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1

AC electrokinetic manipulation of selenium nanoparticles for potential nanosensor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Se nanoparticles were synthesized using a reverse-microemulsion process. ? AC osmotic fluid flow repulses the particles from electrode edges. ? Dielectrophoretic force attracts the particles to electrode edges. ? Dielectrophoresis electrode showed non-ohmic behavior. ? The device can potentially be used as a nanosensor. - Abstract: We report the AC electrokinetic behavior of selenium (Se) nanoparticles for electrical characterization and possible application as micro/nano devices. selenium Se nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a reverse-microemulsion process and investigated structurally using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Interdigitated castellated ITO and non-castellated platinum electrodes were employed for manipulation of suspended materials in the fluid. Using ITO electrodes at low frequency limits resulted in deposition of Se particles on electrode surface. When Se particles exposed to platinum electrodes in the 10 Hz–1 kHz range and V {sub p?p}> 8, AC osmotic fluid flow repulses the particles from electrode edges. However, in 10 kHz–10 MHz range and V {sub p?p}> 5, dielectrophoretic force attracts the particles to electrode edges. As the Se particle concentration increased, the trapped Se particles were aligned along the electric field line and bridged the electrode gap. The device was characterized and can potentially be useful in making micro/nano electronic devices.

Mahmoodi, Seyed Reza [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bayati, Marzieh, E-mail: m-bayati@tums.ac.ir [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinirad, Somayeh [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Foroumadi, Alireza [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gilani, Kambiz [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Title Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Liu Journal Journal of the Electrochemical Society Volume 160 Start Page A849 Issue 6 Pagination A849 - A855 Date Published 01/2013 ISSN 0013-4651 Abstract Pure tin (Sn) nanoparticles can be cycled in stable and high gravimetric capacity (>500 mAh/g) with a polyfluorene-type conductive polymer binder in composite electrodes. Crystalline Sn nanoparticles (<150 nanometers, nm) were used as anode materials in this study. The average diameter of Sn secondary particles is 270 nm, calculated based on BET surface area. The composite electrodes contain a conductive polymer binder that constitutes 2% to 10% of the material, without any conductive additives (e.g., acetylene black). The electrode containing the 5% conductive binder showed the best cycling performance, with a reversible capacity of 510 mAh/g. Crystallinity of Sn particles gradually degrades during cycling, and pulverization of particles was observed after long-term cycling, leading to the capacity fade. The conductive polymer binder shows advantages over other conventional binders, such as Poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) binders, because it can provide electrical conductivity and strong adhesion during Sn volume change.

3

Effect of Capping Agents in Tin Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the particle surfaces. The cycling results using coin-type half cells confirmed that the hydrobenzamide, compared with the others. From Fourier transform magnitude FT of Sn LIII-edge energy dispersive X prepared by the decom- position of tin II amides, Sn NMe2 2 2, at 135°C in dry-anisole- produced particles

Cho, Jaephil

4

Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ? Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ? Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ? CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage and impairs steroidogenesis. ? Nano-Se retained sperm quality against CIS-induced free radicals toxic stress.

Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Abbas [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.abdollahi@utoronto.ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ab initio Molecular Dynamics and Elastic Properties of TiC and TiN Nanoparticles A. V. Postnikov and P. Entel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ab initio Molecular Dynamics and Elastic Properties of TiC and TiN Nanoparticles A. V. Postnikov composition and compared to frozen phonon and molecular dynamics calculations for crystalline TiC and Ti range of frequencies, including the phonon band gap of pure crystalline TiC (near 15 THz). Similar

Entel, P.

6

Preparation, characterization and applications of novel carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from annealing TiN under CO atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were firstly fabricated by calcining TiN powder under CO atmosphere at different temperatures between 400 and 600 °C, both the improved photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue and enhanced photovoltaic performance for dye sensitized solar cells were demonstrated. - Highlights: • CN-codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared by calcining TiN under CO atmosphere. • More visible light response was confirmed by UV–vis DRS and photocatalytic results. • Enhanced conversion efficiency was observed for the DSSCs from CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanode. • CN-codoping played an important role to improve the photocatalytic performance. - Abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped titania (CN-TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were fabricated by calcining titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles under carbon monoxide (CO) atmosphere at four different temperatures in a range of 400–600 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Enhanced light absorption in both the UV and visible light region was observed for the resulted CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS). Improved photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of methylene blue by the CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was demonstrated under UV and visible light, respectively. The highest degradation rate was achieved for CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (13%) compared to N-TiO{sub 2} (10%) and the commercial P25 (5%) under visible light illumination for 40 min. Furthermore, the improved photocatalytic activity of CN-TiO{sub 2} was also confirmed by the degradation of colorless resorcinol under UV–vis light irradiation. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using P25, N-TiO{sub 2} and CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes, respectively. The highest conversion efficiency of 3.31% was achieved by the DSSCs based on the CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes in comparison with the commercial P25 (1.61%) and N-TiO{sub 2} (2.44%) photoanodes. This work demonstrates that thermal treatment of TiN nanoparticles under CO atmosphere has shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to synthesize photocatalysts with enhanced photocatalytic and photovoltaic performance.

Sun, Mingxuan; Song, Peng; Li, Jing; Cui, Xiaoli, E-mail: xiaolicui@fudan.edu.cn

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Improvement of corrosion and electrical conductivity of 316L stainless steel as bipolar plate by TiN nanoparticle implantation using plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work reports the results of TiN-ions implantation into the SS316L samples as bipolar plates by a 4 kJ Mather type Plasma Focus (PF) device operated with nitrogen gas for 10, 20, and 30 shots in order to improve the corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity of samples. The PF can generate short lived (10–100 ns) but high temperature (0.1–2.0 keV) and high density (1018–1020 cm?3) plasma, and the whole process of PF lasts just a few microseconds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal the formation of a nanocrystalline titanium nitride coating on the surface of substrate. The interfacial contact resistance (ICR) of samples is measured, and the results show that the conductivity of samples increase after coating because of high electrical conductivity of TiN coating. The electrochemical results show that the corrosion resistances are significantly improved when TiN films are deposited into SS316L substrate. The corrosion potential of the TiN coated samples increases compared with that of the bare SSI316L and corrosion currents decrease in TiN implanted samples. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) indicates changes in surface morphology before and after potentiostatic test. The thickness of coated layer which is obtained by cross sectional SEM is about 19 ?m.

Malihe Omrani; Morteza Habibi; Reza Amrollahi; Arash Khosravi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nanoparticle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoparticles are submicron particles covering the size range 20–200 nm (diameter). Two general methods are applied for production of nanoparticles: the top–down approach, where one starts with the bulk material ...

Prof. Tharwat Tadros

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Benjamin Gilbert1, Feng Huang1, Hengzhong Zhang1, Glenn A. Waychunas2, and Benjamin Gilbert1, Feng Huang1, Hengzhong Zhang1, Glenn A. Waychunas2, and Jillian F. Banfield1,2 1Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California at Berkeley 2Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Using synchrotron techniques, Benjamin Gilbert and colleagues in Jill Banfield's group at the University of California - Berkeley and Glenn Waychunas at LBNL have determined how the equilibrium structure and lattice dynamics of zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles differ from bulk ZnS. They combined size and shape information from small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) with structure information from wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) to analyze structural differences in the real-space pair distribution function (PDF). By combining SAXS and WAXS, they were able to remove the small-particle size contribution to x-ray diffraction peak broadening and quantify the excess disorder and strain in the nanoparticles relative to bulk ZnS.

10

Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

Phillips, D.R.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sputtering of tin and gallium-tin clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tin and gallium-tin clusters have been produced by 4 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline tin and the gallium-tin eutectic alloy and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sputtered neutral species were photoionized with 193 nm (6.4 eV) excimer laser light. Neutral tin clusters containing up to 10 atoms and mixed gallium-tin clusters Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} with n {<=} 4 for the neutrals and N {<=} 3 for the sputtered ionic species have been detected. Laser power density dependent intensity measurements, relative yields, and kinetic energy distributions have been measured. The abundance distributions of the mixed clusters have been found to be nonstatistical due to significant differences in the ionization efficiencies for clusters with equal nuclearity but different number of tin atoms. The results indicate that Ga{sub 2}Sn and Ga{sub 3}Sn like the all-gallium clusters have ionization potentials below 6.4 eV. In the case of Sn{sub 5}, Sn{sub 6}, GaSn and Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} clusters with n=2 to 4 and m>1, the authors detect species that have sufficient internal energy to be one photon ionized despite ionization potentials that are higher 6.4 eV. The tin atom signal that is detected can be attributed to photofragmentation of dimers for both sputtering from polycrystalline tin and from the gallium-tin eutectic alloy.

Lill, T.; Calaway, W.F.; Ma, Z.; Pellin, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

Buren, Mary Sue

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Synthesis of colloidal CuInSe2 nanoparticles by electrical spark discharge in liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents a low-cost, non-vacuum, and facile process for fabrication of CuInSe2 (CIS) nanoparticles using electrical discharge treatment of mixture of copper, indium, and selenium powders between two tu...

Mehdi Mardanian; Alena A. Nevar; Michael Nedel’ko…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Implications of the toxicity of tetramethyltin, dimethyl tin dichloride, and tin tetrachloride in selecting a suitable tin precursor in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential health hazards in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide films from tetramethylin dimethylin dichloride and tin tetrachloride have to be balanced against the benefits to solar cell fabrication. Concerns regarding the toxicity costs and physical properties of and the quality of the tin oxide films produced with these tin precursors are outlined. (AIP)

Roy G. Gordon; James W. Prescia

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

Phillips, D.R.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

Determination of Selenium in Nuts by Cathodic Stripping Potentiometry (CSP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determination of Selenium in Nuts by Cathodic Stripping Potentiometry (CSP) ... In this work, cathodic stripping potentiometry (CSP) (14) is used to determine the selenium content of nuts that were studied. ... CSP Analysis. ...

Giacomo Dugo Lara La Pera; Vincenzo Lo Turco; Ekaterini Mavrogeni; Maria Alfa

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Photo-electric Conduction in Selenium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variation with light intensity of the photo-current in selenium.—A selenium cell is described which gives a photo-current of 10 ma. for a difference of potential of 100 volts and an illumination of 100 foot-candles. The sensitiveness ratio between the currents under light and dark conditions is 100. The characteristics of the cell are very constant. The experimental results establish the existence of a linear relation between the square of the photo-current and the light intensity. It is pointed out that this result substantiates the conclusion that the photo-conduction in selenium is due to a photo-electric liberation of electrons rather than to an allotropic change from an insulating to a conducting form of selenium.Effect of temperature on the photo-conductivity of selenium.—Under dark conditions the current through a cell immersed in liquid air dropped in 15 sec. to 35 percent of its value at room temperature, and in 10 min. to 0.000046 percent. When the same cell was illuminated with 100 foot-candles and immersed in liquid air, the current increased for 8 min. to about 1.8 times its value at room temperature and then decreased until after 3 hours its value was 82 percent of its value at room temperature. It is concluded that the mechanism of the current conduction under dark conditions is entirely different from that of the photo-conduction.

R. J. Piersol

1927-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Bacterial reduction of selenite to elemental selenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxic species of selenium are pollutants found in agricultural as well as oil refinery waste streams. Selenium contamination is particularly problematic in areas which have seleniferous subsurface geology, such as the central valley of California. We are developing a bacterial treatment system to address the selenium problem using Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, as model Gram (+) and (-) soil bacteria. We have found that, during growth, both organisms reduce selenite, a major soluble toxic species, to red elemental selenium--an insoluble product generally regarded as nontoxic. In both cases, reduction depended on the growth substrate and was effected by an inducible system that effectively removed selenite at concentrations typical of polluted sites--i.e. 50 to 300 ppb. The bacteria studied differed in one respect: when grown in media supplemented with nitrate or sulfate, the ability of P. fluorescens to remediate selenite was enhanced, whereas that of B. subtilis was unchanged. Current efforts are being directed toward understanding the biochemical mechanism(s) of detoxification, and determining whether bacteria occurring in polluted environments such as soils and sludge systems are capable of selenite remediation.

Leighton, T.; Buchanan, B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

Korte, N.E.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effects of selenium on mallard duck reproduction and immune function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selenium from irrigation drain water and coal-fired power stations is a significant environmental contaminant in some regions of the USA. The objectives were to examine whether selenium-exposed waterfowl had altered immune function, disease resistance, or reproduction. Pairs of adult mallards were exposed for 95-99 days on streams with sodium selenite-treated water at 10 and 30 ppb, or on untreated streams. Selenium biomagnified through the food chain to the ducks. Disease resistance was decreased in ducklings hatched on the streams and challenged with duck hepatitis virus 1 (DHV1) when 15-days old. Liver selenium concentrations for these ducklings on the 10 and 30 ppb streams was 3.6 and 7.6 ppm dry weight, respectively. Mortality of ducklings purchased when 7-days old, exposed to selenium for 14 days, and challenged when 22-days old was not affected. However, their selenium exposure was lower (liver selenium 4.1 ppm dry weight for the 30 ppb stream). Five parameters of immune function were measured in adult ducks. Phagocytosis of killed Pasteurella multocida by blood heterophils and monocytes, and blood monocyte concentrations were higher in adult males following 84 days exposure to 30 ppb selenium. Their liver selenium concentrations were 11.1 ppm dry weight after 95-99 days exposure.

Whiteley, P.L.; Yuill, T.M.; Fairbrother, A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

nanoparticles | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles nanoparticles Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

24

Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Species richness and selenium accumulation of plants in soils with elevated concentration of selenium and salinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies were conducted in soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity at Kesterson, California. Biomass distribution, species richness, and selenium accumulation of plants were examined for two sites where 15 cm of surface soil was removed and replaced with fill dirt in the fall of 1989, and two sites were native soil cover. The Se concentrations in the top 15 cm of fill dirt ranged from undetectable to 36 ng g-1. For the native soil sites, Se levels ranged from 75 to 550 ng g-1. Soil Se concentrations below 15 cm ranged from 300 to 700 ng g-1 and were comparable between the fill dirt and the native soil sites. At least 20 different plant species were brought into the two fill dirt sites with the top soil. Avena fatua L., Bassia hyssopifolia Kuntze Rev. Gen. Pl., Centaurea solstitialis L., Erysimum officianale L., Franseria acanthicarpa Cav. Icon., and Melilotus indica (L.) All. contributed over 60% of the total biomass. Only 5 species were found in the native soil sites, and salt grass (Distichlis spicata L.) was the predominant species and accounted for over 80% of the total biomass. Between 1989 and 1990, two years after the surface soil replacement, the two fill dirt sites had a 70% reduction in species richness. Plant tissue selenium concentrations were found to be quite variable between plant species and between sites of sampling. At the fill dirt sites, the plant species with deep root systems accumulated greater amounts of selenium than the shallow-rooted species. The soil selenium concentration of the field soil had no negative effect on pollen fertility, seed set, and seed germination for the plant species examined. However, seedling growth was impaired by the soil selenium concentrations. This suggests that a selection pressure of soil Se concentration may have been imposed on plant species such as M. indica in an early stage of its life cycle.

Huang, Z.Z.; Wu, L. (Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of California, Davis (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

How Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus Utilize Selenium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus How Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus Utilize Selenium How Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus Utilize Selenium Print Monday, 12 March 2012 13:50 Due to drought and limited freshwater supplies, the increased accumulation of naturally occurring salts, boron (B), and selenium (Se) has worsened in some agricultural areas, such as in the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Growing Se-biofortified crops is an emerging method for utilizing these "semiretired lands" because the nutraceutical benefits of enhancing organic Se, an essential micronutrient in crops, is concomitant with the phytoremediation of inorganic Se pollutants. Researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture used ALS Beamline 10.3.2 to study the chemical forms and distribution of Se in the attractive alternative crop Opuntia ficus-indica, an edible spineless prickly pear cactus that tolerates both drought and adverse saline- and B-impacted soil conditions while accumulating and volatilizing organic Se. Micro x-ray fluorescence (mXRF) mapping showed Se concentrated in the tips of the plant's cladodes (edible pads), cladode vasculature, and seed embryos. Se K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that >90% of total Se in cladodes, fruit juice, fruit pulp, and seeds is in organic form (C-Se-C). Cladode tips contain both inorganic selenate (SeO42-) and C-Se-C. Enzymatic digestion confirmed that Se was mainly present in a "free," non-proteinaceous form inside cladode and fruit, whereas in the seed, Se was incorporated into proteins associated with lipids.

27

Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

Searcy, K.; Richardson, M.; Blythe, G.; Wallschlaeger, D.; Chu, P.; Dene, C.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Detailed sequential extraction study of selenium in coal and coal-associated strata from a coal mine in West Virginia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study of the mode of occurrence and distribution of selenium in a rock core from southcentral West Virginia reveals that total selenium concentration varies… (more)

Roy, Mimi.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Selenium induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissues of chick embryos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past three decades research has been carried out to elucidate the role of free radicals and reactive oxygen species play in various pathophysiological processes. Membranes of subcellular organelles contain relatively high concentrations of polyunsaturated lipids as well as hemoproteins which are strong catalysts of lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxides (LPO) destroy membrane integrity and decrease membrane fluidity and elasticity. Selenium is known both as an important essential trace element and an environmental pollutant. Selenium has many uses in the industries. The main source of selenium for the mammalian organism is food (from the soil into the vegetables and grain) and to a lesser extent, drinking water. A number of syndromes of selenium toxicity in animals have been described. Selenium is regarded as the most important biological antioxidant. The antioxidant function of selenium is linked to the activity of seleno enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which catalyses the reduction of hydroperoxides. The antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduce superoxide radicals to H[sub 2]O[sub 2] which inturn is preferential oxidation of glutathione by peroxides is catalysed by GPx. The oxidized glutathione is then reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) and maintains the reduced glutathione levels in the system in a cyclic manner. Further, glutathione transferase (GST) catalyses the transformation of a wide variety of electrophilic compounds to less toxic compounds by conjugating them to GSH. The present study evaluated the biochemical basis of selenium induced lipid peroxidative damage to heart tissues in check embryos and the role of antioxidant enzymes like GPx, GST, GR, SOD and CAT. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Padmaja, K.; Somasekharaiah, B.V.; Prasad, A.R.K. (S.V. Univ., Tirupati (India))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Chemical Form and Distribution of Mercury and Selenium in Edible Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Distribution of Mercury and Selenium in Edible Seafood Chris J. Cappon J. Crispin Smith * Environmental...distribution of mercury and selenium in edible seafood. | The content, chemical form, and...Distribution of Mercury and Selenium in Edible Seafood Chris J. Cappon and J. Crispin Smith......

Chris J. Cappon; J. Crispin Smith

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Facile fabrication of spherical nanoparticle-tipped AFM probes for plasmonic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reliably producing metallic spherical nanoparticle tips using only a simple electrochemical cell. Fabrication of Au spherical nanoparticle (AuNP) tips onto commercial AFM probes is achieved using single-pulse high- fi eld electrochemical growth... is employed for growth since both the cell geometry and electrodeposition solution are kept the same between fabrications. AFM probes are attached to fl u- orine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conductive glass, used as a working DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201400104 Facile...

Sanders, Alan; Zhang, Liwu; Bowman, Richard W.; Herrmann, Lars O.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum.

Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R., E-mail: mdeinert@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78715 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application Arthur VALLERON a,b , Christophe, Engineering Materials Department The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

EMSL - nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles en Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslweb...

36

Gold Nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Perspective Chemistry World 16 December 2007 Structure of a Coated Gold Nanoparticle summary written by Amber Dance, SLAC Communication Office A team of scientists,...

37

High-performance tin oxide-nitrogen doped graphene aerogel hybrids as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tin dioxide nanoparticles on nitrogen doped graphene aerogel (SnO2-NGA) hybrid are synthesized by one-step hydrothermal method and successfully applied in lithium-ion batteries as a free-standing anode. The electrochemical performance of SnO2-NGA hybrid is investigated by galvanostatic charge–discharge cycling, rate capability test, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the SnO2-NGA hybrid with freestanding spongy-like structure exhibit remarkable lithium storage capacity (1100 mAh g?1 after 100 cycles), good cycling stability and high rate capability. The outstanding performance is attributed to the uniform SnO2 nanoparticles, unique spongy-like structure and N doping defect for Li+ diffusion.

Chunhui Tan; Jing Cao; Abdul Muqsit Khattak; Feipeng Cai; Bo Jiang; Gai Yang; Suqin Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Si-Ti-N nanostructured coatings were synthesized by inertial impaction of nanoparticles using a process called hypersonic plasma particle deposition (HPPD). Transmission electron microscopy on samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling show TiN nanocrystallites in an amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate the presence of amorphous Si3N4 in similar films. In-situ particle size distribution measurements show that particle size distributions peak around 14 nm under typical operating conditions.

Hafiz, Jami; Wang Xiaoliang; Mukherjee, Rajesh; McMurry, Peter H.; Heberlein, Joachim V.R.; Girshick, Steven L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC technology by replacing Pt with low-cost, highly active Ir-based catalysts.

Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

JV Task 96 - Phase 2 - Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to improve the understanding of the mercury issue, it is vital to study mercury's effects on selenium physiology. While mercury present in the environment or food sources may pose health risks, the protective effects of selenium have not been adequately considered in establishing regulatory policy. Numerous studies report that vulnerability to mercury toxicity is inversely proportional to selenium status or level. However, selenium status has not been considered in the development of the reference dosage levels for mercury exposure. Experimental animals fed low-selenium diets are far more vulnerable to mercury toxicity than animals fed normal selenium, and animals fed selenium-rich diets are even more resistant. Selenium-dependent enzymes in brain and endocrine tissues can be impaired by excessive mercury exposure, apparently because mercury has an extremely high binding affinity for selenium. When selenium becomes bound to mercury, it is unable to participate in the metabolic cycling of selenoprotein synthesis. Because of mercury-dependent impairments of selenoprotein synthesis, various antioxidant and regulatory functions in brain biochemistry are compromised. This report details a 2-year multiclient-funded research program designed to examine the interactions between mercury and selenium in animal models. The studies explored the effects of dietary intakes of toxic amounts of methylmercury and the protective effects of the normal dietary range of selenium in counteracting mercury toxicity. This study finds that the amounts of selenium present in ocean fish are sufficient to protect against far larger quantities of methylmercury than those present in typical seafoods. Toxic effects of methylmercury exposure were not directly proportional to mercury concentrations in blood, brain, or any other tissues. Instead, mercury toxicity was proportional to molar ratios of mercury relative to selenium. In order to accurately assess risk associated with methylmercury or mercury exposures, mercury-selenium ratios appear to be far more accurate and effective in identifying risk and protecting human and environmental health. This study also finds that methylmercury toxicity can be effectively treated by dietary selenium, preventing the death and progressive disabilities that otherwise occur in methylmercury-treated subjects. Remarkably, the positive response to selenium therapy was essentially equivalent regardless of whether or not toxic amounts of methylmercury were still administered. The findings of the Physiologically Oriented Integration of Nutrients and Toxins (POINT) models of the effects of mercury and selenium developed in this project are consistent with the hypothesis that mercury toxicity arises because of mercury-dependent inhibition of selenium availability in brain and endocrine tissues. This appears to occur through synergistic effects of mercury-dependent inhibition of selenium transport to these tissues and selective sequestration of the selenium present in the tissues. Compromised transport of selenium to the brain and endocrine tissues would be particularly hazardous to the developing fetus because the rapidly growing tissues of the child have no selenium reserves. Therefore, maternal consumption of foods with high mercury-selenium ratios is hazardous. In summation, methylmercury exposure is unlikely to cause harm in populations that eat selenium-rich diets but may cause harm among populations that consume certain foods that have methylmercury present in excess of selenium.

Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Magnetic Nanoparticle NANOMATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Nanoparticle Metrology NANOMATERIALS We are developing best practice metrology for characterization of magnetic nanoparticle systems (e.g. blocking temperature, anisotropy, property distributions, T nanoparticles and provide guidelines to the FDA to properly compare systems when approving nanoparticle systems

42

Precision Nanoparticles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

John Hemminger

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nanoparticle Fabrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This implies the capability to build up tailored nanostructures and various properties for given functions by control at the molecular levels [1...]. Nanoparticles make up one of the most important nanomaterials ...

Y. Hayashi; M. Inoue; H. Takizawa; K. Suganuma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Potential for selenium migration at a lignite power plant solid waste disposal facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may also adsorb selenite, although in relatively minor amounts. In general, clays serve as an inert substrate for media of higher sorbic potential. Selenium leached from lignite ash initially occurs as selenite or selenate. Redox and p...H measurements suggest selenite and elemental selenium are the only forms of inorganic selenium stable at the study site, Selenate is reduced to selenite or converted to selenide by biosynthesis. Selenite is either adsorbed by the soil or converted...

Hall, Steven Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous selenium digital Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 55 Structural Organization of Arsenic Selenide Liquids: New Results from Liquid State NMR Summary: of pure amorphous selenium and is...

46

Nanoparticle "theranostic" platforms for applications in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For DNA Nanoparticle Preparation . 15CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Nanoparticle “Theranostic” Platforms4   1.4  Nanoparticle  

Steiner, Jason Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Selenium and Mercury in Pelagic Fish in the Central North Pacific Near Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between selenium and mercury and their molar ratios in seafood are essential factors in evaluating risks and mercury in seafood is proposed as a more comprehensive seafood safety criterion. Keywords Mercury. Methylmercury. Selenium . Fish . Seafood . Environmental risk assessment . Seafood safety Introduction

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

48

The effect of regimes and methods of glass forming on the tin content in float glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the tin content in glass is derived as a function of the iron oxidecontent in the glass composition, regimes and methods of forming, ... The ways of reducing the tin content in glass in the cour...

V. I. Kondrashov; V. S. Bezlyudnaya; Yu. V. Zverev

49

Chemical Forms of Mercury And Selenium in Fish Following Digestion With Simulated Gastric Fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish is a major dietary source of potentially neurotoxic methylmercury compounds for humans. It is also a rich source of essential selenium. We have used in situ mercury L{sub III}-edge and selenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy to chemically characterize the methylmercury and selenium in both fresh fish and fish digested with simulated gastric fluid. For the mercury, we confirm our earlier finding [Harris et al. (2003) Science301, 1203] that the methylmercury is coordinated by a single thiolate donor, which resembles cysteine, and for the selenium, we find a mixture of organic forms that resemble selenomethionine and an aliphatic selenenyl sulfide such as Cys-S-Se-Cys. We find that local chemical environments of mercury and selenium do not change upon digestion of the fish with simulated gastric fluid. We discuss the toxicological implications for humans consuming fish.

George, G.N.; Singh, S.P.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Understanding nanoparticle aggregation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nanoparticles form the fundamental building blocks for many exciting applications in various scientific disciplines. However, the problem of the large-scale synthesis of nanoparticles remains challenging.… (more)

Pranami, Gaurav

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A transparent ultraviolet triggered amorphous selenium p-n junction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will introduce a semitransparent amorphous selenium (a-Se) film exhibiting photovoltaic effects under ultraviolet light created through a simple and inexpensive method. We found that chlorine can be doped into a-Se through electrolysis of saturated salt water, and converts the weak p-type material into an n-type material. Furthermore, we found that a p-n diode fabricated through this process has shown an open circuit voltage of 0.35 V toward ultraviolet illumination. Our results suggest the possibility of doping control depending on the electric current during electrolysis and the possibility of developing a simple doping method for amorphous photoconductors.

Saito, Ichitaro; Soga, Kenichi; Overend, Mauro; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Miyazaki, Wataru; Onishi, Masanori; Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken [Department of Physics, International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Kudo, Yuki [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yamada, Takatoshi [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Koh, Angel; Chua, Daniel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119077 (Singapore); Aono, Masami [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8686 (Japan)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electron-impact excitation for F-like selenium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron-impact excitation cross sections from the low-lying 1s22s22p5 state of F-like selenium to singly excited states have been calculated. Our relativistic distorted-wave Born procedures have been used for the present calculations. Instead of atomic structure code GRASP, the latest version GRASP2 code is used as multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock atomic structure calculations. The present results have been comprehensively compared with earlier calculations. One of the motivations for the present work is that there are some discrepancies between our results and those of others.

Chen Guo-xin and Qiu Yu-bo

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Detecting Hazardous Gas Analytes Using Porous Silicon Sensors Coated with Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Eddie Goude, University of Florida Georgia Tech SURF 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Sulfur Dioxide (SO2), Phosphine (PH3), and Carbon Monoxide (CO) while the resistance across the sensors of ethanol etched the sample. Then the electron beam process places a layer of titanium then a layer of gold (Au), Nickel (Ni) and Titanium (Ti) nanoparticles. However, the Tin and Gold are the main focus

Li, Mo

54

Head Knowledge: Summary (Segment from the Tin Shed essay)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a world of objectivity, and his method of deductive logical reasoning, of John Locke (1632-1704) and his and objectification, material reductionism, quantification, gradation and secularization (Frey 1994: 95-104, 123 of reliability and validity (Frey 1994:95-104). While traveling outside the Tin Shed, systematic analysis

O'Laughlin, Jay

55

Quasi-ternary nanoparticle superlattices through nanoparticle design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoscale. Quasi-Ternary nanoparticle superlattices Elena V.No1. – Page No6. Quasi-ternary nanoparticle superlatticesthrough nanoparticle design .

Shevchenko, Elena V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Selenium Concentrations in the Colorado Pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): Relationship with Flows in the Upper Colorado River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment ... samples. The...

B. C. Osmundson; T. W. May; D. B. Osmundson

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Field-Measured Oxidation Rates of Biologically Reduced Selenium in Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced Selenium in Sludge Sally M. Benson, John Daggett andCalifornia 94720 U.S.A. Sludge generated during surface-Finding safe and economical sludge disposal methods requires

Benson, Sally M.; Daggett, John; Zawislansi, Peter

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Toenail Selenium Levels and the Subsequent Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Toenail selenium analyses were carried out by the Interfaculty Reactor Institute at Delft...Neutron Activation Analysis. This method and...This moderate reliability may have resulted...By limiting our analysis to the follow-up...

Piet A. van den Brandt; Maurice P. A. Zeegers; Peter Bode; and R. Alexandra Goldbohm

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous selenium detectors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in an Insect Ecosystem: Effects of Insects on Phytoremediation D A N E... of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 0V8, Canada Phytoremediation of selenium-contaminated...

60

Combinatorial study of zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groups of thin-film transistors using a zinc tin oxide semiconductor layer have been fabricated via a combinatorial rf sputtering technique. The ZnO:SnO{sub 2} ratio of the film varies as a function of position on the sample, from pure ZnO to SnO{sub 2}, allowing for a study of zinc tin oxide transistor performance as a function of channel stoichiometry. The devices were found to have mobilities ranging from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V s, with two peaks in mobility in devices at ZnO fractions of 0.80{+-}0.03 and 0.25{+-}0.05, and on/off ratios as high as 10{sup 7}. Transistors composed predominantly of SnO{sub 2} were found to exhibit light sensitivity which affected both the on/off ratios and threshold voltages of these devices.

McDowell, M. G.; Sanderson, R. J.; Hill, I. G. [Dalhousie University, Department of Physics, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new band-structure method which allows the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation with a full (all-electron, non-muffin-tin) crystal potential has been developed. A basis set consisting of the 9 (16) s, p, and d (f) linear-muffin-tin orbitals per site is used. The wave functions as well as the electron density and the potential are split into a smooth ‘‘pseudo’’ part, which is expanded in plane waves, and local parts, which are expressed as spherical-harmonics one-center expansions. The total-energy functional of density-functional theory is evaluated without any shape approximation. The usefulness and accuracy of the method is demonstrated by applying it to a ‘‘frozen phonon’’ in silicon and comparing the results with experiment. The calculated phonon frequency and anharmonic term are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The method is generally applicable to systems with delocalized as well as localized orbitals.

K. H. Weyrich

1988-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

High-frequency losses in tin Josephson tunnel junctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The losses associated with the excitation of surface plasma oscillations in Fiske modes in tin Josephson junctions, at frequencies from 20 to 270 GHz, were measured by studying the currentvoltage characteristics as a function of magnetic field. Our results generally support Economou and Ngai's theory of surface-plasma oscillations and Miller's calculation of the conductivity of superconductors. At lower temperatures, discrepancies that include an anomalous peak in the frequency dependence of the loss may reflect a small disagreement with Miller's results.

T. C. Wang and R. I. Gayley

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modeling the behavior of selenium in Pulverized-Coal Combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of Se during coal combustion is different from other trace metals because of the high degree of vaporization and high vapor pressures of the oxide (SeO{sub 2}) in coal flue gas. In a coal-fired boiler, these gaseous oxides are absorbed on the fly ash surface in the convective section by a chemical reaction. The composition of the fly ash (and of the parent coal) as well as the time-temperature history in the boiler therefore influences the formation of selenium compounds on the surface of the fly ash. A model was created for interactions between selenium and fly ash post-combustion. The reaction mechanism assumed that iron reacts with selenium at temperatures above 1200 C and that calcium reacts with selenium at temperatures less than 800 C. The model also included competing reactions of SO{sub 2} with calcium and iron in the ash. Predicted selenium distributions in fly ash (concentration versus particle size) were compared against measurements from pilot-scale experiments for combustion of six coals, four bituminous and two low-rank coals. The model predicted the selenium distribution in the fly ash from the pilot-scale experiments reasonably well for six coals of different compositions. (author)

Senior, Constance; Otten, Brydger Van; Wendt, Jost O.L.; Sarofim, Adel [Reaction Engineering International, 77 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Pond 2 selenium volatilization study: A synthesis of five years of experimental results, 1990--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial volatilization is a potential remedial measure to decrease the selenium inventory in Kesterson Reservoir soils. Past studies in both the field and the laboratory suggest that a significant percentage of the selenium inventory may be removed in this fashion. The objectives of this study include the quantification of selenium losses and a test of a pilot-scale design which in the future may be used in other parts of the Reservoir.

Zawislanski, P.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Jayaweera, G.R.; Biggar, J.W.; Wu, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Frankenberger, W.T. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil and Environmental Sciences

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effect of Anisotropic Volume Change in Tin Phosphate Nanoparticle Anode Material with Mesocellular Foam Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, PO = propylene oxide . This material has a mesocelluar foam structure. Experimental Pluronic P123 10 g, BASF were dissolved in 40 mL of distilled water into which 8.8 g of H3PO4 had been previously

Cho, Jaephil

66

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

67

One-pot synthesis of highly mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

One-pot synthesis of highly mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide from interpenetrating inorganicorganic networks Authors: Volosin, A.M., Sharma, S., Traverse, C., Newman, N., and...

68

Differential Neutron Scattering Cross Sections and Average Neutron Parameters of Tin Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential cross sections of elastically scattered neutrons were measured for tin isotopes at the...o, s 1/2 1 , S 1/3 ...

V. G. Nikolenko; A. B. Popov; G. S. Samosvat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticle Adjuvant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARTICLE MICROBIAL IMMUNOLOGY Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticle Adjuvant Qing He Alaina R. Mitchell Stacy L. Johnson...to the surfaces on insect cells. . Calcium phosphate nanoparticle adjuvant. | Vaccination to protect against human infectious...

Qing He; Alaina R. Mitchell; Stacy L. Johnson; Claus Wagner-Bartak; Tulin Morcol; Steve J. D. Bell

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Selenium, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc Concentrations in Sediments and Mullet (Mugil cephalus) from the Southern Basin of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selenium, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc Concentrations in Sediments and Mullet (Mugil cephalus) from. Selenium, cadmium, copper, and zinc concentrations were measured in sediments and the tissues of mullet­19; cadmium, 14­42; copper, 1.5­3.6; zinc, 0.77­2.2 times background). Selenium, cadmium, and copper in Lake

Canberra, University of

71

8, 27152744, 2008 Nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 2715­2744, 2008 Nanoparticle formation and evolution in the vehicle exhaust Hua Du the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Nanoparticle­2744, 2008 Nanoparticle formation and evolution in the vehicle exhaust Hua Du and Fangqun Yu Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

72

Thin-film tin oxideâ??ethanol sensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tin Oxide (SnO2) thin films grown on glass substrate at 648 K using direct evaporation method with two gold pads deposited on the top for electrical contacts were exposed to ethanol vapours (200-1000 ppm). The operating temperature of the sensor was optimised. The sensitivity variation of films having different thicknesses was studied. To improve the sensitivity and selectivity further, a thin layer of metal oxide was deposited on the sensor surface to work as a catalytic layer and its effect on the performance of the sensor was studied. The response and recovery times of the sensor were determined.

H.J. Pandya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

P-7 / D. R. Cairns P-7: Wear Resistance of Indium Tin Oxide Coatings on Polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P-7 / D. R. Cairns P-7: Wear Resistance of Indium Tin Oxide Coatings on Polyethylene Terephthalate The wear mechanisms of the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) topsheet). The bottom substrate is typically glass and the top sheet a polyester such as Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET

Cairns, Darran

74

The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ? Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ? Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ? Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil)] [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Porto, Arilza de Oliveira, E-mail: arilzaporto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Magela de Lima, Geraldo [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Paniago, Roberto [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ardisson, José Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Chromatographic speciation of anionic and neutral selenium compounds in Se-accumulating Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and in selenized yeast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selenium-accumulating plants such as Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) concentrate the element in plant shoots and roots. Such behavior may provide a cost-effective technology to clean up contaminated soils and waters that pose major environmental and human health problems (phytoremediation). Such ability to transform selenium into bioactive compounds has important implications for human nutrition and health. Element selective characterization of B. juncea grown in the presence of inorganic selenium under hydroponic conditions provides valuable information to better understand selenium metabolism in plants. The present work determines both previously observed organoselenium species such as selenomethionine and Se-methylselenocysteine and for the first time detects the newly characterized S-(methylseleno)cysteine in plant shoots and roots when grown in the presence of selenate or selenite as the only selenium source. A key feature of this study is the complementary role of selenium and sulfur specific chromatographic detection by HPLC with interfaced inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection and by derivatization GC with interfaced atomic spectral emission. HPLC–ICP-MS limits of detection for such species were in the range 5–50 ng Se mL?1 in the injected extracts. Speciation profiles are compared with those of selenium-enriched yeast by both HPLC–ICP-MS and GC–AED.

Chethaka Kahakachchi; Harriet Totoe Boakye; Peter C. Uden; Julian F. Tyson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Monopole-optimized effective interaction for tin isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a systematic configuration-interaction shell-model calculation on the structure of light tin isotopes with a global optimized effective interaction. The starting point of the calculation is the realistic CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The unknown single-particle energies of the 1d3/2, 2s1/2, and 0h11/2 orbitals and the T=1 monopole interactions are determined by fitting to the binding energies of 157 low-lying yrast states in 102?132Sn. We apply the Hamiltonian to analyze the origin of the spin inversion between 101Sn and 103Sn that was observed recently and to explore the possible contribution from interaction terms beyond the normal pairing.

Chong Qi and Z. X. Xu

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

Erickson, A.S.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

Erickson, A.S.; Chu, J.-H.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Toney, M.F.; Geballe, T.H.; Fisher, I.R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Calculation of tin atomic data and plasma properties.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the major methods and techniques we use in generating basic atomic and plasma properties relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications. The basis of the work is the calculation of the atomic energy levels, transitions probabilities, and other atomic data by various methods, which differ in accuracy, completeness, and complication. Later on, we calculate the populations of atomic levels and ion states in plasmas by means of the collision-radiation equilibrium (CRE) model. The results of the CRE model are used as input to the thermodynamic functions, such as pressure and temperature from the internal energy and density (equation of state), electric resistance, thermal conduction, and other plasma properties. In addition, optical coefficients, such as emission and absorption coefficients, are generated to resolve a radiation transport equation (RTE). The capabilities of our approach are demonstrated by generating the required atomic and plasma properties for tin ions and plasma within the EUV region near 13.5 nm.

Morozov, V.; Tolkach, V.; Hassanein, A.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Photoconductivity of germanium tin alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photocurrent spectroscopy was used to measure the infrared absorption of germanium-tin alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To study dependence on Sn composition, the photocurrent was measured at 100 K on alloys of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} with atomic percentages of Sn up to 9.8%. The optical absorption coefficient was calculated from the photocurrent, and it was found that the absorption edge and extracted bandgap energy decreased with increasing Sn content. For all Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} samples, a fundamental bandgap below that of bulk Ge was observed, and a bandgap energy as low as 0.624 eV was found for a Sn percentage of 9.8% at 100 K.

Coppinger, Matthew; Hart, John; Bhargava, Nupur; Kim, Sangcheol; Kolodzey, James [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

GIS INTERNET MAP SERVICE FOR DISPLAYING SELENIUM CONTAMINATION DATA IN THE SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO PHOSPHATE MINING RESOURCE AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selenium is present in waste rock/overburden that is removed during phosphate mining in southeastern Idaho. Waste rock piles or rock used during reclamation can be a source of selenium (and other metals) to streams and vegetation. Some instances (in 1996) of selenium toxicity in grazing sheep and horses caused public health and environmental concerns, leading to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) involvement. The Selenium Information System Project is a collaboration among the DEQ, the United States Forest Service (USFS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Idaho Mining Association (IMA), Idaho State University (ISU), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)2. The Selenium Information System is a centralized data repository for southeastern Idaho selenium data. The data repository combines information that was previously in numerous agency, mining company, and consultants’ databases and web sites. These data include selenium concentrations in soil, water, sediment, vegetation and other environmental media, as well as comprehensive mine information. The Idaho DEQ spearheaded a selenium area-wide investigation through voluntary agreements with the mining companies and interagency participants. The Selenium Information System contains the results of that area-wide investigation, and many other background documents. As studies are conducted and remedial action decisions are made the resulting data and documentation will be stored within the information system. Potential users of the information system are agency officials, students, lawmakers, mining company personnel, teachers, researchers, and the general public. The system, available from a central website, consists of a database that contains the area-wide sampling information and an ESRI ArcIMS map server. The user can easily acquire information pertaining to the area-wide study as well as the final area-wide report. Future work on this project includes creating custom tools to increase the simplicity of the website and increasing the amount of information available from site-specific studies at 15 mines.

Roger Mayes; Sera White; Randy Lee

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Watching nanoparticles grow | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the distribution of particle sizes, scientists can explain what they see when nanoparticle ensembles form via non-classical mechanisms. Doing a portion of their research at...

84

Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Selenium and Sulfur in a Greenland Ice Sheet: Relation to Fossil Fuel Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...selenium content of these samples was determined by measurement of neutron induced 81Se. The samples were from the Camp Century area of the Greenland ice sheet (77 10'N and 61 07'W) and from a virgin area 80 km east southeast of this location...

Herbert V. Weiss; Minoru Koide; Edward D. Goldberg

1971-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Chemical Form and Distribution of Mercury and Selenium in Edible Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......was not influenced by sample storage time or nature of the packing...predominant chem- ical form in seawater and lower marine food chain...the total seleniumcontent in seawater (49). In addi- tion,Sugimara...of the total selenium in seawater to be an organic form which......

Chris J. Cappon; J. Crispin Smith

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Three-dimensional defect characterization : focused ion beam tomography applied to tin sulfide thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Porosity is postulated to be one of the reasons for the low efficiency of tin sulfide-based devices. This work is a preliminary investigation of the effects of two film growth parameters deposition rate and substrate ...

Youssef, Amanda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transparent electrodes made from metal oxides suffer from poor flexibility and durability. Highly transparent and electrically conductive thin films based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were assembled as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement...

Park, Yong Tae

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nanocrystalline tin compounds/graphene nanocomposite electrodes as anode for lithium-ion battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline tin (Sn) compounds such as SnO2, SnS2, SnS, and graphene nanocomposites were prepared using hydrothermal method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the prepared nanocomposite reveals the prese...

Marappan Sathish; Satoshi Mitani; Takaaki Tomai…

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The tin impurity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 alloys  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Extends work on tin to p-type thermoelectric alloys of formula Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3) doped with Sn. Both single crystals and polycrystals prepared using powder metallurgical techniques are studied and properties reported.

91

Special government etalon of the brightness energy unit at the temperature of tin solidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The special government etalon of the brightness energy unit at the tin solidification temperature, created in VNIIM, assures the reproduction of the unit and transmission of its dimension in conformity ... scheme...

V. V. Babushkin; I. V. Libova

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Magnetoresistance and Microstructure of Magnetite Nanocrystals Dispersed in Indium?Tin Oxide Thin Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indium?tin oxide (ITO) is the most widely used TCO in the semiconductor and electronic device industries. ... NCs of inverse-spinel-type Fe3O4 grew epitaxially on the YSZ substrate, as shown in Figure 4. ...

Koichi Okada; Shigemi Kohiki; Masanori Mitome; Hidekazu Tanaka; Masao Arai; Masaki Mito; Hiroyuki Deguchi

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

Winiarz, Christine Eve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Tin oxide based gas sensor for in-door air quality monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tin oxide nanograins doped with 0.1 at% of antimony have shown highly sensitivity towards tail gas, carbon monoxide and second-hand smoke. Such sensors are very useful for air quality...

Zhu, Lianfeng; Gai, Guosheng; Zhang, Changyue; Ji, Xuewen; Yao, Youwei

95

Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Abstract: Metal nanoparticles...

96

Nanoparticles > Complex Oxides > Research > The Energy Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoparticles The nanoparticle synthesis efforts at EMC2 mostly take place in the Frank DiSalvo group, and focus on preparing useful fuel cell electrocatalysts in nanoparticle...

97

Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticle ink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electronics using copper nanoparticle ink Jin Sung Kang •of electrode using copper nanoparticle ink is presented.of drop on demand copper nanoparticle inkjet printer system,

Kang, Jin Sung; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Jongeun; Thomas Hahn, H.; Jang, Seonhee; Joung, Jae Woo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nanoparticle Safety and Health Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposal of nanoparticles utilized or generated during research projects. This document is intended to

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Selenium nutrition of Morone hybrids including dietary requirements, bioavailability, toxicity and effects on immune responses and disease resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enhance immunocompetence and disease resistance of HSB. In the first experiment, purified and practical diets were supplemented with ?-glucan and selenium in a factorial arrangement and fed to juvenile HSB for 6 wk followed by a S. iniae challenge...

Jaramillo, Francisco , Jr

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

Assessment of selenium food chain transfer and critical exposure factors for avian wildlife species: Need for site-specific data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of selenium poisoning in Belews Lake, NC in the mid-1970s and Kesterson Reservoir, CA in the mid-1980s precipitated a large number of selenium studies. Numerous authors have evaluated the potential for selenium to cause ecologically significant effects via food chain transfer in aquatic ecosystems, especially wetlands. Additionally, bioaccumulation models have been proposed for estimating selenium concentrations in food chains and water that should not be exceeded in order to avoid reproductive effects in avian and aquatic species. The current national chronic ambient water quality criterion (WQC) for protection of aquatic life is 5 {micro}g/L. Scientists with the US Fish and Wildlife Service have recommended setting the ambient water quality criterion at 2 {micro}g/L for both aquatic and wildlife protection.

Adams, W.J. [Kennecott Utah Copper, Magna, UT (United States); Brix, K.V.; Cothern, K.A.; Tear, L.M.; Cardwell, R.D.; Toll, J.E. [Parametrix, Inc., Kirkland, WA (United States); Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Facility Tin City Long Range Radar Station Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Tin City Long Range Radar Station Developer Tanadgusix Corp. Energy Purchaser Tin City Long Range Radar Station Location Nome AK Coordinates 65.559372°, -167.949686° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.559372,"lon":-167.949686,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens Matthew D. Yates catalytic nanoparticles. Palladium nanoparticles can be produced via microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0), but in previous tests using dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB), the nanoparticles

105

Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1?±?0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300?°C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

107

Apoferritin Templated Synthesis of Metal Phosphate Nanoparticle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apoferritin Templated Synthesis of Metal Phosphate Nanoparticle Labels for Electrochemical Immunoassay. Apoferritin Templated Synthesis of Metal Phosphate Nanoparticle Labels for...

108

Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Abstract: Nanocomposite...

109

Apoferritin-Templated Yttrium Phosphate Nanoparticle Conjugates...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apoferritin-Templated Yttrium Phosphate Nanoparticle Conjugates for Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers. Apoferritin-Templated Yttrium Phosphate Nanoparticle Conjugates for...

110

A nanoparticle label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticle labelimmunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific A nanoparticle labelimmunochromatographic electrochemical...

111

Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

112

Divalent metal nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

DeVries, Gretchen Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Adhesion of Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoparticles are ubiquitous: in the vacuum of space where they are visible through their spectral signatures,1 and also on earth where they are present in the atmosphere as aerosols, in fresh waters where the...

Professor Kevin Kendall; Dr Michaela Kendall…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Photo-Targeted Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photo-Targeted Nanoparticles ... The photo-dependent inhibition could be eliminated by prior addn. of glutathione or bisulfite to the irradiated soln. ... Photo-mediated gene activation using caged RNA/DNA in zebrafish embryos ...

Tal Dvir; Matthew R. Banghart; Brian P. Timko; Robert Langer; Daniel S. Kohane

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

SIGNUM: A Matlab, TIN-based landscape evolution model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several numerical landscape evolution models (LEMs) have been developed to date, and many are available as open source codes. Most are written in efficient programming languages such as Fortran or C, but often require additional code efforts to plug in to more user-friendly data analysis and/or visualization tools to ease interpretation and scientific insight. In this paper, we present an effort to port a common core of accepted physical principles governing landscape evolution directly into a high-level language and data analysis environment such as Matlab. SIGNUM (acronym for Simple Integrated Geomorphological Numerical Model) is an independent and self-contained Matlab, TIN-based landscape evolution model, built to simulate topography development at various space and time scales. SIGNUM is presently capable of simulating hillslope processes such as linear and nonlinear diffusion, fluvial incision into bedrock, spatially varying surface uplift which can be used to simulate changes in base level, thrust and faulting, as well as effects of climate changes. Although based on accepted and well-known processes and algorithms in its present version, it is built with a modular structure, which allows to easily modify and upgrade the simulated physical processes to suite virtually any user needs. The code is conceived as an open-source project, and is thus an ideal tool for both research and didactic purposes, thanks to the high-level nature of the Matlab environment and its popularity among the scientific community. In this paper the simulation code is presented together with some simple examples of surface evolution, and guidelines for development of new modules and algorithms are proposed.

A. Refice; E. Giachetta; D. Capolongo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Release Path Temperatures of Shock-Compressed Tin from Dynamic Reflectance and Radiance Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R0 are < 2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are < 5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of < 2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

La Lone, B. M. [NSTec; Stevens, G. D. [NSTec; Turley, W. D. [NSTec; Holtkamp, D. B. [LANL; Iverson, A. J. [NSTec; Hixson, R. S. [NSTec; Veeser, L. R. [NSTec

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nanoparticle assay detects prostate cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MedWire News: US researchers have developed a nanoparticle assay that distinguishes cancerous prostate tissue from...

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nanoparticle shuttle memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

Zettl, Alex Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electrocodeposition of nanoparticle composite films using an impinging jet electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrocodeposition of Nanoparticle Composite Films Using anElectrocodeposition of Nanoparticle Composite Films Using an

Osborne, Steven J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion S. S. Harilal,a Beau O in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithographic light source. An ambient gas that is transparent to 13.5 nm and deceleration of plume species, the addition of ambient gas leads to other events such as double peak formation

Tillack, Mark

125

Collapse of superconductivity in a hybrid tin-graphene Josephson junction array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Collapse of superconductivity in a hybrid tin-graphene Josephson junction array Zheng Han1 of the Josephson junction array into a zero-temperature metallic state. The suppression of proximity, models involving specific types of Josephson junction arrays in which superconducting disks are coupled

Boyer, Edmond

126

Tin oxide-titanium oxide/graphene composited as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A tin oxide-titanium oxide/graphene (SnO2-TiO2.../G) ternary nanocomposite as high-performance anode for Li-ion batteries was prepared via a simple reflux method. ... The graphite oxide (GO) was reduced to graphene

Shan-Shan Chen; Xue Qin

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A study of degradation of indium tin oxide thin films on glass for display applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely used in liquid crystal displays (LCD). Contamination and moisture have proved to have the adverse effect of causing ITO corrosion/degradation. The purpose of this paper is to determine if scratching the surface ... Keywords: Accelerated degradation test, ITO corrosion, ITO degradation, Scratching

W. S. Leung; Y. C. Chan; S. M. Lui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

High Electric Resistance Polymer/Lipid Composite Films on Indium?Tin?Oxide Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High Electric Resistance Polymer/Lipid Composite Films on Indium?Tin?Oxide Electrodes ... Impedance spectra were analyzed in terms of equivalent circuits with resistances, capacitances, and so-called “constant phase elements”. ... resists in directing the selective deposition of metal and ceramic thin films by MOCVD and sol-gel methods, resp. ...

Heiko Hillebrandt; Gerald Wiegand; Motomu Tanaka; Erich Sackmann

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

Methods for the speciation and determination of arsenic and selenium in coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods of sample preparation for the determination of total selenium, and selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate in coal fly ash materials were evaluated. The measurement methods use atomic spectroscopy for the determination of total concentrations and ion chromatography (IC) for the determination of individual ionic species. Sample preparation procedures which minimize the loss or alteration of the species of interest was explored and defined. The utility of the sample preparation methods can be sample dependent, so caution is advised in their use. IC conditions were established for the determination in extract solutions of selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate with minimal interference from common anions.

Schabron, J.F.; Hart, B.K.; Niss, N.D.; Brown, T.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Conditions for a carrier multiplication in amorphous-selenium based photodetector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous selenium is a promising candidate for high sensitivity photodetector due to its unique carrier multiplication phenomenon. More than 10 carriers can be generated per incident photon, which leads to high photo-conversion efficiency of 1000% that allows real-time imaging in dark ambient. However, application of this effect has been limited to specific devices due to the lack in material characterization. In this article, mechanism of carrier multiplication has been clarified using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A prototype photodetector achieved photo conversion efficiency of 4000%, which explains the signal enhancement mechanism in a-Se based photodetector.

Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Kuniyoshi, Shingo; Onishi, Masanori; Kato, Richika; Saito, Ichitaro; Okano, Ken [Department of Material Science, International Christian University, S102 Science Hall, ICU, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Material Science, International Christian University, S102 Science Hall, ICU, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Yamada, Takatoshi [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Koh, Angel T. T.; Chua, Daniel H. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Shimosawa, Tatsuo [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyoku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyoku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Glutathione peroxidase response in tissues of rats fed diets containing fish protein concentrate prepared from shark flesh of known mercury and selenium contents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been reported using experimental animals and synthetic diets containing selenium and mercury compounds to demonstrate detoxification of mercury by selenium. The mechanism of detoxification remains obscure. Most experiments have involved the use of high levels of both elements and relied on the observation of gross symptoms. The measurement of enzyme systems may be useful in detecting effects of mercury at a lower, subclinical level and in elucidating the biochemistry of mercury/selenium interactions. The activity of the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in rats is dependent on dietary selenium and attempts have been made to use this enzyme as an indicator of mercury/selenium interactions. The research described in this paper was designed to investigate the effect of mercury, in the form and amounts which occur naturally in seafood, on the availability of selenium at levels approximating the nutritional requirement. In anticipation of mercury lowering the GSH-Px response a range of selenium concentrations was used, from nutritional deficiency to three times the nutritional requirement.

Thrower, S.J. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Hobart, Australia); Andrewartha, K.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Electron Dynamics in Metallic Nanoparticles M. Aeschlimann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticles are discussed in the light of the results of line width measurements and femtosecond pump...............................................................................................................3 II. ADSORPTION OF LIGHT IN METALLIC NANOPARTICLES...................................4 A. General...............................................18 C. Heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the support

Bauer, Michael

133

Spectroscopy of gallium selenide nanoparticle nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the presence of GaSe nanoparticle nuclei which are non-Superradiance in GaSe Nanoparticle Aggregates”, Journal ofStrongly-Coupled GaSe Nanoparticle Aggregates”, Journal of

Lair, Deborah L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Capture of Prions for Amplification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ANTIVIRAL AGENTS Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Capture of Prions for Amplification...findings suggest that coupling magnetic nanoparticle capture with PMCA could accelerate...not detected by immunoblot, we used nanoparticle-treated supernatants to seed PMCA...

Michael B. Miller; Surachai Supattapone

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

135

Toward multifunctional nanoparticle-based therapeutics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. A. ; Langer, R. , Nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates: aof DNA-linked gold nanoparticle assemblies? J Am Chem Socalpha(nu)beta3- targeted nanoparticle and 1.5 tesla magnetic

Derfus, Austin Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Abstract: The reduction of...

137

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

138

Enzyme Nanoparticles-Based Electronic Biosensor. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

method for fabricating electronic biosensors based on coupling enzyme nanoparticles and self assembly technology is illustrated. Redox horseradish peroxidase nanoparticles were...

139

Toward multifunctional nanoparticle-based therapeutics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors may be improved by tailoring nanoparticles for drug delivery and medical imaging. The core of the nanoparticle can… (more)

Derfus, Austin Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Patterns and instabilities in colloidal nanoparticle assemblies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Colloidal nanoparticles exhibit unusual individual and collective behaviour, often associated with interesting electrical, optical or electromagnetic properties. Thiol-passivated colloidal gold nanoparticles possess in addition a… (more)

Pauliac-Vaujour, Emmanuelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sandia National Laboratories: nanoparticle production method  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticle production method Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells On July 1, 2014, in Capabilities, CINT, Energy, Energy...

143

Silica Supported Ceria Nanoparticles: A Hybrid Nanostructure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoparticles: A Hybrid Nanostructure To Increase Stability And Surface Reactivity Of Nano-crystalline Silica Supported Ceria Nanoparticles: A Hybrid Nanostructure To Increase...

144

Transmission electron microscopy study of the effect of selenium doping on the ordering of GalnP2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selenium doped Ga0.51In0.49P films have been grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition at 600, 670 and 740° C. The extent of ordering of the Group III sublattice has been monitored by transmission electron...

J. P. Goral; Sarah R. Kurtz; J. M. Olson; A. Kibbler

145

Quantification, Localization, and Speciation of Selenium in Seeds of Canola and Two Mustard Species Compared to Seed-Meals Produced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantification, Localization, and Speciation of Selenium in Seeds of Canola and Two Mustard Species with Se. We report a chemical analysis of Se in Brassica seeds (canola, Indian mustard, and white mustard shoots of several Brassica species, canola (Brassica napus), Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), and white

146

Selenium Bioaccumulation in Stocked Fish as an Indicator of Fishery Potential in Pit Lakes on Reclaimed Coal Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Reclaimed Coal Mines in Alberta, Canada L. L. Miller · J. B. Rasmussen · V. P. Palace · G. Sterling · A to selenium (Se) and other metals and metalloids in pit lakes formed by open pit coal mining in Tertiary (thermal coal) and in Cretaceous (metallurgical coal) bedrock. Juvenile hatchery rainbow trout

Hontela, Alice

147

Tuning the surface-plasmon resonance in nanoparticles for glazing applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Issues affecting the performance of polymers doped with conducting nanoparticles for use with windows are examined in terms of impact on visible and solar transmittance solar heat gain and residual scattering. Emphasis is on visible transmittance fixed in the range of 30%–75% combined with maximal blocking of the near-infrared (NIR) component of solar energy in the wavelength range of 750 – 1300 nm . Spectral data and surface-plasmon resonance (SPR) models of absorbance for La B 6 and indium tin oxide nanoparticles embedded in polymer are quite distinct from each other but both can be used and each material has its advantages and disadvantages. The SPR of La B 6 nanoparticles is very efficient at NIR blocking as it lies near 1000 nm but as a result its tail overlaps the visible. In contrast the SPR of ITO lies well beyond 1000 nm and is thus far less efficient only relying on its SPR tail. However this means it only weakly affects the visible. Results of a quasistatic model for the optical properties are presented along with comparisons to full Mie scattering calculations. It is found that ellipsoidal particles are required to explain the properties of the studied La B 6 particles and that scattering can be significant in the NIR while weak in the visible. Furthermore the forward-to-backward-scattering ratio is different for Rayleigh scattering in the visible and scattering near the SPR. The latter is much more isotropic even for larger particles.

S. Schelm; G. B. Smith; P. D. Garrett; W. K. Fisher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Growth of single-crystalline rutile TiO2 nanorods on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass for organicinorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 15] and CdS [2] have been explored and studied to overcome this shortcome, and used in organicGrowth of single-crystalline rutile TiO2 nanorods on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass for organic

Cao, Guozhong

149

Growth of CrO[subscript 2] coated single crystalline (SnO[subscript 2]) tin oxide nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single crystalline tin oxide (SnO[subscript 2]) nanowires have been synthesized by carbothermal reduction of SnO[subscript 2] nanopowder followed by thermal evaporation of the reduced precursor and growth via the ...

Miao, Guo-Xing

150

Reflection of nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is devoted to molecular dynamics modeling of collision of nanoparticle having a small number of degrees of freedom with a structureless plain. The new regularities are established that determine properties of such particles. Generalized collision law is obtained where particle properties are determined by two coefficient, on of which corresponds to restitution coefficient. The discovered regularity predicts the existence of anomalous mode of particle reflection from a massive plain. In this mode, velocity of nanoparticle after reflection from a plain can exceed the initial one. The criterion of realization of such mode is obtained. Anomalous collision mode was observed during numerical modeling. Physical mechanism are discussed of phenomena that are observed during numerical experiments.

M. A. Ratner; A. V. Tur; V. V. Yanovsky

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Crystalline to amorphous phase transition of tin oxide nanocrystals induced by SHI at low temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on Si substrates. The as-deposited films were irradiated using 100 MeV Ag ions at different fluences ranging from 3x10{sup 13} to 3x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} at an incidence angle of 75 deg. with respect to surface normal at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. The as-deposited and irradiated films have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to study the modifications in structural and surface morphological properties. Nanocrystalline film become completely amorphous and nanograins of tin oxide disappeared from the surface as indicated by XRD spectra and AFM micrographs respectively.

Kumar, Vijay; Pratap, Deepti; Jain, Anshul; Agarwal, D. C.; Sulania, I.; Tripathi, A.; Chaudhary, R. J.; Chauhan, R. S. [Department of Physics, R.B.S. College, Agra, U.P.,-282 002 (India); Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, -110 067 (India); UGC-DAE CSR, Khandwa Road, Indore, M.P., -452 017 (India); Department of Physics, R.B.S. College, Agra, U.P., -282 002 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydrogen plasma treatment for improved conductivity in amorphous aluminum doped zinc tin oxide thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the conductivity of earth-abundant transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) remains an important challenge that will facilitate the replacement of indium-based TCOs. Here, we show that a hydrogen (H{sub 2})-plasma post-deposition treatment improves the conductivity of amorphous aluminum-doped zinc tin oxide while retaining its low optical absorption. We found that the H{sub 2}-plasma treatment performed at a substrate temperature of 50?°C reduces the resistivity of the films by 57% and increases the absorptance by only 2%. Additionally, the low substrate temperature delays the known formation of tin particles with the plasma and it allows the application of the process to temperature-sensitive substrates.

Morales-Masis, M., E-mail: monica.moralesmasis@epfl.ch; Ding, L.; Dauzou, F. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladičre 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Jeangros, Q. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hessler-Wyser, A. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladičre 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Nicolay, S. [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Ballif, C. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladičre 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contamination (Cieminski and Flake The absence of Se in brine ?brine ?y larvae Ephy- dra cinerea Jones. Archives of Environmental Contaminationbrine shrimp tis- sue Se levels in the same range as those observed here, selenium contamination

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

An Original Route to Immobilize an Organic Biocide onto a Transparent Tin Dioxide Electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Original Route to Immobilize an Organic Biocide onto a Transparent Tin Dioxide Electrode ... Chloramine is increasingly being considered as an alternative final disinfectant to chlorine in drinking water treatment even if it is generally not as potent as free chlorine against planktonic organisms. ... Moreover, the detection of chlorine by XPS (surface sensitive) and by EDX (bulk sensitive) indicates that the organic deposit is chlorinated throughout its thickness. ...

Catherine Debiemme-Chouvy; Sanae Haskouri; Guy Folcher; Hubert Cachet

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual report, October 1, 1995--December 31,1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selenium geochemistry in tidal wetlands is a topic of continuing study at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The program of studies described in this report was initiated in the fall of 1994 in response to concerns about elevated Se concentrations in waters, sediments, and biota in the Carquinez Strait. Processes by which selenium is introduced and potentially released from the sediment system have been the focus of research in 1996.

Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E.; Benson, S.M. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Upconversion Luminescence of CdTe Nanoparticles. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of CdTe Nanoparticles. Upconversion Luminescence of CdTe Nanoparticles. Abstract: Efficient upconversion luninescence is observed from CdTe nanoparticles in solution and...

157

Nanoparticle diffraction gratings for DNA detection on photopatterned glass substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sendroiu and R. M. Corn: Nanoparticle diffraction gratingsSendroiu and R. M. Corn: Nanoparticle diffraction gratingsthe principle of the nanoparticle-based DNA detection assay

Sendroiu, Luliana E; Corn, Robert M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Targeting atherosclerosis : nanoparticle delivery for diagnosis and treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomimetic amplification of nanoparticle homing to tumors."Biomimetic amplification of nanoparticle homing to tumors."a novel target for nanoparticle-based diagnostics and

Peters, David Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Isolation of Discrete Nanoparticle-DNA Conjugates for Plasmonic Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isolation of Discrete Nanoparticle-DNA Conjugates forABSTRACT. Discrete DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates with DNABG_Keywords”). GOLD, NANOPARTICLE, NANOCRYSTAL, PLASMON,

Claridge, Shelley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Quantum dot nanoparticle conjugation, characterization, and applications in neuroscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of nanoparticle labeling tools for neuralCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Quantum Dot Nanoparticle Conjugation,resulting in aggregation of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates

Pathak, Smita

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electric field directed self assembly of nanoparticle structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self Assembly of Nanoparticle Structures by DietrichBiologically programmed nanoparticle assembly. AdvancedPeriodic square-like gold nanoparticle arrays templated by

Dehlinger, Dietrich Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Engineering embedded metal nanoparticles with ion beam technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002) Engineering embedded metal nanoparticles with ion beam3 Engineering embedded metal nanoparticles with ion beamcompara- Engineering embedded metal nanoparticles with ion

Ren, Feng; Xiao, Xiang Heng; Cai, Guang Xu; Wang, Jian Bo; Jiang, Chang Zhong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Transient and steady-state dark current mechanisms in amorphous selenium avalanche radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical model for describing bias-dependent transient and steady-state behaviors of dark current in amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche detector structures has been developed. The analytical model considers bulk thermal generation current from mid-gap sates, transient carrier depletion, and carrier injection from the electrodes incorporating avalanche multiplication. The proposed physics-based dark current model is compared with the published experimental results on three potential a-Se avalanche detector structures. The steady-state dark current is the minimum for the structures that have effective blocking layers for both holes and electrons. The transient decay time to reach a plateau decreases considerably with increasing electric field.

Kabir, M. Z.; Imam, Safayat-Al [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 Blvd. de Maisonneuve West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 (Canada)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 Blvd. de Maisonneuve West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 (Canada)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Partitioning and chemical speciation of mercury, arsenic, and selenium during inert gas oil shale retorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Green River shale from Colorado and a New Albany shale from Kentucky were retorted in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory 6-kg bench-scale retort at 1 to 2C/min and at 10C/min to maximum temperatures of 500 and 750C under a nitrogen sweep gas. The product streams were analyzed using a variety of methods including Zeeman atomic aabsortion spectroscopy, microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, instrumental neutron activation analysis, high-pressure liquid and silica gel column chromatography, and mercury cold vapor atomic absorption. The results obtained using these analytical methods indicate the the distribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product stream is a function of oil shale type, heating rates, and maximum retorting temperatures. 23 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Sanders, R.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Direct hybridization of tin oxide/graphene nanocomposites for highly efficient lithium-ion battery anodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A facile direct hybridization route to prepare SnO2/graphene nanocomposites for Li-ion battery anode application is demonstrated. Uniform distribution of...2 nanoparticles on graphene layers was enabled by a one-...

Dong Ok Shin; Hun Park; Young-Gi Lee; Kwang Man Kim…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Holographic manipulation of nanoparticle distribution morphology in nanoparticle-dispersed photopolymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on experimental verification of mass transfer of nanoparticles during holographic recording in nanoparticle-dispersed photopolymers. Through direct observations of the...

Tomita, Yasuo; Suzuki, Naoaki; Chikama, Katsumi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nanoparticle-induced surface reconstruction of phospholipid membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle-induced surface reconstruction of phospholipid membranes Bo Wanga , Liangfang Zhangb, 2008) The nonspecific adsorption of charged nanoparticles onto single- component phospholipid bilayers surface reconstruction at the points where nanoparticles adsorb. Nanoparticles of negative charge induce

Zhang, Liangfang

170

Clay Nanoparticle-Supported Single-Molecule FluorescenceSpectroelectr...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clay Nanoparticle-Supported Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroelectrochemistry. Clay Nanoparticle-Supported Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroelectrochemistry. Abstract: We...

171

Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide. Abstract: Many...

172

JV Task 124 - Understanding Multi-Interactions of SO3, Mercury, Selenium, and Arsenic in Illinois Coal Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of pilot-scale combustion testing with a representative Illinois basin coal to explore the multi-interactions of SO{sub 3}, mercury, selenium and arsenic. The parameters investigated for SO{sub 3} and mercury interactions included different flue gas conditions, i.e., temperature, moisture content, and particulate alkali content, both with and without activated carbon injection for mercury control. Measurements were also made to track the transformation of selenium and arsenic partitioning as a function of flue gas temperature through the system. The results from the mercury-SO{sub 3} testing support the concept that SO{sub 3} vapor is the predominant factor that impedes efficient mercury removal with activated carbon in an Illinois coal flue gas, while H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol has less impact on activated carbon injection performance. Injection of a suitably mobile and reactive additives such as sodium- or calcium-based sorbents was the most effective strategy tested to mitigate the effect of SO{sub 3}. Transformation measurements indicate a significant fraction of selenium was associated with the vapor phase at the electrostatic precipitator inlet temperature. Arsenic was primarily particulate-bound and should be captured effectively with existing particulate control technology.

Ye Zhuang; Christopher Martin; John Pavlish

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Super 8 experiment. Nanoparticle aggregates are attachedgroundwater bacteria with nanoparticle aggregates attachedferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support

Luef, B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Single Nanoparticle Surface Enhanced Fluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well established that when in close proximity to gold nanoparticles the optical properties of local fluorescent molecules are dramatically altered. When the localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), tuned...

Linden R. Webster; K. Suhling; D. Richards

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Highly efficient inverted organic solar cells using amino acid modified indium tin oxide as cathode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report that highly efficient inverted organic solar cells were achieved by modifying the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) using an amino acid, Serine (Ser). With the modification of the ITO surface, device efficiency was significantly enhanced from 0.63% to 4.17%, accompanied with an open circuit voltage (Voc) that was enhanced from 0.30?V to 0.55?V. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the work function reduction induced by the amino acid modification resulting in the decreased barrier height at the ITO/organic interface played a crucial role in the enhanced performances.

Li, Aiyuan; Nie, Riming; Deng, Xianyu, E-mail: xydeng@hitsz.edu.cn [Research Center for Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wei, Huaixin; Li, Yanqing; Tang, Jianxin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zheng, Shizhao; Wong, King-Young [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding ?/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ?517??m-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (?78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66?V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

Yang, Chan-Shan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tang, Tsung-Ta [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ru-Pin [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Yu, Peichen [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ci-Ling, E-mail: clpan@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Science of Matters, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436?V, short-circuit current of 24.8?mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5?G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

Yoshimura, Masatoshi, E-mail: yoshimura@rciqe.hokudai.ac.jp; Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan); Tomioka, Katsuhiro [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan) [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honcho Kawaguchi, 332–0012 Saitama (Japan)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

178

Investigation of hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers on cadmium tin oxide thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study reports the use of variable angle reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the formation of a 1-hexadecanethiol adlayer on cadmium tin oxide (CTO) thin film surfaces. These adlayers appear to be robust, ordered monolayers. The optical and electronic properties of CTO thin films chemically vapor deposited onto glass substrates were also investigated. The reflectance of the CTO films was dependent upon the incident angle of the impinging radiation and revealed a reflectance decrease indicative of a plasma frequency in the mid-IR using p-polarized radiation.

Crissy L. Rhodes; Scott H. Brewer; Jaap Folmer; Stefan Franzen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Syntheses and structural characterization of zirconium-tin and zirconium-lead binary and ternary systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The binary zirconium-tin system was reinvestigated. The A15 phase appears to be a line phase with a Zr{sub 4}Sn composition. The Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3} (Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 4} (Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type) compounds are line phases below 1000{degree}C, the latter being a self-interstitial phase of the former. ZrSn{sub 2} is the tin-richest phase. There is an one-phase region between these phases with partial self-interstitials at high temperatures. The zirconium-lead system behaves similarly: there are an A15 phase with a Zr{sub {approximately}5.8}Pb composition, Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 3} (Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 4} (Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4-type}) compounds, and a high temperature solid solution between Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub >3.5} and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 4} from below 1000{degree}C; however, the ZrSn{sub 2} analogue is not formed. The Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type phases in these systems can accommodate third elements interstitially to form stoichiometric compounds Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}Z (Z = B, C, N, O, Al, Si, P, S, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and As and Se) and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 3}Z (Z = Al, Si, P, S, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb and Te) as well as their self-interstitial derivatives. The systems Zr-Sn-T, T = Fe, Co and Ni, did not produce stoichiometric interstitial phases Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}T. Instead, the interstitial phases for these elements are formed only with excess tin that partially occupies the interstitial site together with a T element. Reducing the amount of tin in these systems yields two new phases; Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 2+x}Fe{sub 1-x} (0 {le} {times} {le} 0.28) (W{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 6}Sn{sub 2}Fe (Zr{sub 6}Al{sub 2}Co-type) as characterized by X-ray single crystal analyses. A cobalt analogue for the latter was also synthesized.

Kwon, Y.U.

1991-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Methods of Improving Internal-TIN Nb{sub 3}Sn for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a more reliable and economical high field material for ITER and TPX as well as LDK and KSTAR programs. The overall objective of this work is to provide the TPX/ITER programs and similar projects with an improved, reliable and economical high field Nb{sub 3}Sn multifilamentary conductor strand made by the internal-tin process. An effort will also be made to determine the reasons for the property changes taking place after various heat treatment cycles in an effort to develop optimized heat treatments for the various applications.

Pyon, T; Gregory, E.

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Indium (In)- and tin (Sn)-based metal induced crystallization (MIC) on amorphous germanium (?-Ge)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, metal-induced crystallization (MIC) phenomenon on ?-Ge by indium (In) and tin (Sn) are thoroughly investigated. In- and Sn-MIC process respectively started at 250 °C and 400 °C. Compared to the previously reported MIC samples including In-MIC, Sn-MIC process presented higher sheet resistance (similar to that of SPC) and bigger crystal grains above 50 nm (slightly smaller than that of SPC). According to SIMS analysis, Sn atoms diffused more slowly into Ge than In at 400 °C, providing lower density of heterogeneous nuclei induced by metals and consequently larger crystal grains.

Dong-Ho Kang; Jin-Hong Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Chemical interactions at polymer interfaces: poly(p-xylylene-?-tetrahydrothiophene-bromide, chloride) on indium–tin-oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical interactions, at the interface between a precursor polymer for poly(p-phenylenevinylene), namely poly(p-xylylene-?-tetrahydrothiophene-chloride), and an indium–tin-oxide transparent electrode, are identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The \\{HCl\\} eliminated in the conversion process interacts with the surface of the indium–tin-oxide substrate leading to the formation of indium chloride which then diffuses into the polymer. It appears that indium–tin-oxide, or possibly the indium chloride generated at the interface, acts as a catalyst for the thermal elimination reaction. The results show unequivocally that interfacial interactions are of major importance in understanding, and ultimately improving, the performance of polymer-based electro-luminescent devices.

A Andersson; Th Kugler; M Lögdlund; A.B Holmes; X Li; W.R Salaneck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1,5 L. Vzquez,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1 manuscript received 1 December 2005; published 31 January 2006 We study surface kinetic roughening of Ti. The TiN films exhibit intrinsic anomalous scaling and multiscaling. The film kinetic roughening

Cuerno, Rodolfo

184

Reduction And Stabilization (Immobilization) Of Pertechnetate To An Immobile Reduced Technetium Species Using Tin(II) Apatite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic tin(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 to a non-mobile oxidation state and sequesters the technetium, preventing re-oxidization to mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions. Previous work indicated technetium reacted Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index of 12.8 in Cast Stone. An effect by pH is observed on the distribution coefficient, the highest distribution coefficient being l70,900 observed at pH levels of 2.5 to 10.2. The tin apatite was resistant to releasing technetium under test conditions.

Duncan, J. B.

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

Proton elastic scattering from tin isotopes at 295 MeV and systematic change of neutron density distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross sections and analyzing powers for proton elastic scattering from $^{116,118,120,122,124}$Sn at 295 MeV have been measured for a momentum transfer of up to about 3.5 fm$^{-1}$ to deduce systematic changes of the neutron density distribution. We tuned the relativistic Love-Franey interaction to explain the proton elastic scattering of a nucleus whose density distribution is well known. Then, we applied this interaction to deduce the neutron density distributions of tin isotopes. The result of our analysis shows the clear systematic behavior of a gradual increase in the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes with mass number.

S. Terashima; H. Sakaguchi; H. Takeda; T. Ishikawa; M. Itoh; T. Kawabata; T. Murakami; M. Uchida; Y. Yasuda; M. Yosoi; J. Zenihiro; H. P. Yoshida; T. Noro; T. Ishida; S. Asaji; T. Yonemura

2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Theranostics and Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nanoparticle constituted with nanoscale or nanostructured materials can be modified by approximate 1,500 potential sites. This unique property of nanoparticle is the foundation to employ nanostructures possible...

Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nanoparticle Measurements and Standards for Biomedical and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Measurements and Standards for Biomedical and Health Applications NANOMATERIALS Our consensus standards for characterization of biomedical nanoparticles are currently under development within for the biomedical and EHS sectors. Approach Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory Taking therapeutic

Magee, Joseph W.

188

Nanoparticle "theranostic" platforms for applications in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theranostics ..materials, coined as “theranostics” for their therapeuticbody. 1.4 Nanoparticle Theranostics However, the most unique

Steiner, Jason Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment ... While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. ... Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. ...

Melissa A. Maurer-Jones; Ian L. Gunsolus; Catherine J. Murphy; Christy L. Haynes

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Influence of Vacancies on the Nanoparticle Pulsation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer modeling of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional nanoparticles with Van-der-Waals interaction was performed. The arrangement of atoms was defined on the grounds of an energy minimum. The calculations have shown that in the presence of vacancies in a nanoparticle and the account of a relaxation and oscillations the nanoparticle will pulse. This pulsation on distance between atoms of a nanoparticle is observed in both one-dimensional and a three-dimensional cases.

M. A. Korshunov

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Distributions of selenium, iodine, lead, thorium and uranium in Japanese river waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-lived radionuclides released from nuclear facilities, such as deep underground disposal facilities, could reach humans through several transfer paths in the environment. Uses of ground water and river water for agricultural field irrigation and for drinking water are important paths. In order to understand behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial water environment, we carried out a natural analogue study, that is, measurement of selenium (Se), iodine (I), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and uranium (U) concentrations in 45 Japanese rivers at 10 sampling points from the upper stream to the river mouth for each river. Geometric mean concentrations for Se, I, Pb, Th and U were 0.057, 1.4, 0.039, 0.0055, 0.0109 ng/mL, respectively. Distribution patterns from upper stream to river mouth were different by elements, for instance, the concentrations of I, Th and U increased when the sampling points were nearer the river mouth, while that of Se were almost constant. For Pb, the highest value was observed in the middle part of each river in many cases. (authors)

Tagami, K.; Uchida, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electroless Nanoparticle Film Deposition Compatible with Photolithography,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electroless Nanoparticle Film Deposition Compatible with Photolithography, Microcontact Printing; Revised Manuscript Received October 14, 2002 ABSTRACT Nanoparticles of Au, Pd, and Pt form spontaneously In this paper, we demonstrate that Au, Pd, and Pt nanoparticle films, produced through a spontaneous electroless

Porter Jr., Lon A.

193

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

194

Behavior of Engineered Nanoparticles in Landfill Leachate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research sought to understand the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in landfill leachate by examining the interactions between nanoparticles and leachate components. The primary foci of this paper are the effects of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag nanoparticles ...

Stephanie C. Bolyard; Debra R. Reinhart; Swadeshmukul Santra

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Selenium\June 2007\Eco-SSL for S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selenium Selenium Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-72 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 July 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR SELENIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

196

The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Application for Tuition Rebate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Application for Tuition Rebate Name) _________ / _________ General Information An undergraduate may be eligible for a tuition rebate of up to $1,000 at graduation documentation, you may submit an application for a rebate. If you answered yes to question 3a., you

Lightsey, Glenn

197

Conductive indium-tin oxide nanowire and nanotube arrays made by electrochemically assisted deposition in template membranes: switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conductive indium-tin oxide nanowire and nanotube arrays made by electrochemically assisted-step electrochemically assisted deposition (EAD) process inside Au-plugged anodic aluminium oxide and polycarbonate electrodes in dye-sensi- tized2,6­11 and polymer12 solar cells, fillers in transparent and conductive polymer

198

Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN(111) island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ high-temperature (1165–1248 K) scanning-tunneling microscopy was used to measure temporal fluctuations about the anisotropic equilibrium shape of two-dimensional TiN(111) adatom and vacancy islands on atomically smooth TiN(111) terraces. The equilibrium island shape was found to be a truncated hexagon bounded by alternating ?110? steps, which form [100] and [110] nanofacets with the terrace. Relative step energies ? as a function of step orientation ? were obtained from the inverse Legendre transformation of the equilibrium island shape to within an orientation-independent scale factor ?, the equilibrium chemical potential of the island per unit TiN area. We find that for alternating S1 and S2 ?110? steps, the ratio ?1/?2=0.72±0.02. The parameter ? and, hence, absolute orientation-dependent values of ?(?) and step stiffnesses ??(?) were extracted from quantitative shape fluctuation data using an exact theoretical approach valid for anisotropic islands. For the two ?110? steps, we obtain ?1=0.23±0.05 and ??1=1.9±1.1 eV/Ĺ with ?2=0.33±0.07 and ??2=0.08±0.02 eV/Ĺ over the observed temperature range. Due to the correspondingly high kink energies, TiN(111) step energies exhibit only a very weak temperature dependence between 0 K and the maximum measurement temperature 1248 K.

S. Kodambaka; S. V. Khare; V. Petrova; D. D. Johnson; I. Petrov; J. E. Greene

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfidegraphene nanocomposites with small crystal size for high performance lithium ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfide­graphene nanocomposites with small September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2jm34864k This study reports a novel strategy of preparing graphene composites by employing graphene oxide as precursor and oxidizer. It is demonstrated that graphene oxide can oxidize

Cao, Guozhong

200

Efficient dehydration of carbohydrates to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in ionic liquids catalyzed by tin(IV) phosphonate and zirconium phosphonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we synthesized tin(IV) phosphonate (SnBPMA) and zirconium phosphonate (ZrBPMA) by the reaction of SnCl4·5H2O or ZrOCl2·8H2O with N,N...-bis(phosphonomethyl)aminoacetic acid, which was synthesized fr...

Hui Ning; JinLiang Song; MinQiang Hou; DeZhong Yang; HongLei Fan…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of four-center integrals with the linear muffin-tin orbital tight-binding method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive formulas for the general four-center integral and its Bloch sum within the basis of optimally localized muffin-tin orbitals in the atomic spheres approximation. As an example of application the Hartree and exchange energies of silicon are calculated and the cohesive energy determined in the local-density and Hartree-Fock approximations.

A. Svane and O. K. Andersen

1986-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

?Magnetotransport of magnetite nanoparticle arrays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We combine a material self-assembly with conventional lithographic processes in order to fabricate magnetoelectronic devices composed of ordered three-dimensional arrays of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The device magnetoresistance reaches 35% at 60 K, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 73%. Magnetoresistance of 12% remains at room temperature. Magnetoresistance decreases with both increasing temperature and bias voltage, however, the magnetoresistance of nanoparticle-based structures is only weakly dependent on the voltage—a favorable attribute for application to electronics.

Hao Zeng; C. T. Black; R. L. Sandstrom; P. M. Rice; C. B. Murray; Shouheng Sun

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spray coated indium-tin-oxide-free organic photodiodes with PEDOT:PSS anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we report on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-free spray coated organic photodiodes with an active layer consisting of a poly(3-hexylthiophen) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend and patterned poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) electrodes. External quantum efficiency and current voltage characteristics under illuminated and dark conditions as well as cut-off frequencies for devices with varying active and hole conducting layer thicknesses were measured in order to characterize the fabricated devices. 60% quantum efficiency as well as nearly four orders of magnitude on-off ratios have been achieved. Those values are comparable with standard ITO devices.

Schmidt, Morten, E-mail: morten.schmidt@nano.ei.tum.de; Falco, Aniello; Loch, Marius; Lugli, Paolo; Scarpa, Giuseppe [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technical University of Munich, Arcisstr. 21, 80333 Munich (Germany)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Inkjet printed ambipolar transistors and inverters based on carbon nanotube/zinc tin oxide heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of inkjet printed semiconductor bilayer heterostructures utilizing semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO). The bilayer structure allows for electron transport to occur principally in the amorphous oxide layer and hole transport to occur exclusively in the SWCNT layer. This results in balanced electron and hole mobilities exceeding 2 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} at low operating voltages (<5?V) in air. We further show that the SWCNT-ZTO hybrid ambipolar FETs can be integrated into functional inverter circuits that display high peak gain (>10). This work provides a pathway for realizing solution processable, inkjet printable, large area electronic devices, and systems based on SWCNT-amorphous oxide heterostructures.

Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Dodabalapur, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.dodabalapur@engr.utexas.edu [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Two ways to perform spin-polarized relativistic linear muffin-tin-orbital calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two spin-polarized relativistic versions of the linear muffin-tin-orbital method of band-structure calculations are presented. The first one is a pseudoperturbational method taking the effect of spin splitting only into account within the variational step. The second one treats spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling on the same level by making use of the proper solutions to the Dirac equation for a spin-dependent potential. Both approaches permit a detailed theoretical study of magnetocrystalline anisotropy effects. Results for the band structure, the spin and orbital magnetic moments and the conduction-band contribution to the hyperfine fields of Fe, Co, and Ni obtained by these methods are presented and compared to data obtained by an application of the spin-polarized version of the relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method.

H. Ebert

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

“One-Pot” Synthesis of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural from Carbohydrates using Tin-Beta Zeolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of carbohydrates to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) may provide a step forward toward achieving a renewable biomass-based chemicals and fuels platform. Recently, we reported that a tin-containing, high-silica molecular sieve with the zeolite beta topology (Sn-Beta) can efficiently catalyze the isomerization of glucose to fructose in aqueous media at low pH. Herein, we describe the combination of Sn-Beta with acid catalysts in a one vessel, biphasic reactor system to synthesize HMF from carbohydrates such as glucose, cellobiose, and starch with high efficiency. HMF selectivities over 70% were obtained using this “one-pot” biphasic water/tetrahydrofuran (THF) reactor system. The key to successfully achieving the conversions/selectivities reported is that Sn-Beta is able to convert glucose to fructose at pH near 1 and in saturated aqueous salt solutions.

Nikolla, E; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Moliner, Manuel; Davis, Mark E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

FEAST fundamental framework for electronic structure calculations: Reformulation and solution of the muffin-tin problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent article Polizzi (2009) [15], the FEAST algorithm has been presented as a general purpose eigenvalue solver which is ideally suited for addressing the numerical challenges in electronic structure calculations. Here, FEAST is presented beyond the “black-box” solver as a fundamental modeling framework which can naturally address the original numerical complexity of the electronic structure problem as formulated by Slater in 1937 [3]. The non-linear eigenvalue problem arising from the muffin-tin decomposition of the real-space domain is first derived and then reformulated to be solved exactly within the FEAST framework. This new framework is presented as a fundamental and practical solution for performing both accurate and scalable electronic structure calculations, bypassing the various issues of using traditional approaches such as linearization and pseudopotential techniques. A finite element implementation of this FEAST framework along with simulation results for various molecular systems is also presented and discussed.

Alan R. Levin; Deyin Zhang; Eric Polizzi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The mesoporosity of microparticles spray dried from trehalose and nanoparticle hydroxyapatite depends on the ratio of nanoparticles to sugar and nanoparticle surface charge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ratio of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles (NP) to trehalose in composite microparticle (MP) vaccine vehicles by determining inter-nanoparticle space potentially influences antigen release. Mercury porosimetr...

David M. Wright; Zlatko S. Saracevic…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium from coal fly ash: role of calcium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the leaching behavior of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in coal fly ash is important in evaluating the potential environmental impact of coal fly ash. Batch experiments were employed to systematically investigate the leaching behavior of As and Se in two major types of coal fly ashes, bituminous coal ash and sub-bituminous coal ash, and to determine the underlying processes that control As and Se leaching. The effects of pH, solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, calcium addition, and leaching time on the release of As and Se were studied. Overall, bituminous coal ash leached significantly more As and Se than sub-bituminous coal ash, and Se was more readily leachable, in both absolute concentration and relative fraction, than As for both types of fly ashes. Adsorption/desorption played a major role on As and Se leaching from bituminous coal ashes. However, calcium precipitation played the most important role in reducing As and Se leaching from sub-bituminous coal ashes in the entire experimental pH range. The leaching of As and Se from bituminous coal ashes generally increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. However, for sub-bituminous coal ashes, the leaching of As was not detected under most experimental conditions, while the leaching of Se increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. As{sup V} and Se{sup IV} were found to be the major species in all ash leachates in this study. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Tian Wang; Jianmin Wang; Yulin Tang; Honglan Shi; Ken Ladwig [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States). Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, and Environmental Research Center (ERC)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

Rozhkova, Elena

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Imparting functionality to a metalorganic framework material by controlled nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imparting functionality to a metal�organic framework material by controlled nanoparticle by encapsulating various functional species (for example, nanoparticles) within the frameworks. However, despite increasing numbers of reports of nanoparticle/MOF composites, simultaneously to control the size, composition

216

Exploiting lymphatic transport and complement activation in nanoparticle vaccines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploiting lymphatic transport and complement activation in nanoparticle vaccines Sai T Reddy1 in vaccine development. Here we investigate whether nanoparticles can be used as a vaccine platform complement activation. After intradermal injection, interstitial flow transported ultra-small nanoparticles

Floreano, Dario

217

Antimicrobial nanoparticle for the treatment of bacterial infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

p. 66-77. Wang, B. , et al. , Nanoparticle-induced surfaceChen, and D.M. Shin, Nanoparticle therapeutics: an emerging18171-5. Zhang, L. , et al. , Nanoparticle-assisted surface

Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nanoparticle-based Monitoring of Stem Cell Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M, Ankrum JA, et al. Nanoparticle-based monitoring of cell10.7150/thno.7020 Editorial Nanoparticle-based Monitoring ofcell tracking with the nanoparticle-based contrast agents.

Xu, Chenjie; Zhao, Weian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Proteolytic Surface Functionalization Enhances in Vitro Magnetic Nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proteolytic Surface Functionalization Enhances in Vitro Magnetic Nanoparticle Mobility through interstitial delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle (NP) based therapeutic agents. Collagenase- linked-functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticle (SPM NP) vehicle. The magnetic character of the SPM NP provides spatial and temporal

220

Electrostatically Tuned Interactions in Silica Microsphere-Polystyrene Nanoparticle Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrostatically Tuned Interactions in Silica Microsphere-Polystyrene Nanoparticle Mixtures Angel: July 26, 2005 We explore the generality of nanoparticle haloing1 as a novel colloidal stabilization mechanism in binary mixtures of silica microspheres and polystyrene nanoparticles. By selectively tuning

Lewis, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Gold nanoparticle assemblies: Interplay between thermal effects and optical response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gold nanoparticle assemblies: Interplay between thermal effects and optical response Bruno nanoparticle assemblies depends on many parameters regarding both material morphology and light excitation-embedded gold nanoparticles can result in the generation of thermal excitations through different energy

Boyer, Edmond

222

Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of a bench-scale, inert-gas, oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heating rates and maximum temperatures on the redistribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium into the shale oil, retort water, and offgas of a 6-kg bench-scale retort. A Green River shale (western) from Colorado and a New Albany shale (eastern) from Kentucky were heated at 1-2{degree}C/min to a maximum temperature of 500{degree}C. The eastern and western shales were also heated at 2{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C and at 10{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C. Real-time monitoring of the offgas stream for mercury was accomplished with Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy or a microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy. Microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy was also used to monitor for arsenic in the offgas during retorting; little or no arsenic was observed in the offgas. Mass balance calculations for arsenic and selenium accounted for essentially 100% of those elements in the spent shale, shale oil, and retort water. The mass balance calculations suggest little offgas component for arsenic and selenium. This agrees with the results of the MPD monitoring of the offgas. These results indicate the potential pathway for mercury to enter the environment is from the offgas. Arsenic and selenium preferential redistribution into the shale oil may present problems during the upgrading process.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Fruchter, J.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

JOUKNAI, OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 98. NO. D7. PAGES 12.673-12.685, JULY 20. 1993 Aerosol Selenium at Bermuda and Barbados  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and methane sulfonate(MSA), but the intercept of the Se versusSb regression indicated that a marinebiogenic identification studies [Rahn and Lowenthal, 1984, 1985; Lowenthal et 01.. 1988; Lowenthal and Rahn, 1988). Coal for selenium is not well understood, C o o k andBruland [I9871suggest a similar mechanism where Se

Prospero, Joseph M.

224

Synthesis of Black Elemental Selenium Peroxidase Mimic and Its Application in Green Synthesis of Water-Soluble Polypyrrole as a Photothermal Agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthesis of Black Elemental Selenium Peroxidase Mimic and Its Application in Green Synthesis of Water-Soluble Polypyrrole as a Photothermal Agent ... The black elemental Se catalyzed PPy can convert near-infrared (NIR) light energy to heat with a photothermal efficiency of 28.4%. ...

Leilei Li; Wei Wang; Kezheng Chen

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Methods of making copper selenium precursor compositions with a targeted copper selenide content and precursor compositions and thin films resulting therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precursor compositions containing copper and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semi-conductor applications. Methods of forming the precursor compositions using primary amine solvents and methods of forming the thin films wherein the selection of temperature and duration of heating controls the formation of a targeted species of copper selenide.

Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Leisch, Jennifer (Denver, CO); Taylor, Matthew (West Simsbury, CT); Stanbery, Billy J. (Austin, TX)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Estimation of Loads of Mercury, Selenium, PCBs, PAHs, PBDEs, Dioxins, and1 Organochlorine Pesticides from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to San2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Estimation of Loads of Mercury, Selenium, PCBs, PAHs, PBDEs, Dioxins, and1 Organochlorine 1.6 and 6.1%, respectively. Also monitored were PAHs, PBDEs (two years of19 data), and dioxins) pesticides (DDT, chlordanes, and dieldrin), polybrominated32 diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and dioxins are highly

227

Nanoparticle suspension preparation using the arc spray nanoparticle synthesis system combined with ultrasonic vibration and rotating electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to investigate the use of a new nanoparticle preparation method, i.e., the arc spray nanoparticle synthesis system (ASNSS) combined with ultrasonic...2 nanoparticle suspension. For the proposed ne...

H. Chang; T.T. Tsung; Y.C. Yang; L.C. Chen…

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Single Nanoparticle Tracking Reveals Influence of Chemical Functionality of Nanoparticles on Local Ordering of Liquid Crystals and Nanoparticle Diffusion Coefficients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we used gold nanoparticles purchased with nominal diameters of 150 nm (Ted Pella, Inc.). ... Poulin, P.; Weitz, D. A. Phys. ...

Gary M. Koenig, Jr.; Rizal Ong; Angel D. Cortes; J. Antonio Moreno-Razo; Juan J. de Pablo; Nicholas L. Abbott

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

230

Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

Emrick, Todd S. (South Deerfield, MA); Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA); Dinsmore, Anthony (Amherst, MA); Skaff, Habib (Amherst, MA); Lin, Yao (Amherst, MA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles First direct determination of the chemical diffusivity and...

232

Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

233

Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential...

234

Composition-Controlled Synthesis of Bimetallic Gold-Silver Nanoparticl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition-Controlled Synthesis of Bimetallic Gold-Silver Nanoparticles. Composition-Controlled Synthesis of Bimetallic Gold-Silver Nanoparticles. Abstract: This paper reports...

235

In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates. In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During...

236

Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles with Efficient Urinary Excretion for Nanomedicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles with Efficient Urinary Excretion for Nanomedicine ... The emerging nanomedicine landscape ... Core-shell silica nanoparticles as fluorescent labels for nanomedicine ...

Andrew A. Burns; Jelena Vider; Hooisweng Ow; Erik Herz; Oula Penate-Medina; Martin Baumgart; Steven M. Larson; Ulrich Wiesner; Michelle Bradbury

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

Gold-Coated Nanoparticles For Use In Biotechnology Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gold-Coated Nanoparticles For Use In Biotechnology Applications Gold-Coated Nanoparticles For Use In Biotechnology Applications A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic...

238

Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly active oxygen reduction Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...

239

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercriti...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method. Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method....

240

Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application for formic acid oxidation. Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

242

Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Abstract: Previous experiments have demonstrated that...

243

Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into nanowires in aqueous glucose solutions. Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into nanowires in...

244

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

245

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00...

246

Gold nanoparticle based anisotropic nanocomposites : fabrication, assembly and application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis deals mainly with colloidal anisotropic nanostructures composed of Au nanoparticle and polymer. In the nanocomposites, one side of the Au nanoparticle was encapsulated… (more)

Tao, Chen.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NANOPARTICLE ADDITIVES FOR MULTIPHASE SYSTEMS: SYNTHESIS, FORMULATION AND CHARACTERIZATION.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Study on nanoparticle additives in multiphase systems (liquid, polymer) are of immense interest in developing new product applications. Critical challenges for nanoparticle additives include their… (more)

Kanniah, Vinod

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electrochemical Immunoassay of Cotinine in Serum Based on Nanoparticle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cotinine in Serum Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip . Electrochemical Immunoassay of Cotinine in Serum Based on Nanoparticle Probe and...

249

Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle...

250

Fabrication of water-soluble gold nanoparticle aggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles were linked using octanedithiol to form aggregates containing hundreds of nanoparticles. These aggregates are an interesting material, posing potential applications in the fields ...

Bennett, Samantha E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible...

252

A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor for diagnosis of exposure to toxic organophosphorus agents. A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical...

253

Versatile Apoferritin Nanoparticle Labels for Assay of Protein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Versatile Apoferritin Nanoparticle Labels for Assay of Protein . Versatile Apoferritin Nanoparticle Labels for Assay of Protein . Abstract: A versatile bioassay label based on...

254

Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of...

255

High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric...

256

Three-dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles using Atom Probe Tomography. Three-dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles using Atom Probe Tomography....

257

Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Synthesis and structural characterization of CZTS nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CZTS nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Chemical co-precipitation method with different pH values in the range of 6 to 8. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. XRD studies revealed that the CZTS nanoparticles exhibited Kesterite Structure with preferential orientation along the (112) direction. Sample at pH value of 7 reached the nearly stoichiometric ratio.

Lydia, R.; Reddy, P. Sreedhara [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati-517502 (India)

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect of TiN coatings on the rolling contact fatigue behavior of M50 bearing steel. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a continuing requirement for improved bearing performance for both commercial and military applications. Service temperatures are increasing steadily due to increased power requirements and corrosion of components remains a major concern as well, particularly for bearings in military systems. In our ongoing study, a number of different coatings were applied to VIM-VAR M50 bearing steel to improve both corrosion resistance and rolling contact fatigue behavior. This report deals specifically with coatings produced by the ion beam assisted deposition IBAD of TiN, details of the coating process, and test results obtained. The rolling contact fatigue performance of IBAD TiN coated M50 samples demonstrated increased lifetime performance and durability for a 1 micrometer thick coating. Preliminary data on corrosion properties is also presented.

Middleton, R.M.; Huang, P.J.; Wells, M.G.; Kant, R.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mercury Sensing with Optically Responsive Gold Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assume that the mass of mercury adsorbed at saturation istactics, nanoparticle based mercury sensing should advancemost sensitive method for mercury sensing. References "1!

James, Jay Zachary

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Doping of CdS nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The doping of semiconductor nanoparticles is introduced and examined via doping of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles both by chemical bath deposition route with In3+ cations and by thermal annealing route with Cl? anions. The CdS nanoparticles (10–20 nm in size) were prepared by mixing CdCl2 and Na2S solutions stabilized with pyridine both in absence and in presence of InCl3 additives. The doping of the nanostructured CdS films prepared from CdS nanoparticles dispersions was performed by additives of aqueous CdCl2 solution followed by the film annealing. Due to the used doping procedure the increase of the film conductivity began at temperature ?300 °C, which was far lower than temperature inducing the doping of polycrystalline CdS films and not yet enough for the noticeable recrystallization of CdS nanoparticles into larger domains. The In2S3 and CdCl2 doping of CdS nanoparticles resulted in changes in electronic absorption and luminescence spectra of the nanoparticle dispersions and films. The phenomenon of the easier doping of CdS nanoparticles is discussed in terms of the high surface energy of CdS nanoparticles.

N.M. Osipyonok; A.F. Singaevsky; Yu.V. Noskov; Yu.P. Piryatinski; P.S. Smertenko; O.P. Dimitriev; A.A. Pud

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a...

263

Novel Nanoparticle Tracking Device | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Nanoparticle Tracking Device A new technique simultaneously illuminates the location, orientation and rotation in 3D of individual gold nanorods. Gold nanorods have been used...

264

MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF NANOPARTICLE INTERACTIONS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Molecular dynamics simulations using the Embedded Atom Method were performed to describe the interparticle behavior of two single crystal spherical nickel nanoparticles during compaction based… (more)

Stone, Tonya Williams

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electroactive Silica Nanoparticles for Biological Labeling. ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

novel electrochemical immuno-biosensor based on poly(guanine)-functionalized silica nanoparticle labels and mediator-generated catalytic reaction was described. The functionalized...

266

In0,53Ga0.47Asp-i-n photodiodes with transparent cadmium tin oxide contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In0,53Ga0.47Asp-i-n photodiodes with transparent cadmium tin oxide contacts Paul R. Berger,a) Niloy for publication 28 July 1992) A new type of p-i-n In,,,,GaO,,,As photodiode having an optically transparent into the i-region is not relevant avoiding an increased dark current. The photodiodes exhibited leakage

267

Microsoft Word - nanoparticles.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 2004 July 2004 Nanoparticles: Strained and Stiff Benjamin Gilbert 1 , Feng Huang 1 , Hengzhong Zhang 1 , Glenn A. Waychunas 2 , and Jillian F. Banfield 1,2 1 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California at Berkeley 2 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Using synchrotron techniques, Benjamin Gilbert and colleagues in Jill Banfield's group at the University of California - Berkeley and Glenn Waychunas at LBNL have determined how the equilibrium structure and lattice dynamics of zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles differ from bulk ZnS. They combined size and shape information from small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) with structure information from wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) to analyze structural differences in the real-space pair distribution function (PDF). By combining SAXS

268

Nonextensivity in magnetic nanoparticle ensembles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A superconducting quantum interference device and Faraday rotation technique are used to study dipolar interacting nanoparticles embedded in a polystyrene matrix. Magnetization isotherms are measured for three cylindrically shaped samples of constant diameter but various heights. Detailed analysis of the isotherms supports Tsallis’ conjecture of a magnetic equation of state that involves temperature and magnetic field variables scaled by the logarithm of the number of magnetic nanoparticles. This unusual scaling of thermodynamic variables, which are conventionally considered to be intensive, originates from the nonextensivity of the Gibbs free energy in three-dimensional dipolar interacting particle ensembles. Our experimental evidence for nonextensivity is based on the data collapse of various isotherms that require scaling of the field variable in accordance with Tsallis’ equation of state.

Ch. Binek; S. Polisetty; Xi He; T. Mukherjee; R. Rajesh; J. Redepenning

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Kinetics of Diesel Nanoparticle Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation rates in air of diesel nanoparticles sampled directly from the exhaust stream of a medium-duty diesel engine were measured over the temperature range of 800?1140 °C using online aerosol techniques. ... Particulate emission from diesel engines is currently a topic of great concern from both pollution and public health standpoints. ... In addition, the fundamental carbon-to-hydrogen ratio may be different in diesel particles as compared to the commonly used surrogates (15). ...

Kelly J. Higgins; Heejung Jung; David B. Kittelson; Jeffrey T. Roberts; Michael R. Zachariah

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

270

Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

Yang, Haw (Moraga, CA); Cang, Hu (Berkeley, CA); Xu, Cangshan (Berkeley, CA); Wong, Chung M. (San Gabriel, CA)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso In the well-known Greek legend the touch of King Midas would convert anything to metallic gold. Recently, a team working at SSRL lead by Professor Jorge Gardea-Torresdey from the University of Texas at El Paso have shown that ordinary alfalfa plants can accumulate very small particles (nanoparticles) of metallic gold (1). The best-known materials that contain nanoparticles of metallic gold are gold colloids. These lack the familiar metallic luster, but show bright colors which range from red, violet or blue, depending upon the size of the nanoparticles (2,3). Colloidal gold has traditionally been used to color materials such as glass (e.g. gold ruby glass and cranberry glass) and enamels (e.g. famille rose enamels) since the 16th century. The earliest report of a colloidal gold preparation may be in the Bible. The book of Exodus reports that Moses destroyed the golden calf in a manner that may have resulted in an aqueous (water-based) gold colloid, which he then forced the Israelites to drink. In modern times gold colloids are imbibed for a variety of ailments (despite little or no evidence of any health-related benefits), but the most important applications may be in the field of nano-technology (see 1, and refs therein).

272

Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon (Si) has a very high lithium storage capacity and is being explored as a negative electrode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Si nanowires can exhibit relatively stable performance for many cycles of charging; however, conductive carbon must often be added to the electrode layer to improve the rate capability due to the relatively low electrical conductivity of Si. The added carbon lowers the capacity of the electrode. Here, we show that the rate capability of Si in LIBs can be substantially enhanced by incorporating tin (Sn) into Si nanowires. The solubility of Sn in Si is very low (0.015 at%); yet, Sn used as a seed for supercritical fluid–liquid–solid (SFLS) growth can be trapped in Si nanowires with relatively high concentration (10 at%). Such Sn-containing Si nanowires and no added conductive carbon in the electrode layer, could be cycled in LIBs with high capacity (*1000 mA h g*1 over 100 cycles) at a current density of 2.8 A g*1 (1 C). Capacities exceeding that of graphite could still be reached at cycle rates as high as 2 C. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that lithiation occurs five times faster in Si nanowires with significant amounts of Sn than in the Si nanowires without Sn, and twice as fast as in nanowires that were coated with carbon.

Bogart, Timothy D.; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

The de Haas-van Alphen Effect in Enriched Tin Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been investigated in tin isotopes in the liquid helium temperature range, and no conclusive evidence has been found indicating a dependence of the effect upon atomic mass. However, some new features of the effect have been investigated which are interpreted as being caused by at least two independent groups of electrons. One group of electrons, having effective masses m3=1.1m0 (where m0 is the free electron mass) parallel to the tetragonal axis and m1=0.16m0 perpendicular to the tetragonal axis, and having a chemical potential of E0=0.25 electron volt, gives rise to short period oscillations in the magnetic susceptibility as the magnetic field is varied. A second group of electrons having a chemical potential E0=0.20 electron volts and for which the effective masses are not so clearly defined gives rise to longer period oscillations such that the observed de Haas-van Alphen oscillations exhibit beats between the long and short period terms.

Ted G. Berlincourt

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

High-efficiency indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in the performance of indium tin oxide/indium phosphide (ITO/InP) solar cells have been achieved by using dc magnetron sputter deposited /ital n/-ITO onto an epitaxial /ital p///ital p//sup +/ structure grown on good quality commercial /ital p//sup +/ bulk substrates. The composition of the sputtering gas has been investigated and the highest efficiency cells resulted when the surface of the epilayer was exposed to an Ar/H/sub 2/ plasma before depositing the bulk of the ITO in a more typical Ar/O/sub 2/ plasma. With H/sub 2/ processing, record efficiencies of 18.9% global, 1000 W m/sup /minus/2/, 25 /degree/C (17.0% air mass zero) were achieved. Without H/sub 2/ processing, the devices exhibited lower efficiencies and were unstable. Type conversion of the InP was shown to occur and was established as being associated with the ITO (possibly due to Sn donors) rather than sputter damage. These improvements in performance have resulted from the optimization of the doping, thickness, transport, and surface properties of the /ital p/-type base, as well as from better control over the ITO deposition procedure.

Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

1989-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Tin clustering and precipitation in the oxide during autoclave corrosion of Zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atom probe tomography has been used to study the evolution of tin distribution during the corrosion process in Zircaloy-2. From being completely soluble in the Zr metal matrix, some clustering is evident already in the newly formed oxide close to the metal-oxide interface. Analysis of thicker oxides a few hundred nanometers away from the interface reveals fully developed precipitates of metallic Sn particles of up to 20 nm in size. Although the precipitates contain significant amounts of Zr, it is concluded that they are in the process of being depleted in Zr, which is limited only by the slow diffusion in the oxide scale. The findings are interpreted as being a result of the nobility of the Sn yielding a strong driving force to remain in a metallic state after incorporation in the barrier oxide layer. As Sn occupies substitutional sites in the ZrO2 lattice it is oxidized to a 4+ state when incorporated into the oxide, and in order to remain metallic it must nucleate into precipitates within the inner part of the oxide scale before being re-oxidized to 2+ and eventually to 4+ when the oxygen activity is sufficiently high in the outer parts of the oxide.

G. Sundell; M. Thuvander; H.-O. Andrén

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ? Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ? The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ? The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

Oropeza, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Corea, M., E-mail: mcoreat@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Gómez-Yáńez, C. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico)] [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico); Navarro-Clemente, M.E., E-mail: mnavarroc@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Estimating nanoparticle size from diffraction measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Fourier transform of a Debye-Scherrer diffraction pattern can be used to estimate the characteristic size of nanoparticle samples. This method is insensitive to nanoparticle structure and therefore preferable to the Scherrer formula (which is unreliable because it assumes an underlying size-limited perfect crystal structure).

Hall, B.D.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - au aerosol nanoparticles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles with osteoblast cells Summary: , such as Au nanoparticles 16-18, iron oxide 17, 19, 20, and silica nanoparticles 10, 21 have also been... The role of...

279

Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE)metal nanostructures, and to collidal nanoparticle- based 2Dand 3D nanoparticle arrays. Figure 2. Preparation scheme of

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magneticbenign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, wed In both thin film and nanoparticle formation, the dominant

Byrne, J. M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The influence of size, shape, and surface coating on the stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

images of each of the nanoparticle starting materials. Scalehistograms that show nanoparticle size distributions can bePrecise control over the nanoparticle size, shape, and

Mulvihill, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Natural nanoparticle structure, properties and reactivity from X-ray studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Another important aspect of nanoparticle work relates to theWe thus expect that nanoparticle research will also shedNATURAL NANOPARTICLE STRUCTURE, PROPERTIES AND REACTIVITY

Waychunas, Glenn A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the Reduction of NO by CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~320 - 400°C. Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in theNano Lett. , 7 Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the87 (1984) 152. Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the

Renzas, J.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Zinc oxide nanoparticle-polymeric thin films for dynamic strain sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

010-4940-3 Zinc oxide nanoparticle-polymeric thin ?lms forcharacterized by a unique nanoparticle weight fraction; theinvestigate the effects of nanoparticle weight fractions on

Loh, Kenneth J.; Chang, Donghee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nanoparticle Targeting DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003445  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Targeting DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003445 Ligand-Clustered "Patchy" Nanoparticles,11] it remains largely unappreciated in the design of nanoparticle synthetic systems intended to interact nanoparticles, and linear­linear block copolymer micelles;[12,13] however, typi- cally they are presented

Bhatia, Sangeeta

286

Nanoparticle Assembly DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Assembly DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006231 Silica-Nanoparticle Coatings by Adsorption from Lysine­Silica- Nanoparticle Sols on Inorganic and Biological Surfaces** Nicole Atchison, Wei Fan, Damien, Efrosini Kokkoli,* and Michael Tsapatsis* Silica nanoparticles have been used in applications including

Kokkoli, Efie

287

Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isomerization of glucose into fructose is a large-scale reaction for the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS; reaction performed by enzyme catalysts) and recently is being considered as an intermediate step in the possible route of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Here, it is shown that a large-pore zeolite that contains tin (Sn-Beta) is able to isomerize glucose to fructose in aqueous media with high activity and selectivity. Specifically, a 10% (wt/wt) glucose solution containing a catalytic amount of Sn-Beta (1?50 Sn:glucose molar ratio) gives product yields of approximately 46% (wt/wt) glucose, 31% (wt/wt) fructose, and 9% (wt/wt) mannose after 30 min and 12 min of reaction at 383 K and 413 K, respectively. This reactivity is achieved also when a 45 wt% glucose solution is used. The properties of the large-pore zeolite greatly influence the reaction behavior because the reaction does not proceed with a medium-pore zeolite, and the isomerization activity is considerably lower when the metal centers are incorporated in ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The Sn-Beta catalyst can be used for multiple cycles, and the reaction stops when the solid is removed, clearly indicating that the catalysis is occurring heterogeneously. Most importantly, the Sn-Beta catalyst is able to perform the isomerization reaction in highly acidic, aqueous environments with equivalent activity and product distribution as in media without added acid. This enables Sn-Beta to couple isomerizations with other acid-catalyzed reactions, including hydrolysis/isomerization or isomerization/dehydration reaction sequences [starch to fructose and glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) demonstrated here].

Moliner, Manuel; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterization of Sodium Ion Electrochemical Reaction with Tin Anodes: Experiment and Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tin anodes show a rich structure and reaction chemistry which we have investigated in detail. Upon discharge five plateaus are observed corresponding to -Sn, an unidentified phase (Na/Sn = 0.6), an amorphous phase (Na/Sn = 1.2), a hexagonal R-3m Na5Sn2, and fully sodiated Na15Sn 4. With charging there are six plateaus, which are related to the formation of Na5Sn2 followed by the formation of amorphous phases and -Sn. Upon cycling the formation of metastable Na5Sn2 seems to be suppressed, leading to a single charge plateau at 0.2 V. Theoretical voltages calculated from existing crystal structures using DFT provide a good match with constant current measurements, however, the voltage is more negative compared to quasi-equilibrium measurements (GITT). Search for additional (meta)stable phases using cluster-expansion method predicts many phases lower in energy than the convex hull, including the R-3m Na5Sn2 phase characterized experimentally. The presence of multiple phases in varying lattices with very similar formation energy suggests why the reaction mechanism is non-reversible. Interpretation of M ssbauer spectroscopy data is not yet elucidated due to the very low recoil-free fraction of the materials. The electrode surface is terminated with a SEI layer rich in carbonates such as Na2CO3 and Na alkyl carbonates as evidenced by XPS. After a full charge at 2V, strong evidence for the formation of oxidized Sn4+ is obtained. Subjecting the electrode to a rest after a full charge at 2 V reveals that aging in the electrolyte reduces the oxidized Sn4+ into Sn2+ and Sn0, and concomitantly suppresses the electrolyte decomposition represented by an anomalous discharge plateau at 1.2 V. Thereby, the catalytic decomposition of the electrolyte during discharge is caused by nanosized Sn particles covered by oxidized Sn4+ and not by pure metallic Sn.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Ganesh, Panchapakesan [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL] [ORNL; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude [Institut Charles Gerhardt, University of Montpellier II, FRANCE] [Institut Charles Gerhardt, University of Montpellier II, FRANCE; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Draft annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research aimed at gaining a better understanding of selenium cycling in marshes and mudflats of the Carquinez Strait is being performed by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and collaborators from the University of California at Davis. This work was initiated in the Fall of 1994 and is scheduled to continue through the Fall of 1996. This report summarizes the results of the effort to date.

Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E.; Benson, S.M.; Mountford, H.S. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning process and offers suggestions as to how the technical and institutional issues could have been resolved faster through early adoption of some of the core principles of sound EDSS design.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Nanoparticle-Delivered Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Reduces Ovarian Tumor Burden in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Targets, and Chemical Biology Nanoparticle-Delivered Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively...treatment with nanoparticles. DT-A nanoparticle therapy suppressed tumor growth more...indicating MSLN promoter function following nanoparticle delivery of DNA (Fig. 1E ). Xenograft...

Yu-Hung Huang; Gregory T. Zugates; Weidan Peng; David Holtz; Charles Dunton; Jordan J. Green; Naushad Hossain; Michael R. Chernick; Robert F. Padera, Jr.; Robert Langer; Daniel G. Anderson; Janet A. Sawicki

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hierarchical Assembly of Nanoparticle Superstructures from Block Copolymer-Nanoparticle Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the assembly of block copolymer-nanoparticle composite films on chemically nanopatterned substrates and present fully three-dimensional simulations of a coarse grain model for these hybrid systems. The location and distribution of nanoparticles within the ordered block copolymer domains depends on the thermodynamic state of the composite in equilibrium with the surface. Hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles enables applications in which the ability to precisely control their locations within periodic and nonregular geometry patterns and arrays is required.

Huiman Kang; François A. Detcheverry; Andrew N. Mangham; Mark P. Stoykovich; Kostas Ch. Daoulas; Robert J. Hamers; Marcus Müller; Juan J. de Pablo; Paul F. Nealey

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Linear muffin-tin-orbital and k?p calculations of effective masses and band structure of semiconducting diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of semiconducting diamond is calculated by the scalar-relativistic linear muffin-tin-orbital method within the local-density approximation. Information about matrix elements, effective masses, and Luttinger parameters is extracted by comparison with k?p calculations. An extended 16×16 k?p calculation is performed using the parameters above as input so as to obtain the detailed band structure of the higher valence and lower conduction band states around the ? point in the (110) direction.

M. Willatzen; M. Cardona; N. E. Christensen

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

A comparison of ZnO films deposited on indium tin oxide and soda lime glass under identical conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZnO films have been grown via a vapour phase transport (VPT) on soda lime glass (SLG) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. ZnO film on ITO had traces of Zn and C which gives them a dark appearance while that appears yellowish-white on SLG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm the traces of C in the form of C-O. The photoluminescence studies reveal a prominent green luminescence band for ZnO film on ITO.

Deka, Angshuman; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore - 560012 (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evolution of optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature dependent optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The dielectric function of liquid Sn was different from solid, and an interband transition near 1.5?eV was easily observed in solid while it apparently disappeared upon melting. From the evolution of optical properties with temperature, an optical measurement to acquire the melting point by ellipsometry was presented. From first principles calculation, we show that the local structure difference in solid and liquid is responsible for this difference in the optical properties observed in experiment.

Zhang, D. X.; Shen, B.; Zheng, Y. X.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, J. B.; Yang, S. D.; Zhang, R. J.; Chen, L. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

Vieth, Gabriel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Stable Oxide Nanoparticle Clusters Obtained by Complexation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolyte-neutral copolymers and oppositely charged 6 nm-crystalline nanoparticles. For two different dispersions of oxide nanoparticles, the electrostatic complexation gives rise to the formation of stable nanoparticle clusters in the range 20 - 100 nm. It is found that inside the clusters, the particles are pasted together by the polyelectrolyte blocks adsorbed on their surface. Cryo-transmission electronic microscopy allows to visualize the clusters and to determine the probability distributions functions in size and in aggregation number. The comparison between light scattering and cryo-microscopy results suggests the existence of a polymer brush around the clusters.

J. -F. Berret; A. Sehgal; M. Morvan; O. Sandre; A. Vacher; M. Airiau

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparative and quantitative study of neutral debris emanated from tin plasmas produced by neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet and carbon dioxide laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amount of neutral debris emanated from extreme ultraviolet light source must be minimized to maximize its lifetime. Emanation of neutral atomic debris was experimentally investigated using laser-induced-fluorescence technique for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}, 10.6 {mu}m in wavelength) and Nd-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG, 1.064 {mu}m) lasers irradiated tin foils. Total number of neutral atomic debris from CO{sub 2} laser-irradiated tin foils was 1/100 times smaller than that from Nd:YAG irradiated ones. Competitiveness of CO{sub 2} laser was revealed in terms of debris mitigation.

Matsuoka, Yuji; Nakai, Yuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Maeda, Shinsuke; Shimomura, Masashi; Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shimada, Yoshinori; Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Department of Electronics and Electronic Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles, their origin, activity, and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public he...

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The complete structural transformation of ionic species in the precursor solution, over an amorphous solid and finally into crystalline nanoparticles, is elucidated by in situ investigations under supercritical solvothermal conditions.

Tyrsted, C.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Annealing of single lamella nanoparticles of polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the change of the size and structure of freely suspended single lamella nanoparticles of polyethylene during thermal annealing in aqueous solutions. Using small-angle x-ray scattering and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that a doubling of the crystalline lamella sandwiched between two amorphous polymer layers is obtained by annealing the nanoparticles at 125 C. This thickening of the crystalline lamella can be understood in terms of an unlooping of polymer chains within a single nanoparticle. In addition a variation of the annealing temperature from 90 C to 115 C demonstrates that the inverse of the crystalline lamellar thickness increases linearly with the annealing temperatures leading to a recrystallization line in a Gibbs-Thomson graph. Since the nanoparticles consist of about only eight polymer chains, they can be considered as a ideal candidates for the experimental realization of equilibrium polymer crystals.

Christophe N. Rochette; Sabine Rosenfeldt; Katja Henzler; Frank Polzer; Matthias Ballauff; Qiong Tong; Stefan Mecking; Markus Drechsler; Theyencheri Narayanan; Ludger Harnau

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nanoparticle interaction with model lung surfactant monolayers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nanosciences, the use of nanotechnology has become widespread...and electronics to medicines, particularly in...increasing use of nanotechnology has led to the release...2003 Commercializing nanotechnology. Nat. Biotechnol...nanoparticles in biology and medicine. J. Nanobiotechnol...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Cancels DOE N 456.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-14-13, cancels DOE O 456.1.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Nanoparticle coalescence and sintering: molecular dynamics simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to better understand coalescence and sintering processes of gold nanoparticles. During coalescence in the liquid phase, the initial neck growth can be well described by the viscous flow model. With initial temperature right below the single particle melting temperature, the initial neck growth is controlled by viscous flow at first and then, by grain boundary diffusion. At initial temperatures well below melting, the sintering process occurs very rapidly, which may be attributed to a formation of liquid-like neck regions. The sintering of two free Au nanoparticles irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse is also simulated by combining the two-temperature and MD models. It is shown that by increasing laser input energy, nanoparticles can be melted forming a single larger nanoparticle. The effects of multinanoparticle melting, solidification and sintering are also investigated.

N. Wang; S.I. Rokhlin; D.F. Farson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sandia National Laboratories: Novel Nanoparticle Production Method...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inexpensive way to synthesize TiO2 nanoparticles, which could be used in everything from solar cells to light-emitting diodes. (Photo by Randy Montoya) Sandia researchers Dale...

307

Toward multifunctional nanoparticle-based therapeutics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this remote heating phenomenon to remotely cleave a heat-heat-labile bond. Collectively, our investigations into delivery, biocompatibility, and remoteheat-labile linker. The multifunctional nanoparticles are used to demonstrate remote,

Derfus, Austin Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Magnetically multiplexed heating of single domain nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective hysteretic heating of multiple collocated types of single domain magnetic nanoparticles (SDMNPs) by alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) may offer a useful tool for biomedical applications. The possibility of ...

Romero, G.

309

Single-molecule kinetics of nanoparticle catalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Owing to their structural dispersion, the catalytic properties of nanoparticles are challenging to characterize in ensemble-averaged measurements. The single-molecule approach enables studying the catalysis of na...

Weilin Xu; Hao Shen; Guokun Liu; Peng Chen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kozhevin, V. M. [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

First-principles real-space linear-muffin-tin-orbital calculations of 3d impurities in Cu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have recently developed a scheme, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) formalism in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) and the recursion method, which allows us to perform first-principles, spin-polarized, density-functional electronic-structure calculations in real space. Here we use the real-space linear-muffin-tin-orbital (RS-LMTO-ASA) approach to study the behavior of 3d impurities (V,Cr,Mn,Fe) in a Cu host. We obtain the local density of states, the charge transfers, and local magnetic moments of the impurity and four adjacent shells of Cu atoms. Even though the procedures are quite different, our results for 3d impurities in Cu agree very well with those obtained using the well-established ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Sham Green’s-function formalism. The RS-LMTO-ASA method does not require symmetry and can be used, with no extra effort, to study interstitial impurities and local disturbances in hosts with hcp or more complex structures. It can also be applied in the presence of lattice relaxation.

Sonia Frota-Pesso^a

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Transverse stress effect on the critical current of internal tin and bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of transverse stress on the critical current density, J{sub c}, has been shown to be significant in bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn, with the onset of significant degradation at about 50 Mpa. In an applied field of 10 T, the magnitude of the effect is about seven times larger for transverse stress than for axial tensile stress. In a subsequent study, similar results were observed in another bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor made by a different manufacturer. The mechanism accounting for the transverse stress effect and its large magnitude compared with the axial tensile effect is still the subject of speculation. In an attempt to better understand the nature of the effect, The authors have undertaken a series of experiments to determine whether the transverse stress effect depends on the grain morphology of the Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction layer in the superconductor. To do this, the authors have measured the effect in an internal tin conductor with excess tin, which yields a more equiaxed Nb{sub 3}Sn grain morphology than for bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn, where the grains are more columnar. The results for the effect of transverse compression on the J{sub c} of a round bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn wire are given. The data are probably applicable to a wide variety of Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors for magnet engineering.

Ekin, J.W.; Bray, S.L. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Danielson, P.; Smathers, D. [Teledyne Wah Chang, Albany, OR (United States); Sabatini, R.L.; Suenaga, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Plasmonic nanoparticle scattering for color holograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticles. Comput Phys Commun 183(2):370–381. 28. Temple TL, Mahanama GDK, Reehal HS, Bagnall DM (2009) Influence of localized surface plasmon excitation in silver nanoparticles on the performance of silicon solar cells. Sol Energy Mater Sol Cells 93... the spectrum dramatically alters the dispersion predicted by Bragg’s law. The advantage of this perspective is that multiple arrays of nanostructures can be engineered and multiplexed in sub- wavelength distances. Recent work has shown that a hologram...

Montelongo, Yunuen; Tenorio-Pearl, Jaime Oscar; Williams, Calum; Zhang, Shuang; Milne, William Ireland; Wilkinson, Timothy David

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Characterization of Nanoparticle/Polymer Melt Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two types of nanoparticles are studied: carbon nanofibers and nanoclays. These nanoparticles are incorporated into a polystyrene matrix using different techniques. For the carbon nanofiber/PS composite solvent casting assisted with sonication and melt compounding methods are used. For nanoclay/PS system exfoliated and intercalated composites are prepared using in?situ polymerization and melt compounding methods respectively. Dispersion of these nanoparticles in the PS matrix is studied using TEM SEM and XRD. Rheological characterization of these composites is studied using the Rheometrics Mechanical Spectrometer (RMS800) for shear rheology and Rheometrics Melt Extensiometer (RME) for extensional rheology. Effects of the nanoparticle concentration and dispersion methods on the rheology are studied. The morphology of the composites is studied after the samples have been deformed in the rheometers at certain stage. The orientation of the nanoparticles is quantified based on TEM micrographs. Models are developed to relate the rheology the rheology of nanoparticle/polymer composites to particle concentration orientation and length; these model predictions are compared with our experimentak measurements.

Kurt Koelling; Stephen Bechtel; Jianhua Xu; Yingru Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations show that nanoparticle (NP) diffusivity in weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymer melts has two very different classes of behavior depending on their size. NP relaxation times and their diffusivities are completely described by the local, Rouse dynamics of the polymer chains for NPs smaller than the polymer entanglement mesh size. The motion of larger NPs, which are comparable to the entanglement mesh size, is significantly slowed by chain entanglements, and is not describable by the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Our results are in essentially quantitative agreement with a force-level generalized Langevin equation theory for all the NP sizes and chain lengths explored, and imply that for these lightly entangled systems, activated NP hopping is not important.

Jagannathan T. Kalathi; Umi Yamamoto; Kenneth S. Schweizer; Gary S. Grest; Sanat K. Kumar

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrophobic drug paclitaxel nanoparticles (PAX NPs) and pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared in this study to build a colon targeting nanoparticle based drug delivery system for oral administration. Negative charged PAX NPs at the size of 110...

Yu, Xiao

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

Luminescence of Cds Nanoparticles Doped with Silver Ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optical characteristics of CdS nanoparticles doped with silver ions and produced in aqueous...+...ions in the composition of the semiconductor nanoparticles at which it is possible to increase their luminesce...

G. Ya. Grodzyuk; V. V. Shvalagin; S. R. Lavorik…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications vari- ous nanoparticles onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Charged and nonagglomerated aerosol unique hybrid nanostructures at- tractive for various energy applications. DOI: 10

Chen, Junhong

319

Nanostructure fabrication by electron and ion beam patterning of nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two modes of energetic beam-mediated fabrication have been investigated, namely focused ion beam (FIB) direct-writing of nanoparticles, and a technique for electrostatically patterning ionized inorganic nanoparticles, ...

Kong, David Sun, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluation of nanoparticles-based thermotherapy for cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under alternating magnetic field, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to generate heat for the treatment of cancer. With suitable coating, these nanoparticles are biocompatible, stable in solution, and ...

Wiryaatmadja, Edwina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Potential technologies based on stamped periodic nanoparticle array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A stamped nanoparticle array patterning technology integrating interference lithography, self assembly and soft lithography is assessed. This technology is capable of parallel patterning of nanoparticles at a large scale. ...

Wang, Zongbin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids Lubricants Containing Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to describe the tribological and rheological properties of mixtures of nanoparticles (NPs) and ionic liquids (ILs), specifically the mixture of bare SiO_(2) (silica) nanoparticles and ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (trifluoromethysulfony...

Lu, Wei

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Iron oxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent for thermoacoustic tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation. The addition of an exogenous contrast agent improves image quality by more effectively converting microwave energy to heat. The use of iron oxide nanoparticles in MRI applications has been explored but super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles...

Keho, Aaron Lopez

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of novel polymeric nanoparticles with tailored architectures and functionalities/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a modular synthetic route to a combinatorial library of functional nanoparticles for applications like drug delivery is one of the main interests of our group. To this end, we have envisioned a novel nanoparticle ...

Burts, Alan O. (Alan Omar)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemically graftedChemically grafted nanoparticlesnanoparticles Quantum dot Nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemically graftedChemically grafted nanoparticlesnanoparticles Quantum dot Nanoparticle (~ 5nm Pb atomic force microscope tip: tether nanoparticle to oxide dot, or H-terminated pit after HF etch Ebeam

Plotkin, Steven S.

326

Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast Mike Marino 2011.03.29 Mike-Marino Contrast. It's not just a setting on the TV - it's also...

327

Light output enhancement of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with contrasting indium tin-oxide nanopatterned structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various nanopatterns on the transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) layer are investigated to enhance the light extraction efficiency of the InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Triangular, square, and circular nanohole patterns with the square ...

Sang Hyun Jung; Keun Man Song; Young Su Choi; Hyeong-Ho Park; Hyun-Beom Shin; Ho Kwan Kang; Jaejin Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Characterization of TiN, TiC and TiCN coatings on Ti50.6 at.% Ni alloy deposited by PIII and deposition technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high content of nickel [1]. In addition, its wear resistance is expected to be improved by transition-metal as nitride, carbide and carbonitride, respectively. Based on the electrochemical measurement and ion carbides and nitrides coatings at a rather broad composition range, such as TiN, TiC and TiC1-xNx (0bĂ?b1

Zheng, Yufeng

329

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

330

Biosensors Based on Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes, Nanoparticles, and Nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this book chapter, we will review recent progress in functionalization of nanotubes, nanoparticles, and nanowires for sensing applications.

Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Lin, Yuehe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Visualization of gold nanoparticle on the microscopic picture of red blood cell: implication for possible risk of nanoparticle exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In medicine, there is limited knowledge on the toxicity of nanoparticles. In reproductive medicine, there has been limited knowledge on the effect of gold nanoparticle on the human red blood cell. In ... author p...

Viroj Wiwanitkit; Amornpun Sereemaspun…

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy Jian Feng Li1 , Yi Fan Huang1 or in the form of nanoparticles, are required to realise a substantial SERS effect, and this has severely limited, we report an approach, which we name shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectro- scopy

La Rosa, Andres H.

335

Nanoparticle delivery Nanofountain-Probe-Based High-Resolution Patterning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle delivery Nanofountain-Probe-Based High-Resolution Patterning and Single-Cell Injection these nanoparticles will require unrealized spatial control. Furthermore, single-cell in vitro transfection methods of functionalized diamond nanoparticles are demonstrated using a broadly applicable nanofountain probe, a tool

Espinosa, Horacio D.

336

DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures Bjorn Hogberg and Hakan Olin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures Bj¨orn H¨ogberg and H°akan Olin Department of Engineering used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic

Högberg, Björn

337

Brownian magnetic relaxation of water-based cobalt nanoparticle ferrofluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brownian magnetic relaxation of water-based cobalt nanoparticle ferrofluids Y. Bao, A. B. Pakhomov of monodispersed 20 nm cobalt nanoparticles via a thermal decomposition method we have successfully transferred these hydrophobic nanoparticles into the water phase using tetramethylamonium hydroxide pentahydrate as phase

Krishnan, Kannan M.

338

ccsd00000979 Magnetisation switching in a ferromagnetic Heisenberg nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticle with uniaxial anisotropy: AMonte Carlo investigation D. Ledue 1 , P.E. Berche, R. Patte Groupe de nanoparticle with uniaxial anisotropy using Monte Carlo simulations. The aim of this work is to reproduce, that is to realize the N#19;eel-Brown model. For this purpose we have considered a simple cubic nanoparticle where

339

Nanoparticle amplification via photothermal unveiling of cryptic collagen binding sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle amplification via photothermal unveiling of cryptic collagen binding sites Justin H Ruoslahtifg and Sangeeta N. Bhatia*ah The success of nanoparticle-based cancer therapies ultimately depends on their ability to selectively and efficiently accumulate in regions of disease. Outfitting nanoparticles

Bhatia, Sangeeta

340

Controlling Nanoparticle Aggregation in Colloidal Microwave Absorbers via Interface Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlling Nanoparticle Aggregation in Colloidal Microwave Absorbers via Interface Chemistry Brian ABSTRACT Interface chemistry can be implemented to modulate the aggregation and dispersion of nanoparticles of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles in organic and aqueous solutions. With decrease in solution pH, individual

Stowell, Michael

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341

Dynamic Modes of Nanoparticle Motion During Nanoprobe-based Manipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Modes of Nanoparticle Motion During Nanoprobe-based Manipulation Afshin Tafazzoli and Metin -- In this paper, dynamic behavior of nanoparticle motion during nanoprobe-based manipulation is investigated behavior of nanoparticles. This would benefit us on tribological characterization of materials. Index Terms

Sitti, Metin

342

Nanoparticle-Enhanced Diffraction Gratings for Ultrasensitive Surface Plasmon Biosensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle-Enhanced Diffraction Gratings for Ultrasensitive Surface Plasmon Biosensing Alastair W by the adsorption of gold nanoparticles onto gold diffraction gratings. An enhanced diffraction obtained in the grating to the localized surface plasmons in the gold nanoparticles. As a first example

343

Biomolecular Recognition Based on Single Gold Nanoparticle Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomolecular Recognition Based on Single Gold Nanoparticle Light Scattering G. Raschke,* S. Kowarik of a single gold nanoparticle functionalized with biotin. Addition of streptavidin and subsequent specific binding events alter the dielectric environment of the nanoparticle, resulting in a spectral shift

Peters, Achim

344

Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

David, Anand

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Efficient Polymer Solar Cells Fabricated on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Poly(styrenesulfonate)-Etched Old Indium Tin Oxide Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In organic electronic devices, indium tin oxide (ITO) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are the most common transparent electrode and anodic buffer layer materials, respectively. A widespread concern is that PEDOT:PSS is acidic and etches ITO. We show that this issue is not serious: only a few nanometers of ITO are etched in typical device processing conditions and storage thereafter; conductivity losses are affordable; and optical transmission gains further offset these losses. Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices fabricated on old ITO (with PEDOT:PSS history) were similar or higher in efficiency than devices on fresh ITO. Poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b?]dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

Elshobaki, Moneim [Mansoura University; Anderegg, James [Ames Laboratory; Chaudhary, Sumit [Ames Laboratory

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low-cost electrochemical treatment of indium tin oxide anodes for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a simple low-cost approach as an alternative to conventional O{sub 2} plasma treatment to modify the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for use in organic light-emitting diodes. ITO is functionalized with F{sup ?} ions by electrochemical treatment in dilute hydrofluoric acid. An electrode with a work function of 5.2?eV is achieved following fluorination. Using this electrode, a maximum external quantum efficiency of 26.0% (91?cd/A, 102?lm/W) is obtained, which is 12% higher than that of a device using the O{sub 2} plasma-treated ITO. Fluorination also increases the transparency in the near-infrared region.

Hui Cheng, Chuan, E-mail: chengchuanhui@dlut.edu.cn; Shan Liang, Ze; Gang Wang, Li; Dong Gao, Guo; Zhou, Ting; Ming Bian, Ji; Min Luo, Ying [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Tong Du, Guo, E-mail: dugt@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae=Ca,Sr,Ba, as thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2 Sn, Sr2 Sn and Ba2 Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli - roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Physical properties of highly oriented spray-deposited fluorine-doped tin dioxide films as transparent conductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavily fluorine-doped tin dioxide films were deposited by spray pyrolysis using a high precursor concentration. The effect of film thickness was studied in the range 80–1230 nm. The films were polycrystalline and preferentially oriented along [2 0 0]. The grain size, carrier mobility ?, carrier concentration N and resistivity reached ?230 nm, 35 cm2/V s, 6×1020 cm?3 and 3×10?4 ? cm, respectively, for 1000 nm films. An unusual ‘direct and linear’ ?–N dependence revealed the importance of the structural properties. The 1000 nm thick films possessed an average visible transmittance ?81% and a reflectance ?66% at 2500 nm. The electro-optical properties revealed their excellent quality as a TCO material.

Chitra Agashe; J. Hüpkes; G. Schöpe; M. Berginski

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Investigation of charge compensation in indium-doped tin dioxide by hydrogen insertion via annealing under humid conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of hydrogen (H) as an impurity in indium (In)-doped tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) was investigated by mass spectrometry analyses, with the aim of understanding the charge compensation mechanism in SnO{sub 2}. The H-concentration of the In-doped SnO{sub 2} films increased to (1–2)?×?10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3} by annealing in a humid atmosphere (WET annealing). The electron concentration in the films also increased after WET annealing but was two orders of magnitude less than their H-concentrations. A self-compensation mechanism, based on the assumption that H sits at substitutional sites, is proposed to explain the mismatch between the electron- and H-concentrations.

Watanabe, Ken, E-mail: Watanabe.Ken@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ohsawa, Takeo; Ross, Emily M., E-mail: emross@hmc.edu; Adachi, Yutaka; Haneda, Hajime [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Isao; Takahashi, Ryosuke [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Bierwagen, Oliver, E-mail: bierwagen@pdi-berlin.de [Paul-Drude-Institute, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); White, Mark E.; Tsai, Min-Ying; Speck, James S., E-mail: speck@ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Ohashi, Naoki, E-mail: Ohashi.Naoki@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Dynamics of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. Their relaxation times are strongly size-dependent. The dominant mode of relaxation is also governed by the size of the particles. As a result the dynamics is greatly altered due to polydispersity in the sample. We study the effect of polydispersity on the response functions. These exhibit significant changes as the parameters characterizing polydispersity are varied. We also provide a procedure to extract the particle size distribution in a polydisperse sample using Cole-Cole plots. Further the presence of attractive interactions causes aggregation of particles leading to the formation of clusters. Repulsive interactions along with thermal disorder not only hinder aggregation, but also introduce the possibility of removal of particles or "fragmentation" from clusters. The competing mechanisms of aggregation and fragmentation yield a distribution of cluster sizes in the steady-state. We attempt to understand the formation of clusters and their distributions using a model incorporating the phenomena of aggregation and fragmentation. Scaling forms for quantities of interest have been obtained. Finally we compare our numerical results with experimental data. These comparisons are satisfactory.

Vanchna Singh; Varsha Banerjee; Manish Sharma

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

Argonne CNM Highlight: Light Scattering by Nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Scattering by Nanoparticles: Understanding Confinement of Light for Nanophotonics Applications through Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Light Scattering by Nanoparticles: Understanding Confinement of Light for Nanophotonics Applications through Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Schematic of the apertureless near-field optical microscope Schematic of the apertureless near-field optical microscope. The optical scattering from the AFM probe tip provides the subdiffraction-limited optical field information. One of the motivations of nanoscience is to achieve sufficient control over photon propagation in nanostructures so as to effectively replace the electron with the photon in all-optical integrated circuits. The much greater speed and bandwidth of light pulses versus electrons promise new capabilities and size reduction of photon based “electronics.” Arrays of metal nanoparticles are currently considered a leading candidate for photon

353

On a plasmon resonance in ellipsoidal nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence of the plasmon resonance frequency of metal ellipsoids of revolution on their eccentricity is calculated. The plasmon resonance shifts to the red with increasing eccentricity and its intensity increases. The resonance intensity increases with decreasing the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of a metal. The plasmon resonance frequency in a suspension of randomly oriented prolate nanoparticles (with a large eccentricity) almost exactly coincides with that in a suspension of oriented particles. These features permit the efficient improvement of the sensitivity and resolving power of optoacoustic tomography by introducing prolate metal nanoparticles into the region of an object under study. The possibility of plasmon resonance narrowing by introducing metal nanoparticles into an amplifying medium is pointed out. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Oraevsky, A A [University of Texas, Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Oraevsky, Anatolii N [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Negative Casimir Entropies in Nanoparticle Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Negative entropy has been known in Casimir systems for some time. For example, it can occur between parallel metallic plates modeled by a realistic Drude permittivity. Less well known is that negative entropy can occur purely geometrically, say between a perfectly conducting sphere and a conducting plate. The latter effect is most pronounced in the dipole approximation, which is reliable when the size of the sphere is small compared to the separation between the sphere and the plate. Therefore, here we examine cases where negative entropy can occur between two electrically and magnetically polarizable nanoparticles or atoms, which need not be isotropic, and between such a small object and a conducting plate. Negative entropy can occur even between two perfectly conducting spheres, between two electrically polarizable nano-particles if there is sufficient anisotropy, between a perfectly conducting sphere and a Drude sphere,and between a sufficiently anisotropic electrically polarizable nano-particle and a transverse magnetic conducting plate.

K. A. Milton; Romain Guérout; Gert-Ludwig Ingold; Astrid Lambrecht; Serge Reynaud

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory 6-kg retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine how retorting process parameters affect the partitioning of Hg, As, Se, and Cd from raw oil shale to spent shale, shale oil, retort water, and offgas. For each of the elements, the objective of this study is to (1) determine the distribution coefficients for each product stream; (2) identify the chemical forms in water, gas, and oil streams, with particular emphasis on inorganic or organometallic species known to be or suspected of being carcinogenic, toxic, or otherwise harmful; (3) investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for mobilization into each product stream for toxic or labile chemical forms identified in item 2 are mobilized into each product stream; and (4) the effect of retorting rate, maximum retorting temperature, and retorting atmosphere on items 1 and 3. A Green River shale from Colorado and a New Albany shale from Kentucky were heated at 1 to 2/sup 0/C/min and at 10/sup 0/C/min to maximum temperatures of 500 and 750/sup 0/C under a nitrogen sweep gas. The product streams were analyzed using a variety of methods including Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy, microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, instrumental neutron activation analysis, high-pressure liquid and silica gel column chromatography, and mercury cold vapor atomic absorption. The results obtained using these analytical methods indicate that the distribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product stream is a function of oil shale type, heating rates, and maximum retorting temperatures. 11 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Sanders, R.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Monitoring Photothermally Excited Nanoparticles via Multimodal Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(5, 6) While models exist for the nonradiative energy transfer mechanisms and heat-flux optimization from single photothermally excited nanoparticles,(7-10) clinically relevant samples will include a wide distribution of nanoparticle cluster sizes not accounted for by simple models. ... Dynamic fluid motion induced by particle heating is noteworthy for its potential to dramatically increase the induced temperature rise due to particle focusing balanced against the temperature losses induced through increased convection. ... distributions resulting from Joule heating in a variety of microfluidic circuits that are electrokinetically pumped. ...

Matthew L. Clarke; Shin Grace Chou; Jeeseong Hwang

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles their origin activity and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public health concerns related to this sometimes-strange new science of “nano ” while raising awareness of nanomaterials’ toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to tiny particles via dust storms volcanic ash and other natural processes and that our bodily systems are well adapted to protect us from these potentially harmful intruders. The reticuloendothelial system in particular actively neutralizes and eliminates foreign matter in the body including viruses and nonbiological particles. Particles originating from human activities have existed for millennia e.g. smoke from combustion and lint from garments but the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation has profoundly increased anthropogenic particulate pollution. Significantly technological advancement has also changed the character of particulate pollution increasing the proportion of nanometer-sized particles-“nanoparticles”-and expanding the variety of chemical compositions. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between particulate air pollution levels respiratory and cardiovascular diseases various cancers and mortality. Adverse effects of nanoparticles on human health depend on individual factors such as genetics and existing disease as well as exposure and nanoparticle chemistry size shape agglomeration state and electromagnetic properties. Animal and human studies show that inhaled nanoparticles are less efficiently removed than larger particles by the macrophage clearance mechanisms in the lungs causing lung damage and that nanoparticles can translocate through the circulatory lymphatic and nervous systems to many tissues and organs including the brain. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size smaller than cells and cellular organelles allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures disrupting their normal function. Examples of toxic effects include tissue inflammation and altered cellular redox balance toward oxidation causing abnormal function or cell death. The manipulation of matter at the scale of atoms “nanotechnology ” is creating many new materials with characteristics not always easily predicted from current knowledge. Within the nearly limitless diversity of these materials some happen to be toxic to biological systems others are relatively benign while others confer health benefits. Some of these materials have desirable characteristics for industrial applications as nanostructured materials often exhibit beneficial properties from UV absorbance in sunscreen to oil-less lubrication of motors. A rational science-based approach is needed to minimize harm caused by these materials while supporting continued study and appropriate industrial development. As current knowledge of the toxicology of “bulk” materials may not suffice in reliably predicting toxic forms of nanoparticles ongoing and expanded study of “nanotoxicity” will be necessary. For nanotechnologies with clearly associated health risks intelligent design of materials and devices is needed to derive the benefits of these new technologies while limiting adverse health impacts. Human exposure to toxic nanoparticles can be reduced through identifying creation-exposure pathways of toxins a study that may someday soon unravel the mysteries of diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Reduction in fossil fuel combustion would have a large impact on global human exposure to nanoparticles as would limiting deforestation and desertification. While nanotoxicity is a relatively new concept to science this review reveals the result of life’s long history of evolution in the presence of nanoparticles and how the human body in particular has adapted to defend itself against nanoparticulate intruders.

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Synthesis and Characterization of Bimagnetic Bricklike Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the magnetic energy density was enhanced as a result of the exchange coupling between the hard and soft phases media7­9 and permanent magnetic materials10­12 because the intimate contact between the hard and soft magnetic phases in the nanoparticles enhances interphase exchange coupling. Most of the bimagnetic

Liu, J. Ping

360

Nanoparticles in Medicine: Therapeutic Applications and Developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generally in the 1­100 nm dimension range. The application of nanotechnology to medicine, knownNanoparticles in Medicine: Therapeutic Applications and Developments L Zhang1 , FX Gu1 , JM Chan2 , AZ Wang3,4 , RS Langer1 and OC Farokhzad4 Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter

Zhang, Liangfang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Notice establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles activities. DOE N 251.79 extends this Notice until 4-19-2011. Canceled by DOE O 456.1.

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and assign responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Cancels DOE N 456.1. Canceled by DOE O 456.1 Admin Chg 1.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

Interfacial Functionalization and Engineering of Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

97   Figure 4.9. Tafel plots of the area-speci?c kinetic183   Figure 7.9. Tafel plot of the Pt/G nanoparticles forThis is manifested in the Tafel plot of Figure 4.8, where

Song, Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effects of varying ethanol and water concentrations as a gold nanoparticle gel solvent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Striped gold nanoparticles are unique in several of their characteristics and applications. Recent experiments have determined a new medium with which contain the nanoparticles is that of a chemical gel. The nanoparticles ...

Schaefer, Thomas Gerard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nanoparticle-Aptamer Bioconjugates: A New Approach for Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in Brief Nanoparticle-Aptamer BioconjugatesA New Approach...nontargeted cells. Next, we generated nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates with RNA...of targeted drug delivery with nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates. Introduction...

Omid C. Farokhzad; Sangyong Jon; Ali Khademhosseini; Thanh-Nga T. Tran; David A. LaVan; Robert Langer

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Impacts of Hematite Nanoparticle Exposure on Biomechanical, Adhesive, and Surface Electrical Properties of Escherichia coli Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Environmental Microbiology Impacts of Hematite Nanoparticle Exposure on Biomechanical, Adhesive...et al. 2010. Dispersion of TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates by Pseudomonas aeruginosa...charge, and agglomeration state of nanoparticle dispersions for toxicological studies...

Wen Zhang; Joseph Hughes; Yongsheng Chen

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Luteolin Nanoparticle in Chemoprevention: In Vitro and In Vivo Anticancer Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Articles Luteolin Nanoparticle in Chemoprevention: In Vitro and In...luteolin. Our results suggest that nanoparticle delivery of naturally occurring dietary...researchers have demonstrated that nanoparticle-mediated delivery could be a promising...

Debatosh Majumdar; Kyung-Ho Jung; Hongzheng Zhang; Sreenivas Nannapaneni; Xu Wang; A.R.M. Ruhul Amin; Zhengjia Chen; Zhuo (G). Chen; Dong M. Shin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of a Nanoparticle-Labeled Microfluidic Immunoassay for Detection of Pathogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MICROBIAL IMMUNOLOGY Development of a Nanoparticle-Labeled Microfluidic Immunoassay...nucleic acids (4, 11). Multiple nanoparticle detection methods have been developed...29). The intensity generated by a nanoparticle is 100,000 times that generated by...

Frank Y. H. Lin; Mahdi Sabri; Javad Alirezaie; Dongqing Li; Philip M. Sherman

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Oral Therapy Using Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Antituberculosis Drugs in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...EXPERIMENTAL THERAPEUTICS Oral Therapy Using Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Antituberculosis Drugs...India We evaluated the efficacy of nanoparticle-encapsulated antituberculosis drugs...histopathology, suggesting that the nanoparticle drug delivery system has potential...

Christine M. Johnson; Rajesh Pandey; Sadhna Sharma; G. K. Khuller; Randall J. Basaraba; Ian M. Orme; Anne J. Lenaerts

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

What Controls the Melting Properties of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Controls the Melting Properties of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies? Rongchao Jin the relative importance of nanoparticle, oligonucleotide, and environmental variables that contribute to the observed sharp melting transitions associated with DNA-linked nanoparticle structures. These variables

371

Nanoparticle assembly via the dewetting of patterned thin metal lines: Understanding the instability mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle assembly via the dewetting of patterned thin metal lines: Understanding correlated nanoparticles from lithographically patterned pseudo-one-dimensional nickel lines. The evolution of the nickel line instabilities and nanoparticle formation with a correlated size and spacing was observed

Kondic, Lou

372

Investigation of Gold Nanoparticle Inks for Low-Temperature Lead-Free Packaging Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Gold Nanoparticle Inks for Low-Temperaturee-mail: tim_b@eecs.berkeley.edu Gold nanoparticle inks wereInvestigation of Gold Nanoparticle Inks for Low-Temperature

Bakhishev, Teymur; Subramanian, Vivek

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Enzyme–Gold Nanoparticle Bioconjugates: Quantification of Particle Stoichiometry and Enzyme Specific Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enzyme–gold nanoparticle bioconjugates have a wide variety of uses ... characterized. This protocol outlines preparation of enzyme–nanoparticle bioconjugates and two complementary methods for quantifying enzyme:nanoparticle

Jacqueline D. Keighron; Christine D. Keating

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nanoparticle Targeting of Anticancer Drug Improves Therapeutic Response in Animal Model of Human Epithelial Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Targets, and Chemical Biology Nanoparticle Targeting of Anticancer Drug Improves...14263. Prior studies suggested that nanoparticle drug delivery might improve the therapeutic...responses not possible with a free drug. Nanoparticle|drug delivery|PAMAM dendrimer...

Jolanta F. Kukowska-Latallo; Kimberly A. Candido; Zhengyi Cao; Shraddha S. Nigavekar; Istvan J. Majoros; Thommey P. Thomas; Lajos P. Balogh; Mohamed K. Khan; James R. Baker, Jr.

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Strong Sulfur Binding with Conducting Magneli-Phase TinO2n-1 Nanomaterials for Improving Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will go through a series of soluble intermediate higher-order polysulfides (Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4 of Li2S2, Li2S, and sulfur.6-8 In order to solve these challenges, there have been recent developmentsStrong Sulfur Binding with Conducting Magneli-Phase TinO2n-1 Nanomaterials for Improving Lithium-Sulfur

Cui, Yi

376

Distribution of arsenic, selenium, and other trace elements in high pyrite Appalachian coals: Evidence for multiple episodes of pyrite formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pennsylvanian coals in the Appalachian Basin host pyrite that is locally enriched in potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Hg, Pb, and Ni. A comparison of pyrite-rich coals from northwestern Alabama, eastern Kentucky, and West Virginia reveals differences in concentrations and mode of occurrence of trace elements in pyrite. Pyrite occurs as framboids, dendrites, or in massive crystalline form in cell lumens or crosscutting veins. Metal concentrations in pyrite vary over all scales, from microscopic to mine to regional, because trace elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the different morphological forms of pyrite, and in the multiple generations of sulfide mineral precipitates. Early diagenetic framboidal pyrite is usually depleted in As, Se, and Hg, and enriched in Pb and Ni, compared to other pyrite forms. In dendritic pyrite, maps of As distribution show a chemical gradient from As-rich centers to As-poor distal branches, whereas Se concentrations are highest at the distal edges of the branches. Massive crystalline pyrite that fills veins is composed of several generations of sulfide minerals. Pyrite in late-stage veins commonly exhibits As-rich growth zones, indicating a probable epigenetic hydrothermal origin. Selenium is concentrated at the distal edges of veins. A positive correlation of As and Se in pyrite veins from Kentucky coals, and of As and Hg in pyrite-filled veins from Alabama coals, suggests coprecipitation of these elements from the same fluid. In the Kentucky coal samples (n = 18), As and Se contents in pyrite-filled veins average 4200 ppm and 200 ppm, respectively. In Alabama coal samples, As in pyrite-filled veins averages 2700 ppm (n = 34), whereas As in pyrite-filled cellular structures averages 6470 ppm (n = 35). In these same Alabama samples, Se averages 80 ppm in pyrite-filled veins, but was below the detection limit in cell structures. In samples of West Virginia massive pyrite, As averages 1700 ppm, and Se averages 270 ppm (n = 24). The highest concentration of Hg (? 102 ppm) is in Alabama pyrite veins. Improved detailed descriptions of sulfide morphology, sulfide mineral paragenesis, and trace-element concentration and distribution allow more informed predictions of: (1) the relative rate of release of trace elements during weathering of pyrite in coals, and (2) the relative effectiveness of various coal-cleaning procedures of removing pyrite. For example, trace element-rich pyrite has been shown to be more soluble than stoichiometric pyrite, and fragile fine-grained pyrite forms such as dendrites and framboids are more susceptible to dissolution and disaggregation but less amenable to removal during coal cleaning.

S.F. Diehl; M.B. Goldhaber; A.E. Koenig; H.A. Lowers; L.F. Ruppert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

New insight into artifactual phenomena during in vitro toxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles: study of TNF-adsorption on alumina oxide nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticles: study of TNF- adsorption on alumina oxide nanoparticle MĂ©lanie Pailleuxa,b , Delphine Boudarda Biomolecules can be adsorbed on nanoparticles (NP) and degraded during in vitro toxicity assays: boehmite nanoparticles; toxicity; TNF- adsorption; TNF- degradation; correction curve hal-00799129,version1

Boyer, Edmond

378

Deposition of TiN and HfO{sub 2} in a commercial 200 mm remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor (Oxford Instruments FlexAL trade mark sign ) that includes an inductively coupled plasma source and a load lock capable of handling substrates up to 200 mm in diameter. The deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) is described for the combination of the metal-halide precursor TiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma and the combination of the metallorganic precursor Hf[N(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4} and O{sub 2} plasma, respectively. The influence of the plasma exposure time and substrate temperature has been studied and compositional, structural, and electrical properties are reported. TiN films with a low Cl impurity content were obtained at 350 deg. C at a growth rate of 0.35 A /cycle with an electrical resistivity as low as 150 {mu}{omega} cm. Carbon-free (detection limit <2 at. %) HfO{sub 2} films were obtained at a growth rate of 1.0 A /cycle at 290 deg. C. The thickness and resisitivity nonuniformity was <5% for the TiN and the thickness uniformality was <2% for the HfO{sub 2} films as determined over 200 mm wafers.

Heil, S. B. S.; Hemmen, J. L. van; Hodson, C. J.; Singh, N.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Roozeboom, F.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Yatton BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Collective spontaneous emission of two atoms near metal nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present quantum-mechanical approach for collective spontaneous emission (superradiance) of emitters (as atoms) near metal nanoparticle, when frequencies of transitions of emitters coincide with frequency of localized plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. Our approach is based on Schrodinger description and it uses wave functions of states of systems. Interactions between emitters and between the nanoparticle and emitters are taken into account. We consider an example of two emitters and show that radiation is occurred through symmetric states of emitters as it is in Dicke model of superradiance. The nanoparticle accelerates collective spontaneous emission similar how it accelerates spontaneous emission of single emitter. Radiation from two emitters near the nanoparticle is faster than the radiation from two separated and non-interacted "nanoparticle+single emitter" systems. Efficiency of superradiance, i.e. the ratio of emitted photons to total number initial excitations in the system, is smaller than 1 d...

Protsenko, Igor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Tailored magnetic nanoparticles for in vitro, in vivo and in situ magnetorelaxometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In particular, the science of magnetic nanoparticles isis magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), or the science andMagnetic fluids in vitreoretinal surgery." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science

Pisanic, Thomas R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Experimental and theoretical investigation of transport phenomena in nanoparticle colloids (nanofluids)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates the thermal transport behavior of nanoparticle colloids or nanofluids. The major efforts are: to determine methods to characterize a nanoparticle colloid's mass loading, chemical constituents, ...

Williams, Wesley Charles, 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Metallic nanoparticle on micro ring resonator for bio optical detection and sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have numerically investigated the unique effects of metallic nanoparticle on the ring resonator, especially multiple Au nanoparticles on the micro ring resonator with the 4-port...

Haddadpour, Ali; Yi, Yasha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Tamoxifen Inducing Cytotoxic Effect on Mcf-7 Breast Cancer Cell Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoparticle in drug delivery offers major improvements to ... of this study is to synthesize a polymeric nanoparticle encapsulating TMX, and investigate the in vitro characteristics on breast cance...

A. M. Akim; E. E. Tung; P. P. Chong…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticle Labels/Protein Microarray for Detection...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticle LabelsProtein Microarray for Detection of Protein Biomarkers. Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticle LabelsProtein Microarray for Detection of Protein...

385

SciTech Connect: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochem...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - afm cr2o3 nanoparticles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

57 Mechanistic principles of nanoparticle evolution to zeolite crystals Summary: standard for accurately measuring the dimensions of deposited precursor nanoparticles by...

387

Electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly of hybrid thin films using polyelectrolytes and inorganic nanoparticles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Polymer/inorganic nanoparticle hybrid thin films, primarily composed of functional inorganic nanoparticles, are of great interest to researchers because of their interesting electronic, photonic, and optical… (more)

Peng, Chunqing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Indium-tin-oxide-free tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al organic light-emitting diodes with 80% enhanced power efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free small molecule organic light-emitting diodes (SMOLEDs) with multilayered highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as the anode are demonstrated. PEDOT:PSS/MoO{sub 3}/N,N'-diphenyl- N,N'-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq{sub 3})/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen)/LiF/Al SMOLEDs exhibited a peak power efficiency of 3.82 lm/W, 81% higher than that of similar ITO-based SMOLEDs (2.11 lm/W). The improved performance is believed to be due to the higher work function, lower refractive index, and decreased surface roughness of PEDOT:PSS vs ITO, and to Ohmic hole injection from PEDOT:PSS to the NPD layer via the MoO{sub 3} interlayer. The results demonstrate that PEDOT:PSS can substitute ITO in SMOLEDs with strongly improved device performance.

Cai, Min; Xiao, Teng; Liu, Rui; Chen, Ying; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lithium intercalation in sputter deposited antimony-doped tin oxide thin films: Evidence from electrochemical and optical measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides are used as transparent electrical contacts in a variety of applications, including in electrochromic smart windows. In the present work, we performed a study of transparent conducting antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) thin films by chronopotentiometry in a Li{sup +}-containing electrolyte. The open circuit potential vs. Li was used to investigate ATO band lineups, such as those of the Fermi level and the ionization potential, as well as the dependence of these lineups on the preparation conditions for ATO. Evidence was found for Li{sup +} intercalation when a current pulse was set in a way so as to drive ions from the electrolyte into the ATO lattice. Galvanostatic intermittent titration was then applied to determine the lithium diffusion coefficient within the ATO lattice. The electrochemical density of states of the conducting oxide was studied by means of the transient voltage recorded during the chronopotentiometry experiments. These measurements were possible because, as Li{sup +} intercalation took place, charge compensating electrons filled the lowest part of the conduction band in ATO. Furthermore, the charge insertion modified the optical properties of ATO according to the Drude model.

Montero, J., E-mail: jose.montero@angstrom.uu.se; Granqvist, C. G.; Niklasson, G. A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The A°ngström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Guillén, C.; Herrero, J. [Department of Energy, Ciemat, Avda. Complutense 40, Ed. 42, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

Multilayer films of indium tin oxide/TiO2 codoped with vanadium and nitrogen for efficient photocatalytic water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TiO22 films codoped with V cations and N anions were synthesised by RF-magnetron sputtering. The incorporation of V and N in TiO2 lattice produces isolated energy levels near the conduction and valence bands, respectively, causing an effective narrowing of the band gap to 2.5 eV. Recombination of photo-charges was reduced by depositing multilayer films of indium tin oxide (ITO)/V-N-codoped TiO2 with different numbers of bilayers. In multilayer structure, the generated photoelectrons, travelling into TiO2 film of limited thickness, rapidly enter the space charge interface of the ITO/TiO2 films from where they are instantaneously injected into the ITO layer and then removed towards the cathode. The synergic effects created by band narrowing and enhanced charge separation by using codoping and multilayer structure strategy in TiO2 generate higher photocurrent for water splitting under visible light which definitely exceeds that obtained by doping TiO2 with a single, V or N, element.

Z. El Koura; N. Patel; R. Edla; A. Miotello

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold of indium-tin oxide films at 1064 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced-damage characteristics of commercial indium-tin oxide (ITO) films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering deposition on K9 glass substrates as a function of the film thickness have been studied at 1064 nm with a 10 ns laser pulse in the 1-on-1 mode, and the various mechanisms for thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold (LIDT) of the film have been discussed in detail. It is observed that laser-damage-resistance of ITO film shows dramatic thickness effect with the LIDT of the 50-nm ITO film 7.6 times as large as the value of 300 nm film, and the effect of depressed carrier density by decreasing the film thickness is demonstrated to be the primary reason. Our experiment findings indicate that searching transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film with low carrier density and high carrier mobility is an efficient technique to improve the laser-damage-resistance of TCO films based on maintaining their well electric conductivity.

Wang Haifeng; Huang Zhimeng; Zhang Dayong; Luo Fei; Huang Lixian; Li Yanglong; Luo Yongquan; Wang Weiping; Zhao Xiangjie [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electric Resistance Change Mechanism of Indium-Tin Oxide Film During Deposition of Dielectric Oxide Films by RF Magnetron Sputtering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric resistance change of indium-tin oxide (ITO) film was investigated when dielectric oxide films such as Sr(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 and Y2O3 for an electroluminescent device were deposited on the ITO by the rf magnetron sputtering method using oxide ceramic targets. In order to understand the mechanism of the resistance change, a dc voltage of -70~+70 V was biased to an ITO film during the sputtering of dielectric oxide films. The resistance of the ITO film became higher in the positive bias region. The cause of the increase in resistance of the ITO films was confirmed to be oxidation by the oxide targets and the sputtering gas. The amount of the resistance change could be qualitatively explained by the ratio of the oxygen introduced into the ITO film and the combined oxygen forming O2 gas at the ITO surface incident to the ITO film at the sputtering of the dielectric oxide films.

Tomizo Matsuoka; Jun Kuwata; Masahiro Nishikawa; Yosuke Fujita; Takao Tohda; Atsushi Abe

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Direct Investigation of Superparamagnetism in Co Nanoparticle Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct probe of superparamagnetism was used to determine the complete anisotropy energy distribution of Co nanoparticle films. The films were composed of self-assembled lattices of uniform Co nanoparticles of 3 or 5 nm in diameter, and a variable temperature scanning-SQUID microscope was used to measure temperature-induced spontaneous magnetic noise in the samples. Accurate measurements of anisotropy energy distributions of small volume samples will be critical to magnetic optimization of nanoparticle devices and media.

S. I. Woods; J. R. Kirtley; Shouheng Sun; R. H. Koch

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

3 - Nanoparticle exposure assessment: methods, sampling techniques, and data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Nanotechnology is now applied to many industries, resulting in a wide range of nanomaterial-containing products, such as electronic components, cosmetics, medicines, vehicles, and home appliances. Nanoparticles can be released throughout the life cycle of nanoproducts, including manufacture, consumer use, and disposal, thereby involving workers, consumers, and the environment in potential exposure. However, there is no current consensus on the best sampling method for characterizing manufactured nanoparticle exposure. Therefore, this chapter addresses nanoparticle exposure assessment methods, sampling techniques, and data analysis.

I.J. Yu; G. Ichihara; K. Ahn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Structural Transitions of Solvent-Free Oligomer-Grafted Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel structural transitions of solvent-free oligomer-grafted nanoparticles are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead-spring model. Variations in core size and grafting density lead to self-assembly of the nanoparticles into a variety of distinct structures. At the boundaries between different structures, the nanoparticle systems undergo thermoreversible transitions. This structural behavior, which has not been previously reported, deviates significantly from that of simple liquids. The reversible nature of these transitions in solvent-free conditions offers new ways to control self-assembly of nanoparticles at experimentally accessible conditions.

Alexandros Chremos and Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Concentrated aqueous alumina nanoparticle suspensions with additions of saccharides such as fructose, glucose, sucrose, and others were studied by rheometry and low temperature differential scanning… (more)

Lawler, Katherine Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions | Advanced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share A schematic of soft nanocolloidal suspensions comprising of soft polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethered silica nanoparticles suspended in PEG oligomers. The pictures...

398

Microfluidic Reactors for the Controlled Synthesis of Monodisperse Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particles by using microfluidics: control over size, shape,nanoparticles using microfluidics," Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. ,particles by using microfluidics: control over size, shape,

Erdem, Emine Yegan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electron donor-dependent radionuclide reduction and nanoparticle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

size were observed, the association of UO2 nanoparticles with an exopolymeric substance (EPS) was observed and found to be independent of electron donor source. Electron...

400

Far-from-equilibrium nanoparticle assemblies : patterns, transport and dynamics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work is centered on the study of self-organisation and pattern formation in a prototypical nanostructured system, namely colloidal nanoparticle assemblies. The particular system chosen… (more)

Blunt, Matthew Oliver

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

Wong, Michael S. (Houston, TX); Wachs, Israel E. (Bethlehem, PA); Knowles, William V. (Pearland, TX)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

Finding out how particles move through nanoparticle channels...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Finding out how particles move through nanoparticle channels Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design...

403

Structure of a Thiol Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoparticle at...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thiol Monolayer-protected Gold Nanoparticle at 1.1 Resolution Nanometer-size metal particles are of fundamental interest for their chemical and quantum electronic properties,...

404

Nanoparticle preconditioning for enhanced thermal therapies in cancer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nanoparticles show tremendous promise in the safe and effective delivery of molecular adjuvants to enhance local cancer therapy. One important form of local cancer treatment… (more)

Shenoi, Mithun M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus > Archived...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gruner's time at CHESS In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus January 24th, 2013 A Nature Materials...

406

Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of active nanoparticle additive for lubricatns that will minimize sulfur and phosporous content in engine oil, and lower ash forming elements deer08adhvaryu.pdf More Documents &...

407

DNA Origami Directed Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle Architectures Source: Angewandte Chemie International Edition Year: 2010 Volume: 49 Pages: 2700-2704 ABSTRACT: DNA origami...

408

Watching the Nanoparticles Go Round and Round | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoparticles Go Round and Round Until now, watching the detailed spinning motion of nano-objects within living cells has been impossible. Combining an existing technique, known...

409

Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

Coble, Inger M

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Velcro for Nanoparticles | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Molecular Fossil A Molecular Fossil Ultrafast Imaging of Electron Waves in Graphene When Size Matters: Yttrium Oxide Breaking Down Under Pressure Breakthrough in Nanocrystals' Growth Next Step to Drought-Resistant Plants? Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Velcro for Nanoparticles NOVEMBER 17, 2010 Bookmark and Share Different shapes of gold nanoparticles will self-assemble into different configurations when attached to single strands of DNA. DNA can do more than direct how bodies are made - it can also direct the composition of many kinds of materials, according to a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne.

411

Induction Theorem Analysis of Resonant Nanoparticles: Design of a Huygens Source Nanoparticle Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose an advanced formulation of standard antenna theory for the basic investigation and design of resonant nanoparticles. This methodology is based on transforming the original scattering problem into a radiation configuration by invoking the induction theorem. Then applying basic antenna theory principles, such as the suppression of any reactive power, the properties of the resonances are engineered. This nanoantenna approach has been validated by revisiting a number of well-known multilayered core-shell structures. It provides additional important physical insights into how the core-shell structures operate and it enables combinations of different resonant phenomena associated with them, e.g., plasmonic and high-? resonances, in an intuitive manner. Its efficacy is demonstrated by designing a multilayered nanoparticle that achieves lasing with a maximum directivity in the forward direction and a null in the backward direction, i.e., a Huygens source nanoparticle laser.

Ińigo Liberal; Ińigo Ederra; Ramón Gonzalo; Richard W. Ziolkowski

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Dynamic Colloidal Stabilization by Nanoparticle Halos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the conditions under which colloids can be stabilized by the addition of smaller particles. The largest repulsive barriers between colloids occur when the added particles repel each other with soft interactions, leading to an accumulation near the colloid surfaces. At lower densities these layers of mobile particles (nanoparticle halos) result in stabilization, but when too many are added, the interactions become attractive again. We systematically study these effects—accumulation repulsion, reentrant attraction, and bridging—by accurate integral equation techniques.

S. Karanikas and A. A. Louis

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Stochastic modelling of silicon nanoparticle synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution–Part 1: Experimental investigations”, pp. 998– 1007, Copyright (2010), with permission from Elsevier. by thermal, laser or microwave radiation sources [22, 72, 103]. The decom- position of silane forms reactive silicon hydrides, which combine... into applications of silicon nanoparticles in photovoltaics has been conducted. As the quantum confinement effects of a particle are strongly dependent on its size and structure, it may be possible to tune a photovoltaic cell to better match solar emission than...

Menz, William Jefferson

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Bilayers in nanoparticle-doped polar mesogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structures of the mesophases of five members of the 4-n-alkyl-4?-cyanobiphenyl homologous series (4-n-butyl-4?-cyanobiphenyl to 4-n-octyl-4?-cyanobiphenyl) doped with milled BaTiO3 nanoparticles were investigated by x-ray scattering. Clear solutions of each of the 4-n-alkyl-4?-cyanobiphenyls were first prepared in n-heptane and then doped with an n-heptane/nanoparticle dispersion, which led to gelation. The nanogels were found to be one-dimensional, multilayered, smectic nanostructures in each case. Surprisingly, a characteristic layer spacing of 4.5 nm was observed in all five homologues. Synchrotron x-ray scattering study of the multilayer structures of doped 4-n-pentyl-4?-cyanobiphenyl and 4-n-octyl-4?-cyanobiphenyl revealed nine orders of the primary Bragg reflection which were used to calculate the electron density profiles of the multilayers by Fourier analysis. The multilayers were found to consist of molecular bilayers wherein the mesogens were arranged in a head-to-head assembly of the polar head groups. The alkyl tails of the mesogenic molecules were freely movable and the tail-to-tail assembly was stabilized by heptane. The dissolved nanoparticles clearly induced a new self-assembled nanostructure in which the rigid aromatic part, and not the overall length, of the molecules defined the layer spacing.

Alexander Lorenz; Deńa M. Agra-Kooijman; Natalie Zimmermann; Heinz-S. Kitzerow; Dean R. Evans; Satyendra Kumar

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aqueous heavy metal ions, including toxic metals such as lead, cadmium, and mercury, is describedLetters Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal Ions Youngjin Kim that by functionalizing metal nanoparticles with appropriate heavy-metal ion receptors, the particles might be coaxed

416

Heat transfer from nanoparticles: a corresponding state analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer from nanoparticles: a corresponding state analysis Samy Merabia , Sergei Shenogin that inhibits the formation of an insulating vapor film. heat transfer | nanoparticles | liquids | phase transitions Introduction Sub-micron scale heat transfer is attracting a growing inter- est, motivated by both

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

Silica Nanoparticles and Frameworks from Rice Husk Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silica Nanoparticles and Frameworks from Rice Husk Biomass ... silica nanoparticles; rice husk; porous; biomass; hierarchical ... (22-25) Although the silica structures from RHs appear to be much less complicated and less visually attractive compared to the ones from diatoms, the large quantities of RH biomass offer an opportunity for mass production of nanostructured silica for industrial applications. ...

Weixing Wang; Jarett C. Martin; Xiaotian Fan; Aijie Han; Zhiping Luo; Luyi Sun

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solvothermal reduction synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cles, surface-coated by a molecular layer, have been widely used in cleanup remediation4 and biological-separate technologies.5 Magnetite nanoparticles properly coated by a special surfac- tant could also form a water to produce superparamagnetic nanoparticles with diameter less than 15 nm and a narrow size distribution

Gao, Song

419

Fabrication of magnetite/silica/titania core-shell nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fe3O4/SiO2/TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized via a sol-gel method with the aid of sonication. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were being encapsulated within discrete silica nanospheres, ...

Suh Cem Pang; Sze Yun Kho; Suk Fun Chin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics A thesis presented Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics Eric Mazur Brian R. Tull Abstract irradiated surface layer to the grain boundaries. #12;iv Lastly, we measure the photovoltaic properties

Mazur, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SiO2 Nanoparticle Sequestration via Reactive Functionalization in Holographic Polymer-Dispersed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SiO2 Nanoparticle Sequestration via Reactive Functionalization in Holographic Polymer addition of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of many materials can be synthesized in sizes small enough are available to control the chemical interaction of the nanoparticles with the HPDLC system. Previous research

Braun, Paul

422

Formation and post-deposition compression of smooth and processable silicon thin films from nanoparticle suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticle suspensions Noah T. Jafferisa) and James C. Sturm Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton and processable silicon thin-films from single-crystal silicon-nanoparticle suspensions. Single-crystal Si-nanoparticles on printing silicon from nanoparticles has shown much promise.3,4 Ha¨rting et al.4 report screen-printed films

423

14ZH-2003-05 Hydrogel Nanoparticle Dispersins with Inverse Thermoreversible Gelation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14ZH-2003-05 Hydrogel Nanoparticle Dispersins with Inverse Thermoreversible Gelation Hydrogels have by entrapping a colloidal array inside a gel, by covalently bonding self-assembled nanoparticles into a network nanoparticles that can form a physically bonded nanoparticle network above a gelation temperature. The gel

Mohanty, Saraju P.

424

Metallic-nanoparticle assisted enhanced band-to-band tunneling current Deblina Sarkara)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic-nanoparticle assisted enhanced band-to-band tunneling current Deblina Sarkara) and Kaustav) Metallic nanoparticle assisted band-to-band tunneling is proposed, and the impact of such nanoparticle that an asymmetric pinning is required to leverage maximum benefits from the insertion of metallic nanoparticles. VC

425

Phase Behavior and 3D Structure of Strongly Attractive Microsphere-Nanoparticle Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Behavior and 3D Structure of Strongly Attractive Microsphere-Nanoparticle Mixtures James F microspheres and polystyrene nanoparticles. These binary mixtures are electrostatically tuned to promote a repulsion between like-charged (microsphere-microsphere and nanoparticle-nanoparticle) species and a strong

Weeks, Eric R.

426

Selectively Assembled Co Nanoparticle Stripes Prepared by Covalent Linkage and Microcontact Printing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selectively Assembled Co Nanoparticle Stripes Prepared by Covalent Linkage and Microcontact introduce a novel strategy to fabricate a bifunctional monolayer assembly of Co nanoparticles on a Si- (111 and the nanoparticles. The Br-terminated Co nanoparticles that are assembled on the aminopropyl-terminated Si surface

Kim, Sehun

427

Reference “Hierarchical Nanoparticle Ensembles Synthesized by Liquid Phase Directed Self-Assembly”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticles with precise radii. Catalytic, electrical and optical applications ultimately stand to benefit

Jason Fowlkes; Nick Roberts; Yueying Wu; Javier Diez; Ro Gonzalez; Chris Hartnett; Shahriar Afkhami; Lou Kondic; Philip Rack

428

Effect of Nanoparticle Conjugation on Gene Silencing by RNA Interference Neetu Singh,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Nanoparticle Conjugation on Gene Silencing by RNA Interference Neetu Singh, Amit Agrawal) and nanoparticles (e.g., magnetic, quantum dots, gold and carbohydrate nanoparticles) have been shown to deliver siRNAs and covalent coupling of siRNAs with polymers or nanoparticles have been shown to be effective in delivering si

Bhatia, Sangeeta

429

Internalization pathways into cancer cells of gadolinium-based radiosensitizing nanoparticles Wael Rima a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Over the last few decades, nanoparticles have been studied in theranostic field with the objective

Boyer, Edmond

430

Oxygen Reduction Catalyzed by Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on Graphene Quantum Dots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

graphene quantum dot; platinum nanoparticle; oxygen reduction; defect; X-ray diffraction; XPS; Tafel plot ...

Guoqiang He; Yang Song; Ke Liu; Andrew Walter; Sophie Chen; Shaowei Chen

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nanoparticle sizing method based on fluorescence anisotropy analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand for applications of nanoparticles in electric architecture has been increasing. Nanoparticles provide new opportunities for improving circuit response. We discuss a novel method for evaluating nanoparticle sizes based on fluorescence anisotropy analysis. Particle size evaluation is possible through measurements of the rotational diffusion coefficient, which is sensitive to particle size. We develop a system for measuring rotational diffusion coefficients by using a fluorescent probe to label a particle. We report fundamental experiments that verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The rotational diffusion coefficients of gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging 6–20 nm were measured using the proposed method. The measured rotational diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing particle size. This finding indicates that nanoparticles smaller than 15 nm can be measured with fine resolution.

Terutake Hayashi; Yuki Ishizaki; Masaki Michihata; Yasuhiro Takaya; Shin-Ichi Tanaka

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A Method to Increase Current Density in a Mono Element Internal Tin Processed Superconductor Utilizing Zr Oxide to Refine Grain Size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of Oxygen on (Nb1Zr)3Sn multifilament conductors manufactured by the Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) process was explored to improve the current density by refining the grain size. This followed work first done by General Electric on the Nb3Sn tape process. Techniques to fabricate the more difficult Nb1Zr composites are described and allowed fabrication of long lengths of .254 mm diameter wire from an 88.9 mm diameter billet. Oxygen was incorporated through the use of SnO2 mixed with tin powder and incorporated into the core. These were compared to samples with Ti+Sn and Cu+Sn cores. Heat treatments covered the range of 700 C to 1000 C. Current density vs. H, grain size, and reaction percentages are provided for the materials tested. The Oxygen gave superior results in the temperature range of 815-1000 C. It also stabilized the filament geometry of the array in comparison to the other additions at the higher temperatures. At 815 C a peak in layer Jc yielded values of 2537 A/mm2 at 12 T and 1353 A/mm2 at 15T, 8-22% and 30-73% greater respectively than 700 C values. Results with Oxygen at high temperature show the possibility of high speed continuous reaction of the composite versus the current batch or react in place methods. In general the Ti additions gave superior results at the lower reaction temperature. Future work is suggested to determine if the 815 C reaction temperature can lead to higher current density in high tin (Nb1Zr+Ox)3Sn conductors. A second technique incorporated oxygen directly into the Nb1Zr rods through heat treatment with Nb2O5 at 1100 C for 100 hours in vacuum prior to extrusion. The majority of the filaments reduced properly in the composite but some local variations in hardness led to breakage at smaller diameters.

Bruce A. Zeitlin, Eric Gregory

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Khi i hc k thut thng tin (Undergraduateds School of IES) http://www.uec.ac.jp/ies/faculty/index.html (Jpns)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lng Lng t hc Vt liu hc Cht bán dn - Siêu bán dn Thit b in t - Thit b quang in t - T - Vt liu quang Thông tin quang Vt lý rn Sinh hc - Thn kinh hc H thng sinh hc o lng sinh hc Tên thng qun lý doanh nghip... nh hng ngh nghip: K s h thng, K s qun lý sn xut - cht lng sn phm, Chuyên

Yanai, Keiji

434

Interaction of colloidal nanoparticles with their local environment: the (ionic) nanoenvironment around nanoparticles is different from bulk and determines the physico-chemical properties of the nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...10.1021/nn204643g ) 5 Perelshtein, I , 2013 Chitosan and chitosan-ZnO-based complex nanoparticles: formation...molecular dynamics study of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and horseradish peroxidase in selected salt solutions...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Real time monitoring of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly on surfaces of magnetic recording media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticle self-assembly dynamics are monitored in real-time by detecting optical diffraction from an all-nanoparticle grating as it self-assembles on a grating pattern recorded on a magnetic medium. The diffraction efficiency strongly depends on concentration, pH, and colloidal stability of nanoparticle suspensions, demonstrating the nanoparticle self-assembly process is highly tunable. This metrology could provide an alternative for detecting nanoparticle properties such as colloidal stability.

Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Crawford, T. M., E-mail: crawftm@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Qi, B.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 161 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), 91 Technology Dr., Anderson, South Carolina 29625 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

Reeves, Daniel B., E-mail: dbr@Dartmouth.edu; Weaver, John B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Lamellar L? Mesophases Doped with Inorganic Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of nanostructured hybrid systems is a flourishing area of research, which brings together chemistry, physics and materials science. These systems are composed of nanoparticles with interesting properties (e.g. optical, magnetic, catalytic) dispersed within an organic matrix. Control of both the position and orientation of the particles in a precise and reproducible way is an important goal. Towards this goal, the use of lyotropic liquid crystals as host phases is a promising strategy that has prompted sustained experimental work over the last decade. Here we briefly review this field, with an emphasis on the structure and the physical characterization of these novel materials.

Doru Constantin; Patrick Davidson

2014-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Vector coherent states for nanoparticle Hamiltonians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first part of this work deals with a formalism of vector coherent states construction for a system of $M$ Fermi-type modes associated with $N$ bosonic modes. Then follows a generalization to a Hamiltonian describing the translational motion of the center of mass of a nanoparticle. The latter gives rise to a new mechanism for the electronic energy relaxation in nanocrystals, intensively studied today in condensed matter physics. Finite degeneracies of the involved Hamiltonian systems are also investigated. The defined vector coherent states satisfy relevant mathematical properties of continuity, resolution of identity, temporal stability and action identity.

Isiaka Aremua; Mahouton Norbert Hounkonnou

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Vibration of Nanoparticles in Viscous Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, we present results of a rigorous finite-element analysis and commensurate scaling theory that enable interpretation and analysis of these experiments, for the extensional vibrational modes of axisymmetric nanoparticles immersed in viscous fluids. ... (51) Vibration of the particle accelerates the fluid, which increases the effective mass of the vibrating particle. ... Using low-frequency Raman scattering, the authors clearly demonstrate that single-domain NCs vibrate differently than their multiply twinned counterparts, through the splitting of the quadrupolar vibrations, which is only obsd. ...

Debadi Chakraborty; Emma van Leeuwen; Matthew Pelton; John E. Sader

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

440

Metal Oxide Nanoparticles as Bactericidal Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

8 Magnesium oxide prepared through an aerogel procedure (AP-MgO)9 yields square and polyhedral shaped nanoparticles with diameters varying slightly around 4 nm, arranged in an extensive porous structure with considerable pore volume. ... Approximately 106 CFU (colony forming units) of bacteria or spores were deposited on water filtration membranes with pore size 0.45 ?m (Millipore Corp.). ... The filters were dried at ambient conditions for 30 min and then completely covered with 0.25 g of AP-MgO/X2 (X = Cl, Br, none). ...

Peter K. Stoimenov; Rosalyn L. Klinger; George L. Marchin; Kenneth J. Klabunde

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Plasmonic effect of gold nanoparticles in organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Light trapping, due to the embedding of metallic nanoparticles, has been shown to be beneficial for a better photoabsorption in organic solar cells. Researchers in plasmonics and in the organic photovoltaics fields are working together to improve the absorption of sunlight and the photon–electron coupling to boost the performance of the devices. Recent advances in the field of plasmonics for organic solar cells focus on the incorporation of gold nanoparticles. This article reviews the different methods to produce and embed gold nanoparticles into organic solar cells. In particular, concentration, size and geometry of gold nanoparticles are key factors that directly influence the light absorption in the devices. It is shown that a careful choice of size, concentration and location of gold nanoparticles in the device result in an enhancement of the power conversion efficiencies when compared to standard organic solar cell devices. Our latest results on gold nanoparticles embedded in on organic solar cell devices are included. We demonstrate that embedded gold nanoparticles, created by depositing and annealing a gold film on transparent electrode, generate a plasmonic effect which can be exploited to increase the power conversion efficiency of a bulk heterojunction solar cell up to 10%.

Marco Notarianni; Kristy Vernon; Alison Chou; Muhsen Aljada; Jinzhang Liu; Nunzio Motta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Process development of a novel arc spray nanoparticle synthesis system (ASNSS) for preparation of a TiO 2 nanoparticle suspension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the development of an innovative technology to manufacture TiO2...nanoparticles. Manufacturing nanoparticles is considered as a crucial step towards product and process innovation. In our pr...

Tsing-Tshih Tsung; Ho Chang; Liang-Chia Chen…

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Assessment of functional changes in nanoparticle-exposed neuroendocrine cells with amperometry: exploring the generalizability of nanoparticle-vesicle matrix interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using two of the most commonly synthesized noble metal nanoparticle preparations, citrate-reduced Au and Ag, the impacts of short-term accidental nanoparticle exposure are examined in primary culture murine ... m...

Sara A. Love; Christy L. Haynes

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Effect of oxidizer on grain size and low temperature DC electrical conductivity of tin oxide nanomaterial synthesized by gel combustion method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline Tin oxide material with different grain size was synthesized using gel combustion method by varying the fuel (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}) to oxidizer (HNO{sub 3}) molar ratio by keeping the amount of fuel as constant. The prepared samples were characterized by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Analysis X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX). The effect of fuel to oxidizer molar ratio in the gel combustion method was investigated by inspecting the grain size of nano SnO{sub 2} powder. The grain size was found to be reduced with the amount of oxidizer increases from 0 to 6 moles in the step of 2. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the calcined product showed the formation of high purity tetragonal tin (IV) oxide with the grain size in the range of 12 to 31 nm which was calculated by Scherer's formula. Molar ratio and temperature dependence of DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial was studied using Keithley source meter. DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial increases with the temperature from 80K to 300K. From the study it was observed that the DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial decreases with the grain size at constant temperature.

Rajeeva, M. P., E-mail: jayanna60@gmail.com; Jayanna, H. S., E-mail: jayanna60@gmail.com; Ashok, R. L.; Naveen, C. S. [Department of P.G. Studies and Research in Physics, Kuvempu University, Jnanasahyadri, Shankarghatta, Shimoga- 577451, Karnataka (India); Bothla, V. Prasad [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

445

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Emerging Issues in Nanoparticle Aerosol Science and Technology Workshop report sponsored by: NSF, Southern California Particle Center and UCLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has responsibility for nuclear reactor safety which includes emissions of radioactive particles pollution sources, (2) industrial production of nanoparticle reinforcing fillers such as carbon black nanoparticle products by aerosol processes, (4) atmospheric dynamics of fractal-like nanoparticle aerosols (e

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

448

Abstract #1561: RNA nanoparticle vaccines: combining drug inducible CD40 activation with CTL peptide delivery improves vaccine efficacy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Systemic Administration of Polymeric Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Curcumin (NanoCurc...circulation. We have engineered a polymeric nanoparticle encapsulated curcumin formulation...bioavailability. We envisioned that nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery could be useful...

Alison McCormick; Jan Kemnade; David Spencer

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ultrasound Increases Nanoparticle Delivery by Reducing Intratumoral Pressure and Increasing Transport in Epithelial and Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chemical Biology Ultrasound Increases Nanoparticle Delivery by Reducing Intratumoral Pressure...clinic can be used to enhance in vivo nanoparticle delivery to epithelial and EMT tumors...analysis of vascular permeability and nanoparticle accumulation in tumors. Acquisition...

Katherine D. Watson; Chun-Yen Lai; Shengping Qin; Dustin E. Kruse; Yueh-Chen Lin; Jai Woong Seo; Robert D. Cardiff; Lisa M. Mahakian; Julie Beegle; Elizabeth S. Ingham; Fitz-Roy Curry; Rolf K. Reed; Katherine W. Ferrara

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Dynamic final-state nanoparticle-substrate interaction in the photoemission of dodecanethiolate-passivated Ag nanoparticles on graphite substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have carried out a photoemission study of dodecanethiolate- (DT-) passivated Ag nanoparticles supported on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates. From detailed photoemission measurements, it is found that the Fermi-level onsets in the photoemission spectra of DT-passivated Ag nanoparticles on the HOPG substrates are not the metallic Fermi edge, with the steep slope being away from the Fermi level. We attribute the unusual spectral features in the vicinity of Fermi level to the dynamic final-state effect in photoemission, indicative of the interaction between the nanoparticle and substrate through the surface passivants on a femtosecond time scale.

Akinori Tanaka; Yuitsu Takeda; Tazumi Nagasawa; Shigeru Sato

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Optically detected, single nanoparticle mass spectrometer with pre-filtered electrospray nanoparticle source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An instrument designed for non-destructive mass analysis of single trapped nanoparticles is described. The heart of the instrument is a 3D quadrupole (Paul) trap constructed to give optical access to the trap center along ten directions, allowing passage of lasers for particle heating and detection, particle injection, collection of scattered or fluorescent photons for particle detection and mass analysis, and collection of particles on TEM grids for analysis, as needed. Nanoparticles are injected using an electrospray ionization (ESI) source, and conditions are described for spraying and trapping polymer particles, bare metal particles, and ligand stabilized particles with masses ranging from 200 kDa to >3 GDa. Conditions appropriate to ESI and injection of different types of particles are described. The instrument is equipped with two ion guides separating the ESI source and nanoparticle trap. The first ion guide is mostly to allow desolvation and differential pumping before the particles enter the trap section of the instrument. The second is a linear quadrupole guide, which can be operated in mass selective or mass band-pass modes to limit transmission to species with mass-to-charge ratios in the range of interest. With a little experience, the design allows injection of single particles into the trap upon demand.

Howder, Collin R.; Bell, David M.; Anderson, Scott L. [Chemistry Department, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticle films for optical sensing applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to monitor gas species selectively, sensitively, and reliably in extreme temperatures and harsh conditions is critically important for more efficient energy production using conventional fossil energy based production technologies, enabling advanced technologies for fossil based power plants of the future, and improving efficiency in domestic manufacturing industries. Optical waveguide based sensing platforms have become increasingly important but a need exists for materials that exhibit useful changes in optical properties in response to changing gas atmospheres at high temperatures. In this manuscript, the onset of a near-IR absorption associated with an increase in free carrier density in doped metal oxide nanoparticles to form so-called conducting metal oxides is discussed in the context of results obtained for undoped and Al-doped ZnO nanoparticle based films. Detailed film characterization results are presented along with measured changes in optical absorption resulting from various high temperature treatments in a range of gas atmospheres. Optical property changes are also discussed in the context of a simple model for optical absorption in conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and thin films. The combination of experimental results and theoretical modeling presented here suggests that such materials have potential for high temperature optical gas sensing applications. Simulated sensing experiments were performed at 500 °C and a useful, rapid, and reproducible near-IR optical sensing response to H{sub 2} confirms that this class of materials shows great promise for optical gas sensing.

Ohodnicki, Paul R., Jr.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Argonne CNM News: Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles Mark Holt (Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials) examines a sample in the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Evolutional pathway from iron particle seeds with thin layers of amorphous iron oxide coating to hybrid nanoparticles composed of solid Ag nanodomains and hollow Fe3O4 nanoshells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images (false colorized) and corresponding schematic illustration (silver: yellow, iron oxide: blue, iron core: black) of the hybrid particles at different stages along the reaction are highlighted on the edge. The TEM image at the center highlights Ag-Fe3O4 hybrid nanoparticles in which Ag and Fe3O4 are false colorized in orange yellow and blue, respectively. TEM analysis was done at Argonne's Electron Microscopy Center

454

Argonne CNM Highlight: Damping of acoustic vibrations in gold nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Damping of acoustic vibrations in gold nanoparticles Damping of acoustic vibrations in gold nanoparticles Nanopatterning of STO Vibrations in nanostructures offer applications in molecular-scale biological sensing and ultrasensitive mass detection. To approach single-atom sensing, it is necessary to reduce the dimensions of the structures to the nanometer scale while preserving long-lived vibrations. This requires an understanding of how vibrations in nanoscale objects are damped - or lose their energy to the fluid surroundings and within themselves. Researchers have used fast laser pulses to produce and probe high-frequency vibrations in metal nanoparticles. However, significant variations in particle dimensions complicate measurements. By studying bipyramid-shaped gold nanoparticles with highly uniform sizes

455

Synthesis and properties of MPEG-coated superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in methoxy polyethylene glycol, which was used as solvent, reducing agent, and modifying agent in the reaction. The morphologies and phase compositions ...

Xueli Cao; Baolin Zhang; Fangyuan Zhao; Lingyun Feng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Laser-Based Deposition Technique: Patterning Nanoparticles into Microstructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-Based Deposition Technique: Patterning Nanoparticles into Microstructures Edward M. Nadgorny Jaroslaw Drelich Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION The laser- tions of unlike materials, and unconventional substrates. The technique makes use of laser

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

457

Tuning of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasmonic nanoparticles based thin film solar cells plays a crucial role in designing the current breed of third generation solar cells. To decrease the material cost for economic viability without compromising o...

Somik Chakravarty; Lingeswaran Arunagiri…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Metal Nanoparticles Enhanced Optical Absorption in Thin Film Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasmonic enhanced absorption for thin film solar cells with silver nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on top of the amorphous silicon film (a-Si:H) solar cells and embedded inside the...

Xie, Wanlu; Liu, Fang; Qu, Di; Xu, Qi; Huang, Yidong

459

Heteroepitaxial Self Assembling Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Monocrystalline Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and investigate fundamental properties. Noble metal nanoparticles made of gold or silver are grown in cavities in monocrystalline silicon formed by helium ion implantation and high temperature annealing at depth greater than 500 nm from the surface. Metals...

Martin, Michael S.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

460

Near-field heat transfer between gold nanoparticle arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiative heat transfer between gold nanoparticle layers is presented using the coupled dipole method. Gold nanoparticles are modelled as effective electric and magnetic dipoles interacting via electromagnetic fluctuations. The effect of higher-order multipoles is implemented in the expression of electric polarizability to calculate the interactions at short distances. Our findings show that the near-field radiation reduces as the radius of the nanoparticles is increased. Also, the magnetic dipole contribution to the heat exchange becomes more important for larger particles. When one layer is displayed in parallel with respect to the other layer, the near-field heat transfer exhibits oscillatory-like features due to the influence of the individual nanostructures. Further details about the effect of the nanoparticles size are also discussed.

Phan, Anh D., E-mail: anhphan@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Phan, The-Long, E-mail: ptlong2512@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Woods, Lilia M. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles for biological applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) of high crystallinity, high magnetization, and size-monodispersity were synthesized with oleic acid as their native ligands. These hydrophobic and non-functionalized MPs have magnetic ...

Insin, Numpon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Optimizing hysteretic power loss of magnetic ferrite nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis seeks to correlate hysteretic power loss of tertiary ferrite nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields to trends predicted by physical models. By employing integration of hysteresis loops simulated from ...

Chen, Ritchie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Surface modification, functionalization and bioconjugation of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rise to a number of applications in medicine, chemistry or biotechnology. PEG is...nanoparticlesAdvances in experimental medicine and biology:bio-applications of...Y. , and J. Liu2006Functional DNA nanotechnology:emerging applications of DNAzymes...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Phase-equilibrium-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal dispersion of nanoparticles (CNPs) has interesting properties both in terms of fundamental studies and industrials applications. Particular focus on the phase equilibrium and separation dynamics of CNPs has been ...

Kwon, Seok Joon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

SELF-ASSEMBLY AND CONTROLLED ASSEMBLY OF NANOPARTICLES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes an exploration of interactions between metal nanoparticles and new techniques for their assembly. In Chapter 2, the self-assembly of 300-nm diameter Au,… (more)

Dillenback, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Magnetism in nanoparticle LaCoO3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism in nanoparticle LaCoO 3 A. M. Durand, 1 D. P.o ? 37 K. For T magnetism in bulk LCO is associatedto surfaces or interfaces. The magnetism of LaCoO 3 (LCO) is

Durand, A. M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Investigation of Water-Soluble X-ray Luminescence Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

we report the synthesis of LaF3:Tb3+-MTCP (meso-Tetra(4-carboxyphenyl) porphine) nanoparticle conjugates and investigate the energy transfer as well as singlet oxygen generation...

469

Gold Nanoparticles Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Society Year: 2010 Volume: 132 Pages: 3248-3249 ABSTRACT: Here we demonstrate Au nanoparticle self-similar chain structure organized by triangle DNA origami with well-controlled...

470

Disorder in DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report experimental observations on the effect of disorder on the phase behavior of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies. Variation in DNA linker lengths results in different melting temperatures of the DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies. We observed an unusual trend of a nonmonotonic “zigzag” pattern in the melting temperature as a function of DNA linker length. Linker DNA resulting in unequal DNA duplex lengths introduces disorder and lowers the melting temperature of the nanoparticle system. Comparison with free DNA thermodynamics shows that such an anomalous zigzag pattern does not exist for free DNA duplex melting, which suggests that the disorder introduced by unequal DNA duplex lengths results in this unusual collective behavior of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies.

Nolan C. Harris and Ching-Hwa Kiang

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edition Year: 2011 Volume: 50 Pages: 2041-2044 ABSTRACT: A critical challenge in nanoparticle (NP) surface functionalization is to label the NP surface with a single copy of a...

472

Electronic properties of phenylated ligand-capped nanoparticle films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation was carried out of the electronic characteristics of drop-cast films comprised of phenylated ligand-capped gold nanoparticles. In homoligand-type films, the dominant mechanism of charge transfer was expected ...

Schilling, Thomas C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Synthesis of high tetragonality nanoparticle BaTiO3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New preparation methods for barium titanate powders that can be used for more compact/superior multilayer ceramic capacitors, embedded capacitors, and high capacitance plastic composite materials in microelectronics are described. The methods involve ... Keywords: Barium titanate, Dielectrics, Nanoparticles, Tetragonality

Burtrand I. Lee; X. Wang; S. Joon Kwon; H. Maie; R. Kota; J. H. Hwang; J. G. Park; M. Hu

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Nanoparticle Reactor Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Nanoparticle Reactor Automation Overview would be fully automated and able to run overnight. The team was also asked to keep the solutions from

Demirel, Melik C.

475

Engineering embedded metal nanoparticles with ion beam technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize our recent results of study on how to engineer the embedded metal nanoparticles in silica by ion implantation and ion irradiation technologies, including controlling the size,...

Feng Ren; Xiang Heng Xiao; Guang Xu Cai; Jian Bo Wang…

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Devastated crops: multifunctional efficacy for the production of nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. Biological methods were used to synthesize metal and metal oxide nanoparticles of specific shape and size since they enhance the properties ...

G. Madhumitha; Selvaraj Mohana Roopan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Harnessing the collective properties of nanoparticle ensembles for cancer theranostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Individual inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in the fields of drug delivery, cancer imaging and therapy. There are still many hurdles that limit the performance of individual NPs for these ap...

Yi Liu; Jun-Jie Yin; Zhihong Nie

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Cancer theranostics: multifunctional gold nanoparticles for diagnostics and therapy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Doctorate in Biology, Specialty in Biotechnology The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum in molecular diagnostics due to their unique physico-chemical properties… (more)

Conde, Joăo Diogo Osório de Castro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted wet chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles is reported. ? Substituting water with non-aqueous media prevents the formation of nickel hydroxide. ? Size of particles decreased from 10 to 20 nm down to 2–4 nm by using multi-jet mode. ? Synthesized nanoparticles have diffraction patterns similar to amorphous materials. -- Abstract: In this study nickel nanoparticles were prepared via chemical reduction of nickel acetate using sodium borohydride using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. This technique was used to spray a finely dispersed aerosol of nickel precursor solution into the reductive bath. Obtained particles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles and showed that applying EHDA technique to chemical reduction method results in producing smaller particles with narrower size distribution in comparison with conventional reductive precipitation method.

Barzegar Vishlaghi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farzalipour Tabriz, M., E-mail: meisam.fa@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammad Moradi, O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 13, 2011 4:00 pm Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticle Medicines Mark E. Davis Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology CNMS D D I I...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tin selenium nanoparticle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Exposure Modeling of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exposure Modeling of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment ... Colvin, V. L. The potential environmental impact of engineered nanomaterials Nat. ... ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering2014 2 (10), 2275-2282 ...

Nicole C. Mueller; Bernd Nowack

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

482

Ferromagnetism in chemically synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Ni doping. Ferromagnetism in chemically synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles by Ni doping. Abstract: This work reports the discovery of room-temperature ferromagnetism in 5 - 9 nm...

483

Synthesis and Characterization of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Ethanol Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pure phase, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were synthesized at lower temperature by microwave assisted auto combustion synthesis method. As-synthesized particles had sizes ~50 nm with spherical shape. Gas respons...

Sachin Tyagi; Sarita Devi; Ashok K. Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

METAL NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH METAL-LIGAND COVALENT BONDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fundamental and technological perspectives, largely because these nanomaterials show unique optical and electronicelectronic energy structures, which may serve as a fundamentaland electronic characteristics, the metal nanoparticles have been attracting extensive interest in the field of fundamental

Kang, Xiongwu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Spatiotemporal controlled delivery of nanoparticles to injured vasculature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex multimodal nanoparticles (NP) that target and deliver therapeutic agents to a site of disease are a promising direction in modem medicine. As a starting point for innovation, we designed a hybrid NP system combining ...

Chan, Juliana Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Carriker, Neil [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, Jesse G [ORNL; Gable, Jennifer [Environmental Standards, Inc.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Argonne CNM News: Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures Scientists in the Center for Nanoscale Materials and Argonne's Biosciences Division have demonstrated a remarkably simple, elegant, and cost-effective way of assembling nanoparticles into larger structures of any desired shape and form at will via a process called "optically directed assembly." Optically directed assembly (ODA) involves suspensions of gold and carbon nanoparticles in water. A small droplet of the suspension is placed on a glass slide, and a low-power laser is focused onto a small region within the droplet near its surface. Through a complex process involving optical trapping, heating, evaporation, convective fluid flow, and chemical interactions, the nanoparticles fuse near the laser focus and as the experimenter moves the laser focus around in the droplet, a continuous filament of the fused material follows. These remarkable structures remain completely intact even after the fluid is drained off. In this manner "handcrafted" filaments of up to millimeter lengths and 10-60 times wider than the original nanoparticles can be formed with arbitrary shape and design. The resulting hierarchical architectures may be useful for a variety of applications, including biological sensing, electronics, optics, and emerging energy technologies. As a first demonstration, the researchers handcrafted a microscopic glyph — the Chinese symbol for "king."

489

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Title Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Michael E. Grass, Daniel K. Roseguo, Z. Liu, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Li Journal Electrochemical Solid-State Letters Volume 14 Start Page A61 Issue 5 Pagination A61-A63 Date Published 02/2001 Keywords Electrochemistry, elemental semiconductors, etching, lithium, nanoparticles, secondary cells, silicon, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra Abstract This study characterizes the native oxide layer of Si nanoparticles and evaluates its effect on their performance for Li-ion batteries. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to identify the chemical state and morphology of the native oxide layer. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis were used to estimate the oxide content for the Si samples. Hydrofluoric acid was used to reduce the oxide layer. A correlation between etching time and oxide content was established. The initial electrochemical performances indicate that the reversible capacity of etched Si nanoparticles was enhanced significantly compared with that of the as-received Si sample.

490

Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles via electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate solutions. ? Design of a Taguchi orthogonal array to identify the optimal experimental conditions. ? Controlling the size and shape of particles via applied voltage and oxalate concentration. ? Characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles by SEM, UV–vis, FT-IR and TG–DTA. - Abstract: A rapid, clean and simple electrodeposition method was designed for the synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles. Zinc oxalate nanoparticles in different size and shapes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate aqueous solutions. It was found that the size and shape of the product could be tuned by electrolysis voltage, oxalate ion concentration, and stirring rate of electrolyte solution. A Taguchi orthogonal array design was designed to identify the optimal experimental conditions. The morphological characterization of the product was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. UV–vis and FT-IR spectroscopies were also used to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. The TG–DTA studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation occurs in two steps over a temperature range of 350–430 °C. In contrast to the existing methods, the present study describes a process which can be easily scaled up for the production of nano-sized zinc oxalate powder.

Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushani, Mahmoud [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Ilam University, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

A silicon nanoparticle/reduced graphene oxide composite anode with excellent nanoparticle dispersion to improve lithium ion battery performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Composite anodes of Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets with highly dispersed...+...electrochemistry by becoming highly involved in the charge–discharge reaction mechanisms as indicat...

Rhet C. de Guzman; Jinho Yang; Mark Ming-Cheng Cheng…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Optical properties of Ag nanoparticle-polymer composite film based on two-dimensional Au nanoparticle array film  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nanocomposite polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) films containing Ag nanoparticles and Rhodamine 6G are prepared on the two-dimensional distinctive continuous ultrathin gold nanofilms. We investigate the optical pro...

Long-De Wang; Tong Zhang; Xiao-Yang Zhang; Yuan-Jun Song…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Method for making nanotubes and nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing nano-scale tubes and particles. The apparatus comprises novel electrodes for use in arc discharge techniques. The electrodes have interior conduits for delivery and withdrawal of material from the arc region where product is formed. In one embodiment, the anode is optionally made from more than one material and is termed a compound anode. The materials used in the compound anode assist in the reaction that forms product in the arc region of the apparatus. The materials assist either by providing reaction ingredients, catalyst, or affecting the reaction kinetics. Among other uses, the inventive apparatus is used to produce nanotubes and nanoparticles having a variety of electrical and mechanical properties.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Robustness of the magnetoresistance of nanoparticle arrays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent work has found that the interplay between spin accumulation and Coulomb blockade in nanoparticle arrays results in peaky I-V and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) curves and in huge values of the TMR. We analyze how these effects are influenced by a polarization asymmetry of the electrodes, the dimensionality of the array, the temperature, resistance, or charge disorder, and long-range interactions. We show that the magnitude and voltage dependence of the TMR do not change with the dimensionality of the array or the presence of junction resistance disorder. A different polarization in the electrodes modifies the peak shape in the I-V and TMR curves but not their order of magnitude. Increasing the temperature or length of the interaction reduces to some extent the size of the peaks, the reduction being due to long-range interactions that are smaller in longer arrays. Charge disorder should be avoided to observe large TMR values.

V. Estévez and E. Bascones

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cleaner water using bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater contaminated by hazardous chlorinated compounds, especially chlorinated ethenes, continues to be a significant environmental problem in industrialized nations. The conventional treatment methods of activated carbon adsorption and air-stripping successfully remove these compounds by way of transferring them from the water phase into the solid or gas phase. Catalysis is a promising approach to remove chlorinated compounds completely from the environment, by converting them into safer, non-chlorinated compounds. Palladium-based materials have been shown to be very effective as hydrodechlorination catalysts for the removal of chlorinated ethenes and other related compounds. However, relatively low catalytic activity and a propensity for deactivation are significant issues that prevent their widespread use in groundwater remediation. Palladium-on-gold bimetallic nanoparticles, in contrast, were recently discovered to exhibit superior catalyst activity and improved deactivation resistance. This new type of material is a significant next-step in the development of a viable hydrodechlorination catalysis technology.

Wong, Michael S.; Alvarez, Pedro J.J.; Fang, Yu-Iun; Akçin, Nurgül; Nutt, Michael O.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Heck, Kimberly N.

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

496

Magnetic nanoparticles-based diagnostics and theranostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, enormous efforts have been made to translate nanotechnology innovations into medical practice. The main focuses were diagnosis and therapy with recent emphasis on multi-modal imaging. Since in many instance the sites for imaging and therapy are the same it became apparent that targeted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which can be imaged, can also be used as a platform for theranostics applications. MNPs, which are characterized by high surface-to-volume ratios, are not only excellent scaffolds for loading targeting moieties, imaging tags and drugs, but can themselves be used to induce therapeutic effects making them the platform of choice for theranostics applications. In the current assay we will outline some of the recent progress in the synthesis and functionalization of MNPs, as well as their applications in multimodal imaging. The main body of the present essay, however, focuses on recent theranostic applications of such MNPs.

Yoram Cohen; Shani Yariv Shoushan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Charging and Heating Dynamics of Nanoparticles in Nonthermal Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this award was to understand the interactions of nanometer-sized particles with ionized gases, also called plasmas. Plasmas are widely used in the fabrication of electronic circuits such as microprocessors and memory devices, in plasma display panels, as well as in medical applications. Recently, these ionized gases are finding applications in the synthesis of advanced nanomaterials with novel properties, which are based on nanometer-sized particulate (nanoparticles) building blocks. As these nanoparticles grow in the plasma environment, they interact with the plasmas species such as electrons and ions which critically determines the nanoparticle properties. The University of Minnesota researchers conducting this project performed numerical simulations and developed analytical models that described the interaction of plasma-bound nanoparticles with the plasma ions. The plasma ions bombard the nanoparticle surface with substantial energy, which can result in the rearrangement of the nanoparticles’ atoms, giving them often desirable structures at the atomic scale. Being able to tune the ion energies allows to control the properties of nanoparticles produced in order to tailor their attributes for certain applications. For instance, when used in high efficiency light emitting devices, nanoparticles produced under high fluxes of highly energetic ions may show superior light emission to particles produced under low fluxes of less energetic ions. The analytical models developed by the University of Minnesota researchers enable the research community to easily determine the energy of ions bombarding the nanoparticles. The researchers extensively tested the validity of the analytical models by comparing them to sophisticated computer simulations based on stochastic particle modeling, also called Monte Carlo modeling, which simulated the motion of hundreds of thousands of ions and their interaction with the nanoparticle surfaces. Beyond the scientific intellectual merits, this award had significant broader impacts. Two graduate students received their doctoral degrees and both have joined a U.S. manufacturer of plasma-based semiconductor processing equipment. Four undergraduate students participated in research conducted under this grant and gained valuable hands-on laboratory experience. A middle school science teacher observed research conducted under this grant and developed three new course modules that introduce middle school students to the concepts of nanometer scale, the atomic structure of matter, and the composition of matter of different chemical elements.

Kortshagen, Uwe R.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

The relationship between structural evolution and electrical percolation of the initial stages of tungsten chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline TiN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental results and a geometric model of the evolution of sheet resistance and surface morphology during the transition from nucleation to percolation of tungsten chemical vapor deposition over ultrathin polycrystalline titanium nitride (TiN). We observed two mechanisms of reduction in sheet resistance. At deposition temperatures higher than 310 deg. C, percolation effect is formed at {approx}35% of surface coverage, {theta}, and characterized with a sharp drop in resistance. At temperature below 310 deg. C, a reduction in resistance occurs in two steps. The first step occurs when {theta} = 35% and the second step at {theta} = 85%. We suggest a geometric model in which the electrical percolation pass is modulated by the thickness threshold of the islands at the instant of collision.

Rozenblat, A. [Micron Semiconductors Israel Ltd., Qiryat-Gat 82109 (Israel); Department of Physical Electronics, Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Haimson, S. [Material Science Program, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Horvitz, D. [Micron Semiconductors Israel Ltd., Qiryat-Gat 82109 (Israel)

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

499

Nanoparticle-based combination therapy toward overcoming drug resistance in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Nanoparticle-based combination therapy toward overcoming drug resistance in cancer Che-Ming Jack Hu, Liangfang Zhang * Department of Nanoengineering and Moores Cancer Center, University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1106 3. Combinatorial nanoparticles against multidrug resistance in cancer

Zhang, Liangfang

500

Mass Production and Size Control of Lipid–Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles through Controlled Microvortices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lipid–polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles can deliver a wide range of therapeutic compounds in a controlled manner. LPH nanoparticle syntheses using microfluidics improve the mixing process but are restricted by a low ...

Kim, YongTae