? Advantages... ? Enhanced bioavailability and controlled release ? Penetration across biological barriers ? Increased drug targeting efficiency Methods for Nanoparticle Production Materials ? Polymers ? Metals ? Ceramics ? Biological materials ? Liposomes ? Peptides...

  16. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V., E-mail: vnnara@yahoo.co.in [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Vijayalakshmi, L. [Annai Veilankanni's College for Women (Arts and Science), Saidapet, Chennai 600015 (India); Stephen, A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2014-01-28

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  17. Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into wood substrate and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rector, Kirk D; Lucas, Marcel

    2015-11-04

    Metal nanoparticles were incorporated into wood. Ionic liquids were used to expand the wood cell wall structure for nanoparticle incorporation into the cell wall structure. Nanoparticles of elemental gold or silver were found to be effective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging contrast or sensing agents. Nanoparticles of elemental iron were found to be efficient microwave absorbers and caused localized heating for disrupting the integrity of the lignocellulosic matrix. Controls suggest that the localized heating around the iron nanoparticles reduces losses of cellulose in the form of water, volatiles and CO.sub.2. The ionic liquid is needed during the incorporation process at room temperature. The use of small amounts of ionic liquid combined with the absence of an ionic liquid purification step and a lower energy and water use are expected to reduce costs in an up-scaled pretreatment process.

  18. Graphdiyne as a Promising Substrate for Stabilizing Pt Nanoparticle Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zheng-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    At present, Pt nanoparticle catalysts in fuel cells suffer from aggregation and loss of chemical activity. In this work, graphdiyne, which has natural porous structure, was proposed as substrate with high adsorption ability to stabilize Pt nanoparticles. Using multiscale calculations by ab initio method and the ReaxFF potential, geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics simulations, Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations and minimum energy paths calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and the rates of desorption and migration of Pt nanoparticles on graphdiyne and graphene. According to the comparison between graphdiyne and graphene, it was found that the high adsorption ability of graphdiyne can avoid Pt nanoparticle migration and aggregation on substrate. Then, simulations indicated the potential catalytic ability of graphdiyne-Pt-nanoparticle system to the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. In summary, graphdiyne should be an excellent material to replace graphite or amorphous ca...

  19. Photovoltaic devices having nanoparticle dipoles for enhanced performance and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, George M. (Portland, OR); Schut, David M. (Philomath, OR); Stonas, Andreas (Albany, OR)

    2011-08-09

    A photovoltaic device has nanoparticles sandwiched between a conductive substrate and a charge selective transport layer. Each of the nanoparticles has a ligand shell attached to the nanoparticle core. A first type of ligand is electron rich and attached to one hemisphere of the nanoparticle core, while a second type of ligand is electron poor and attached to an opposite hemisphere of the core. Consequently, the ligand shell induces an electric field within the nanoparticle, enhancing the photovoltaic effect. The arrangement of ligands types on different sides of the nanoparticle is obtained by a process involving ligand substitution after adhering the nanoparticles to the conductive substrate.

  20. LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

    2012-06-01

    This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

  1. Real time monitoring of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly on surfaces of magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Crawford, T. M., E-mail: crawftm@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Qi, B.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 161 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), 91 Technology Dr., Anderson, South Carolina 29625 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Nanoparticle self-assembly dynamics are monitored in real-time by detecting optical diffraction from an all-nanoparticle grating as it self-assembles on a grating pattern recorded on a magnetic medium. The diffraction efficiency strongly depends on concentration, pH, and colloidal stability of nanoparticle suspensions, demonstrating the nanoparticle self-assembly process is highly tunable. This metrology could provide an alternative for detecting nanoparticle properties such as colloidal stability.

  2. Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2014-03-10

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

  3. Plasma Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Nanocomposite Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Alex W. Kawczak

    2008-09-01

    The nanocomposite energy applications for plasma reactor produced nanoparticles are reviewed. Nanoparticles are commonly defined as particles less than 100 nm in diameter. Due to this small size, nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio. This increases the surface energy compared to the bulk material. The high surface-to-volume ratio and size effects (quantum effects) give nanoparticles distinctive chemical, electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties from those of the bulk material. Nanoparticles synthesis can be grouped into 3 broad approaches. The first one is wet phase synthesis (sol-gel processing), the second is mechanical attrition, and the third is gas-phase synthesis (aerosol). The properties of the final product may differ significantly depending on the fabrication route. Currently, there are no economical large-scale production processes for nanoparticles. This hinders the widespread applications of nanomaterials in products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is engaging in research and development of advanced modular hybrid plasma reactors for low cost production of nanoparticles that is predicted to accelerate application research and enable the formation of technology innovation alliances that will result in the commercial production of nanocomposites for alternative energy production devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaics and electrochemical double layer capacitors.

  4. Do cement nanoparticles exist in space ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2014-01-01

    The calcium-silicate-hydrate is used to model properties of cement on Earth. We study cementitious nanoparticles and propose these structures as components of cosmic dust grains. Quantum density functional theory methods are applied for the calculation of infrared spectra of Ca4Si4O14H4, Ca6Si3O13H2, and Ca12Si6O26H4 clusters. We find bands distributed over the near, mid and far-infrared region. A specific calcium-silicate-hydrate spectral feature at 14 microns, together with the bands at 10 and 18 microns which exist for other silicates as well, could be used for a detection of cosmic cement. We compare calculated bands with the 14 microns features in the spectra of HD 45677, HD 44179, and IRC+10420 which were observed by Infrared Space Observatory and classified as remaining. High abundance of oxygen atoms in cementitious nanoparticles could partially explain observed depletion of this element from the interstellar medium into dust grains.

  5. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-?-structure arrangement.

  6. Nanoparticles and nanowires: synchrotron spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sham, T.K.

    2008-08-11

    This paper reviews the research in nanomaterials conducted in our laboratory in the last decade using conventional and synchrotron radiation techniques. While preparative and conventional characterisation techniques are described, emphasis is placed on the analysis of nanomaterials using synchrotron radiation. Materials of primary interests are metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons. Synchrotron techniques based on absorption spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), which includes X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXFAS), and de-excitation spectroscopy, including X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) are described. We show that the tunability, brightness, polarisation and time structure of synchrotron radiation are providing unprecedented capabilities for nanomaterials analysis. Synchrotron studies of prototype systems such as gold nanoparticles, 1-D nanowires of group IV materials, C, Si and Ge as well as nanodiamond, and compound semiconductors, ZnS, CdS, ZnO and related materials are used to illustrate the power and unique capabilities of synchrotron spectroscopy in the characterisation of local structure, electronic structure and optical properties of nanomaterials.

  7. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard (Boulder, CO); Duda, Anna (Denver, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Yost, Vernon (Littleton, CO); Meier, Daniel (Atlanta, GA); Ward, James S. (Golden, CO)

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  8. Fabrication of organic and inorganic nanoparticles using electrospray 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deotare, Parag Bhaskar

    2009-05-15

    . [2] K. Y. Win and S. Feng, ?Effects of particle size and surface coating on cel- lular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles for oral delivery of anticancer drugs,? Biomaterials, vol. 26, pp. 2713?2722, 2005. [3] X. He, K. Wang, W. Tan, J. Li, X. Yang, S...)-poly(lactide) (mpeg- pla) nanoparticles for controlled delivery of anticancer drugs,? Biomaterials, vol. 25, pp. 2843?2849, 2004. [16] K. Y. Win and S. Feng, ?Effects of particle size and surface coating on cel- lular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles for oral...

  9. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  10. Green synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticle using Aloe barbadensis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thappily, Praveen, E-mail: pravvmon@gmail.com, E-mail: shiiuvenus@gmail.com; Shiju, K., E-mail: pravvmon@gmail.com, E-mail: shiiuvenus@gmail.com [Laboratory for Molecular Photonics and Electronics (LAMP), Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala 673601 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles was achieved by simple visible light irradiation using aloe barbadensis leaf extract as reducing agent. UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis was used for confirmation of the successful formation of nanoparticles. Investigated the effect of light irradiation time on the light absorption of the nanoparticles. It is observed that upto 25 minutes of light irradiation, the absorption is linearly increasing with time and after that it becomes saturated. Finally, theoretically fitted the time-absorption graph and modeled a relation between them with the help of simulation software.

  11. Energy dissipation in single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles: Dynamical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Lyutyy; S. I. Denisov; A. Yu. Peletskyi; C. Binns

    2015-02-14

    We study, both analytically and numerically, the phenomenon of energy dissipation in single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles driven by an alternating magnetic field. Our interest is focused on the power loss resulting from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which describes the precessional motion of the nanoparticle magnetic moment. We determine the power loss as a function of the field amplitude and frequency and analyze its dependence on different regimes of forced precession induced by circularly and linearly polarized magnetic fields. The conditions to maximize the nanoparticle heating are also analyzed.

  12. Bioresponsive Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Neetu

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential carriers for therapeutic payloads. However, achieving triggered drug release from MSNPs in vivo has been challenging. Here, we ...

  13. Tribological Properties of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheireddin, Bassem

    2013-08-02

    New nanomaterials and nanoparticles are currently under investigation as lubricants or lubricant additives due to their unusual properties compared to traditional materials. One of the objectives of this work is to investigate ...

  14. Effects and applications of capillary condensation in ultrathin nanoparticle assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gemici, Zekeriyya

    2010-01-01

    The electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique can be used to make uniform, conformal multi-stack nanoparticle thin films from aqueous solution, with precise thickness and roughness control over each stack. Much ...

  15. Spatiotemporal controlled delivery of nanoparticles to injured vasculature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Juliana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Complex multimodal nanoparticles (NP) that target and deliver therapeutic agents to a site of disease are a promising direction in modem medicine. As a starting point for innovation, we designed a hybrid NP system combining ...

  16. Formation and applications of nanoparticles in silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibers are the basis for applications that have grown considerably in recent years (telecommunications, sensors, fiber lasers, etc). Despite undeniable successes, it is necessary to develop new generations of amplifying optical fibers that will overcome some limitations typical of silica glass. In this sense, the amplifying Transparent Glass Ceramics (TGC), and particularly the fibers based on this technology, open new perspectives that combine the mechanical and chemical properties of a glass host with the augmented spectroscopic properties of embedded nanoparticles. This paper is an opportunity to make a state of the art on silica-based optical fibers containing nanoparticles of various types, particularly rare-earth-doped oxide nanoparticles, and on the methods for making such fibers. In the first section of this article, we will review basics on standard optical fibers and on nanoparticle-doped fibers. In the second section we will recall some fabrication methods used for standard optical fibers, ...

  17. Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

    2011-01-01

    to the microtube and vortex the tube. 4. Place the microtubeto “Day 1” microtube and vortex the tube. 8. Place “Day 1”solution to tube with nanoparticles, vortex, and return to

  18. Phase-equilibrium-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Seok Joon

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal dispersion of nanoparticles (CNPs) has interesting properties both in terms of fundamental studies and industrials applications. Particular focus on the phase equilibrium and separation dynamics of CNPs has been ...

  19. Nucleation and Growth of Atmospheric Nanoparticles at Molecular Scale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wen

    2014-04-14

    to form critical nucleus and subsequent growth of freshly nucleated nanoparticles. Unfortunately, our current knowledge of these two steps is very limited. In the current study, the dicarboxylic acids (organic acid) assisted nucleation is investigated...

  20. Surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insin, Numpon

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) of high crystallinity, high magnetization, and size-monodispersity were synthesized with oleic acid as their native ligands. These hydrophobic and non-functionalized MPs have magnetic ...

  1. Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

  2. Modeling of Magnetic Nanoparticles Transport in Shale Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Cheng

    2014-12-18

    stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) from induced fractures play a critical role in significantly increasing well productivity. In this project, a mathematical model for simulating nanoparticle transport in shale reservoirs was developed. The simulator includes...

  3. Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted wet chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzegar Vishlaghi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farzalipour Tabriz, M., E-mail: meisam.fa@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammad Moradi, O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ? Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles is reported. ? Substituting water with non-aqueous media prevents the formation of nickel hydroxide. ? Size of particles decreased from 10 to 20 nm down to 2–4 nm by using multi-jet mode. ? Synthesized nanoparticles have diffraction patterns similar to amorphous materials. -- Abstract: In this study nickel nanoparticles were prepared via chemical reduction of nickel acetate using sodium borohydride using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. This technique was used to spray a finely dispersed aerosol of nickel precursor solution into the reductive bath. Obtained particles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles and showed that applying EHDA technique to chemical reduction method results in producing smaller particles with narrower size distribution in comparison with conventional reductive precipitation method.

  4. Critical Assessment of the Evidence for Striped Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stirling, Julian

    There is now a significant body of literature which reports that stripes form in the ligand shell of suitably functionalised Au nanoparticles. This stripe morphology has been proposed to strongly affect the physicochemical ...

  5. Microfluidic technologies for accelerating the clinical translation of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langer, Robert

    Using nanoparticles for therapy and imaging holds tremendous promise for the treatment of major diseases such as cancer. However, their translation into the clinic has been slow because it remains difficult to produce ...

  6. The Phase of Iron Catalyst Nanoparticles during Carbon Nanotube Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Christoph T.; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Gamalski, Andrew D.; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Weatherup, Robert S.; Ducati, Caterina; Baehtz, Carsten; Robertson, John; Hofmann, Stephan

    2012-11-28

    growth modes occur upon hydrocarbon exposure: For ?-rich Fe nanoparticle distributions, metallic Fe is the active catalyst phase, implying that carbide formation is not a prerequisite for nanotube growth. For ?-rich catalyst mixtures, Fe3C formation more...

  7. Photoswitchable Nanoparticles for Triggered Tissue Penetration and Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Rong

    We report a novel nanoparticulate drug delivery system that undergoes reversible volume change from 150 to 40 nm upon phototriggering with UV light. The volume change of these monodisperse nanoparticles comprising spiropyran, ...

  8. Nanosensors based on functionalized nanoparticles and surface enhanced raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA); Huser, Thomas R. (Livermore, CA); Hollars, Christopher W. (Brentwood, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Laurence, Ted A. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-27

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that utilizes metal surfaces to provide enhanced signals of several orders of magnitude. When molecules of interest are attached to designed metal nanoparticles, a SERS signal is attainable with single molecule detection limits. This provides an ultrasensitive means of detecting the presence of molecules. By using selective chemistries, metal nanoparticles can be functionalized to provide a unique signal upon analyte binding. Moreover, by using measurement techniques, such as, ratiometric received SERS spectra, such metal nanoparticles can be used to monitor dynamic processes in addition to static binding events. Accordingly, such nanoparticles can be used as nanosensors for a wide range of chemicals in fluid, gaseous and solid form, environmental sensors for pH, ion concentration, temperature, etc., and biological sensors for proteins, DNA, RNA, etc.

  9. Enhancement of in vitro Translation by Gold Nanoparticle – DNA Conjugates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sunho

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP)?DNA conjugates can enhance in vitro translation of a protein. Enhancement occurs via a combination of nonspecific adsorption of translation-related molecules and the ribosome to the AuNP?DNA and ...

  10. Synthesis and high-pressure structural studies of bismuth nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaimayo, Wanaruk

    2013-07-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are materials in which the size of at least one dimension is less than 100 nm. Examples include quantum dots, nanoparticles, “Buckminsterfullerene (C60)”, carbon nanotubes, graphene and TiO2 thin ...

  11. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  12. Multilayered and complex nanoparticle architectures through plasma synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Wakeland, Stephen; Cui, Yuehua; Knapp, Angela; Richard, Monique; Luhrs, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Using the Aerosol Through Plasma (ATP) method in conjunction with simple chemical techniques a variety of complex and novel nanoparticle architectures were created. A TP was used to make metal-core/carbon shell nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm diameter) of SnlCarbon and AI/Carbon. These have, respectively, potential for application as battery anode (for hybrid and electric vehicles) and high energy fuel In one example of post processing, the Sn-core/carbon-shell material is treated in acidic solution and yields a true nano-sized hollow carbon shell. These shells have potential application as catalyst supports, gas storage, a neutral buoyancy material for applications as varied as proppants, and slow release capsules for pharmaceutical or agricultural applications. A different set of post-A-T-P processes were used to make three layer nanoparticles with a metal core, graphite inner shell and ceramic outer shell. This method extends the range of achievable nanoparticles architectures, hence enabling new applications.

  13. Probing metal nanoparticles and assemblies with analytical ultracentrifugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Randy (Randy Patrick)

    2010-01-01

    Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a powerful tool to obtain statistically relevant size and shape measurements for macromolecular systems. Metal nanoparticles coated by a ligand shell of thiolated molecules provide ...

  14. Heteroepitaxial Self Assembling Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Monocrystalline Silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Michael S.

    2013-08-13

    and investigate fundamental properties. Noble metal nanoparticles made of gold or silver are grown in cavities in monocrystalline silicon formed by helium ion implantation and high temperature annealing at depth greater than 500 nm from the surface. Metals...

  15. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J; Fortner, Allison M; Jett, Robert T; Peterson, Mark J; Carriker, Neil; Morris, Jesse G; Gable, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  16. Protective Agent-Free Synthesis of Colloidal Cobalt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balela, M. D. L.; Lockman, Z.; Azizan, A.; Matsubara, E.; Amorsolo, A. V. Jr.

    2010-03-11

    Spherical colloidal cobalt (Co) nanoparticles of about 2-7 nm were synthesized by hydrazine reduction in ethylene glycol at 80 deg. C. The mean diameter of the Co nanoparticles was varied to some extent by changing the pH, temperature, Co(II) chloride hexahydrate concentration, and amount of hydrazine. The Co particle size was reduced by decreasing Co(II) chloride concentration and increasing amount of hydrazine.

  17. Stability of stainless-steel nanoparticle and water mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, You Young; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-11-28

    as little surfactant as possible to investigate the heat transfer mechanism between metallic nanoparticles, so adding SDBS with mass ratio of 0.5 is better; cationic surfactants is known not to work well in high pH solutions; and it is easier to use... water with pH control and surfactant additions. It is clear that both ?-potential and absorbance (sedimentation) measurements are important in measuring the stability of nanoparticle-fluids. Dispersion via ultrasonic vibration was used to induce...

  18. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushani, Mahmoud [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Ilam University, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles via electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate solutions. ? Design of a Taguchi orthogonal array to identify the optimal experimental conditions. ? Controlling the size and shape of particles via applied voltage and oxalate concentration. ? Characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles by SEM, UV–vis, FT-IR and TG–DTA. - Abstract: A rapid, clean and simple electrodeposition method was designed for the synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles. Zinc oxalate nanoparticles in different size and shapes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate aqueous solutions. It was found that the size and shape of the product could be tuned by electrolysis voltage, oxalate ion concentration, and stirring rate of electrolyte solution. A Taguchi orthogonal array design was designed to identify the optimal experimental conditions. The morphological characterization of the product was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. UV–vis and FT-IR spectroscopies were also used to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. The TG–DTA studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation occurs in two steps over a temperature range of 350–430 °C. In contrast to the existing methods, the present study describes a process which can be easily scaled up for the production of nano-sized zinc oxalate powder.

  20. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 14 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 APRIL 2002 Absolute TiN(111) Step Energies from Analysis of Anisotropic Island Shape Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    .45.Mp NaCl-structure titanium nitride (TiN) is widely used as a hard, wear-resistant coating on cutting tools, as a dif- fusion barrier in microelectronic devices, and as a corro- sion and abrasion resistant

  1. Thermal cycling effect on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a carbonate eutectic with alumina nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Sandhya

    2011-08-08

    The objective of this research was to measure the effect of thermal cycling on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a nanocomposite material consisting of a eutectic of lithium carbonate and potassium carbonate and 1% by mass alumina...

  2. Method for making nanotubes and nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing nano-scale tubes and particles. The apparatus comprises novel electrodes for use in arc discharge techniques. The electrodes have interior conduits for delivery and withdrawal of material from the arc region where product is formed. In one embodiment, the anode is optionally made from more than one material and is termed a compound anode. The materials used in the compound anode assist in the reaction that forms product in the arc region of the apparatus. The materials assist either by providing reaction ingredients, catalyst, or affecting the reaction kinetics. Among other uses, the inventive apparatus is used to produce nanotubes and nanoparticles having a variety of electrical and mechanical properties.

  3. Charging and Heating Dynamics of Nanoparticles in Nonthermal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2014-08-15

    The focus of this award was to understand the interactions of nanometer-sized particles with ionized gases, also called plasmas. Plasmas are widely used in the fabrication of electronic circuits such as microprocessors and memory devices, in plasma display panels, as well as in medical applications. Recently, these ionized gases are finding applications in the synthesis of advanced nanomaterials with novel properties, which are based on nanometer-sized particulate (nanoparticles) building blocks. As these nanoparticles grow in the plasma environment, they interact with the plasmas species such as electrons and ions which critically determines the nanoparticle properties. The University of Minnesota researchers conducting this project performed numerical simulations and developed analytical models that described the interaction of plasma-bound nanoparticles with the plasma ions. The plasma ions bombard the nanoparticle surface with substantial energy, which can result in the rearrangement of the nanoparticles’ atoms, giving them often desirable structures at the atomic scale. Being able to tune the ion energies allows to control the properties of nanoparticles produced in order to tailor their attributes for certain applications. For instance, when used in high efficiency light emitting devices, nanoparticles produced under high fluxes of highly energetic ions may show superior light emission to particles produced under low fluxes of less energetic ions. The analytical models developed by the University of Minnesota researchers enable the research community to easily determine the energy of ions bombarding the nanoparticles. The researchers extensively tested the validity of the analytical models by comparing them to sophisticated computer simulations based on stochastic particle modeling, also called Monte Carlo modeling, which simulated the motion of hundreds of thousands of ions and their interaction with the nanoparticle surfaces. Beyond the scientific intellectual merits, this award had significant broader impacts. Two graduate students received their doctoral degrees and both have joined a U.S. manufacturer of plasma-based semiconductor processing equipment. Four undergraduate students participated in research conducted under this grant and gained valuable hands-on laboratory experience. A middle school science teacher observed research conducted under this grant and developed three new course modules that introduce middle school students to the concepts of nanometer scale, the atomic structure of matter, and the composition of matter of different chemical elements.

  4. A novel inorganic-organic compound: Synthesis and structural characterization of tin(II) phenylbis(phosphonate), Sn{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}PO{sub 3})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subbiah, Ayyappan; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Clearfield, Abraham . E-mail: clearfield@mail.chem.tamu.edu

    2005-04-15

    A novel tin(II) phenylbis(phosphonate) compound has been synthesized hydrothermally and its structure has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure is monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c (no. 14), a=4.8094(4), b=16.2871(13), c=6.9107(6)A; {beta}=106.292(6){sup o}, V=519.59(7)A{sup 3}, Z=2. The three-dimensional structure consists of 3-coordinated tin and 4-coordinated phosphorus double layers separated (pillared) by phenyl rings. These phenyl rings are placed 4.8A apart along the a-axis in the structure resulting in lower surface area ({approx}14m{sup 2}/g). The porosity has been increased by replacing phenyl groups by methyl groups ({approx}31m{sup 2}/g)

  5. Multiparametric approach for the evaluation of lipid nanoparticles for siRNA delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabi, Christopher A.

    Nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery is a complex process that requires transport across numerous extracellular and intracellular barriers. As such, the development of nanoparticles for efficient delivery would benefit ...

  6. Synthesis, characterization and assembly of the binary ligand protected gold nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyewon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    When a gold nanoparticle is coated with two dislike ligands, the ligands selfassemble on the nanoparticle surface and the phase separation occurs based on the miscibility and the size mismatch of two ligands, and the sizes ...

  7. Effects of Shape and Size of Gold Nanoparticles on the Properties of Colloid and Nanocomposite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarrin, Tahira

    2010-01-16

    part is to study the interfacial reactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and fluid molecules. This is to obtain basic understanding of nanoparticles and their interactions with matrix materials. Thirdly, we will investigate the mechanical properties...

  8. Electrochemical interaction between graphite and molten salts to produce nanotubes, nanoparticles, graphene and nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamali, Ali; Fray, Derek

    2015-09-15

    carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes, metal filled carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes, graphene or nanodiamonds. The application of metal filled carbon nanotubes as anodes in lithium ion batteries is reviewed. Surprisingly, this method of preparation...

  9. Structure and activity of protein-nanoparticle conjugates: towards a strategy for optimizing the interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticle-protein conjugates have a variety of applications in imaging, sensing, assembly and control. The nanoparticle-protein interface is made of numerous complex interactions between protein side-chains and the ...

  10. Interaction of amphiphilic gold nanoparticles with lipid membranes and their application to cancer radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yu-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Striped gold nanoparticles (NPs), inorganic particles protected by an amphiphilic mixed organic ligand shell, are the most recent and potent evolution of gold nanoparticle intracellular delivery vectors. Here we propose ...

  11. Critical heat flux enhancement via surface modification using colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles (Nanofluids)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2008-01-01

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles (1-100nm) in common fluids (water, refrigerants, or ethanol...). Materials used for nanoparticles include chemically stable metals (e.g., gold, silver, ...

  12. The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qian

    2013-02-15

    The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and biotemplated assembly of indium nitride and indium gallium nitride nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Jennifer Chia-Jen

    2010-01-01

    A low-temperature, ambient pressure solution synthesis of colloidal InN nanoparticles is presented. This synthesis utilizes a previously dismissed precursor and results in individual, non-aggregated nanoparticles with ...

  14. Letters to Analytical Chemistry Silver Nanoparticles on a Plastic Platform for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    MNPs suspended in a liquid phase suffers from the inherent stability issues related to the colloidal of nanoparticle's size, shape, and material.1d,3 Suspensions of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs), especially Au NPs

  15. Photophysics and Charge Separation Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Semiconductor Nanoparticle Junctions and Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, David F.

    2011-02-14

    The work on this grant can be divided into two categories: spectroscopy and dynamics of GaSe nanoparticles, and synthesis and exciton dynamics of II-VI nanoparticles and nanostructures.

  16. MICROFLUIDIC MICROSYSTEM FOR MAGNETIC SENSING OF NANOPARTICLES WITH GIANT MAGNETO-IMPEDANCE TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MICROFLUIDIC MICROSYSTEM FOR MAGNETIC SENSING OF NANOPARTICLES WITH GIANT MAGNETO fabricated a microfluidic microsystem integrating a Giant Magneto-Impedance wire sensor that successfully-Impedance (GMI), magnetic sensor, magnetic nanoparticles, microfluidic, microsystem INTRODUCTION Magnetic

  17. Health Effects of Nanoparticles Nanotechnology research is producing remarkable advances for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Health Effects of Nanoparticles Nanotechnology research is producing remarkable advances for detecting, treating, and preventing health problems. However, while nanoparticles can lead to breakthrough Health Applications Determining the toxicology of particles and ensuring quality control are crucial

  18. Gold Nanoparticles Functionalised with Fast Water Exchanging Gd3+ Chelates: Linker Effects on the Relaxivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Miguel F.; Gonçalves, Janaina; Mousavi, B.; Prata, M. I. M.; Rodrigues, S. P. J.; Calle, Daniel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdan, Sebastian; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Ferreira, Paula M.; Helm, L.; Martins, José A.; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.

    2015-01-22

    The relaxivity displayed by Gd3+ chelates immobilized onto gold nanoparticles is the result of complex interplay between nanoparticle size, water exchange rate and chelate structure. In this work we study the effect of the length of ?...

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I. Nr. 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); Hempelmann, R. [Physical Chemistry Department, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2013-11-13

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of n-octadecayl mercaptan-protected palladium nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Synthesis and characterization of n-octadecayl mercaptan-protected palladium nanoparticles C Abstract Long-chain n-octadecayl mercaptan (C18H37SH)-passivated palladium nanoparticles are synthesized and charac- terized. The palladium nanoparticles are successfully capped by n-octadecayl mercaptan

  1. The Effect of Nanoparticles on the Thermal Transitions of Hydrated Layer-by-Layer Assemblies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puhr, Joseph Timothy

    2014-04-25

    Nanoparticles can have a profound effect on a polymer’s glass transition temperature (T_(g)). Many layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies contain nanoparticles for added functionality, but the resulting effect of nanoparticles on an LbL film’s properties...

  2. Harnessing nonlinear rubber swelling for bulk synthesis of anisotropic hybrid nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Tao; Smoukov, Stoyan. K.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-08-27

    -PDVB nanoparticles. Without PVP, the hybrid nanoparticles of Au- PDVB aggregate (see SI-Fig. S1). The cross-linking is critical for the generation of anisotropic nanoparticles since if styrene (with only one vinyl bond) is used as the monomer, only a very thin...

  3. In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcoxon, Jess P. (Albuquerque, NM); Abrams, Billie L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-10

    A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

  4. Short communication TiO2 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotubes for significantly improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication TiO2 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotubes for significantly improved to synthesize nanohybrids of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles-decorating carbon nanotubes (CNTs@TiO2). The nanohybrid a l a b s t r a c t TiO2 nanoparticles-decorated CNTs.

  5. Solvent Mediated Assembly of Nanoparticles Confined in Mesoporous Alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle J. Alvine; Diego Pontoni; Oleg G. Shpyrko; Peter S. Pershan; David J. Cookson; Kyusoon Shin; Thomas P. Russell; Markus Brunnbauer; Francesco Stellacci; Oleg Gang

    2006-03-24

    The controlled self-assembly of thiol stabilized gold nanocrystals in a mediating solvent and confined within mesoporous alumina was probed in situ with small angle x-ray scattering. The evolution of the self-assembly process was controlled reversibly via regulated changes in the amount of solvent condensed from an undersaturated vapor. Analysis indicated that the nanoparticles self-assembled into cylindrical monolayers within the porous template. Nanoparticle nearest-neighbor separation within the monolayer increased and the ordering decreased with the controlled addition of solvent. The process was reversible with the removal of solvent. Isotropic clusters of nanoparticles were also observed to form temporarily during desorption of the liquid solvent and disappeared upon complete removal of liquid. Measurements of the absorption and desorption of the solvent showed strong hysteresis upon thermal cycling. In addition, the capillary filling transition for the solvent in the nanoparticle-doped pores was shifted to larger chemical potential, relative to the liquid/vapor coexistence, by a factor of 4 as compared to the expected value for the same system without nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis of manganese spinel nanoparticles at room temperature by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovannelli, F., E-mail: fabien.giovannelli@univ-tours.fr [GREMAN, UMR 7347 CNRS-CEA, Universite Francois Rabelais, 15 rue de la chocolaterie, 41000 BLOIS (France); Autret-Lambert, C.; Mathieu, C.; Chartier, T.; Delorme, F. [GREMAN, UMR 7347 CNRS-CEA, Universite Francois Rabelais, 15 rue de la chocolaterie, 41000 BLOIS (France); Seron, A [BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 ORLEANS Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-08-15

    This paper is focused on a new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by alkalisation by sodium hydroxide on a manganeous solution at room temperature. The precipitates obtained at different pH values have been characterized by XRD and TEM. Since the first addition of sodium hydroxide, a white Mn(OH){sub 2} precipitate appears. At pH=7, {gamma}-MnOOH phase is predominant with needle like shaped particles. At pH=10, hausmanite nanoparticles, which exhibits well defined cubic shape in the range 50-120 nm are obtained. This new precipitation route is a fast and easy environmentally friendly process to obtain well crystallized hausmanite nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles after a precipitation at pH=10. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis has been performed by precipitation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is between 50 and 120 nm.

  7. Final Report for "Boron and Tin in Nuclear Medicien: The Development of Reactive Solid-State Reagents for PET and SPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Kabalka

    2006-01-13

    The research program was directed at the use of functionalized organometallic reagents that would rapidly react with radiolabeled agents generated by a medical cyclotron or reactor. The radioisotopes included fluorine-18, oxgygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11 and iodine-123; all short lived nuclides of importantce in nuclear medicine imaging studies utilizing emission tomography techniques. The early studies led to the development of extensive new isotope incorporation chemistry. These studies validated the feasibility of using reactive intermediates, such as the organoboranes, and acted as a catalyst for others to investigate organometallic agents based on mercury, tin, and silicon. A large number of radiolabeling techniques and radiopharmaceuticals were developed. These included agents for use in oncology, neurology, and metabolism. The research resulted in the generation of one hundred and one journal articles, eighty seven refereed published abstracts and forty one invited lectures. Thirteen postdoctoral students, fourteen graduate students, and twenty eight undergraduate students were trained in the scientific aspects of nuclear medicine imaging under the asupices of this grant.

  8. Effect of ultraviolet radiation exposure on room-temperature hydrogen sensitivity of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide sensor incorporated into microelectromechanical systems device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Satyajit; Agrawal, Rajnikant; Cho, Hyoung J.; Seal, Sudipta; Ludwig, Lawrence; Parish, Clyde [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC) and Mechanical Materials Aerospace Engineering (MMAE) Department, Engineering 381, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), John F. Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida 32899 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure on the room-temperature hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensitivity of nanocrystalline indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3})-doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin-film gas sensor is investigated in this article. The present sensor is incorporated into microelectromechanical systems device using sol-gel dip-coating technique. The present sensor exhibits a very high sensitivity, as high as 65 000-110 000, at room temperature, for 900 ppm of H{sub 2} under the dynamic test condition without UV exposure. The H{sub 2} sensitivity is, however, observed to reduce to 200 under UV radiation, which is contrary to the literature data, where an enhanced room-temperature gas sensitivity has been reported under UV radiation. The observed phenomenon is attributed to the reduced surface coverage by the chemisorbed oxygen ions under UV radiation, which is in consonance with the prediction of the constitutive equation, proposed recently by the authors, for the gas sensitivity of nanocrystalline semiconductor oxide thin-film sensors.

  9. Morphology and structure evolution of tin-doped indium oxide thin films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering: The role of the sputtering atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, Man, E-mail: man.nie@helmholtz-berlin.de; Mete, Tayfun; Ellmer, Klaus [Department of Solar Fuels and Energy Storage Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-21

    The microstructure and morphology evolution of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) thin films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering in different sputtering atmospheres were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy. The surface roughness w increases with increasing film thickness d{sub f}, and exhibits a power law behavior w???d{sub f}{sup ?}. The roughness decreases with increasing O{sub 2} flow, while it increases with increasing H{sub 2} flow. The growth exponent ? is found to be 0.35, 0.75, and 0.98 for depositions in Ar/10%O{sub 2}, pure Ar, and Ar/10%H{sub 2} atmospheres, respectively. The correlation length ? increases with film thickness also with a power law according to ????d{sub f}{sup z} with exponents z?=?0.36, 0.44, and 0.57 for these three different gas atmospheres, respectively. A combination of local and non-local growth modes in 2?+?1 dimensions is discussed for the ITO growth in this work.

  10. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on biocompatibility and cellular uptake of chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Yizhi

    nanofibrous membrane by electrospinning as a magnetic nanoparticle delivery approach J. Appl. Phys. 115, 17B

  11. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    @uw.edu (G. Cao). Nano Energy (2013) 2, 769­778 #12;Author's personal copy supercapacitors [1­6], fuel cells to the deposition of tin oxide nanoparticles. As a result, carbon cryogel­tin oxide nanocomposites with optimized

  12. Drying/self-assembly of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Plimpton, Steven James; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Grest, Gary Stephen

    2010-10-01

    The most feasible way to disperse particles in a bulk material or control their packing at a substrate is through fluidization in a carrier that can be processed with well-known techniques such as spin, drip and spray coating, fiber drawing, and casting. The next stage in the processing is often solidification involving drying by solvent evaporation. While there has been significant progress in the past few years in developing discrete element numerical methods to model dense nanoparticle dispersion/suspension rheology which properly treat the hydrodynamic interactions of the solvent, these methods cannot at present account for the volume reduction of the suspension due to solvent evaporation. As part of LDRD project FY-101285 we have developed and implemented methods in the current suite of discrete element methods to remove solvent particles and volume, and hence solvent mass from the liquid/vapor interface of a suspension to account for volume reduction (solvent drying) effects. To validate the methods large scale molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to follow the evaporation process at the microscopic scale.

  13. Airbrushed Nickel Nanoparticles for Large-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarac, Mehmet; ANDERSON, BRYAN; Pearce, Ryan; Railsback, Justin; Oni, Adedapo; White, Ryan M.; Hensley, Dale K; Lebeau, James M; Melechko, Anatoli; Tracy, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using Ni nanoparticle (NP) catalysts that were deposited by airbrushing onto Si, Al, Cu, and Ti substrates. Airbrushing is a simple method for depositing catalyst NPs over large areas that is compatible with roll-to-roll processing. The distribution and morphology of VACNFs are affected by the airbrushing parameters and the composition of the metal foil. Highly concentrated Ni NPs in heptane give more uniform distributions than pentane and hexanes, resulting in more uniform coverage of VACNFs. For VACNF growth on metal foils, Si micropowder was added as a precursor for Si-enriched coatings formed in situ on the VACNFs that impart mechanical rigidity. Interactions between the catalyst NPs and the metal substrates impart control over the VACNF morphology. Growth of carbon nanostructures on Cu is particularly noteworthy because the miscibility of Ni with Cu poses challenges for VACNF growth, and carbon nanostructures anchored to Cu substrates are desired as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and for thermal interface materials.

  14. The luminescence of BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles upon high-energy excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Halyatkin, O. O.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Mitina, N. E.; Zaichenko, A. S.; Rodnyi, P. A.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Gektin, A. V.

    2014-08-07

    The dependence of X-ray excited luminescence intensity on BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size was studied. A sharp decrease of self-trapped exciton luminescence intensity was observed when the nanoparticle size is less than 80?nm. The main mechanism of the luminescence quenching is caused by the escape of electrons from the nanoparticles. Escape of electrons from nanoparticles is confirmed by the considerable increase of luminescence intensity of the polystyrene scintillator with embedded BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles comparing with pure polystyrene scintillator.

  15. Determination of the paradihlorobenzene and paradibromobenzene solid solutions nanoparticles structure via Raman spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korshunov, M A

    2012-01-01

    We measured the small frequencies Raman spectrum of the paradihlorobenzene and paradihlorobenzene solid solution nanoparticles with the size about 100 nanometers. Values of frequencies of lines decrease. The size of nanoparticles was determined by the electronic microscope. Calculations of nanoparticles structure were done using the method of molecular dynamics and histograms of nanoparticles spectra were calculated via the Dyne's method. The result is that the Raman spectrum is the sum of spectra from the central part of the nanoparticle and superficial structures with smaller concentration of paradihlorobenzene.

  16. Stabilization of colloidal suspensions by means of highly-charged nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiwen Liu; Erik Luijten

    2004-12-22

    We employ a novel Monte Carlo simulation scheme to elucidate the stabilization of neutral colloidal microspheres by means of highly-charged nanoparticles [V. Tohver et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 8950 (2001)]. In accordance with the experimental observations, we find that small nanoparticle concentrations induce an effective repulsion that prevents gelation caused by the intrinsic van der Waals attraction between colloids. Higher nanoparticle concentrations induce an attractive potential which is, however, qualitatively different from the regular depletion attraction. We also show how colloid-nanoparticle size asymmetry and nanoparticle charge can be used to manipulate the effective interactions.

  17. Synthesis of CdS nanoparticles for photocatalytic application of methyleneblue degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthuraj, V.; Umadevi, M.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Kajamuhideen, M. S.

    2014-04-24

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of cadmium acetate with thiourea in the presence and absence of methylene blue dye (MB). The nanoparticles were characterized by, XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis. XRD study shows the presence of hexagonal phase for the nanoparticles whereas in case of the bulk samples only the hexagonal phase is observed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) showed a strong interaction of methyl groups with CdS nanoparticles. The degradation of methylene blue was analysed using UV-Vis absorbance spectrum. Thus the results authenticate that methylene blue dye influences the structural and optical properties of the CdS nanoparticles.

  18. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  19. Nanoparticle Technology for Biorefining of Non-Food Source Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruski, Marek; Trewyn, Brian G.; Lee, Young-Jin; Lin, Victor S.-Y.

    2013-01-22

    The goal of this proposed work is to develop and optimize the synthesis of mesoporous nanoparticle materials that are able to selectively sequester fatty acids from hexane extracts from algae, and to catalyze their transformation, as well as waste oils, into biodiesel. The project involves studies of the interactions between the functionalized MSN surface and the sequestering molecules. We investigate the mechanisms of selective extraction of fatty acids and conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into biodiesel by the produced nanoparticles. This knowledge is used to further improve the properties of the mesoporous nanoparticle materials for both tasks. Furthermore, we investigate the strategies for scaling the synthesis of the catalytic nanomaterials up from the current pilot plant scale to industrial level, such that the biodiesel obtained with this technology can successfully compete with food crop-based biodiesel and petroleum diesel.

  20. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guilei, E-mail: sunguilei@126.com [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, Xiaojie, E-mail: dalian03@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang, Qiquan [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Yan, Honghao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  1. Size dependence of the Directional Scattering Conditions on Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Camara, Braulio; Cuadrado, Alexander; Urruchi, Virginia; Sanchez-Pena, Jose Manuel; Vergaz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The resonant modes observed in semiconductor nanoparticles and the coherence interaction between them, producing directional light scattering, may be very interesting for CMOS integrated all-optical devices. In these systems the control over the light scattering should be crucial, as well as the strength of this control. Fabrication parameters such as the size and shape of the nanoparticles and the optical properties of the environment can strongly affect to the emergence of these phenomena. In this work, we numerically explore the size dependence of the directional scattering conditions of semiconductor nanoparticles. Several semiconductor materials and a large size range have been considered to be a reference for further works. An interesting and unexpected linear behavior has been observed.

  2. Directed assembly of discrete gold nanoparticle groupings usingbranched DNA scaffolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claridge, Shelley A.; Goh, Sarah L.; Frechet, Jean M.J.; Williams, Shara C.; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-09-14

    The concept of self-assembled dendrimers is explored for the creation of discrete nanoparticle assemblies. Hybridization of branched DNA trimers and nanoparticle-DNA conjugates results in the synthesis of nanoparticle trimer and tetramer complexes. Multiple tetramer architectures are investigated, utilizing Au-DNA conjugates with varying secondary structural motifs. Hybridization products are analyzed by gel electrophoresis, and discrete bands are observed corresponding to structures with increasing numbers of hybridization events. Samples extracted from each band are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, and statistics compiled from micrographs are used to compare assembly characteristics for each architecture. Asymmetric structures are also produced in which both 5 and 10 nm Au particles are assembled on branched scaffolds.

  3. Nanoparticles at liquid interfaces: Rotational dynamics and angular locking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona; Koplik, Joel; Colosqui, Carlos E.

    2014-01-07

    Nanoparticles with different surface morphologies that straddle the interface between two immiscible liquids are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology employed allows us to compute the interfacial free energy at different angular orientations of the nanoparticle. Due to their atomistic nature, the studied nanoparticles present both microscale and macroscale geometrical features and cannot be accurately modeled as a perfectly smooth body (e.g., spheres and cylinders). Under certain physical conditions, microscale features can produce free energy barriers that are much larger than the thermal energy of the surrounding media. The presence of these energy barriers can effectively “lock” the particle at specific angular orientations with respect to the liquid-liquid interface. This work provides new insights on the rotational dynamics of Brownian particles at liquid interfaces and suggests possible strategies to exploit the effects of microscale features with given geometric characteristics.

  4. The influence of size, shape, and surface coating on the stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulvihill, M.J.; Habas, S.E.; La Plante, I.J.; Wan, J.; Mokari, T.

    2010-09-03

    In response to the rapid development and emerging commercialization of nanoparticles, fundamental studies concerning the fate of nanoparticles in the environment are needed. Precise control over the nanoparticle size, shape, and surface coating of cadmium selenide particles modified with thiolate ligands has been used to analyze the effects of nanoparticle design on their stability in aqueous environments. Nanoparticle stability was quantified using the concept of critical coagulation concentration (CCC) in solutions of sodium chloride. These investigations characterized the instability of the ligand coatings, which varied directly with chain length of the capping ligands. The stability of the ligand coatings were characterized as a function of time, pH, and ionic strength. Ligand dissociation has been shown to be a primary mechanism for nanoparticle aggregation when short-chain (C2-C6) ligands are used in the ligand shell. Stable nanoparticle suspensions prepared with long chain ligands (C11) were used to characterize nanoparticle stability as a function of size and shape. A linear relationship between particle surface area and the CCC was discovered and was found to be independent of nanoparticle shape. Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface coating demonstrated the importance of ligand stability and particle surface area for the prediction of nanoparticle stability.

  5. Generic approach for synthesizing asymmetric nanoparticles and nanoassemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Yugang; Hu, Yongxing

    2015-05-26

    A generic route for synthesis of asymmetric nanostructures. This approach utilizes submicron magnetic particles (Fe.sub.3O.sub.4--SiO.sub.2) as recyclable solid substrates for the assembly of asymmetric nanostructures and purification of the final product. Importantly, an additional SiO.sub.2 layer is employed as a mediation layer to allow for selective modification of target nanoparticles. The partially patched nanoparticles are used as building blocks for different kinds of complex asymmetric nanostructures that cannot be fabricated by conventional approaches. The potential applications such as ultra-sensitive substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been included.

  6. Structure of graphene oxide dispersed with ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Rishikesh Pandey, Devendra K.; Khare, P. S.

    2014-10-15

    Graphene has been proposed as a promising two-dimensional nanomaterial with outstanding electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties for many applications. In present work a process of dispersion of graphene oxide with ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol solution with different pH values, have been studied. Samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-visible spectroscopy and particles size measurement. The results analysis indicates overall improved emission spectrum. It has been observed that the average diameter of RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide) decreases in presence of ZnO nanoparticles from 3.8?m to 0.41?m.

  7. Direct observation of two-step crystallization in nanoparticle superlattice formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Lee, Won Chul; Geissler, Phillip L.; Rabani, Eran; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-10-06

    Direct imaging of nanoparticle solutions by liquid phase transmission electron microscopy has enabled unique in-situ studies of nanoparticle motion and growth. In the present work, we report on real-time formation of two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays in the very low diffusive limit, where nanoparticles are mainly driven by capillary forces and solvent fluctuations. We find that superlattice formation appears to be segregated into multiple regimes. Initially, the solvent front drags the nanoparticles, condensing them into an amorphous agglomerate. Subsequently, the nanoparticle crystallization into an array is driven by local fluctuations. Following the crystallization event, superlattice growth can also occur via the addition of individual nanoparticles drawn from outlying regions by different solvent fronts. The dragging mechanism is consistent with simulations based on a coarse-grained lattice gas model at the same limit.

  8. A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    , fuel cells, solar cells Introduction Energy has become the most important problem facing human- ity 1 to be promising for various energy applications including solar cells 12,13 , fuel cells 14,15 , Li-ion batteries redox reactions 25 . CNTs coated with nanoparticles of CdSe and CdS have been dem- onstrated

  9. Polymer Crowding and Shape Distributions in Polymer-Nanoparticle Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Kang Lim; Alan R. Denton

    2014-10-24

    Macromolecular crowding can influence polymer shapes, which is important for understanding the thermodynamic stability of polymer solutions and the structure and function of biopolymers (proteins, RNA, DNA) under confinement. We explore the influence of nanoparticle crowding on polymer shapes via Monte Carlo simulations and free-volume theory of a coarse-grained model of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures. Exploiting the geometry of random walks, we model polymer coils as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor. Accounting for the entropic cost of a nanoparticle penetrating a larger polymer coil, we compute the crowding-induced shift in the shape distributions, radius of gyration, and asphericity of ideal polymers in a theta solvent. With increased nanoparticle crowding, we find that polymers become more compact (smaller, more spherical), in agreement with predictions of free-volume theory. Our approach can be easily extended to nonideal polymers in good solvents and used to model conformations of biopolymers in crowded environments.

  10. Supporting Information for: Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S1 Supporting Information for: Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter *Corresponding Author: blogan@ psu.edu Number of pages: 5 Number of figures: 4 #12;S2 Figure SI1. Palladium. Starting concentration of palladium was 100 mg/L Pd(II). Six hours was chosen as the incubation time

  11. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bonnie

    2014-08-19

    , such as buckminsterfullerene (C60)[5], carbon nanotubes (CNTs)[5], and nanodiamonds[5]. Their special chemical and physical properties point to a high potential in applications in industry and medicine. 1.3.2 Fluorescent carbon nano-particles discovered by accident...

  12. Complement receptor type 2conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    ). Cross-linked iron oxide (CLIO) and other iron oxide formulations affect T2 primarily and lead+), accelerate T1 relaxation and lead to brighter contrast images. The superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOComplement receptor type 2­conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles [CR2-Fc-SPIO] Kam

  13. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions Shawn A. Putnam,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions Shawn A. Putnam,a David G. Cahill, and Paul V We describe an optical beam deflection technique for measurements of the thermal diffusivity of fluid the thermal conductivity of ethanol-water mixtures; in nearly pure ethanol, the increase in thermal

  14. Formation of Iron Nanoparticles and Increase in Iron Reactivity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    each on presieved (goethite suspensions. Microscopic analyses of the processed soil and goethite samples reveal the neo-formation of Fe-rich nanoparticle aggregates, which were(III) oxide (mainly goethite or hematite) and clay minerals. At circumneutral pH, the solubility of Fe

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte-Coated Gold Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Christopher

    . Consequently, poor polymer coverage can decrease the stability of colloidal suspensions required for many sulfonate) (PSS) via electrostatic self-assembly. The suspension stability, monitored by the gold surface. These differences in stability of the multilayer components and the nanoparticle suspension are rationalized

  16. Nanoparticles are generated on behalf of the manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, catalysts and hydrogen storage materials. Nanoparticles have been. Optimization A team of TU Delft scientists succeeded in developing an optimized spark discharge based method this optimized spark discharge based method is unique concerning purity of the particles produced and its

  17. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  18. Aerosol Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of Magnetic Iron Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rapidly over the past decades, such as mechanical milling, spray drying, sol-gel, sonochemistry, etcAerosol Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of Magnetic Iron Nanoparticles D. Kim1,a , E.S. Vasilieva2,b, evaporated and transported by carrier gas flow to the preliminary heated tubular furnace for decomposition

  19. Generation of Core/shell Nanoparticles with Laser Ablation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Young Kyong

    2012-10-19

    Two types of core/shell nanoparticles (CS-NPs) generation based on laser ablation are developed in this study, namely, double pulse laser ablation and laser ablation in colloidal solutions. In addition to the study of the generation mechanism of CS...

  20. Silica Coating of hydrophilic SPIO nanoparticles via microemulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    Silica Coating of hydrophilic SPIO nanoparticles via microemulsion Mehdi Sadegh Ahmadi, Lionel Silica coating is a well-known method for surface modification of varoius nano-sized materials in order to improve their colloi- dal and chemical stability. Silica coating can also be employed as an alternative

  1. Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Department of Chemical Engineering, Urmia University of Technology, Urmia 57155-419 ; Ghiaci, M.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (7–12 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ? An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ? WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 7–12 nm. ? Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ? WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ? Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UV–visible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 7–12 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 6–24 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

  2. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymeric pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 ?m YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.

  3. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymericmore »pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 ?m YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.« less

  4. Quantum Mechanics of Insitu Synthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles with in Anionic Microgels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza Wasif Baig; Muhammad Siddiq

    2013-05-28

    In this work, we discuss the quantum mechanics of many-body systems i.e. hybrid microgel consisting of negatively charged anionic microgels possessing thick sheath of water molecules solvating its protruding anionic moieties and nanoparticle captivated with in it. Thermodynamic feasibility of synthesis of particular nanoparticle with in the microgel is dependent upon the magnitude of interaction between nanoparticle, water molecules and microgel relative to sum of magnitude of self-interaction between counterions and interaction between counterions and microgel. Nanoparticles synthesized with in the microgels have thick electronic cloud that oscillates under the influence of net interaction potential of charged anionic moieties and solvent water molecules. Hamiltonian describing energy of oscillating electronic cloud wrapped around nanoparticle is mathematically derived to be equal to product of integral of electron density and its position vector overall space multiplied with net electric force acting on the oscillating electronic cloud of nanoparticle.

  5. Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589

    2014-03-10

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

  6. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  7. Tin oxide thick film by doping rare earth for detecting traces of CO{sub 2}: Operating in oxygen-free atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Ya; Zhang, Guozhu; Zhang, Shunping; Zeng, Dawen; Xie, Changsheng, E-mail: csxie@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • La, Gd, and Lu doped SnO{sub 2} with their sensing properties toward CO{sub 2} were compared. • The microstructures of SnO{sub 2}-based nanoparticles were elaborately characterized. • La-SnO{sub 2} thick film shows superior response toward trace ppm CO{sub 2}. • Our sensing material can be recommended to employ in oxygen-free environment. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} thick films doped with atomic ratios ranging from 0 up to 8 at.% La, 8 at.% Gd, 8 at.% Lu were fabricated, respectively, via hydrothermal and impregnation methods. The crystal phase, morphology, and chemical composition of the SnO{sub 2}-based nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, EDX, HRTEM and XPS. Sensing properties of La-SnO{sub 2}, Gd-SnO{sub 2}, Lu-SnO{sub 2} films, as well as the pure SnO{sub 2} film, were analyzed toward CO{sub 2} in the absence of O{sub 2}. It was found that the optimal doping element was La and the best doping ratio was 4 at.%. The maximum response appeared at an operating temperature of 250 °C, on which condition the 4 at.% La-SnO{sub 2} exhibited a remarkable improvement of response from 5.12 to 29.8 when increasing CO{sub 2} concentration from 50 to 500 ppm. Furthermore, the working mechanism underlying such enhancement in CO{sub 2}-sensing functions by La additive in the absence of O{sub 2} was proposed and discussed.

  8. Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation and comparison of the measurements of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using the European Particle Measurement Programme (PMP) system and catalytic stripper

  9. Design and construction of a Helmholtz coil apparatus for nanoparticle heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, Jessica A. (Jessica Ann)

    2006-01-01

    Manipulating biomolecules can lead to better understanding how specific biological components function and can result in new therapeutic techniques. Biomolecules are manipulated by magnetically heating conductive nanoparticles ...

  10. Compact zwitterion-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, He

    We have recently developed compact and water-soluble zwitterionic dopamine sulfonate (ZDS) ligand coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for use in various biomedical applications. The defining ...

  11. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation Jeong Y.that the catalytic activity under CO oxidation with partiallayers on catalytic activity during CO oxidation is not

  12. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jeong Y.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation Jeong Y.that the catalytic activity under CO oxidation with partiallayers on catalytic activity during CO oxidation is not

  13. Extensional rheology of shear-thickening fumed silica nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    polyethylene oxide solution Sunilkumar Khandavalli and Jonathan P. Rothsteina) Mechanical and Industrial rheology of fumed silica nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous polyethylene oxide (PEO) solution

  14. Natural nanoparticle structure, properties and reactivity from X-ray studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    types in an ?-FeOOH (goethite) nanoparticle as a function ofenvironments in nano- goethite crystallites based on theof a different habit of goethite. Note internal contrast

  15. High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles and Polymers Enabled by Vapor Permeable Polymer Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demko, Michael Thomas

    2012-01-01

    conduc- tors for flexible electronics. Journal of theelectrodes on flexible electronics. 7,91 When nanoparticleNanoscale patterning and electronics on flexible sub- strate

  16. Laser Assisted Nanomanufacturing with Solution Processed Nanoparticles for Low-cost Electronics and Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Heng

    2009-01-01

    Fig. 1. 1 Flexible electronics and flexible solar cells. Inof metal oxide based electronics on heat sensitive flexibleNanoparticles for Low-cost Electronics and Photovoltaics by

  17. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  18. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of active nanoparticle additive for lubricatns that will minimize sulfur and phosporous content in engine oil, and lower ash forming elements

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan-Alginate Nanoparticles for Trans-Cinnamaldehyde Entrapment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loquercio, Andre S

    2014-11-04

    Trans-cinnamaldehyde incorporated chitosan and alginate nanoparticles were synthesized using the ionic gelation and polyelectrolyte complexation technique. Alginate, chitosan, calcium chloride, and trans-cinnamaldehyde at predetermined...

  20. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Rezaie, Sassan; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ? Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ? Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  1. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of tin over the energy range of 29-60 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonge, Martin D. de; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Paterson, David; Kanter, Elliot P.; Southworth, Stephen H.; Young, Linda; Beno, Mark A.; Linton, Jennifer A.; Jennings, Guy [X-Ray Operations and Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron Project, Major Projects Victoria, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); BESSRC-CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60 keV to 0.04-3 % accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2 %. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f{sub 2} is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2 % persist between calculated and observed values.

  2. Trapping and aerogelation of nanoparticles in negative gravity hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Novosselov, Igor V.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmüller, Hans; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Stipe, Christopher B.

    2014-06-16

    We report the experimental realization of continuous carbon aerogel production using a flame aerosol reactor by operating it in negative gravity (?g; up-side-down configuration). Buoyancy opposes the fuel and air flow forces in ?g, which eliminates convectional outflow of nanoparticles from the flame and traps them in a distinctive non-tipping, flicker-free, cylindrical flame body, where they grow to millimeter-size aerogel particles and gravitationally fall out. Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that a closed-loop recirculation zone is set up in ?g flames, which reduces the time to gel for nanoparticles by ?10{sup 6}?s, compared to positive gravity (upward rising) flames. Our results open up new possibilities of one-step gas-phase synthesis of a wide variety of aerogels on an industrial scale.

  3. Gamma-Free Neutron Detector Based upon Lithium Phosphate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Wallace

    2007-08-28

    A gamma-free neutron-sensitive scintillator is needed to enhance radiaition sensing and detection for nonproliferation applications. Such a scintillator would allow very large detectors to be placed at the perimeter of spent-fuel storage facilities at commercial nuclear power plants, so that any movement of spontaneously emitted neutrons from spent nuclear fuel or weapons grade plutonium would be noted in real-time. This task is to demonstrate that the technology for manufacturing large panels of fluor-doped plastic containing lithium-6 phosphate nanoparticles can be achieved. In order to detect neutrons, the nanoparticles must be sufficiently small so that the plastic remains transparent. In this way, the triton and alpha particles generated by the capture of the neutron will result in a photon burst that can be coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WLS) producing an optical signal of about ten nanoseconds duration signaling the presence of a neutron emitting source.

  4. Synthesis of SnO{sub 2} Nanoparticles Using Ultrasonication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Sanhita; Devi, P. Sujatha

    2010-10-04

    The use of ultrasonic energy for chemical synthesis has recently become an interesting and growing area of research. Using this form of energy, we have synthesized nanoparticles of SnO{sub 2}(8-30 nm) at room temperature by a sonication assisted precipitation technique. In order to understand the effect of ultrasonic energy on particle size and their distribution, the precipitation time was varied during the preparation. A sonication time of 3 h was found to be optimum to produce SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles having size below 10 nm. We found that a gradual increase of the sonication time gradually decreases the particle size with interesting morphology and increased surface area. The butane sensing properties of the synthesized powders exhibited a direct influence of the sonication time on the sensing properties. A 3 h sonicated sample, exhibited a maximum response of around 98.88% towards 5000 ppm butane at 450 deg. C with a fast recovery time.

  5. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  6. Interactions between silver nanoparticles and polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, H. L.; Wu, C. M.; Lin, F. D.; Rick, J.

    2014-08-15

    The interaction of polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofibers with silver (Ag) nanoparticles (mean diameter 8nm) has been modeled using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The physical adsorption of PVA through the hydroxyl group, to the Ag, and its corresponding molecular orientation was compared with experimental results obtained from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the same material. A good agreement was found between the computational model of the vibrational spectrum of the adsorbate and the experimentally observed SERS. In general, aliphatic capping molecules are used to passivate the surface of Ag{sub 55} nanocrystals (55 = atomic number of Ag). In this study, a DFT simulation was employed to show binding energies and electron contour map analyses of Ag{sub 55} with PVA. Here we show that the PVA interacts with the Ag nanoparticle's surface, through the OH group, thereby contributing significantly to the increase in SERS activity.

  7. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnette, Drew [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Roper, D. Keith, E-mail: dkroper@uark.edu [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  8. Optical properties of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshy, Jiji, E-mail: drkcgeorge@gmail.com; Chandran, Anoop, E-mail: drkcgeorge@gmail.com; Samuel, Soosen, E-mail: drkcgeorge@gmail.com; George, K. C., E-mail: drkcgeorge@gmail.com [Department of Physics S.B.College Changanassery, Kerala, 686101 (India)

    2014-10-15

    SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a sol-gel technique. The samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM, TEM, UV, Photoluminescence (PL) and Raman studies. The obtained product has a particle size of 12 nm with absorption peak at 278 nm. The absorption peak shows a blue shift when compared to the bulk due to quantum confinement. The FTIR spectrum of the prepared SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibits a broad absorption band between 3100 and 3400 cm{sup ?1} as well as a narrower peak at 1600 cm{sup ?1}. The PL spectrum shows two strong peaks at 420 and 484 nm and broad peak between 430 and 470 nm.

  9. Radiation pressure efficiency measurements of nanoparticle coated microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Soo Y.; Taylor, Joseph D.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Hart, Sean J.; Terray, Alex

    2013-12-02

    Experimental measurements of the radiation pressure efficiency (Q{sub pr}) for several microparticles have been compared to theoretical calculations extrapolated from the Bohren-Huffman code for Mie scattering of coated particles. An increased shift of the Q{sub pr} parameter was observed for 2??m SiO{sub 2} core particles coated with nanoparticles of higher refractive indices. Coatings of 14?nm melamine particles were found to increase the Q{sub pr} parameter 135 times over similar coatings using SiO{sub 2} particles of the same size. While a coating of 100?nm polystyrene particles also showed a significant increase, they did not agree well with theoretical values. It is hypothesized that other factors such as increased scatter, drag, and finite coating coverage are no longer negligible for coatings using nanoparticles in this size regime.

  10. Binary nanoparticle superlattices of soft-particle systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Travesset, Alex

    2015-07-20

    The solid-phase diagram of binary systems consisting of particles of diameter ?A=? and ?B=?? (??1) interacting with an inverse p = 12 power law is investigated as a paradigm of a soft potential. In addition to the diameter ratio ? that characterizes hard-sphere models, the phase diagram is a function of an additional parameter that controls the relative interaction strength between the different particle types. Phase diagrams are determined from extremes of thermodynamic functions by considering 15 candidate lattices. In general, it is shown that the phase diagram of a soft repulsive potential leads to the morphological diversity observed inmore »experiments with binary nanoparticles, thus providing a general framework to understand their phase diagrams. In addition, particular emphasis is shown to the two most successful crystallization strategies so far: evaporation of solvent from nanoparticles with grafted hydrocarbon ligands and DNA programmable self-assembly.« less

  11. Reactive self-heating model of aluminum spherical nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karen S. Martirosyan; Maxim Zyskin

    2012-12-17

    Aluminum-oxygen reaction is important in many highly energetic, high pressure generating systems. Recent experiments with nanostructured thermites suggest that oxidation of aluminum nanoparticles occurs in a few microseconds. Such rapid reaction cannot be explained by a conventional diffusion-based mechanism. We present a rapid oxidation model of a spherical aluminum nanoparticle, using Cabrera-Mott moving boundary mechanism, and taking self-heating into account. In our model, electric potential solves the nonlinear Poisson equation. In contrast with the Coulomb potential, a "double-layer" type solution for the potential and self-heating leads to enhanced oxidation rates. At maximal reaction temperature of 2000 C, our model predicts overall oxidation time scale in microseconds range, in agreement with experimental evidence.

  12. Reactive self-heating model of aluminum spherical nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martirosyan, Karen S

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-oxygen reaction is important in many highly energetic, high pressure generating systems. Recent experiments with nanostructured thermites suggest that oxidation of aluminum nanoparticles occurs in a few microseconds. Such rapid reaction cannot be explained by a conventional diffusion-based mechanism. We present a rapid oxidation model of a spherical aluminum nanoparticle, using Cabrera-Mott moving boundary mechanism, and taking self-heating into account. In our model, electric potential solves the nonlinear Poisson equation. In contrast with the Coulomb potential, a "double-layer" type solution for the potential and self-heating leads to enhanced oxidation rates. At maximal reaction temperature of 2000 C, our model predicts overall oxidation time scale in microseconds range, in agreement with experimental evidence.

  13. Size dependent phase diagrams of Nickel-Carbon nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnin, Yann; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Bichara, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The carbon rich phase diagrams of nickel-carbon nanoparticles, relevant to catalysis and catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes, are calculated for system sizes up to about 3 nanometers (807 Ni atoms). A tight binding model for interatomic interactions drives the Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations used to locate solid, core/shell and liquid stability domains, as a function of size, temperature and carbon chemical potential or concentration. Melting is favored by carbon incorporation from the nanoparticle surface, resulting in a strong relative lowering of the eutectic temperature and a phase diagram topology different from the bulk one. This should be taken into account in our understanding of the nanotube growth mechanisms.

  14. Phase behavior and material properties of hollow nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. S. Schwarz; S. A. Safran

    2000-09-02

    Effective pair potentials for hollow nanoparticles like the ones made from carbon (fullerenes) or metal dichalcogenides (inorganic fullerenes) consist of a hard core repulsion and a deep, but short-ranged, van der Waals attraction. We investigate them for single- and multi-walled nanoparticles and show that in both cases, in the limit of large radii the interaction range scales inversely with the radius, $R$, while the well depth scales linearly with $R$. We predict the values of the radius $R$ and the wall thickness $h$ at which the gas-liquid coexistence disappears from the phase diagram. We also discuss unusual material properties of the solid, which include a large heat of sublimation and a small surface energy.

  15. Surface species produced in the radiolysis of zirconia nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrasco-Flores, Eduardo A.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2007-12-21

    Modifications to water-zirconia nanoparticle interfaces induced by {gamma} irradiation have been examined using diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), Raman scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Spectroscopy with in situ heating was used to probe variations in the dissociatively bound chemisorbed water on the zirconia nanoparticles following evaporation of the physisorbed water. DRIFT spectra show that the bridged Zr-OH-Zr species decreases relative to the terminal Zr-OH species upon irradiation. No variation is observed with Raman scattering, indicating that the zirconia morphology is unchanged. EPR measurements suggest the possible formation of the superoxide ion, presumably by modification of the surface OH groups. Trapped electrons and interstitial H atoms are also observed by EPR.

  16. The characterization of Co-nanoparticles supported on graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazylewski, P; Kukharenko, A I; Kurmaev, E Z; Hunt, A; Moewes, A; Lee, Y H; Cholakh, S O; Chang, G S

    2015-01-01

    The results of density functional theory calculations and measurements using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of Co-nanoparticles dispersed on graphene/Cu are presented. It is found that for low cobalt thickness (0.02 nm - 0.06 nm) the Co forms islands distributed non-homogeneously which are strongly oxidized under exposure to air to form cobalt oxides. At greater thicknesses up to 2 nm the upper Co-layers are similarly oxidized whereas the lower layers contacting the graphene remain metallic. The measurements indicate a Co2+ oxidation state with no evidence of a 3+ state appearing at any Co thickness, consistent with CoO and Co[OH]2. The results show that thicker Co (2nm) coverage induces the formation of a protective oxide layer while providing the magnetic properties of Co nanoparticles.

  17. Investigation into the molar feeding ratio and temperature dependence on the replacement reaction between platinum ions and silver nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuk, Archimedes

    2010-01-01

    The deliberate structuring of bimetallic nanoparticles has useful applications in both fuel cell applications and biomedical research. This thesis studies the replacement reaction between platinum ions and silver nanoparticles, ...

  18. A modified method for barium titanate nanoparticles synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashiri, R., E-mail: ro_ashiri@iaud.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dezful Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 313, Dezful (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nemati, Ali [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sasani Ghamsari, M. [Solid State Lasers Research Group, Laser and Optics Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Solid State Lasers Research Group, Laser and Optics Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanjabi, S. [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aalipour, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: TEM micrograph of BaTiO{sub 3} powders synthesized at 800 Degree-Sign C for 1 h and SAED pattern (inset) of BaTiO{sub 3} powders. In this research, a modified, cost efficient and quick sol-gel procedure was used for preparation of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified process was used for preparation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modified process led to preparation of finer BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles in shorter period of time and lower temperature contrary to previous researches. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed procedure seems to be more preferable for mass production. -- Abstract: In this research, a modified, cost effective sol-gel procedure applied to synthesize BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles. XRD and electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) applied for microstructural characterization of powders. The obtained results showed that the type of precursors, their ratio and the hydrolysis conditions had a great effect on time, temperature and therefore the costs of the synthesis process. By selection, utilization of optimized precursor's type, hydrolysis conditions, fine cubic BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized at low temperature and in short time span (1 h calcination at 800 Degree-Sign C). The proposed procedure seems to be more preferable for mass production. The result indicated that the polymorphic transformation to tetragonal (ferroelectric characteristic) occurred at 900 Degree-Sign C, which might be an indication of being nanosized.

  19. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  20. Self-assembly of amphiphilic peanut-shaped nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Whitelam; Stefan A. F. Bon

    2010-02-19

    We use computer simulation to investigate the self-assembly of Janus-like amphiphilic peanut-shaped nanoparticles, finding phases of clusters, bilayers and micelles in accord with ideas of packing familiar from the study of molecular surfactants. However, packing arguments do not explain the hierarchical self-assembly dynamics that we observe, nor the coexistence of bilayers and faceted polyhedra. This coexistence suggests that experimental realizations of our model can achieve multipotent assembly of either of two competing ordered structures.

  1. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qingwu; Li, Wenguang; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  2. Synthesis of zirconium oxide nanoparticle by sol-gel technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, H. S.; Ahmad, A.; Hamzah, H. [School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Zirconium oxide nanoparticle is synthesized using sol-gel technique. Various mole ratio of ammonia solution and nitric acid relative to zirconium propoxide is added in the reaction to study the effect on the crystallinity and particle size on zirconium oxide particle. Zirconium oxide synthesized with nitric acid have the smallest particle size under FESEM image and show the increasing formation of crystalline tetragonal phase under XRD diffractogram.

  3. Quantum cutting in nanoparticles producing two green photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorbeer, C [Ruhr-Universitat Bochum; Mudring, Anja -V [Ames Laboratory

    2014-01-01

    A synthetic route to nanoscale NaGdF4:Ln is presented which allows for quantum cutting based on the Gd-Er-Tb system. This shows, that cross-relaxation and other energy transfer processes necessary for multiphoton emission can be achieved in nanoparticles even if the large surface and the potentially huge amount of killer traps would suggest a lack of subsequent emission.

  4. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  5. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor; Huang, Baiyu; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Woodfield, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

  6. An Optimized Nanoparticle Separator Enabled by Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2010-01-01

    Size based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism to deposit/etch nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition (EBID) was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam interaction region (BIR). Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub 50nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects), (2) preserved the fidelity of spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  7. Nanoparticle preparation of Mefenamic acid by electrospray drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolkepali, Nurul Karimah, E-mail: fitrah@salam.uitm.edu.my; Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu, E-mail: fitrah@salam.uitm.edu.my; Anuar, Nornizar [Faculty Of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Naim, M. Nazli [Food and Process Department, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bakar, Mohd Rushdi Abu [Kulliyyah of Pharmacy, International Islamic University Malaysia, P.O Box 141, 25710, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2014-02-24

    Nanoparticles preparation of Mefenamic acid (MA) by using an electrospray drying method was conducted in this study. Electrospray drying is a process that uses electrostatic force to disperse a conductive liquid stream into fine charged droplets through the coulomb fission of charges in the liquid and finally dry into fine particles. Electrospray drying modes operation usually in Taylor cone jet, and it was formed by controlling applied voltage and liquid flow rate. A conductive liquid (2.77–8.55?Scm{sup ?1}) which is MA solution was prepared by using acetone with concentration 0.041 and 0.055 M before pumping at a flow rate of 3–6ml/h. By applying the applied voltage at 1.3–1.5 kV, Taylor cone jet mode was formed prior to the electrospray. During electrospray drying process, solvent evaporation from the droplet was occurring that leads to coulomb disruption and may generate to nanoparticles. The dried nanoparticles were collected on a grounded substrate that was placed at varying distance from the electrospray. MA particle with size range of 100–400 nm were produced by electrospray drying process. Characterization of particles by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that particles formed into polymorph I.

  8. Ferroplasmons: Intense Localized Surface Plasmons in Metal-Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachan, Ritesh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Malasi, Abhinav [ORNL; Ge, Jingxuan [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Yadavali, Sagar P [ORNL; Gangopadhyay, Anup [Washington University, St. Louis; Krishna, Dr. Hare [Washington University, St. Louis; Garcia, Hernando [Southern Illinois University; Duscher, Gerd J M [ORNL; Kalyanaraman, Ramki [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of photons with matter at length scales far below their wavelengths has given rise to many novel phenomena, including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, LSPR with narrow bandwidth (BW) is observed only in a select few noble metals, and ferromagnets are not among them. Here, we report the discovery of LSPR in ferromagnetic Co and CoFe alloy (8% Fe) in contact with Ag in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser dewetting. These plasmons in metal-erromagnetic nanostructures, or ferroplasmons (FP) for short, are in the visible spectrum with comparable intensity and BW to those of the LSPRs from the Ag regions. This finding was enabled by electron energy-loss mapping across individual nanoparticles in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The appearance of the FP is likely due to plasmonic interaction between the contacting Ag and Co nanoparticles. Since there is no previous evidence for materials that simultaneously show ferromagnetism and such intense LSPRs, this discovery may lead to the design of improved plasmonic materials and applications. It also demonstrates that materials with interesting plasmonic properties can be synthesized using bimetallic nanostructures in contact with each other.

  9. CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

  10. Evaporation-Driven Fast Crystallization of 3D Micro- and Nano-particle Assemblies via Micro Mechanical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sun

    2012-01-01

    3D ZnO Nanoparticle Assemblies on Gold Electrodes A novel manufacturing method, “High resolution screen printing

  11. VOLUME 76, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 19 FEBRUARY 1996 Large Local-Field Corrections in Optical Rotatory Power of Quartz and Selenium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, John

    local fields are needed despite the vector character of light. A self-energy-corrected local-density for linearly polarized light. This phenomenon is described by the optical rotatory power r v nL 2 nR 2c, where-Field Corrections in Optical Rotatory Power of Quartz and Selenium Lars Jönsson,1 Zachary H. Levine,1,2 and John W

  12. Electromagnetic absorption mechanisms in metal nanospheres: Bulk and surface effects in radiofrequency-terahertz heating of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, George

    in radiofrequency-terahertz heating of nanoparticles G. W. Hanson,1,a) R. C. Monreal,2 and S. P. Apell3 1 Department on the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by metallic nanoparticles in the radio and far infrared frequency by which nonmagnetic metallic nanoparticles can absorb low frequency radiation, including both classical

  13. Non-Fourier heat transport in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles under ultrafast laser pulse excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Non-Fourier heat transport in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles under ultrafast laser and Baluchistan, Zahedan, Iran 10 PACS : Keywords : ballistic heat transfer, core-shell, nanoparticle, ultrafast laser Abstract15 Relaxation dynamics of embedded metal nanoparticles after ultrafast laser pulse

  14. Real-Time Imaging of Perivascular Transport of Nanoparticles During Convection-Enhanced Delivery in the Rat Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Chris B.

    , and nanoparticles infused into neural tissue localize in the perivascular spaces of blood vessels within the brain-time distribution of nanoparticles infused in the cortex of live, anesthetized rats via CED. Fluorescent nanoparticles of 24 and 100 nm nominal diameters were infused into rat cortex through microfluidic probes. We

  15. Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

  16. Laser desorption/ionization from nanostructured surfaces: nanowires, nanoparticle films and silicon microcolumn arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Laser desorption/ionization from nanostructured surfaces: nanowires, nanoparticle films and silicon for soft laser desorption/ionization (SLDI) mass spectrometry. Thin films of gold nanoparticles (with 12 to analyze a series of directly deposited polypeptide samples. In this new SLDI method, the required laser

  17. Targeting of nanoparticles to cell adhesion molecules for potential immune therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittasupho, Chuda

    2010-12-10

    , multivalent ICAM-1 or LFA-1 ligands were conjugated to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) to target the clustering of these receptors and increase the avidity of binding to ICAM-1 or LFA-1. Polymeric nanoparticles possess some advantages over other...

  18. Surface Functionalization of Silicon Nanoparticles Produced by Laser-Driven Pyrolysis of Silane followed by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Surface Functionalization of Silicon Nanoparticles Produced by Laser-Driven Pyrolysis of Silane. In Final Form: March 15, 2004 CO2 laser induced pyrolysis of silane was used to produce silicon quantities of silicon nanoparticles by laser-driven pyrolysis of silane followed by an HF- HNO3 etching

  19. Identifying low-coverage surface species on noble metal nanoparticles by DNP-NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on ?-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  20. Correlating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    Correlating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by micelle encapsulation and supported on -Al2O3 during the oxidation of methanol the pretreatment. KEYWORDS: platinum, methanol oxidation, operando, XAFS, EXAFS, XANES, alumina, nanoparticle, size

  1. Nanoparticle iron-phosphate anode material for Li-ion battery Dongyeon Son

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    density.1 The graphite generally used in lithium rechargeable batteries has a capacity of 372 mNanoparticle iron-phosphate anode material for Li-ion battery Dongyeon Son School of Materials rechargeable batteries. The electrochemical properties of the nanoparticle iron phosphates were characterized

  2. Solvent mediated assembly of nanoparticles confined in mesoporous alumina Kyle J. Alvine,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershan, Peter S.

    Solvent mediated assembly of nanoparticles confined in mesoporous alumina Kyle J. Alvine,1, * Diego solvent and confined within mesoporous alumina was probed in situ with small angle x-ray scattering of solvent condensed from an under- saturated vapor. Analysis indicated that the nanoparticles self

  3. A Solvent-Free Thermosponge Nanoparticle Platform for Efficient Delivery of Labile Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    A Solvent-Free Thermosponge Nanoparticle Platform for Efficient Delivery of Labile Proteins Won Il a solvent-free polymer thermo-expansion mechanism with clinical potential, capable of effectively delivering biological half-lives and efficacy in vivo. KEYWORDS: Nanoparticles, thermosponge, solvent-free, therapeutic

  4. A novel strategy for surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for lung cancer imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    A novel strategy for surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for lung-step procedure for the surface functionalization of SPIO nanoparticles with a lung cancer-targeting peptide and demonstrate high T2 relaxivity. The nanoprobes are specific in targeting avb6­expressing lung cancer cells

  5. Spin glass behavior in an interacting -Fe2O3 nanoparticle system D. Parker*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - 1 - Spin glass behavior in an interacting -Fe2O3 nanoparticle system D. Parker*1 , V. Dupuis+2 glass behavior of a concentrated assembly of interacting maghemite nanoparticles and compare it to that of canonical atomic spin glass systems. ac versus temperature and frequency measurements show evidence

  6. Remote control of ion channels and neurons through magnetic-field heating of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferkey, Denise

    Remote control of ion channels and neurons through magnetic-field heating of nanoparticles Heng stimulation1­3 has begun to unravel the neur- onal processing that controls certain animal behaviours4. Here, we show an approach based on radio-frequency magnetic-field heating of nanoparticles to remotely

  7. Hetero-Epitaxial Anion Exchange Yields Single-Crystalline Hollow Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Jun, Young-wook; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-08-26

    Anion exchange with S was performed on ZnO colloidal nanoparticles. The resulting hollow ZnS nanoparticles are crystal whose shape is dictated by the initial ZnO. Crystallographic and elemental analyses provide insight into the mechanism of the anion exchange.

  8. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ? A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ? The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ? The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 ?{sup 3} for bulk to 57 ?{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Detecting nanoparticles at radio frequencies: Jovian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    -by, when the on-board dust analyser recorded dust streams which were interpreted as nanoparticles moving discovery of nanoparticles accelerated by the solar wind motional electric field at 1 AU, with the STEREO and the residual charge [Drapatz and Michel, 1974] produces an electric pulse which is detected by the antennas

  10. Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers J Available online 30 March 2006 Abstract The mechanical and optical properties of dual-coated optical fibers with silica nanoparticles added to the secondary (outer) coating have been investigated. Incorporation

  11. Polyhedral Shapes of CeO2 Nanoparticles Zhong Lin Wang*, and Xiangdong Feng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Ceria nanoparticles are a widely used nanomaterial for applications in catalysts, fuel cell are one of the most important nanoma- terials for a wide range of applications in catalysts,1,2 fuel cell are likely to affect their performance in technological applications. 1. Introduction Ceria nanoparticles

  12. Response to "Comment on Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production Using Geobacter sulfurreducens"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to "Comment on Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production Using Geobacter nanoparticle production by G. sulfurreducens. While acetate and hydrogen were examined as electron donors and investigated the effect of a mediator, while we focused on the utility of hydrogen gas as an electron donor

  13. Evolution of Size and Shape in the Colloidal Crystallization of Gold Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    Evolution of Size and Shape in the Colloidal Crystallization of Gold Nanoparticles Owen C. Compton to aggregation of nanoparticles and formation of colloidal crystals. Based on results from dynamic light, or colloidal crystals, continues to be of great academic and technical interest.1-9 Demonstrated uses

  14. Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles synthesis from tailings by ultrasonic chemical co-precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles synthesis from tailings by ultrasonic chemical co-precipitation Shen online xxxx Keywords: Fe3O4 nanoparticles Ultrasonic-assisted chemical co-precipitation Surfaces Magnetic-assisted chemical co- precipitation utilizing high purity iron separated from iron ore tailings by acidic leaching

  15. INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

  16. Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

    2012-09-01

    This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

  17. Studies on the chemical synthesis and characterization of lead oxide nanoparticles with different organic capping agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arulmozhi, K. T., E-mail: arulsheelphy@gmail.com [Physics Wing (DDE), Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India); Mythili, N. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)] [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Lead oxide (PbO) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using Lead (II) acetate as precursor. The effects of organic capping agents such as Oleic acid, Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) and Cetryl Tri Methyl Butoxide (CTAB) on the size and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Photoluminescence (PL) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to analyse the prepared nanoparticles for their physical, structural and optical properties. The characterization studies reveal that the synthesized PbO nanoparticles had well defined crystalline structure and sizes in the range of 25 nm to 36 nm for capping agents used and 40 nm for pure PbO nanoparticles.

  18. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hender Lopez; Vladimir Lobaskin

    2015-08-06

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles. The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  19. The radiative heat transfer between a rotating nanoparticle and a plane surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahid Ameri; Mehdi Shafei Aporvari; Fardin Kheirandish

    2015-06-03

    Based on a microscopic approach, we propose a Lagrangian for the combined system of a rotating dielectric nanoparticle above a plane surface in the presence of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations. In the framework of canonical quantization, the electromagnetic vacuum field is quantized in the presence of dielectric fields describing the nanoparticle and a semi-infinite dielectric with planar interface. The radiative heat power absorbed by the rotating nanoparticle is obtained and the result is in agreement with previous results when the the rotational frequency of the nanoparticle is zero or much smaller than the relaxation frequency of the dielectrics. The well known near field effect is reexamined and discussed in terms of the rotational frequency. The radiative heat power absorbed by the nanoparticle for well-known peak frequencies, is plotted in terms of the rotational frequency showing an interesting effect resembling a phase transition around a critical frequency, determined by the relaxation frequency of the dielectrics.

  20. Ordered porous mesostructured materials from nanoparticle-block copolymer self-assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Scott; Wiesner, Ulrich; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides mesostructured materials and methods of preparing mesostructured materials including metal-rich mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrids, porous metal-nonmetal nanocomposite mesostructures, and ordered metal mesostructures with uniform pores. The nanoparticles can be metal, metal alloy, metal mixture, intermetallic, metal-carbon, metal-ceramic, semiconductor-carbon, semiconductor-ceramic, insulator-carbon or insulator-ceramic nanoparticles, or combinations thereof. A block copolymer/ligand-stabilized nanoparticle solution is cast, resulting in the formation of a metal-rich (or semiconductor-rich or insulator-rich) mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrid. The hybrid is heated to an elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of an ordered porous nanocomposite mesostructure. A nonmetal component (e.g., carbon or ceramic) is then removed to produce an ordered mesostructure with ordered and large uniform pores.