Sample records for tin selenium nanoparticle

  1. Ionic liquid-induced synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langi, Bhushan [Changu Kana Thakur Research Centre, New Panvel 410 206 (India)] [Changu Kana Thakur Research Centre, New Panvel 410 206 (India); Shah, Chetan; Singh, Krishankant [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Chaskar, Atul, E-mail: achaskar@rediffmail.com [Changu Kana Thakur Research Centre, New Panvel 410 206 (India)] [Changu Kana Thakur Research Centre, New Panvel 410 206 (India); Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, Parma N. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple wet chemical method has been used to synthesize selenium nanoparticles by the reaction of ionic liquid with sodium selenosulphate, a selenium precursor, in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol stabilizer, in aqueous medium. The method is capable of producing spherical selenium nanoparticles in the size range of 76-150 nm under ambient conditions. This is a first report on the production of nano-selenium assisted by an ionic liquid. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sol by a high-speed centrifuge machine, and can be re-dispersed in an aqueous medium. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  2. Thermally Activated, Inverted Interfacial Electron Transfer Kinetics: High Driving Force Reactions between Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and Electrostatically-Bound Molecular Reactants Dennis A. Gaal and Joseph: The kinetics and mechanism of fast electron transfer (ET) between tin oxide nanoparticles and electrostatically-order studies establish that, at least in the short time regime, electrons are transferred directly from the tin

  3. Riley oxidation: A forgotten name reaction for synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chetan P.; Dwivedi, Charu; Singh, Krishan K. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumar, Manmohan, E-mail: manmoku@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bajaj, Parma N. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple wet chemical method, involving reaction of acetone with selenium dioxide, has been developed, to synthesize polyvinyl alcohol-stabilized selenium nanoparticles. The method is capable of producing nanoparticles in the size range of about 100-300 nm, under ambient conditions. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sols by a high-speed centrifuge, and can be re-dispersed in aqueous medium by a sonicator. The effect of concentrations of selenium dioxide, acetone and PVA on the size of the selenium nanoparticles has been studied. The size of the selenium nanoparticles has been found to increase with increase in the reaction time as well as the concentration of selenium dioxide, while it decreases with increase in the concentration of the stabilizer, PVA. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  4. Monomer-Capped Tin Metal Nanoparticles for Anode Materials in Lithium Secondary Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    Monomer-Capped Tin Metal Nanoparticles for Anode Materials in Lithium Secondary Batteries Mijung Graphite can store 372 mAh/g corresponding to LiC6, and tin can store 970 mAh/g corresponding to Li4.4Sn close to graphite. The reason for failure is believed to be the inhomogeneous volume expansion

  5. Mechanism for the formation of tin oxide nanoparticles and nanowires inside the mesopores of SBA-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satishkumar, G.; Titelman, L. [Blechner Center for Industrial Catalysis and Process Development, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Landau, M.V., E-mail: mlandau@bgu.ac.i [Blechner Center for Industrial Catalysis and Process Development, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of polycrystalline tin oxide nanoparticles (NP) and nanowires was investigated using nanocasting approach included solid-liquid strategy for insertion of SnCl{sub 2} precursor and SBA-15 silica as a hard template. HR-TEM and XRD revealed that during the thermal treatment in air 5 nm tin oxide NP with well defined Cassiterite structure were formed inside the SBA-15 matrix mesopores at 250 deg. C. After air calcination at 700 deg. C the NP assembled inside the SBA-15 mesopores as polycrystalline nanorods with different orientation of atomic layers in jointed nanocrystals. It was found that the structure silanols of silica matrix play a vital role in creating the tin oxide NP at low temperature. The pure tin chloride heated in air at 250 deg. C did not react with oxygen to yield tin oxide. Tin oxide NP were also formed during the thermal treatment of the tin chloride loaded SBA-15 in helium atmosphere at 250 deg. C. Hence, it is well evident that silanols present in the silica matrix not only increase the wetting of tin chloride over the surface of SBA-15 favoring its penetration to the matrix pores, but also react with hydrated tin chloride according to the proposed scheme to give tin oxide inside the mesopores. It was confirmed by XRD, N{sub 2}-adsorption, TGA-DSC and FTIR spectra. This phenomenon was further corroborated by detecting the inhibition of SnO{sub 2} NP formation at 250 deg. C after inserting the tin precursor to SBA-15 with reduced silanols concentration partially grafted with tin chloride. - Graphical abstract: The mechanism of formation of polycrystalline tin oxide nanoparticles (NP) and nanowires was investigated using nanocasting approach included solid-liquid strategy for insertion of SnCl{sub 2} precursor and SBA-15 silica as a hard template. It was found that the structure silanols of silica matrix play a vital role in creating the tin oxide NP during thermal treatment.

  6. Preparation, characterization and applications of novel carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from annealing TiN under CO atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Song, Peng; Li, Jing; Cui, Xiaoli, E-mail: xiaolicui@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were firstly fabricated by calcining TiN powder under CO atmosphere at different temperatures between 400 and 600 °C, both the improved photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue and enhanced photovoltaic performance for dye sensitized solar cells were demonstrated. - Highlights: • CN-codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared by calcining TiN under CO atmosphere. • More visible light response was confirmed by UV–vis DRS and photocatalytic results. • Enhanced conversion efficiency was observed for the DSSCs from CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanode. • CN-codoping played an important role to improve the photocatalytic performance. - Abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped titania (CN-TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were fabricated by calcining titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles under carbon monoxide (CO) atmosphere at four different temperatures in a range of 400–600 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Enhanced light absorption in both the UV and visible light region was observed for the resulted CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS). Improved photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of methylene blue by the CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was demonstrated under UV and visible light, respectively. The highest degradation rate was achieved for CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (13%) compared to N-TiO{sub 2} (10%) and the commercial P25 (5%) under visible light illumination for 40 min. Furthermore, the improved photocatalytic activity of CN-TiO{sub 2} was also confirmed by the degradation of colorless resorcinol under UV–vis light irradiation. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using P25, N-TiO{sub 2} and CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes, respectively. The highest conversion efficiency of 3.31% was achieved by the DSSCs based on the CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes in comparison with the commercial P25 (1.61%) and N-TiO{sub 2} (2.44%) photoanodes. This work demonstrates that thermal treatment of TiN nanoparticles under CO atmosphere has shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to synthesize photocatalysts with enhanced photocatalytic and photovoltaic performance.

  7. Electromechanical properties of freestanding graphene functionalized with tin oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    to pristine freestanding graphene and propose a nanoparticle encapsulation model. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4745780] Solar cells utilizing solid-state semiconductor materials. In the past ten years polymer heterojunction solar cells, which use cheaply manufactured organic polymers

  8. Methane-assisted combustion synthesis of nanocomposite tin dioxide materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    Methane-assisted combustion synthesis of nanocomposite tin dioxide materials S.D. Bakrania *, C., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125, USA Abstract Combustion synthesis of tin dioxide (SnO2) was studied using: Combustion synthesis; Nanoparticles; Tin dioxide; Metals 1. Introduction Tin dioxide (SnO2) is the most

  9. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marcinek, Marek (Warszawa, PL); Kostecki, Robert (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Ab initio Molecular Dynamics and Elastic Properties of TiC and TiN Nanoparticles A. V. Postnikov and P. Entel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entel, P.

    and vibrational modes are presented for titanium carbide and titanium nitride clusters of nearly stoichiometric of acoustic modes. INTRODUCTION Titanium carbide and nitride prepared as nanoparticles find many applications-principle calculations of vibration frequencies and patterns is a reliable and precision method to extract total energy

  11. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  12. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Abstract: Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the...

  13. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, D.R.

    1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  14. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  15. Selenium speciation in ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  16. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  17. Combustion Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Tin and Tin Oxide (SnOx, x 02) Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    Combustion Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Tin and Tin Oxide (SnOx, x 0 the concentration of oxygen in the reactant gases and the flame temperatures, metallic tin (Sn), tin monoxide (romarchite SnO), and/or tin dioxide (cassiterite SnO2) were generated. The crystalline powders consisted

  18. Discovery of the Tin Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Amos; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-eight tin isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Kinetic determination of selenium in biological material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efremenko, O.A.; Krasnyuk, I.I.; Kudrin, A.N.; Rudenko, B.A.

    1986-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A very promising method for selenium determination is a kinetic analytical procedure that combines the simplicity and availability of physical instrumentation with a low analyte detection limit. This paper reports a modification of the method to enable the determination of selenium in rat blood and involves decomposing the sample with a mixture of nitric and perchloric acids, separation of the selenium (IV) from other decomposition products, and quantitatively determining selenium by the described kinetic method using the indicator reaction of iron (II) edetate oxidation by sodium nitrate.

  20. Aquatic chemistry of selenium: evidence of biomethylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, T.D.; Bruland, K.W.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical species of dissolved selenium were examined in surface waters from three sites in the San Joaquin and Imperial Valleys of California. Six dissolved selenium species were identified: the inorganic species selenate and selenite; nonvolatile organic selenides, including seleno amino acids and a dimethylselenonium ion; and the volatile methylated forms dimethyl selenide and dimethyl diselenide. The occurrences of methylated selenium species in the aquatic environment has important implications regarding the biogeochemical behavior of selenium in natural aqueous systems. Laboratory studies indicate that the nonvolatile dimethylselenonium ion can be transformed into volatile dimethyl selenide at neutral pH, providing a pathway for the in situ production of dimethyl selenide in natural waters. Geochemical flux calculations indicate that outgassing of dimethyl selenide may be an important removal mechanism for dissolved selenium from aqueous systems. 22 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  1. Tinning/Trimming Robot System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a new surface mount assembly area at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), a tinning/trimming robot system tins and trims the gold-plated leads of surface mount technology (SMT) transistors. The KCD-designed system uses a Unimation PUMA 260 robot, a General Production Devices SP-2000 solder pot; water-soluble Blackstone No. 2508 flux; and a Virtual Industries high-temperature, ESD-conductive, miniature suction cup. After the manual cleaning operation, the processed SMT transistors go to the QUADSTAR Automated Component Placement System for a Radar Logic Assembly. The benefits are reductions in the cost of nonconformance, worker fatigue, and standard hours.

  2. Artificial fireball generation via an erosive discharge with tin alloy electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirozerski, A L; Lebedeva, E L; Borisov, B F; Khomutova, A S; Mavlonazarov, I O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for generation of long-living autonomous fireball-like objects via a pulse erosive discharge between tin alloy electrodes. The objects are similar to the natural ball lightning in some properties, in particular, they have high energy density and are capable to burn through thin metal foils. The dynamics of the objects are studied using high speed videorecording. During their lifetime the fireballs generate aerogel threads. The studies of their structure by scanning electron microscopy reveal the presence of tin oxide nanoparticles and nanowhiskers.

  3. Part I Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) Enter your TIN in the appropriate box. The TIN provided must match the name given on the "Name" line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Part I Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) Enter your TIN in the appropriate box. The TIN provided). If you do not have a number, see How to get a TIN on page 3. Social security number ­ ­ Route are not required to sign the certification, but you must provide your correct TIN. See the instructions on page 4

  4. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

  5. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  6. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  7. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  8. TIN--1998 78.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be the world's largest producer of secondary tin. Tin metal recovered from new tinplate scrap and used tin cans from the various scrapped alloys of tin and recycled in those same alloy industries. Secondary tin from%; electrical, 22%; transportation, 13%; construction, 11%; and other, 32%. The estimated value of primary metal

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: indium tin oxide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    indium tin oxide Sandian Selected for Outstanding Engineer Award On December 10, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Research &...

  10. Ion emission and expansion in laser-produced tin plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdt, Russell Allen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scale length laser-produced tin plasmas, PhD dissertation,and Expansion in Laser-Produced Tin Plasma A dissertationof a CO 2 laser pulse with tin-based plasma for an extreme

  11. Micropatterning of Proteins and Mammalian Cells on Indium Tin Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revzin, Alexander

    Micropatterning of Proteins and Mammalian Cells on Indium Tin Oxide Sunny S. Shah, Michael C and electrochemical activation to create micropatterned cocultures on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates applications in tissue engineering and biosensing. KEYWORDS: indium tin oxide · photolithography · switchable

  12. Viscoelastic DampingViscoelastic Damping Characteristics of Indium-Tin/Characteristics of Indium-Tin/SiCSiC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan Jr., Colby Corson

    1 Viscoelastic DampingViscoelastic Damping Characteristics of Indium-Tin/Characteristics of Indium-Tin Approach: · Based on past experience, indium-tin has well- characterized stiffness/damping. · Fabricate

  13. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed...

  14. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular...

  15. Why is Tin so soft?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Piekarewicz

    2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of isoscalar monopole strength in the neutron-even 112-124Sn-isotopes has been computed using a relativistic random-phase-approximation approach. The accurately-calibrated model used here (``FSUGold'') has been successful in reproducing both ground-state observables as well as collective excitations - including the giant monopole resonance (GMR) in 90Zr, 144Sm, and 208Pb. Yet this same model significantly overestimates the GMR energies in the Sn isotopes. It is argued that the question of ``Why is Tin so soft?'' becomes an important challenge to the field and one that should be answered without sacrificing the success already achieved by several theoretical models.

  16. Selenium speciation in ground water. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  17. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  18. TIN--1999 78.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of primary metal consumed domestically was about $310 million. Industry stocks remained steady (tables 2 secondary tin was produced from various scrapped alloys of tin and recycled in those same alloy industries. In 1999, however, tin metal recovered from new tinplate scrap and used tin cans was the only type

  19. TIN--2002 78.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIN--2002 78.1 TIN By James F. Carlin, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Elsie D, international data coordinator. Tin has not been mined in the United States since 1993; consequently, the country is mostly reliant on imports and recycling for its tin requirements. Twenty-five firms consumed 91

  20. TIN--2003 77.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIN--2003 77.1 TIN By James F. Carlin, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Elsie D, international data coordinator. Tin has not been mined in the United States since 1993; consequently, the country is mostly reliant on imports and recycling for its tin needs. Twenty-five firms consumed 80

  1. Nanostructured Tin Dioxide Materials for Gas Sensor Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    CHAPTER 30 Nanostructured Tin Dioxide Materials for Gas Sensor Applications T. A. Miller, S. D) levels for some species. Tin dioxide (also called stannic oxide or tin oxide) semi- conductor gas sensors undergone extensive research and development. Tin dioxide (SnO2) is the most important material for use

  2. TIN--2000 79.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIN--2000 79.1 TIN By James F. Carlin, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Elsie D, international data coordinator. Tin was not mined in the United States during 2000. Twenty- five firms consumed 86% of reported primary tin used domestically. The major uses were as follows: electrical, 24%; cans

  3. Therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  4. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed

  5. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 80% of the primary tin consumed

  6. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  7. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  8. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 97% of the primary tin. The major uses

  9. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 77% of the primary tin consumed

  10. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  11. Tin electroplating/stripping evaluation. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHenry, M.R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation was conducted to determine possible replacement chemistries for electroplating and stripping of tin-lead. The driver for this project was two-fold. Our first goal dealt with hazardous waste reduction. It was desired to eliminate lead (a heavy metal) from the electroplating process and thiourea (a known carcinogen) from the stripping process. We also sought to reduce the cost of nonconformance (CONC) realized by this process in the form of rough plating, broken paths, poor solderability, and overetching. Three suppliers` tin chemistries were evaluated as replacements for electroplating and stripping of tin-lead. Based on preliminary testing, one chemistry was chosen, evaluated, and approved for production use.

  12. Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roppel, Thaddeus A.

    Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays the amount of data to be processed. This work is a first example in feature extraction from tin-oxide sensors element array of tin-oxide sensors is presented. Results are extrapolated to other arrays of chemical

  13. Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide films using tetrakis,,dimethylamino... tin Jeffrey W. Elam,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide films using tetrakis,,dimethylamino... tin Jeffrey W. Elam dimethylamino tin and hydrogen peroxide. This method avoids problems of corrosion and agglomeration associated with the halogenated compound, SnCl4. Tin oxide films were successfully deposited on a variety of substrates using

  14. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  15. Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shay, Joseph Fred

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of laser-produced tin plasma. Part I: XUVof laser-produced tin plasma. Part II: Radiation-expanding laser-produced tin plasma,” Eighth International

  16. Extreme-ultraviolet radiation transport in small scale length laser-produced tin plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequoia, Kevin Lamar Williams

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from laser-produced tin plasmas. Proceedings ofRadiation from Laser- Produced Tin Plasmas. Physical Reviewspectra of xenon and tin discharges. Physical Review E,

  17. amorphous selenium detectors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The atomic processes leading to calcite growth are still debated. The presence Montes-Hernandez, German 65 Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the...

  18. Use of plasma treatment to grow carbon nanotube forests on TiN substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esconjauregui, S.; Bayer, B. C.; Fouquet, M.; Wirth, C. T.; Yan, F.; Xie, R.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ducati, C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Baehtz, C. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf e.V., P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Castellarin-Cudia, C. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale, 14 km 163.4, I-34149, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Bhardwaj, S.; Cepek, C. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen plasma pretreatment is used to enforce the growth of vertically-aligned carbon nanotube forests on TiN substrates. The evolution of the substrate, catalyst, and nanotubes are studied by in situ and ex-situ photoemission and X-ray diffraction in order to understand the growth mechanism. We find that TiN retains its crystallographic structure and its conductivity during plasma pretreatment and nanotube growth, which is confirmed by electrical measurements. Plasma pretreatment is found to favor the growth of nanotube forests by root growth, as it binds the catalyst nanoparticles more strongly to the substrate than thermal pretreatment. We find that plasma pretreatment time should be limited, otherwise poor or no growth is found.

  19. T thong tin ve chat lng khong kh trong nha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tôø thoâng tin veà chaát löôïng khoâng khí trong nhaø Chaát löôïng khoâng khí khoâng toát trong ñöôïc soáng khoûe maïnh. Neáu muoán bieát theâm thoâng tin veà chaát löôïng khoâng khí vaø söùc khoûe

  20. TIN DOCT 2002 Issue 60 S$5.00 Anniversary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    TIN DÌOCT 2002 Issue 60 S$5.00 Anniversary Special Feature- Egypt Calendar The Pyramids The Sphinx Andromeda Aristotle Ancient Greek astronomy #12;TIN DÌ Content Editor: Kepler Letters Consultant: Newton

  1. Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

  2. TIN--2001 78.1 By James F. Carlin, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIN--2001 78.1 TIN By James F. Carlin, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Elsie D firms consumed 83% of the reported primary tin used domestically in 2001. The major uses were as follows. The recycling rate for steel cans was 58% in 2001 and 2000, compared with 56% in 1995 and 15% in 1988

  3. NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface Construction Building and Fire Research Institute of Standards and Technology #12;NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface This report addresses the task of meshing point clouds by triangulated elevated surfaces referred to as TIN

  4. Head Knowledge: Summary (Segment from the Tin Shed essay)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Head Knowledge: Summary (Segment from the Tin Shed essay) While certainly much more nuanced than would declare that it's to be discovered outside Tin Shed, viewed from the wooden bench. Reality of reliability and validity (Frey 1994:95-104). While traveling outside the Tin Shed, systematic analysis

  5. Lithiation of Tin Oxide: A Computational Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that the lithiation of pristine SnO forms a layered Li$_\\text{X}$O structure while the expelled tin atoms agglomerate into 'surface' planes separating the Li$_\\text{X}$O layers. The proposed lithiation model widely differs from the common assumption that tin segregates into nano-clusters embedded in the lithia matrix. With this model we are able to account for the various tin bonds that are seen experimentally and explain the three volume expansion phases that occur when SnO undergoes lithiation: (i) at low concentrations Li behaves as an intercalated species inducing small volume increases; (ii) for intermediate concentrations SnO transforms into lithia causing a large expansion; (iii) finally, as the Li concentration further increases a saturation of the lithia takes place until a layered Li$_2$O is formed. A moderate volume expansion results from this last process. We also report a 'zipper' nucleation mechanism that could provide the seed for the transformation from tin oxide to lithium oxide.

  6. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  7. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  8. Supporting Information Hybrid Tin Oxide-SWNT Nanostructures Based Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S1 Supporting Information Hybrid Tin Oxide-SWNT Nanostructures Based Gas Sensor Syed Mubeen1 , Min) and (c) showing high magnification SEM images of bare SWNTs and SWNTs coated with tin oxide (-0.4 V vs of bare SWNTs and SWNTs coated with tin oxide (-0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl wire, 5 µC) towards a) H2S, b) acetone

  9. Effect Threshold for Selenium Toxicity in Juvenile Splittail, Pogonichthys macrolepidotus A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigby, Mark C.; Deng, Xin; Grieb, Thomas M.; Teh, Swee J.; Hung, Silas S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total maximum daily load (TMDL) for selenium is under development (San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control

  10. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruwandi Andrahennadi; Mark Wayland; Ingrid J. Pickering [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Department of Geological Sciences

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  11. DESIGN OF A 10-T SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNET USING NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NIOBIUM-TIN CONOOCTOR' C. Taylor, R. Meuser. S. Caspi. W.NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR C. Taylor, R. Meuser, S. Caspi, W.NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR* C. Taylor, R. Meuser, S. Caspi, W.

  12. State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godeke, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of ECN-type Niobium-Tin wire towards smallerD. Elen, Development of Niobium-Tin conductors at ECN, Adv.Simulations of the effects of tin composition gradients on

  13. DESIGN OF A 10-T SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNET USING NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIPOLE HAGNET USING NIOBIUM-TIN CONOOCTOR' C. Taylor, R.DIPOLE MAGNET USING NIOBIUM-TIN CONDUCTOR C. Taylor, R.slid tooling for the niobium- tin magnet .sre on halld, and

  14. Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S S; O'Shay, B; Tillac, M S; Tao, Y

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mitigation in a laser-produced tin plasma is one of the mostambient pressure, the tin species with kinetic Downloaded 19Sn + species ejected by the tin plume exhibits a Downloaded

  15. Influence of spot size on propagation dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?Color online? Images of the tin plume recorded with 280 ? mdynamics of laser-produced tin plasma S. S. Harilal a?dynamics of an expanding tin plume for various spot sizes

  16. A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R., E-mail: mdeinert@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78715 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum.

  17. Measurements of Modulus of Elasticity and Thermal Contraction of Epoxy Impregnated Niobium-Tin and Niobium-Titanium Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, K.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niobium-Tin and Niobium-Titanium Composites Ken P. Chow andniobium· tin and niobium· titanium superconductor. Accurate

  18. Measurements of Modulus of Elasticity and Thermal Contraction of Epoxy Impregnated Niobium-Tin and Niobium-Titanium Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, K.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Epoxy Impregnated Niobium-Tin and Niobium-Titaniumwith epoxy impregnated niobium· tin and niobium· titanium

  19. Hydrological and geochemical investigations of selenium behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.M.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Zawislanski, P.; Yee, A.W.; Daggett, J.S.; Oldfather, J.M.; Tsao, L.; Johannis, P.W.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1985 to the present we have studied the behavior of selenium in various habitats and environments at Kesterson reservoir, shifting emphasis as remedial actions altered the physical setting. Investigations have evaluated the efficacy of several remedial alternatives, from innovative techniques relying on the complex geochemical behavior of selenium alternatives, from innovative techniques relying on the complex geochemical behavior of selenium in aquatic environments to conventional excavation schemes. Results of these studies supported two cost-effective remedial measures; drain water deliveries were terminated in 1986 and, in 1988, 1 million cubic yards of soil were imported and used to fill the low lying areas of the former Kesterson Reservoir. To date, these two actions appear to have eliminated the aquatic habitat that caused waterfowl death and deformity at Kesterson from the early 1980's to 1987. Biological, surface water and groundwater monitoring data collected by the USBR indicate that Kesterson is now a much safer environment than in past years when drainage water containing 300{mu}g/l of selenium was delivered to the Reservoir. The continued presence of a large inventory of selenium within the upper portions of unfilled areas of Kesterson Reservoir and immediately below the fill material requires that a continued awareness of the status of this inventory be maintained and improved upon. 83 refs., 130 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Size-Dependent Detachment-Limited Decay Kinetics of Two-Dimensional TiN Islands on TiN(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Size-Dependent Detachment-Limited Decay Kinetics of Two-Dimensional TiN Islands on TiN(111) S kinetics of two-dimensional TiN adatom and vacancy islands on atomically smooth TiN(111) terraces. We numbers: 68.35.Md, 68.35.Fx, 68.37.Ef, 82.45.Mp B1-NaCl structure TiN is widely used as a hard wear

  1. Spectral Control of Emission from Tin Doped Targets for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control of emissions from tin doped targets for extremearray (UTA) emission around 13.5 nm from solid density tinand tin doped foam targets. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV)

  2. Solid-to-solid phase transformations of nanostructured selenium-tin thin films induced by thermal annealing in oxygen atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serra, A. [Physics Applied to Material Science interdepartmental Laboratory (PAMS-Lab) - Dipartimento di Beni Culturali - Università del Salento - Lecce (Italy); Rossi, M. [Dipartimento Scienze di Base ed Applicate all'Ingegneria, and CNIS - Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Buccolieri, A.; Manno, D. [Physics Applied to Material Science interdepartmental Laboratory (PAMS-Lab) - Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali - Università del Salento - Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and morphological evolution of nanostructured thin films obtained from thermal evaporation of polycrystalline Sn-Se starting charge as a function of the subsequent annealing temperature in an oxygen flow has been analysed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, small area electron diffraction, digital image processing, x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy have been employed in order to investigate the structure and the morphology of the obtained films. The results evidenced, in the temperature range from RT to 500°C, the transition of the material from a homogeneous mixture of SnSe and SnSe{sub 2} nanocrystals, towards a homogeneous mixture of SnO{sub 2} and SeO{sub 2} nanocrystals, with an intermediate stage in which only SnSe{sub 2} nanocrystals are present.

  3. Amorphous tin-cadmium oxide films and the production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaonan; Gessert, Timothy A

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A tin-cadmium oxide film having an amorphous structure and a ratio of tin atoms to cadmium atoms of between 1:1 and 3:1. The tin-cadmium oxide film may have an optical band gap of between 2.7 eV and 3.35 eV. The film may also have a charge carrier concentration of between 1.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3 and 2.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3. The tin cadmium oxide film may also exhibit a Hall mobility of between 40 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1 and 60 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1. Also disclosed is a method of producing an amorphous tin-cadmium oxide film as described and devices using same.

  4. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, Richard A. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support the liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  5. Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from a laser pro- duced tin plasma has been studied extensively in recent years. The need for 13.5 nm wavelength and a regenerative target lead to the use of tin droplet targets.10 Hot tin

  6. Modeling of EUV Emission and Conversion Efficiency from Laser-Produced Tin Plasmas for Nanolithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Modeling of EUV Emission and Conversion Efficiency from Laser-Produced Tin Plasmas simulation tools. Here, we investigate the radiative properties of tin and tin-doped foam plasmas heated by 1 at intermediate focus (IF). Laser-generated plasmas containing lithium, xenon or tin are potentially good emission

  7. Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israeli, Navot

    Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111) S annealing of three-dimensional (3D) TiN(111) mounds, consisting of stacked 2D islands, at temperatures-limited decay of 2D TiN islands on atomically-flat TiN(111) terraces [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 176102

  8. TiN for MEMS hotplate heaters J.F. Creemer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    TiN for MEMS hotplate heaters J.F. Creemer1 , P.M. Sarro2 , M. Laros2 , H. Schellevis2 , L, DIMES, ECTM, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft, Netherlands. Summary: Low-stress TiN has been investigated is required to protect the TiN against oxidation. Keywords: TiN thin films, micro heater, hot plate 1

  9. JV Task 96 - Phase 2 - Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve the understanding of the mercury issue, it is vital to study mercury's effects on selenium physiology. While mercury present in the environment or food sources may pose health risks, the protective effects of selenium have not been adequately considered in establishing regulatory policy. Numerous studies report that vulnerability to mercury toxicity is inversely proportional to selenium status or level. However, selenium status has not been considered in the development of the reference dosage levels for mercury exposure. Experimental animals fed low-selenium diets are far more vulnerable to mercury toxicity than animals fed normal selenium, and animals fed selenium-rich diets are even more resistant. Selenium-dependent enzymes in brain and endocrine tissues can be impaired by excessive mercury exposure, apparently because mercury has an extremely high binding affinity for selenium. When selenium becomes bound to mercury, it is unable to participate in the metabolic cycling of selenoprotein synthesis. Because of mercury-dependent impairments of selenoprotein synthesis, various antioxidant and regulatory functions in brain biochemistry are compromised. This report details a 2-year multiclient-funded research program designed to examine the interactions between mercury and selenium in animal models. The studies explored the effects of dietary intakes of toxic amounts of methylmercury and the protective effects of the normal dietary range of selenium in counteracting mercury toxicity. This study finds that the amounts of selenium present in ocean fish are sufficient to protect against far larger quantities of methylmercury than those present in typical seafoods. Toxic effects of methylmercury exposure were not directly proportional to mercury concentrations in blood, brain, or any other tissues. Instead, mercury toxicity was proportional to molar ratios of mercury relative to selenium. In order to accurately assess risk associated with methylmercury or mercury exposures, mercury-selenium ratios appear to be far more accurate and effective in identifying risk and protecting human and environmental health. This study also finds that methylmercury toxicity can be effectively treated by dietary selenium, preventing the death and progressive disabilities that otherwise occur in methylmercury-treated subjects. Remarkably, the positive response to selenium therapy was essentially equivalent regardless of whether or not toxic amounts of methylmercury were still administered. The findings of the Physiologically Oriented Integration of Nutrients and Toxins (POINT) models of the effects of mercury and selenium developed in this project are consistent with the hypothesis that mercury toxicity arises because of mercury-dependent inhibition of selenium availability in brain and endocrine tissues. This appears to occur through synergistic effects of mercury-dependent inhibition of selenium transport to these tissues and selective sequestration of the selenium present in the tissues. Compromised transport of selenium to the brain and endocrine tissues would be particularly hazardous to the developing fetus because the rapidly growing tissues of the child have no selenium reserves. Therefore, maternal consumption of foods with high mercury-selenium ratios is hazardous. In summation, methylmercury exposure is unlikely to cause harm in populations that eat selenium-rich diets but may cause harm among populations that consume certain foods that have methylmercury present in excess of selenium.

  10. Original article Effects of selenium and vitamin E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    significativement (P mine E (58-83 %). L'âge aux and maintenance of preg- nancy and the regulation of hormone metabolism through the anterior lobe of the pituitary in vitamin E and/or selenium-supplemented ewes. How- ever, no report is available on the sparing effect

  11. Precision Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    John Hemminger

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

  12. Precision Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Hemminger

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

  13. TiN Coatings on Fuel Cladding Tube 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Zhichao 1987-

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    demonstrate this new design and deposite TiN on the tubes. A systematic physical property study including surface characterization (SEM), mechanical testing (hardness and scratch test), thermal cycle test and thermal conductivity measurements, was conducted...

  14. Tin-silver-bismuth solders for electronics assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A lead-free solder alloy is disclosed for electronic assemblies composed of a eutectic alloy of tin and silver with a bismuth addition, x, of 0tin effective to depress the melting point of the tin-silver composition to a desired level. Melting point ranges from about 218 C down to about 205 C depending an the amount of bismuth added to the eutectic tin-silver alloy as determined by DSC analysis, 10 C/min. A preferred alloy composition is 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi (weight percent based on total alloy weight). 4 figs.

  15. Antimony-Doped Tin(II) Sulfide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Rupak

    Thin-film solar cells made from earth-abundant, inexpensive, and nontoxic materials are needed to replace the current technologies whose widespread use is limited by their use of scarce, costly, and toxic elements. Tin ...

  16. Tin-silver-bismuth solders for electronics assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vianco, Paul T. (Albuquerque, NM); Rejent, Jerome A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lead-free solder alloy for electronic assemblies composed of a eutectic alloy of tin and silver with a bismuth addition, x, of 0tin effective to depress the melting point of the tin-silver composition to a desired level. Melting point ranges from about 218.degree. C. down to about 205.degree. C. depending an the amount of bismuth added to the eutectic tin-silver alloy as determined by DSC analysis, 10.degree. C./min. A preferred alloy composition is 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi (weight percent based on total alloy weight).

  17. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

  18. Selenium Partitioning and Food-Chain Transfer at the Salton Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jennifer Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entirely by agricultural wastewater from the Imperial,selenium in the agricultural wastewater (Frankenberger andof freshwater or agricultural wastewater that the SCH ponds

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous selenium flat Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on a-Se direct conversion detector Summary: ). The digital detector consists of a flat panel using the amorphous selenium technology (ANRAD Corporation... : the most promising are...

  20. Extreme-ultraviolet spectral purity and magnetic ion debris mitigation by use of low-density tin targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S S; Tillack, Mark S; O'Shay, Beau; Tao, Y; Paguio, R; Nikroo, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UTA obtained from full density tin and 0.5% Sn density.The UTA spectrum from tin doped foam targets showed distincta) and 0.5 % density (b) tin in the presence and absence of

  1. Analysis of Bulk and Thin Film Model Samples Intended for Investigating the Strain Sensitivity of Niobium-Tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mentink, M. G. T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitivity of Niobium-Tin M. G. T. Mentink, A. Anders, D.Sensitivity of Niobium—Tin M. G. T. Mentink, A. Anders, M.of the art powder-in-tube niobium-tin superconductors,"

  2. XXX TJ1100-03 April 24, 2004 20:29 Exploring the Selenium Phytoremediation Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XXX TJ1100-03 April 24, 2004 20:29 Exploring the Selenium Phytoremediation Potential of Transgenic and E. A. H. Pilon-Smits1 QUERY SHEET Q1: Au: Please provide location of Dept. 0 #12;XXX TJ1100-03 April WORDS: selenium, Indian mustard, Brassica juncea, phytoremediation. #12;XXX TJ1100-03 April 24, 2004 20

  3. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological on sele- nium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer

  4. Laser wavelength effects on ionic and atomic emission from tin plasmas D. Campos,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Laser wavelength effects on ionic and atomic emission from tin plasmas D. Campos,a S. S. Harilal centered at 13.5 nm. Spitzer et al.1 reported that tin targets irradiated by a neodymium-doped yttrium alu

  5. Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and the response time. Rutile-structured tin oxide (SnO2) is an n-type semiconducting material widely used in gas

  6. Analysis of Sulfur And Selenium Assimilation in 'Astragalus' Plants With Varying Capacities to Accumulate Selenium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sors, T.G.; Ellis, D.R.; Na, G.Nam.; Lahner, B.; Lee, S.; Leustek, T.; Pickering, I.J.; Salt, D.E.; /Purdue U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Saskatchewan U.

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Several Astragalus species have the ability to hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) when growing in their native habitat. Given that the biochemical properties of Se parallel those of sulfur (S), we examined the activity of key S assimilatory enzymes ATP sulfurylase (ATPS), APS reductase (APR), and serine acetyltransferase (SAT), as well as selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT), in eight Astragalus species with varying abilities to accumulate Se. Se hyperaccumulation was found to positively correlate with shoot accumulation of S-methylcysteine (MeCys) and Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), in addition to the level of SMT enzymatic activity. However, no correlation was observed between Se hyperaccumulation and ATPS, APR, and SAT activities in shoot tissue. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing both ATPS and APR had a significant enhancement of selenate reduction as a proportion of total Se, whereas SAT overexpression resulted in only a slight increase in selenate reduction to organic forms. In general, total Se accumulation in shoots was lower in the transgenic plants overexpressing ATPS, PaAPR, and SAT. Root growth was adversely affected by selenate treatment in both ATPS and SAT overexpressors and less so in the PaAPR transgenic plants. Such observations support our conclusions that ATPS and APR are major contributors of selenate reduction in planta. However, Se hyperaccumulation in Astragalus is not driven by an overall increase in the capacity of these enzymes, but rather by either an increased Se flux through the S assimilatory pathway, generated by the biosynthesis of the sink metabolites MeCys or MeSeCys, or through an as yet unidentified Se assimilation pathway.

  7. Nucleation kinetics during homoepitaxial growth of TiN(001) by reactive magnetron sputtering Marcel A. Wall, David G. Cahill, I. Petrov, D. Gall, and J. E. Greene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Nucleation kinetics during homoepitaxial growth of TiN(001) by reactive magnetron sputtering Marcel to study the nucleation of homoepitaxial TiN layers grown on TiN(001) by ultrahigh vacuum reactive kinet- ics of TiN, a two-component refractory ceramic, on TiN 001 . TiN, typically deposited by reactive

  8. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  9. Determination of Tin in Nickel-based Alloys by Electrothermal Laser-excited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert G.

    Determination of Tin in Nickel-based Alloys by Electrothermal Laser-excited Atomic Fluorescence. The determination of tin in nickel-based alloys by laser-excited sampling, has been the most frequently employed technique for the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys.3­5 The useatomic fluorescence in a graphite

  10. -tin ! Imma ! sh Phase Transitions of Germanium Xiao-Jia Chen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;-tin ! Imma ! sh Phase Transitions of Germanium Xiao-Jia Chen,1 Chao Zhang,2 Yue Meng,3 Rui March 2011) New paths were designed for the investigations of the #12;-tin ! Imma ! sh phase transitions in nanocrystalline Ge under conditions of hydrostatic stress. A second-order transition between the #12;-tin and Imma

  11. P-31 / Schlott P-31: Nodule Formation on Indium-Oxide Tin-Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P-31 / Schlott P-31: Nodule Formation on Indium-Oxide Tin-Oxide Sputtering Targets M. Schlott, M from indium-oxide tin-oxide (ITO) targets [1]. Unfor- tunately, black growths, or nodules, commonly isostatic pressing partly reduced powder mixtures of 90 wt.% indium-oxide and 10 wt.% tin-oxide [4

  12. Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a , Huisheng Keywords: TiN films Residual stress Hardness Fracture toughness Morphology, structure, residual stress, hardness, and fracture toughness of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride (TiN) thin films, deposited at 300

  13. Sputtered TiN films for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators S. Ohya,1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    Sputtered TiN films for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators S. Ohya,1, a) B. Chiaro,2 A of the properties of TiN films by varying the deposition conditions in an ultra-high-vacuum reactive magnetron changes to weak tensile in-plane strain. The TiN films absorb a high concentration of contaminants

  14. First-principles calculations of step formation energies and step interactions on TiN(001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    First-principles calculations of step formation energies and step interactions on TiN(001) Cristian the formation energies and repulsive interactions of monatomic steps on the TiN(001) surface, using den- sity studies on different aspects related to thin film growth on TiN surfaces, few atomistic studies have been

  15. TiN surface dynamics: role of surface and bulk mass transport processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    TiN surface dynamics: role of surface and bulk mass transport processes J. Bareñoa , S. Kodambakab, USA Abstract. Transition-metal nitrides, such as TiN, have a wide variety of applications as hard/decay kinetics of two- and three-dimensional TiN(111) islands and the effect of surface-terminated dislocations

  16. . The tin centre is responsible for the activation of the ketone substrate and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Randy

    procedure3 . The tin centre is responsible for the activation of the ketone substrate and increases catalysts, tin is substituted for some of the silicon or aluminium atoms facing the channel, and so is incorporated into the framework. Tin centres are responsible for the catalytic activity of these materials

  17. Atomic layer deposition of TiN films Growth and electrical behavior down to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic layer deposition of TiN films Growth and electrical behavior down to sub-nanometer scale Hao Van Bui #12;ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TiN FILMS GROWTH AND ELECTRICAL BEHAVIOR DOWN TO SUBD. Thesis - University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Title: Atomic layer deposition of TiN films

  18. The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    MRSEC The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films D Science & Engineering Center For zinc-indium-tin oxide (ZITO) films, grown by pulsed-laser deposition was replaced by substitution with zinc and tin in equal molar proportions (co-substitution). All ZITO films

  19. Liquid-tin-jet laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet generation P. A. C. Jansson,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid-tin-jet laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet generation P. A. C. Jansson,a) B. A. M. Hansson, O spectral signatures. The system is demonstrated using tin Sn as the target due to its strong emission materials with new spectral signatures. As an example we use tin, motivated by its current interest for EUV

  20. Laser Direct Write Patterned Indium Tin Oxide Films for Photomasks and Anisotropic Resist Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    Laser Direct Write Patterned Indium Tin Oxide Films for Photomasks and Anisotropic Resist bimetallic Sn/In film into a indium tin oxide layer. Sn over In films (15-120nm thick) with a 1:10 thickness mask, etch resist. 1. Introduction The transparent and conductive films like indium tin oxide (ITO

  1. Effect of Plating Variables on Whisker Formation in Pure Tin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Effect of Plating Variables on Whisker Formation in Pure Tin Films Stephanie Miller Advisors & Materials Engineering, Washington State University Introduction Tin whiskers are single-crystal filaments the effect of plating variables on whisker growth in tin-plated copper samples, with the goal of finding

  2. Diffusion-driven extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in country rocks of the Tin Mountain pegmatite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Diffusion-driven extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in country rocks of the Tin Mountain rocks (amphibolites and schists) of the Tin Mountain pegmatite show systematic changes with distance; fluid infiltration; Tin Mountain pegmatite 1. Introduction Lithium is a fluid-mobile, moderately

  3. Angular distribution of debris from CO2 and YAG laser-produced tin plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Angular distribution of debris from CO2 and YAG laser- produced tin plasmas D. Campos, R. W. Coons investigated the angular dependence of atomic and ionic debris from CO2 and YAG laser-produced tin plasmas centered at 13.5 nm (commonly called in-band radiation). Spitzer et al [1] found that tin targets

  4. Microstructure development in Nb3Sn(Ti) internal tin superconducting wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    Microstructure development in Nb3Sn(Ti) internal tin superconducting wire I. Pong Æ S. C. Hopkins Æ have studied the phase formation sequences in a Nb3Sn `internal tin' process superconductor. Heat treatments were performed to convert the starting materials of tin, Ti­Sn, copper and niobium, to bronze

  5. Ordering points for incremental TIN construction from James J. Little and Ping Shi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Jim

    Ordering points for incremental TIN construction from DEMs James J. Little and Ping Shi Department approximations to terrain surfaces (TINs) from dense digital elevation models(DEMs) adds points to an initial in the current TIN, the worst fitting point, in terms of vertical distance, is selected. The order of insertion

  6. Computers & Geosciences 32 (2006) 749766 A simple algorithm for the mapping of TIN data onto a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computers & Geosciences 32 (2006) 749­766 A simple algorithm for the mapping of TIN data onto 2005 Abstract Triangulated irregular networks (TIN) in landscape evolution models have the advantage of TIN landscape nodes onto a static grid, facilitating the creation of a fixed stratigraphic record

  7. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline and epitaxial TiN films on (100) silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Qiuming

    Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline and epitaxial TiN films on (100) silicon H. Wang, A 2001) We investigated mechanical properties of TiN as a function of microstructure varying from nanocrystalline to single crystal TiN films deposited on (100) silicon substrates. By varying the substrate

  8. Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion S. S. Harilal,a Beau O online 28 April 2006 Controlling the debris from a laser-generated tin plume is one of the prime issues radiation can be used for controlling highly energetic particles from the tin plume. We employed a partial

  9. Interface Stability During Rapid Solidification of Silicon-Tin A thesis presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interface Stability During Rapid Solidification of Silicon-Tin A thesis presented by David Eric for the experiment were silicon and silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafers implanted with tin. The SOS samples were also/s, the interface might undergo breakdown at 0.3 atomic percent tin, resulting in a cellular structure with a cell

  10. The Effects of pH Variation on Whisker Growth on Tin Plated Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    The Effects of pH Variation on Whisker Growth on Tin Plated Copper Jeffrey Wu Advisors: Uttara Engineering Introduction: Field Failure Caused by Tin Whisker Short 20 YEARS Whiskers Growing Inside://nepp.nasa.gov/whisker/photos/pom/index.htm) Tin is an element commonly desired to plate on electrical components because of it's corrosion

  11. Selenium inhibits the phytotoxicity of mercury in garlic (Allium sativum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jiating [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, Yuxi, E-mail: gaoyx@ihep.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yu-Feng; Hu, Yi; Peng, Xiaomin [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Dong, Yuanxing [Department of Physics, Xinzhou Teachers University, Xinzhou 034000 (China)] [Department of Physics, Xinzhou Teachers University, Xinzhou 034000 (China); Li, Bai; Chen, Chunying [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chai, Zhifang, E-mail: chaizf@ihep.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterial and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the influence of selenium on mercury phytotoxicity, the levels of selenium and mercury were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in garlic tissues upon exposure to different dosages of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) and selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2?}) or selenate (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2?}). The distributions of selenium and mercury were examined with micro-synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (?-SRXRF), and the mercury speciation was investigated with micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (?-XANES). The results show that Se at higher exposure levels (>1 mg/L of SeO{sub 3}{sup 2?} or SeO{sub 4}{sup 2?}) would significantly inhibit the absorption and transportation of Hg when Hg{sup 2+} levels are higher than 1 mg/L in culture media. SeO{sub 3}{sup 2?} and SeO{sub 4}{sup 2?} were found to be equally effective in reducing Hg accumulation in garlic. The inhibition of Hg uptake by Se correlates well with the influence of Se on Hg phytotoxicity as indicated by the growth inhibition factor. Elemental imaging using ?-SRXRF also shows that Se could inhibit the accumulation and translocation of Hg in garlic. ?-XANES analysis shows that Hg is mainly present in the forms of Hg–S bonding as Hg(GSH){sub 2} and Hg(Met){sub 2}. Se exposure elicited decrease of Hg–S bonding in the form of Hg(GSH){sub 2}, together with Se-mediated alteration of Hg absorption, transportation and accumulation, may account for attenuated Hg phytotoxicity by Se in garlic. -- Highlights: ? Hg phytotoxicity can be mitigated by Se supplement in garlic growth. ? Se can inhibit the accumulation and transportation of Hg in garlic tissues. ? Localization and speciation of Hg in garlic can be modified by Se.

  12. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, no tin was mined domestically. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,770 6,640 6,800 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 11,700 12,200 765 12,000 12,000 Consumption: cans and containers, 30%; electrical, 20%; construction, 10%; transportation, 10%; and other, 30: primary metal consumed, $278 million; imports for consumption, refined tin, $326 million; and secondary

  13. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, no tin was mined domestically. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,020 6,770 7,000 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 11,800 11,700 12,200 765 12,000 Consumption: cans and containers, 30%; electrical, 20%; construction, 10%; transportation, 10%; and other, 30: primary metal consumed, $318 million; imports for consumption, refined tin, $391 million; and secondary

  14. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

  15. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

  16. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

  17. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

  18. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

  19. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

  20. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

  1. Abstract--Titanium nitride (TiN) has been investigated as a material for MEMS hotplate heaters operating at high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    Abstract--Titanium nitride (TiN) has been investigated as a material for MEMS hotplate heaters widely available. A material similar to Ta5Si3 is titanium nitride (TiN). It combines a very high melting TiN Bond pad TiN Figure 1. Schematic cross section of the hotplate. Titanium Nitride for MEMS

  2. Hydrological and geochemical investigations of selenium behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Benson, S.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research relevant to selenium specification, fractionation, physical redistribution, reduction and oxidation, and spatial distribution as related to Kesterson Reservoir. The work was carried out by scientists and engineers from the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory over a two year period from October 1992 to September 1994. Much of the focus of these efforts was on the effects of two above-average rainfall years (1991/1992 and 1992/1993). These events marked a departure from the previous six years of drought conditions, under which oxidation of Se in the soil profile led to a marked increase in soluble Se. Evidence from the last two years show that much of the re-oxidized Se was once more reduced due to increased soil moisture content. Also, in areas of high hydraulic conductivity, major vertical displacement of selenium and other solutes due to rainfall infiltration was observed. Such observations underscore the dependence of the future of Se speciation and distribution on environmental conditions.

  3. Field-Measured Oxidation Rates of Biologically Reduced Selenium in Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.; Daggett, John; Zawislansi, Peter

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced Selenium in Sludge Sally M. Benson, John Daggett andCalifornia 94720 U.S.A. Sludge generated during surface-Finding safe and economical sludge disposal methods requires

  4. The distribution of selenium and other trace elements in Texas waters and soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Desheng

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumental and chemical conditions for selenium analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . . . 40 10 Summary of method detection limits (MDL), SRM recoveries, spike recoveries, RPD between duplicates and samples in the ICP analysis for 22...

  5. Microstructure of amorphous indium oxide and tin oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauf, I.A.; Brown, L.M. (Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Indium oxide, tin oxide, and some other doped and undoped oxide semiconductors show an interesting and technologically important combination of properties. They have high luminous transparency, good electrical conductivity and high infrared reflectivity. Numerous techniques for depositing these materials have been developed and have undergone a number of changes during last two decades. An understanding of the basic physics of these materials has begun to dawn. Most of the literature on transparent conducting oxides consists of studying the dependence of the properties on the composition, preparation conditions, such as deposition rate, substrate temperature or post-deposition heat treatment. In this paper the authors have employed the transmission electron microscopy to study the microstructure of reactively evaporated, electron beam evaporated, ion-beam sputtered amorphous indium oxide and reactively evaporated amorphous tin oxide thin films. These films, which have received little attention in the past, can have enormous potential as transparent conductive coatings on heat-sensitive substrates and inexpensive solar cells.

  6. Potential for selenium migration at a lignite power plant solid waste disposal facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Steven Douglas

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . All groundwater that recharges on the disposal site is slightly saline and flows east, probably discharging into the Gibbons Creek Reservoir. Selenium, arsenic, boron, iron, manganese, and sulfate in the lignite waste effluent exceed either EPA... ( 1975) drinking water standards or EPA (1973) recommended livestock water standards. Since the natural groundwater contains higher concentrations of selenium, iron, manganese, and sulfate than the waste effluent, only arsenic and boron should...

  7. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  8. CX-005780: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sintered Copper Zinc Tin Selenium Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal FoilCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6Date: 05/11/2011Location(s): San Jose, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. Some effects of selenium on the growth and survival of larval stages of the american oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Wendy S

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -seleniferous areas, selenium 1s present in detectable amounts: in Oregon, Had?-:i- markos and Bonhorst (1961) reported a selenium content of . 317 ppm in eggs and . 034 ppm in milk, with sim1lar figures being reported for products from other areas. In b1rds... that selenium is accumu!ated to re'latively h1gh levels in marine biota (Robertson et al. , 1972; Sandholm et al. , 1973), Recent reports indicate that . 1-. 5 pg/1 of selenium may be considered a representative range for polluted vdaters (Fowler...

  10. MEMS Hotplates with TiN as a Heater Material J.F. Creemer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    MEMS Hotplates with TiN as a Heater Material J.F. Creemer1 , W. van der Vlist2 , C.R. de Boer2 , H investigated as a heater material for hotplates and microreactors. TiN is CMOS compatible, and has a higher melting point (2950 ºC) than conventional heaters of Pt and poly-Si. For the first time, TiN is tested

  11. THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC SELENIUM SUPPLEMENTATION AND DIETARY ENERGY MANIPULATION ON MARES AND THEIR FOALS: SELENIUM CONCENTRATIONS, GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY, FOALING PARAMETERS AND FOAL PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karren, Brady

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Quarter Horse mares (n=28, 465-612 kg BW, 6-19 yrs of age) were used to investigate the effect of organic selenium (Se) supplementation (Selenosource, Diamond V Mills, Inc. Cedar Rapids, IA (SeM)) and DE manipulation on plasma, muscle, and colostrum...

  12. Leaching studies for tin recovery from waste e-scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: maniskrjha@gmail.com [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Choubey, Pankaj Kumar; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumari, Archana [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Lee, Jae-chun, E-mail: jclee@kigam.re.kr [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Vinay [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Jeong, Jinki [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the most essential components of all electrical and electronic equipments, which contain noteworthy quantity of metals, some of which are toxic to life and all of which are valuable resources. Therefore, recycling of PCBs is necessary for the safe disposal/utilization of these metals. Present paper is a part of developing Indo-Korean recycling technique consists of organic swelling pre-treatment technique for the liberation of thin layer of metallic sheet and the treatment of epoxy resin to remove/recover toxic soldering material. To optimize the parameters required for recovery of tin from waste PCBs, initially the bench scale studies were carried out using fresh solder (containing 52.6% Sn and 47.3% Pb) varying the acid concentration, temperature, mixing time and pulp density. The experimental data indicate that 95.79% of tin was leached out from solder material using 5.5 M HCl at fixed pulp density 50 g/L and temperature 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 165 min. Kinetic studies followed the chemical reaction controlled dense constant size cylindrical particles with activation energy of 117.68 kJ/mol. However, 97.79% of tin was found to be leached out from solder materials of liberated swelled epoxy resin using 4.5 M HCl at 90 Degree-Sign C, mixing time 60 min and pulp density 50 g/L. From the leach liquor of solder materials of epoxy resin, the precipitate of sodium stannate as value added product was obtained at pH 1.9. The Pb from the leach residue was removed by using 0.1 M nitric acid at 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 45 min and pulp density 10 g/L. The metal free epoxy resin could be disposed-of safely/used as filling material without affecting the environment.

  13. Selective Oxidative Degradation of Organic Pollutants by Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Photosensitization: Tin Porphyrin versus C60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    : Tin Porphyrin versus C60 Aminofullerene Systems Heechan Kim, Wooyul Kim, Yuri Mackeyev,§ Gi-Seon Lee ABSTRACT: This study evaluates the potential application of tin porphyrin- and C60 aminofullerene

  14. VISUAL WORDS, TEXT ANALYSIS CONCEPTS FOR COMPUTER VISION Wang-Juh Chen, Hoi Tin Kong, Minah Oh,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISUAL WORDS, TEXT ANALYSIS CONCEPTS FOR COMPUTER VISION By Wang-Juh Chen, Hoi Tin Kong, Minah Oh Report: Visual Words, Text Analysis Concepts for Computer Vision Wang-Juh Chen Hoi Tin Kong Minah Oh

  15. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strasser, Peter (Houston, TX); Koh, Shirlaine (Houston, TX); Mani, Prasanna (Houston, TX); Ratndeep, Srivastava (Houston, TX)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  16. Silicon-tin oxynitride glassy composition and use as anode for lithium-ion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neudecker, Bernd J. (Knoxville, TN); Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions which are especially useful in the construction of anode material for thin-film electrochemical devices including rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, electrochromic mirrors, electrochromic windows, and actuators. Additional applications of silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions include optical fibers and optical waveguides.

  17. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of TiN from tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of titanium in a nitrogen atmosphere forms TiN with only a slight dependence on substrate temperatureAtmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of TiN from tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium, Massachusetts 02138 (Received 15 December 1994; accepted 28 October 1995) Near stoichiometric titanium nitride

  18. Friday, April 13, 2005 Morning Session Chaired by Tin-Yau Tam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    Friday, April 13, 2005 Morning Session Chaired by Tin-Yau Tam 09:30 ­ 10:15 Raymond H. Chan Results on the Drazin Inverse 10:45 ­ 11:15 Tin-Yau Tam, Auburn University On Four Sets of Scalars

  19. TESLA Report 2004-02 Anti-multipactor TiN coating of RF power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N layers generation on surfaces which were not protected in this way previously. Thin TiN films on ceramicTESLA Report 2004-02 1 Anti-multipactor TiN coating of RF power coupler components for TESLA performance of couplers) J. Lorkiewicz1 , The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Pl 05-400 Otwock

  20. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, R.A.

    1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  1. Couplings between dipole and quadrupole vibrations in tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Simenel; Philippe Chomaz

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the couplings between collective vibrations such as the isovector giant dipole and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in tin isotopes in the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a Skyrme energy density functional. These couplings are a source of anharmonicity in the multiphonon spectrum. In particular, the residual interaction is known to couple the isovector giant dipole resonance with the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance built on top of it, inducing a nonlinear evolution of the quadrupole moment after a dipole boost. This coupling also affects the dipole motion in a nucleus with a static or dynamical deformation induced by a quadrupole constraint or boost respectively. Three methods associated with these different manifestations of the coupling are proposed to extract the corresponding matrix elements of the residual interaction. Numerical applications of the different methods to 132Sn are in good agreement with each other. Finally, several tin isotopes are considered to investigate the role of isospin and mass number on this coupling. A simple 1/A dependence of the residual matrix elements is found with no noticeable contribution from the isospin. This result is interpreted within the Goldhaber-Teller model.

  2. Orientation-dependent mobilities from analyses of two-dimensional TiN(111) island decay J. Bareo,1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    Orientation-dependent mobilities from analyses of two-dimensional TiN(111) island decay kinetics J (T = 1550-1700 K) low-energy electron microscopy measurements of two-dimensional TiN island coarsening/decay kinetics on TiN(111) terraces for which ( ) values are known [Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 35409

  3. Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. Analysis of Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. Analysis of Ar¿ Sputter Etched and UPS were used to study epitaxial TiN 001 layers grown in situ which were Ar sputter etched. The films Host Material: epitaxial TiN(001) thin film sputter etched Instrument: Physical Electronics, Inc. 5400

  4. EURODISPLAY 2002 631 P-64: A Comparative Study of Metal Oxide Coated Indium-tin Oxide Anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EURODISPLAY 2002 631 P-64: A Comparative Study of Metal Oxide Coated Indium-tin Oxide Anodes and Technology Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract Indium-tin oxide anodes capped with certain oxides-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The oxides of tin, zinc, praseodymium, yttrium, gallium, terbium and titanium have been

  5. arXiv:condmat/0607335 Molecular dynamics of shock fronts and their transitions in Lennard-Jonesium and Tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    in Lennard-Jonesium and Tin J. M. D. Lane #3; and M. P. Marder y Center for Nonlinear Dynamics, University for shocks in tin which agrees to within 6% with experimental data. We study the strong shock to elastic-plastic shock transition in tin and #12;nd that it is a continuous transition consistent with a transcritical

  6. Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. I. Analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. I. Analysis of As-deposited Layers used to characterize as- deposited epitaxial TiN 001 layers grown in situ. The films were deposited, while the UPS data was generated by He I and He II UV radiation. The spectra show that the TiN 001

  7. Pathways of atomistic processes on TiN,,001... and ,,111... surfaces during film growth: an ab initio study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Pathways of atomistic processes on TiN,,001... and ,,111... surfaces during film growth: an ab used to calculate binding and diffusion energies of adatoms, molecules, and small clusters on TiN 001 and TiN 111 surfaces in order to isolate the key atomistic processes which determine texture evolution

  8. Patterning of indium tin oxide by projection photoablation and lift-off process for fabrication of flat-panel displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Kanti

    Patterning of indium tin oxide by projection photoablation and lift-off process for fabrication online 25 June 2007 Indium tin oxide ITO , an important material used as a transparent conductive oxide in such fabrication. Therefore, innovations in patterning tech- nology, especially for materials such as indium tin

  9. Fabrication of TiN nanorods by electrospinning and their electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Dongfei; Lang, Junwei [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan, Xingbin, E-mail: xbyan@licp.cas.c [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Hu, Litian; Xue, Qunji [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TiN nanorods were synthesized using electrospinning technique followed by thermolysis in different atmospheres. A dimethyl formamide-ethanol solution of poly-(vinyl pyrrolidone) and Ti (IV)-isopropoxide was used as the electrospinning precursor solution and as-spun nanofibers were calcined at 500 {sup o}C in air to generate TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. Subsequently, a conversion from TiO{sub 2} nanofibers to TiN nanorods was employed by the nitridation treatment at 600{approx}1400 {sup o}C in ammonia atmosphere. A typical characteristic of the final products was that the pristine nanofibers were cut into nanorods. The conversion from TiO{sub 2} to TiN was realized when the nitridation temperature was above 800 {sup o}C. As-prepared nanorods were composed of TiN nano-crystallites and the average crystallite size gradually increased with the increase of the nitridation temperature. Electrochemical properties of TiN nanorods showed strong dependence on the nitridation temperature. The maximum value of the specific capacitance was obtained from the TiN nanorods prepared at 800 {sup o}C. -- Graphical Abstract: TiN nanorods were prepared using electrospinning followed by thermolysis under different atmospheres. Electrochemical properties of the TiN nanorods showed strong dependence on the nitridation temperature. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} TiN nanorods were synthesized by a combination of electrospinning and thermolysis. {yields} Electrochemical properties showed strong dependence on the nitridation temperature. {yields} The TiN nanorods prepared at 800 {sup o}C possessed the highest specific capacitance.

  10. Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

  11. Selenium(IV) and (VI) sorption by soils surrounding fly ash management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, S.; Burns, P.E.; Murarka, I.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from unlined coal ash disposal facilities is one of the most significant anthropogenic sources of selenium to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting transport of selenium in ash leachate, sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} was measured for 18 soils obtained down-gradient from three ash landfill sites and evaluated with respect to several soil properties. Furthermore, soil attenuation from lab-generated ash leachate and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations as well as pH on both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was quantified for a subset of soils. For both Se(IV) and Se(VI), pH combined with either percentage clay or dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-extractable Fe described {gt} 80% of the differences in sorption across all soils, yielding an easy approach for making initial predictions regarding site-specific selenium transport to sensitive water bodies. Se(IV) consistently exhibited an order of magnitude greater sorption than Se(VI). Selenium sorption was highest at lower pH values, with Se(IV) sorption decreasing at pH values above 6, whereas Se(VI) decreased over the entire pH range (2.5-10). Using these pH adsorption envelopes, the likely effect of ash leachate-induced changes in soil pore water pH with time on selenium attenuation by down gradient soils can be predicted. Selenium sorption increased with increasing Ca{sup 2+} concentrations while SO{sub 4}2- suppressed sorption well above enhancements by Ca{sup 2+}. Soil attenuation of selenium from ash leachates agreed well with sorption measured from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4}, indicating that 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} is a reasonable synthetic leachate for assessing selenium behavior at ash landfill sites.

  12. A monopole-optimized effective interaction for tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong Qi; Z. X. Xu

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a systematic configuration-interaction shell model calculation on the structure of light tin isotopes with a new global optimized effective interaction. The starting point of the calculation is the realistic CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The unknown single-particle energies of the $1d_{3/2}$, $2s_{1/2}$ and $0h_{11/2}$ orbitals and the T=1 monopole interactions are determined by fitting to the binding energies of 157 low-lying yrast states in $^{102-132}$Sn. We apply the Hamiltonian to analyze the origin of the spin inversion between $^{101}$Sn and $^{103}$Sn that was observed recently and to explore the possible contribution from interaction terms beyond the normal pairing.

  13. Effective interactions and shell model studies of heavy tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Kartamyshev; T. Engeland; M. Hjorth-Jensen; E. Osnes

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from large-scale shell-model calculations of even and odd tin isotopes from 134Sn to 142}Sn with a shell-model space defined by the 1f7/2,2p3/2,0h9/2,2p1/2,1f5/2,0i13/2 single-particle orbits. An effective two-body interaction based on modern nucleon-nucleon interactions is employed. The shell-model results are in turn analyzed for their pairing content using a generalized seniority approach. Our results indicate that a pairing-model picture captures a great deal of the structure and the correlations of the lowest lying states for even and odd isotopes.

  14. Electrochemical fabrication and optical properties of porous tin oxide films with structural colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Hua; Shu, Shiwei; Lee, Chris; Zeng, Shanshan [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong); Lu, Zhouguang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, 8 Yuexing 1st Road, Shenzhen Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen (China); Li, Yang Yang, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong); City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, 8 Yuexing 1st Road, Shenzhen Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals with porous features not only provide the capability to control light but also enable structural colors that are environmentally sensitive. Here, we report a novel kind of tin oxide-based photonic crystal featuring periodically arranged air pores fabricated by the periodic anodization of tin foil. The existence of a photonic band gap in the fabricated structure is verified by its vivid color, and its reflective spectra which are responsive to environmental stimuli. Furthermore, the sample colors (i.e., the photonic band gap positions) can be easily adjusted by manipulating the anodization parameters. The theoretical modeling results of these tin oxide photonic crystals agree well with the reported experimental ones.

  15. Simulation studies for Tin Bolometer Array for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, V; Mathimalar, S; Nanal, V; Pillay, R G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to identify and reduce the gamma radiation which can be a significant source of background for any double beta decay experiment. The TIN.TIN detector array, which is under development for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in $^{124}$Sn, has the potential to utilize the hit multiplicity information to discriminate the gamma background from the events of interest. Monte Carlo simulations for optimizing the design of a Tin detector module has been performed by varying element sizes with an emphasis on the gamma background reduction capabilities of the detector array.

  16. Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

  17. Simulation studies for Tin Bolometer Array for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Singh; N. Dokania; S. Mathimalar; V. Nanal; R. G. Pillay

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to identify and reduce the gamma radiation which can be a significant source of background for any double beta decay experiment. The TIN.TIN detector array, which is under development for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in $^{124}$Sn, has the potential to utilize the hit multiplicity information to discriminate the gamma background from the events of interest. Monte Carlo simulations for optimizing the design of a Tin detector module has been performed by varying element sizes with an emphasis on the gamma background reduction capabilities of the detector array.

  18. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

  19. Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ladwig

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (principally arsenic and selenium) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion products (CCPs). Specific objectives of the project were: (1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCP management sites, including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; (2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic species at three CCP sites; and (3) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of selenium species at three CCP sites. Each of these objectives was accomplished using a combination of field sampling and laboratory analysis and experimentation. All of the methods used and results obtained are contained in this report. For ease of use, the report is subdivided into three parts. Volume 1 contains methods and results for the field leachate characterization. Volume 2 contains methods and results for arsenic adsorption. Volume 3 contains methods and results for selenium adsorption.

  20. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  1. Selenium Accumulation, Distribution, and Speciation in Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus: A Drought-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Accumulation, Distribution, and Speciation in Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus: A Drought.H. Pilon-Smits, and John L. Freeman2 Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture published report of these detrimental effects, which have also occurred in other Se-rich areas (Ohlendorf et

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Liver and kidney concentrations of selenium in wild boars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL PAPER Liver and kidney concentrations of selenium in wild boars (Sus scrofa) from in wild boars from the northwest part of Poland, depending on season of the year, age, sex, and body weight. Altogether, samples of livers and kidneys from 172 wild boars that were shot in 2005­2008 were

  3. Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Abstract: Metal nanoparticles exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) which is very sensitive to the size and shape of the nanoparticle...

  4. Exploring the structural basis for selenium/mercury antagonism in Allium fistulosum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNear, Jr., David H.; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A. (UCIN); (Kentucky)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    While continuing efforts are devoted to studying the mutually protective effect of mercury and selenium in mammals, few studies have investigated the mercury-selenium antagonism in plants. In this study, we report the metabolic fate of mercury and selenium in Allium fistulosum (green onion) after supplementation with sodium selenite and mercuric chloride. Analysis of homogenized root extracts via capillary reversed phase chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (capRPLC-ICP-MS) suggests the formation of a mercury-selenium containing compound. Micro-focused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of freshly excised roots show Hg sequestered on the root surface and outlining individual root cells, while Se is more evenly distributed throughout the root. There are also discrete Hg-only, Se-only regions and an overall strong correlation between Hg and Se throughout the root. Analysis of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra show a 'background' of methylselenocysteine within the root with discrete spots of SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, Se{sup 0} and solid HgSe on the root surface. Mercury outlining individual root cells is possibly binding to sulfhydryl groups or plasma membrane or cell wall proteins, and in some places reacting with reduced selenium in the rhizosphere to form a mercury(II) selenide species. Together with the formation of the root-bound mercury(II) selenide species, we also report on the formation of cinnabar (HgS) and Hg{sup 0} in the rhizosphere. The results presented herein shed light on the intricate chemical and biological processes occurring within the rhizosphere that influence Hg and Se bioavailability and will be instrumental in predicting the fate and assisting in the remediation of these metals in the environment and informing whether or not fruit and vegetable food selection from aerial plant compartments or roots from plants grown in Hg contaminated soils, are safe for consumption.

  5. An experimental investigation of acoustic cavitation as a fragmentation mechanism of molten tin droplets in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnard, Trond Arnold

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were performed where single molten tin droplets of known size, shape and temperature were dropped from a low height into a pool of distilled water. The pressure waves emanating from the hot droplets ...

  6. Three-dimensional defect characterization : focused ion beam tomography applied to tin sulfide thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youssef, Amanda

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porosity is postulated to be one of the reasons for the low efficiency of tin sulfide-based devices. This work is a preliminary investigation of the effects of two film growth parameters deposition rate and substrate ...

  7. Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong Tae

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent electrodes made from metal oxides suffer from poor flexibility and durability. Highly transparent and electrically conductive thin films based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were assembled as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement...

  8. Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winiarz, Christine Eve

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

  9. Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

  10. Selenium nutrition of Morone hybrids including dietary requirements, bioavailability, toxicity and effects on immune responses and disease resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Francisco , Jr

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    enhance immunocompetence and disease resistance of HSB. In the first experiment, purified and practical diets were supplemented with ?-glucan and selenium in a factorial arrangement and fed to juvenile HSB for 6 wk followed by a S. iniae challenge...

  11. Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

  12. Extended and Revised Analysis of Singly Ionized Tin: Sn II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haris, K; Tauheed, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of singly ionized tin (SnII) is partly a one-electron and partly a three-electron system with ground configuration 5s25p. The excited configurations are of the type 5s2nl in the one-electron part, and 5s5p2, 5p3 and 5s5pnl (nl = 6s, 5d) in the three-electron system with quartet and doublet levels. The spectrum analyzed in this work was recorded on a 3 m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph of the Antigonish laboratory (Canada) in the wavelength region 300 - 2080 {\\AA} using a triggered spark source. The existing interpretation of the one-electron level system was confirmed in this paper, while the 2S1/2 level of the 5s5p2 configuration has been revised. The analysis has been extended to include new configurations 5p3, 5s5p5d and 5s5p6s with the aid of superposition-of-configurations Hartree-Fock calculations with relativistic corrections. The ionization potential obtained from the ng series was found to be 118023.7(5) 1/cm (14.63307(6) eV). We give a complete set of critically evaluat...

  13. Short-range order, atomic displacements and effective interatomic ordering energies in TiN0.82 (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2217 Short-range order, atomic displacements and effective interatomic ordering energies in TiN0 monocristal TiN0,82 a été mesurée à l'équilibre thermodynamique à 700, 800 et 900 °C. L'intensité diffuse est, de 0,042 et 0,024 Å respectivement. Abstract. - The elastic diffuse neutron scattering of a TiN0

  14. TIN2 Binds TRF1 and TRF2 Simultaneously and Stabilizes the TRF2 Complex on Telomeres*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lange, Titia

    TIN2 Binds TRF1 and TRF2 Simultaneously and Stabilizes the TRF2 Complex on Telomeres* Received interacting partner, TIN2, as well as PIP1 and POT1 and regulates telomere-length homeo- stasis. The TRF2 that TRF1, TIN2, PIP1, and POT1 are associated with the TRF2-hRap1 complex. Gel filtration identified a TRF

  15. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  16. Nanoparticle toxicity testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593EnergyNanoparticleNanoparticle

  17. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

  18. NanoSIMS analysis of arsenic and selenium in cereal grain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Katie L.; Schröder, Markus; Lombi, Enzo; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P.; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Shewry, Peter R.; Grovenor, Chris R.M. (Rothamsted); (UCopenhagen); (Oxford)

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cereals are an important source of selenium (Se) to humans and many people have inadequate intakes of this essential trace element. Conversely, arsenic (As) is toxic and may accumulate in rice grain at levels that pose a health risk. Knowledge of the localization of selenium and arsenic within the cereal grain will aid understanding of their deposition patterns and the impact of processes such as milling. High-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) was used to determine the localization of Se in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and As in rice (Oryza sativa). Combined synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (S-XRF) and NanoSIMS analysis utilized the strengths of both techniques. Selenium was concentrated in the protein surrounding the starch granules in the starchy endosperm cells and more homogeneously distributed in the aleurone cells but with Se-rich hotspots. Arsenic was concentrated in the subaleurone endosperm cells in association with the protein matrix rather than in the aleurone cells. NanoSIMS indicated that the high intensity of As identified in the S-XRF image was localized in micron-sized hotspots near the ovular vascular trace and nucellar projection. This is the first study showing subcellular localization in grain samples containing parts per million concentrations of Se and As. There is good quantitative agreement between NanoSIMS and S-XRF.

  19. Selenium And Arsenic Speciation in Fly Ash From Full-Scale Coal-Burning Utility Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.E.; Senior, C.L.; Chu, P.; Ladwig, K.; Huffman, G.P.; /Kentucky U. /Reaction Engin. Int. /Elect. Power Res. Inst., Palo Alto

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the post-combustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  20. Coherent growth of superconducting TiN thin films by plasma enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideki; Semba, Kouich [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) thin films on (001) MgO substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and radio frequency acitvated nitrogen plasma. Although cubic TiN is stabile over a wide temperature range, superconducting TiN films are exclusively obtained when the substrate temperature exceeds 710 Degree-Sign C. TiN films grown at 720 Degree-Sign C show a high residual resistivity ratio of approximately 11 and the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) is well above 5 K. Superconductivity has been confirmed also by magnetiztion measurements. In addition, we determined the upper critical magnetic field ({mu}{sub 0}H{sub c2}) as well as the corresponding coherence length ({xi}{sub GL}) by transport measurements under high magnetic fields. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy data revealed full in plane coherency to the substrate as well as a low defect density in the film, in agreement with a mean-free path length Script-Small-L Almost-Equal-To 106 nm, which is estimated from the residual resistivity value. The observations of reflection high energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations during the growth, distinct Laue fringes around the main Bragg peaks, and higher order diffraction spots in the reciprocal space map suggest the full controlability of the thickness of high quality superconducting TiN thin films.

  1. Broad spectral response photodetector based on individual tin-doped CdS nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Weichang, E-mail: wchangzhou@gmail.com, E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Dongsheng, E-mail: wchangzhou@gmail.com, E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, College of Physics and Information Science, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High purity and tin-doped 1D CdS micro/nano-structures were synthesized by a convenient thermal evaporation method. SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM were used to examine the morphology, composition, phase structure and crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Raman spectrum was used to confirm tin doped into CdS effectively. The effect of impurity on the photoresponse properties of photodetectors made from these as-prepared pure and tin-doped CdS micro/nano-structures under excitation of light with different wavelength was investigated. Various photoconductive parameters such as responsivity, external quantum efficiency, response time and stability were analyzed to evaluate the advantage of doped nanowires and the feasibility for photodetector application. Comparison with pure CdS nanobelt, the tin-doped CdS nanowires response to broader spectral range while keep the excellect photoconductive parameters. Both trapped state induced by tin impurity and optical whispering gallery mode microcavity effect in the doped CdS nanowires contribute to the broader spectral response. The micro-photoluminescence was used to confirm the whispering gallery mode effect and deep trapped state in the doped CdS nanowires.

  2. Passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coating on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenja, S.; Pan, J.; Wallinder, I.O.; Leygraf, C.; Kulu, P.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coatings deposited by arc ion plating onto prenitrided AISI 304 stainless steel have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky measurements in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.05 M HCl. The chemical composition of the oxidized surface film atop TiN was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Up to 1.2 V/SHE the TiN coating exhibits passive behavior, which is attributed to the formation of a TiO{sub 2}-like film of nanometer thickness which grows linearly with anodic potential at a rate of 2.4 nm/V. Above 1.2 V/SHE enhanced anodic oxidation of TiN is observed at a rate of 17.7 nm/V, and the overall corrosion performance is governed both by the oxidized TiN coating and by a metallic Ti interlayer atop the nitrided stainless steel substrate. At all potentials the TiO{sub 2} film is characterized by relatively high donor densities and is, furthermore, terminated by a hydroxylated surface.

  3. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  4. Automated Morphology Analysis of Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chiwoo

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The functional properties of nanoparticles highly depend on the surface morphology of the particles, so precise measurements of a particle's morphology enable reliable characterizing of the nanoparticle's properties. Obtaining the measurements...

  5. The selenium-75-homocholic acid taurine test reevaluated: combined measurement of fecal selenium-75 activity and 3 alpha-hydroxy bile acids in 211 patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Tilburg, A.J.; de Rooij, F.W.; van den Berg, J.W.; Kooij, P.P.; van Blankenstein, M. (Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Dijkzigt, Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recommended reference values for the selenium-75-homocholic acid taurine (75SeHCAT) test, used in the analysis of chronic diarrhea, were evaluated in 211 patients by comparing simultaneous measurements of 3 alpha-hydroxy bile acids and 75Se activity in daily collected stools. An initial evaluation in 11 patients showed that the fecal collection method, which allows inspection and additional analysis of stools, was equivalent to the abdominal retention method. Selenium-75-HCAT whole-body retention half-life (WBR50) was greater than 2.8 days in less than 10% of the patients with bile acid malabsorption and less than 1.7 days in less than 10% of the normals. We recommend that a 75SeHCAT WBR50 less than 1.7 days is abnormal, a WBR50 greater than 2.8 days is normal, and a WBR50 in the range 1.7-2.8 days is equivocal, which was the case in 48% (94/195) of the patients in this study.

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplment au no 12, Tome 35, Dcembre 1974,page C6-393 SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LATTICE DYNAMICS OF GRANULAR TIN (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -393 SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LATTICE DYNAMICS OF GRANULAR TIN (*) S. AKSELROD, M. PASTERNAK Physics Department, Tel was measured in samples of 4 5 8 Sn grains embedded in a tin-oxide matrix. The Debye temperature of the same

  7. Tin(II) alkoxide hydrolysis products for use as base catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin alkoxide compounds are provided with accessible electrons. The compounds are a polymeric tin alkoxide, [Sn(OCH.sub.2 C(CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.2 ].sub.n, and the hydrolysis products Sn.sub.6 O.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 C(CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4 and Sn.sub.5 O.sub.2 (OCH.sub.2 C(CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.6. The hydrolysis products are formed by hydrolyzing the [Sn(OCH.sub.2 C(CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.2 ].sub.n in a solvent with controlled amounts of water, between 0.1 and 2 moles of water per mole of the polymeric tin alkoxide.

  8. Cluster formation probability in the trans-tin and trans-lead nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Santhosh; R. K. Biju; Sabina Sahadevan

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Within our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) cluster formation probabilities are calculated for different clusters ranging from carbon to silicon for the parents in the trans-tin and trans- lead regions. It is found that in trans-tin region the 12^C, 16^O, 20^Ne and 24^Mg clusters have maximum cluster formation probability and lowest half lives as compared to other clusters. In trans-lead region the 14^C, 18, 20^O, 23^F, 24,26^Ne, 28,30^Mg and 34^Si clusters have the maximum cluster formation probability and minimum half life, which show that alpha like clusters are most probable for emission from trans-tin region while non-alpha clusters are probable from trans-lead region. These results stress the role of neutron proton symmetry and asymmetry of daughter nuclei in these two cases.

  9. State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

  10. Tin-117m-labeled stannic (Sn.sup.4+) chelates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Richards, Powell (Bayport, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiopharmaceutical reagents of this invention and the class of Tin-117m radiopharmaceuticals are therapeutic and diagnostic agents that incorporate gamma-emitting nuclides that localize in bone after intravenous injection in mammals (mice, rats, dogs, and rabbits). Images reflecting bone structure or function can then be obtained by a scintillation camera that detects the distribution of ionizing radiation emitted by the radioactive agent. Tin-117m-labeled chelates of stannic tin localize almost exclusively in cortical bone. Upon intravenous injection of the reagent, the preferred chelates are phosphonate compounds, preferable, PYP, MDP, EHDP, and DTPA. This class of reagents is therapeutically and diagnostically useful in skeletal scintigraphy and for the radiotherapy of bone tumors and other disorders.

  11. Tin Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries Using Natural Wood Fiber as a Mechanical Buffer and Electrolyte Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    Tin Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries Using Natural Wood Fiber as a Mechanical Buffer and Electrolyte Information ABSTRACT: Sodium (Na)-ion batteries offer an attractive option for low cost grid scale storage due to the abundance of Na. Tin (Sn) is touted as a high capacity anode for Na-ion batteries with a high theoretical

  12. Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    by alternating 110 steps, which form 100 and 110 nanofacets with the terrace. Relative step energiesAbsolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from of the island per unit TiN area. We find that for alternating S1 and S2 110 steps, the ratio 1 / 2 0.72 0

  13. Diffusion of nitrogen implanted in titanium nitride (TiN1-x) F. Abautret and P. Eveno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1113 Diffusion of nitrogen implanted in titanium nitride (TiN1- x) F. Abautret and P. Eveno The diffusion of nitrogen 15, implanted in non-stoichiometric titanium nitride single-crystals (03B4 - TiN1-x on i usion m m ri es compared with the oxides. No data are available about nitrogen (or titanium

  14. The effect of axial strain cycling on the critical current density and n-value of ITER niobium-tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    The effect of axial strain cycling on the critical current density and n-value of ITER niobium niobium-tin VAC and EM-LMI strands and the detailed characterisation of the EM-LMI-TFMC strand at -0 current density and n-value of two ITER candidate niobium-tin strands (EM- LMI and VAC). The strands were

  15. Crystal chemistry and self-lubricating properties of monochalcogenides gallium selenide and tin selenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the fundamentals of the crystal chemistry and self-lubricating mechanisms of two monochalcogenides; tin selenide and gallium selenide. Specifically, it enumerates their inter-atomic array and bond structure in crystalline states, and correlates this fundamental knowledge with their self-lubricating capacity. Friction tests assessing the self-lubricating performance of gallium and tin selenides were carried out on a pin-on-disk machine. Specifically, large crystalline pieces of gallium selenide and tin selenide were cut and cleaved into flat squares and subsequently rubbed against the sapphire balls. In another case, the fine powders (particle size {approx} 50--100 {mu}m) of gallium selenide and tin selenide were manually fed into the sliding interfaces of 440C pins and 440C disks. For the specific test conditions explored, it was found that the friction coefficients of the sapphire/gallium selenide and sapphire/tin selenide pairs were {approx} 0.23 and {approx} 0.35, respectively. The friction coefficients of 440C pin/440C disk test pairs with gallium selenide and tin selenide powders were on the orders of {approx} 0.22 and {approx} 0.38, respectively. For comparison, a number of parallel friction tests were performed with MoS{sub 2} powders and compacts and the results of these tests were also reported. The friction data together with the crystal-chemical knowledge and the electron microscopic evidence supported the conclusion that the lubricity and self-lubricating mechanisms of these solids are closely related to their crystal chemistry and the nature of interlayer bonding.

  16. Epitaxial TiN(001) wetting layer for growth of thin single-crystal Cu(001) J. S. Chawla, X. Y. Zhang, and D. Galla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Epitaxial TiN(001) wetting layer for growth of thin single-crystal Cu(001) J. S. Chawla, X. Y.5-nm-thick TiN(001) buffer layer. X-ray diffraction and reflection indicate that the TiN(001) surface continuous Cu layer on MgO. The wet- ting of Cu on TiN is expected to be better, due to the surface energy

  17. 714 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 38, NO. 4, APRIL 2010 Interaction of a CO2 Laser Pulse With Tin-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Pulse With Tin-Based Plasma for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Source Yezheng Tao, Mark S. Tillack

  18. Nondestructive characterization of a TiN metal gate: Chemical and structural properties by means of standing-wave hard x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fadley, Charles

    Nondestructive characterization of a TiN metal gate: Chemical and structural properties by means (HXPS, HAXPES) is applied to a thick (100 A° ) film of a metal gate TiN grown on top of a Si/MoSi2 of TiN, as well as the buried interface between TiN and the native oxide on top of the mirror

  19. Tridentate ligated heteronuclear tin(II) alkoxides for use as base catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin alkoxide compounds are provided with accessible electrons. The tin alkoxide compound have the general formula (THME).sub.2 Sn.sub.3 (M(L).sub.x).sub.y, where THME is (O--CH.sub.2).sub.3 C(CH.sub.3), M is a metal atom selected from Sn and Ti, L is an organic/inorganic ligand selected from an alkoxide, a phenoxide or an amide, x is selected from 2 and 4 and y is selected from 0 and 1. These compounds have applicability as base catalysts in reactions and in metal-organic chemical vapor depositions processes.

  20. Structural characterization and electronic structure of laser treated TiN thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, Sheetal; Nair, K. G. M.; Phase, D. M.; Gupta, Ratnesh [School of Instrumentation, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa road, Indore-452001 (India); Material Science Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); UGC-DAE CSR, Indore Center, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); School of Instrumentation, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa road, Indore-452001 (India)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    TiN thin films prepared by laser treatment using Kr-F excimer laser in the controlled atmosphere. The depth distribution and composition of nitrogen and contaminated oxygen have been determined by non-Rutherford proton backscattering using 1.7 MeV Tendetron accelerator. The electronic structure of TiN thin film have been characterized by resonant photoelectron spectroscopy using indus-I synchrotron radiation. Specifically, complex resonance profile that shows the enhancement at 45 eV which is consistent with the resonant photoemission of Ti 3d states involved in the Titanium nitride and oxide.

  1. Surface modification of indium tin oxide by plasma treatment: An effective method to improve the efficiency, brightness, and reliability of organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface modification of indium tin oxide by plasma treatment: An effective method to improve; accepted for publication 7 January 1997 We demonstrate the improvement of an indium tin oxide anode contact conductivity, and effi- ciency as a hole injector into organic materials, indium tin oxide ITO has been widely

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF BINARY ALLOYS BY AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY: THE GOLD-SILVER AND GOLD-TIN SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overbury, S.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE GOLD-SILVER AND GOLD-TIN SYSTEMS Steven Henry Overbury (GOLD-SILVER lu"JD GOLD-TIN SYSTEl1S Steven Henry Overburyat % Au,113 WEIGHT PERCENT TIN I I I I 133G. [5~ II I T L I

  3. Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1,5 L. Vzquez,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuerno, Rodolfo

    Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1 manuscript received 1 December 2005; published 31 January 2006 We study surface kinetic roughening of TiN. The TiN films exhibit intrinsic anomalous scaling and multiscaling. The film kinetic roughening

  4. arXiv:cond-mat/0607335v113Jul2006 Molecular dynamics of shock fronts and their transitions in Lennard-Jonesium and Tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    in Lennard-Jonesium and Tin J. M. D. Lane and M. P. Marder Center for Nonlinear Dynamics, University of Texas for shocks in tin which agrees to within 6% with experimental data. We study the strong shock to elastic-plastic shock transition in tin and find that it is a continuous transition consistent with a transcritical

  5. Selective etching of TiN over TaN and vice versa in chlorine-containing Hyungjoo Shin,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Selective etching of TiN over TaN and vice versa in chlorine-containing plasmas Hyungjoo Shin 1 April 2013; published 18 April 2013) Selectivity of etching between physical vapor-deposited TiN selectivity of etching TiN over TaN by adding small amounts (

  6. Indium tin oxide single-mode waveguide modulator Ray T. Chen, Dan Robinson, Huey Lu, Lev Sadovnik, and Zonh-Zen Ho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Indium tin oxide single-mode waveguide modulator Ray T. Chen, Dan Robinson, Huey Lu, Lev Sadovnik containing an indium tin oxide waveguide, two holographic mirrors, two microprisms, and two ohmic contacts range of interest. The index of refraction of an indium tin oxide film can be represented by 362 / SPIE

  7. PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

  8. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  9. Some effects of selenium on the growth and survival of larval stages of the american oyster, Crassostrea virginica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Wendy S

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. J . M. Neff Acute Oioa say on early life stages of C assostre ~vi i ica indicate that selenium was toxic at all concentrations tested. Toxic effects are most significant at 10 ppm, particularly...) of the experiment. Some toxicity however, was apparent. In continuous exposures, selenium proved to be highly toxic, with effects compounded over time. Survival in 10 ppm was less than 1! after 48 hours and decreased to . 14K after 72 hours. In all...

  10. Correlation between the Indium Tin Oxide morphology and the performances of polymer light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : This paper reports on performance enhancement of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) based on poly(2,5-bis. Keywords : Polymer light emitting diode; Indium tin oxide; Atomic force microscopy; Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy 1. Introduction Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have received worldwide

  11. A Comparison of Auger Electron Spectra from Stoichiometric Epitaxial TiN,,001...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    , low electrical resistivity 300 K TiN 111 15 cm Ref. 2 due to the overlap of N 2p and Ti 3d bands see. In the experiments, the AES spectra were collected using primary electron beam energies of 3, 5, 10, and 20 ke, Inc. 660 Major Elements in Spectrum: Ti, N Minor Elements in Spectrum: none Printed Spectra: 4 Spectra

  12. SnO2 Filled Mesoporous Tin Phosphate High Capacity Negative Electrode for Lithium Secondary Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    SnO2 Filled Mesoporous Tin Phosphate High Capacity Negative Electrode for Lithium Secondary Battery insulators, and optics.1-6 On the other hand, their applications to electrode materials in lithium secondary batteries have received little attention because of the very limited candidates.7,8 Recently

  13. Phase Transformations in Pulsed Laser Deposited Nanocrystalline Tin Oxide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Phase Transformations in Pulsed Laser Deposited Nanocrystalline Tin Oxide Thin Films Haiyan Fan August 20, 2002. Revised Manuscript Received November 11, 2002 Thin SnOx films have been synthesized of reducing gases,1-3 and thin films have been synthesized by various means including evapora- tion,4

  14. DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic Rennes, UMR 6226, 35042 Rennes, France KeywordsPerovskite, photovoltaic, first-principles calculations, k these hybrid semiconductor photovoltaic cells(HSPC) maydiffer from the one of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC

  15. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  16. Nontoxic and Abundant Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals for Potential High-Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    and abundant copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) nanocrystals for potential thermoelectric applications. The CZTS sulfide (CZTS) as a nontoxic and abundant thermoelectric material and characterized its thermoelectric materials, the elements in the composition of CZTS are in extremely high abundancethe natural reserves

  17. Nanoparticles and atherosclerosis : resolving the paradox 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftis, Jennifer

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    -derived nanoparticles results in increases in platelet-monocyte aggregation and thrombus formation in healthy volunteers. These combustion derived nanoparticles share structural similarities with engineered nanoparticles designed for intravascular infusion. This raises...

  18. Methods for the speciation and determination of arsenic and selenium in coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schabron, J.F.; Hart, B.K.; Niss, N.D.; Brown, T.H.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of sample preparation for the determination of total selenium, and selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate in coal fly ash materials were evaluated. The measurement methods use atomic spectroscopy for the determination of total concentrations and ion chromatography (IC) for the determination of individual ionic species. Sample preparation procedures which minimize the loss or alteration of the species of interest was explored and defined. The utility of the sample preparation methods can be sample dependent, so caution is advised in their use. IC conditions were established for the determination in extract solutions of selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate with minimal interference from common anions.

  19. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplkment au no 5, Tome 35, Mai 1974,page C4-75 ON THE CPA IN A MUFFIN-TIN MODEL POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IN A MUFFIN-TIN MODEL POTENTIAL THEORY OF RANDOM SUBSTITUTIONAL ALLOYS B. L. GYORFFY and G. M. STOCKS HH Wills se simplifient pour des puits de potentiel muffin-tin sans recouvrement, et nous pourrons deriver une scattering amplitude t;(&)in the CPA for non-overlapping muffin-tin potential wells is simplified and a new

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 12, Tome 37, DPcembre 1976,page C6-897 M~SSBAUERSTUDIES OF' lZ9IATOMS IMPLANTED IN a-AND fl-TIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ~SSBAUERSTUDIES OF' lZ9IATOMS IMPLANTED IN a- AND fl-TIN H. DE WAARD and G. J. KEMERINK Laboratorium voor Algemene on the basis of a simple model. Implants of 1291 in /3 tin yield two line spectra identicalto those found for implants in a tin converted to /3 tin by heating. Repeated phase transitions show that the impurity

  1. Lemly, A.D. 1995. A Protocol for Aquatic Hazard Assessment of Selenium. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, Vol. 32, No. 280B288 Lemly, A.D. 1996. Assessing the Toxic Threat of Selenium to Fish and Aquatic Birds. Environmental Monitoring and Assessmen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    References Lemly, A.D. 1995. A Protocol for Aquatic Hazard Assessment of Selenium and Environmental Defense. The Project is subject to a Waste Discharge Requirement that strictly limits the load and the overall hazard of selenium to the ecosystem continued to be high according to Lemly's index (Lemly 1995

  2. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

  3. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Abstract: The reduction of...

  4. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

  5. Evaluation of monolayer protected metal nanoparticle technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Diana J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self assembling nanostructured nanoparticles represent a new class of synthesized materials with unique functionality. Such monolayer protected metal nanoparticles are capable of resisting protein adsorption, and if utilized ...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Novel Nanoparticle Production Method...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tiesCapabilitiesNovel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses,...

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF NANOPARTICLESOF NANOPARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandini, Giulio

    TECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF NANOPARTICLESOF NANOPARTICLES Monica Distaso #12;Optical transitions the reaction temperature, a surfactant coating layer around the NCs remains tightly bound to their surface

  8. anisotropic nanoparticles synthesis characterization: Topics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Battery Anode Material Chemistry Websites Summary: Template Synthesis of Hollow Sb Nanoparticles as a High-Performance Lithium Battery Anode Material the graphite...

  9. Selenium Bioaccumulation in Stocked Fish as an Indicator of Fishery Potential in Pit Lakes on Reclaimed Coal Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hontela, Alice

    on Reclaimed Coal Mines in Alberta, Canada L. L. Miller · J. B. Rasmussen · V. P. Palace · G. Sterling · A to selenium (Se) and other metals and metalloids in pit lakes formed by open pit coal mining in Tertiary (thermal coal) and in Cretaceous (metallurgical coal) bedrock. Juvenile hatchery rainbow trout

  10. A Prospective Study of Blood Selenium Levels and the Risk of Arsenic-2 related Premalignant Skin Lesions3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    1 1 A Prospective Study of Blood Selenium Levels and the Risk of Arsenic-2 related Premalignant-related premalignant skin lesions and prediagnostic blood Se levels in 30357 cases of skin lesions newly-diagnosed from in the Health Effects59 of As Longitudinal Study with available baseline blood and urine samples collected in60

  11. A field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector for direct conversion amorphous selenium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldan, A. H.; Zhao, W. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A practical detector structure is proposed to achieve stable avalanche multiplication gain in direct-conversion amorphous selenium radiation detectors. Methods: The detector structure is referred to as a field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector. Stable avalanche multiplication gain is achieved by eliminating field hot spots using high-density avalanche wells with insulated walls and field-shaping inside each well. Results: The authors demonstrate the impact of high-density insulated wells and field-shaping to eliminate the formation of both field hot spots in the avalanche region and high fields at the metal-semiconductor interface. Results show a semi-Gaussian field distribution inside each well using the field-shaping electrodes, and the electric field at the metal-semiconductor interface can be one order-of-magnitude lower than the peak value where avalanche occurs. Conclusions: This is the first attempt to design a practical direct-conversion amorphous selenium detector with avalanche gain.

  12. Growth of CrO[subscript 2] coated single crystalline (SnO[subscript 2]) tin oxide nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Guo-Xing

    Single crystalline tin oxide (SnO[subscript 2]) nanowires have been synthesized by carbothermal reduction of SnO[subscript 2] nanopowder followed by thermal evaporation of the reduced precursor and growth via the ...

  13. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  14. Absolute orientation-dependent TiN(001) step energies from two-dimensional equilibrium island shape and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    -independent scale factor k, the equilibrium chemical potential of the island per unit TiN mo- lecular area. We; Adatoms B1 NaCl-structure TiN is widely used for de- positing hard wear-resistant coatings on cutting. A related property, the step-edge stiffness, ~bbðuÞ bðuÞ þ d2 bðuÞ=du2 , is proportional to the island

  15. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Taus, Rhys; Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloymore »(Ti-6Al-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached ?225?kV bias voltage while generating less than 100?pA of field emission (« less

  16. Molybdenum as a contact material in zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, W.; Peterson, R. L., E-mail: blpeters@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are of increasing interest for a variety of thin film electronics applications. Here, the contact properties of different source/drain electrode materials to solution-processed amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors are studied using the transmission line method. The width-normalized contact resistance between ZTO and sputtered molybdenum is measured to be 8.7 ?-cm, which is 10, 20, and 600 times smaller than that of gold/titanium, indium tin oxide, and evaporated molybdenum electrodes, respectively. The superior contact formed using sputtered molybdenum is due to a favorable work function lineup, an insulator-free interface, bombardment of ZTO during molybdenum sputtering, and trap-assisted tunneling. The transfer length of the sputtered molybdenum/ZTO contact is 0.34??m, opening the door to future radio-frequency sub-micron molybdenum/ZTO thin film transistors.

  17. Hydrogen plasma treatment for improved conductivity in amorphous aluminum doped zinc tin oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales-Masis, M., E-mail: monica.moralesmasis@epfl.ch; Ding, L.; Dauzou, F. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Jeangros, Q. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hessler-Wyser, A. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Nicolay, S. [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Ballif, C. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving the conductivity of earth-abundant transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) remains an important challenge that will facilitate the replacement of indium-based TCOs. Here, we show that a hydrogen (H{sub 2})-plasma post-deposition treatment improves the conductivity of amorphous aluminum-doped zinc tin oxide while retaining its low optical absorption. We found that the H{sub 2}-plasma treatment performed at a substrate temperature of 50?°C reduces the resistivity of the films by 57% and increases the absorptance by only 2%. Additionally, the low substrate temperature delays the known formation of tin particles with the plasma and it allows the application of the process to temperature-sensitive substrates.

  18. Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications V.M.Dao, Dr. G. Coullerez, Dr. L, the main goal was to synthesize and to characterize novel fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles (NPs) involve superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), a fluorescently-labeled polymer

  19. Symmetry Energy and the Isoscaling in Reactions on Enriched Tin Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Danagulyan; A. R. Balabekyan; G. H. Hovhannisyan

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The coefficients of symmetry energy term for fragments with Z=4,11,12 measured in multifragmentation reactions initiated by proton and deuteron with energy of 3.65A GeV on enriched tin isotopes 112,118,120,124Sn are determined. The dependence of isoscaling parameter on the excitation energy, the temperature of fragmenting systems and the density ratio for heavy mass products are analised.

  20. Electrical properties of TiN on gallium nitride grown using different deposition conditions and annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Liuan; Kishi, Akinori; Shiraishi, Takayuki; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Qingpeng; Ao, Jin-Ping, E-mail: jpao@ee.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Institute of Technology and Science, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the thermal stability of different refractory metal nitrides used as Schottky electrodes on GaN. The results demonstrate that TiN, MoSiN, and MoN possess good rectification and adhesion strength, with barrier heights of 0.56, 0.54, and 0.36?eV, respectively. After thermal treatment at 850?°C for 1?min, the TiN and MoN electrodes still exhibit rectifying characteristics, while the MoSiN degrades to an ohmic-like contact. For further study, several TiN films are deposited using different N{sub 2}/Ar reactive/inert sputtering gas ratios, thereby varying the nitrogen content present in the sputtering gas. Ohmic-like contact is observed with the pure Ti contact film, and Schottky characteristics are observed with the samples possessing nitrogen in the film. The average Schottky barrier height is about 0.5?eV and remains virtually constant with varying nitrogen deposition content. After examining Raman spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, the increase in the film resistivity after thermal treatment is attributed to oxidation and/or nitridation. Films deposited with a medium (40% and 60%) nitrogen content show the best film quality and thermal stability.

  1. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual report, October 1, 1995--December 31,1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E.; Benson, S.M. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium geochemistry in tidal wetlands is a topic of continuing study at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The program of studies described in this report was initiated in the fall of 1994 in response to concerns about elevated Se concentrations in waters, sediments, and biota in the Carquinez Strait. Processes by which selenium is introduced and potentially released from the sediment system have been the focus of research in 1996.

  2. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  3. Thng tin pht t my ghi m v khon chi tr phc li Bo Him Tht Nghip gn nht c th tip cn 24 ting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thông tin phát t máy ghi âm v khon chi tr phúc li Bo Him Tht Nghip gn nht có th tip cn 24 ting mt chiu, Th Hai n Th Sáu, hoc vào nhng ngày cui tun. Thông tin chi tr phúc li UI c cp nht hng ngày, và phn ánh sinh hot h s vào ngày làm vic trc ó. nhn c thông tin v khon chi tr ca mình, xin làm nhng s la chn

  4. Elastic properties of sulphur and selenium doped ternary PbTe alloys by first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bali, Ashoka, E-mail: rcmallik@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Chetty, Raju, E-mail: rcmallik@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Mallik, Ramesh Chandra, E-mail: rcmallik@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Thermoelectric Materials and Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead telluride (PbTe) is an established thermoelectric material which can be alloyed with sulphur and selenium to further enhance the thermoelectric properties. Here, a first principles study of ternary alloys PbS{sub x}Te{sub (1?x)} and PbSe{sub x}Te{sub (1?x)} (0?x?1) based on the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) is presented for different ratios of the isoelectronic atoms in each series. Equilibrium lattice parameters and elastic constants have been calculated and compared with the reported data. Anisotropy parameter calculated from the stiffness constants showed a slight improvement in anisotropy of elastic properties of the alloys over undoped PbTe. Furthermore, the alloys satisfied the predicted stability criteria from the elastic constants, showing stable structures, which agreed with the previously reported experimental results.

  5. High-pressure behavior of amorphous selenium from ultrasonic measurements and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.; Liu, X. R.; Hong, S. M., E-mail: hpswjtu@gmail.com, E-mail: smhong@home.swjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Z. G. [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhu, H. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Peng, J. P. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-pressure behavior of melt-quenched amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been investigated via ultrasonic measurements and Raman scattering at room temperature. The ultrasonic measurements were conducted on a-Se in a multi-anvil apparatus with two different sample assemblies at pressures of up to 4.5 and 4.8?GPa. We discovered that similar kinks occur in the slopes of the pressure dependence characteristics of the travel time and the sound velocity in both shear and longitudinal waves in the 2.0–2.5?GPa range. These kinks are independent of the sample assemblies, indicating an intrinsic transformation of the a-Se. Additionally, we deduced the pressure-volume relationship of a-Se from the sound velocity characteristics using the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state, and the results agreed well with those of previous reports. In situ high-pressure Raman scattering measurements of a-Se were conducted in a diamond anvil cell with an 830?nm excitation line up to a pressure of 4.3?GPa. We found that the characteristic band of a-Se at ?250?cm{sup ?1} experienced a smooth shift to a lower frequency with pressure, but a sharp slope change in the band intensity versus pressure occurred near 2.5?GPa. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that the samples remain in their amorphous states after decompression. Thus, we proposed that the abnormal compression behavior of a-Se in the 2.0–2.5?GPa range can be attributed to pressure-induced local atomic reconfiguration, implying an amorphous-amorphous transition of the elementary selenium.

  6. Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

  7. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  8. Plasmonic Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated Scanning and Photoemission Electron Microscopy. Plasmonic Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated...

  9. Selenium Accumulation, Distribution, and Speciation in Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus: A Drought- and Salt-Tolerant, Selenium-Enriched Nutraceutical Fruit Crop for Biofortified Foods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banuelos, Gary S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Walse, Spencer S.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Yang, Soo In; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.; Freeman, John L.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The organ-specific accumulation, spatial distribution, and chemical speciation of selenium (Se) were previously unknown for any species of cactus. We investigated Se in Opuntia ficus-indica using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, microfocused x-ray fluorescence elemental and chemical mapping ({micro}XRF), Se K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). {micro}XRF showed Se concentrated inside small conic, vestigial leaves (cladode tips), the cladode vasculature, and the seed embryos. Se K-edge XANES demonstrated that approximately 96% of total Se in cladode, fruit juice, fruit pulp, and seed is carbon-Se-carbon (C-Se-C). Micro and bulk XANES analysis showed that cladode tips contained both selenate and C-Se-C forms. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry quantification of Se in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions followed by LC-MS structural identification showed selenocystathionine-to-selenomethionine (SeMet) ratios of 75:25, 71:29, and 32:68, respectively in cladode, fruit, and seed. Enzymatic digestions and subsequent analysis confirmed that Se was mainly present in a 'free' nonproteinaceous form inside cladode and fruit, while in the seed, Se was incorporated into proteins associated with lipids. {micro}XRF chemical mapping illuminated the specific location of Se reduction and assimilation from selenate accumulated in the cladode tips into the two LC-MS-identified C-Se-C forms before they were transported into the cladode mesophyll. We conclude that Opuntia is a secondary Se-accumulating plant whose fruit and cladode contain mostly free selenocystathionine and SeMet, while seeds contain mainly SeMet in protein. When eaten, the organic Se forms in Opuntia fruit, cladode, and seed may improve health, increase Se mineral nutrition, and help prevent multiple human cancers.

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  11. Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

    2008-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic K? lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic K? line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  12. Isoscaling in Reactions on Enriched Tin Isotopes and Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Danagulyan; A. R. Balabekyan; G. H. Hovhannisyan; N. A. Demekhina; I. Adam; V. G. Kalinnikov; M. I. Krivopustov; V. M. Tsoupko-Sitnikov

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Isospin effects in 12C ion induced reactions on enriched tin isotopes are investigated. The isoscaling parameter B is determined for different mass regions of product nuclei. It is shown that the isoscaling parameter is sensitive to the formation mechanism of products, and increases as the difference in the asymmetry is increasing. Using the exitatation energy obtained with the catcher technique temperatures, density ratio ro/ro0 for product nuclei in different mass regions and the values of symmetry energy coefficient for light mass regions of product nuclei for proton and deuteron induced reactions are determined.

  13. Using indium tin oxide material to implement the imaging of microwave plasma ignition process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Hou, Lingyun; Zhang, Guixin, E-mail: guixin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang, Boya; Liu, Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhi; Huang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method is introduced to get global observation of microwave plasma ignition process at high pressure. A microwave resonator was designed with an indium tin oxide coated glass at bottom. Microwave plasma ignition was implemented in methane and air mixture at 10 bars by a 2?ms-3?kW-2.45?GHz microwave pulse, and the high speed images of the ignition process were obtained. The images visually proved that microwave plasma ignition could lead to a multi-point ignition. The system may also be applied to obtain Schlieren images, which is commonly used to observe the development of flame kernel in an ignition process.

  14. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaiduk, P. I., E-mail: gaiduk@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Belarusian State University, prosp. Nezavisimosti 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lundsgaard Hansen, J., E-mail: johnlh@phys.au.dk; Nylandsted Larsen, A., E-mail: anl@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bregolin, F. L., E-mail: f.lipp-bregolin@hzdr.de; Skorupa, W., E-mail: W.Skorupa@hzdr.de [Department of Semiconductor Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  15. Excitation energy and strength of the pygmy dipole resonance in stable tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Özel; J. Enders; H. Lenske; P. von Neumann-Cosel; I. Poltoratska; V. Yu. Ponomarev; A. Richter; D. Savran; N. Tsoneva

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{112,120}$Sn$(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ reactions have been studied at the S-DALINAC. Electric dipole (E1) strength distributions have been determined including contributions from unresolved strength extracted by a fluctuation analysis. Together with available data on $^{116,124}$Sn, an experimental systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable even-mass tin isotopes is established. The PDR centroid excitation energies and summed strengths are in reasonable agreement with quasiparticle-phonon model calculations based on a nonrelativistic description of the mean field but disagree with relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation predictions.

  16. Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty Ltd Jump to:OffshoreOpen EnergyTin

  17. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Targeted polymeric nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    , IMS Room 20 A variety of organic and inorganic materials have been utilized to generate nanoparticles drugs for combination therapy. The surface engineering of these nanoparticles may yield them "stealth

  18. Proton elastic scattering from tin isotopes at 295 MeV and systematic change of neutron density distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Terashima; H. Sakaguchi; H. Takeda; T. Ishikawa; M. Itoh; T. Kawabata; T. Murakami; M. Uchida; Y. Yasuda; M. Yosoi; J. Zenihiro; H. P. Yoshida; T. Noro; T. Ishida; S. Asaji; T. Yonemura

    2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections and analyzing powers for proton elastic scattering from $^{116,118,120,122,124}$Sn at 295 MeV have been measured for a momentum transfer of up to about 3.5 fm$^{-1}$ to deduce systematic changes of the neutron density distribution. We tuned the relativistic Love-Franey interaction to explain the proton elastic scattering of a nucleus whose density distribution is well known. Then, we applied this interaction to deduce the neutron density distributions of tin isotopes. The result of our analysis shows the clear systematic behavior of a gradual increase in the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes with mass number.

  19. Reduction And Stabilization (Immobilization) Of Pertechnetate To An Immobile Reduced Technetium Species Using Tin(II) Apatite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, J. B.

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic tin(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 to a non-mobile oxidation state and sequesters the technetium, preventing re-oxidization to mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions. Previous work indicated technetium reacted Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index of 12.8 in Cast Stone. An effect by pH is observed on the distribution coefficient, the highest distribution coefficient being l70,900 observed at pH levels of 2.5 to 10.2. The tin apatite was resistant to releasing technetium under test conditions.

  20. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nenoff, Tina M. (Sandia Park, NM); Powers, Dana A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zhang, Zhenyuan (Durham, NC)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  1. Optical generation of free charge carriers in thin films of tin oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhurbina, I. A., E-mail: zhurbina@vega.phys.msu.ru; Tsetlin, O. I.; Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods of infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to study nanocrystalline SnO{sub x} films (1 {<=} x {<=} 2) prepared by thermal oxidation of metallic tin layers. A monotonic decrease in the transmittance of films in the infrared region has been observed as a result of exposure of the films to light with the wavelength of 380 nm at room temperature. The effect is at a maximum for the samples with x Almost-Equal-To 2 and is observed for {approx}10 min after switching off of illumination. The mentioned variations in optical properties, similarly to those observed in the case of heating of the samples in the dark, are accounted for by an increase in the concentration of free charge carriers (electrons) in nanocrystals of tin dioxide. The data of infrared spectroscopy and the Drude model are used to calculate the concentrations of photogenerated charge carriers ({approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}); variations in these concentrations in the course of illumination and after switching off of illumination are determined. Mechanisms of observed photogeneration of charge carriers in SnO{sub x} films and possible applications of this effect to gas sensors are discussed.

  2. Experimental investigation of liquid spall in laser shock-loaded tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resseguier, T. de; Signor, L.; Dragon, A.; Boustie, M.; Roy, G.; Llorca, F. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, ENSMA, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laboratoire de Mecanique et Physique des Materiaux, ENSMA, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, ENSMA, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a metal is shocked above its melting pressure or melted on release, the tensile stresses generated upon reflection of the compressive pulse from a free surface are induced into a liquid state. Instead of the well-known spallation process observed in solid targets, cavitation is expected in the melted material, and liquid fragments are ejected from the free surface. Their size, velocity, and temperature distributions are issues of increasing interest, as well as their impact on other nearby materials, but data are limited on the subject. Here, we present an experimental study performed on tin samples subjected to high pressure laser shocks (ranging from about 50 to 200 GPa) of short duration ({approx}5 ns). The results include post-test observations of the ejecta recovered after impact on a polycarbonate shield and time-resolved measurements of the free surface velocity through the shield. For shock pressures below some 80 GPa, the velocity profiles are compared to the predictions of one-dimensional simulations involving a multiphase equation of state. For higher loading pressures, the emergence of the shock at the free surface produces a rapid loss of reflectivity so the particle velocity cannot be determined. In all cases, solidified fragments of tin are recovered on the shield. Their sizes, their shapes, and the induced damage depend significantly on shock pressure, and are indicative of a very wide range of ejection velocities. The data provide a basis for a phenomenological description of the process.

  3. Shell-model study of quadrupole collectivity in light tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coraggio, L; Gargano, A; Itaco, N; Kuo, T T S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A realistic shell-model study is performed for neutron-deficient tin isotopes up to mass A=108. All shell-model ingredients, namely two-body matrix elements, single-particle energies, and effective charges for electric quadrupole transition operators, have been calculated by way of the many-body perturbation theory, starting from a low-momentum interaction derived from the high-precision CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. The focus has been put on the enhanced quadrupole collectivity of these nuclei, which is testified by the observed large B(E2;0+ -> 2+)s. Our results evidence the crucial role played by the Z=50 cross-shell excitations that need to be taken into account explicitly to obtain a satisfactory theoretical description of light tin isotopes. We find also that a relevant contribution comes from the calculated neutron effective charges, whose magnitudes exceed the standard empirical values. An original double-step procedure has been introduced to reduce effectively the model space in order to ov...

  4. Shell-model study of quadrupole collectivity in light tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Coraggio; A. Covello; A. Gargano; N. Itaco; T. T. S. Kuo

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A realistic shell-model study is performed for neutron-deficient tin isotopes up to mass A=108. All shell-model ingredients, namely two-body matrix elements, single-particle energies, and effective charges for electric quadrupole transition operators, have been calculated by way of the many-body perturbation theory, starting from a low-momentum interaction derived from the high-precision CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. The focus has been put on the enhanced quadrupole collectivity of these nuclei, which is testified by the observed large B(E2;0+ -> 2+)s. Our results evidence the crucial role played by the Z=50 cross-shell excitations that need to be taken into account explicitly to obtain a satisfactory theoretical description of light tin isotopes. We find also that a relevant contribution comes from the calculated neutron effective charges, whose magnitudes exceed the standard empirical values. An original double-step procedure has been introduced to reduce effectively the model space in order to overcome the computational problem.

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplment au no 12, Tome 35, Dcembre 1974,page C6-379 DEBYE-WALLER FACTOR OF TIN-ANTIMONY SOLID SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -WALLER FACTOR OF TIN-ANTIMONY SOLID SOLUTIONS J. SITEK, J. CIRAK and J. LIPKA Slovak Technical University at % and 10at %tin in antimony. Values of the forceconstantratio have been obtained. The Mossbauer effect recoilless fraction for the sample with 3 at % (sample 1) and 10 at % (sample 2) of tin in antimony became

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 8, Tome 39, aozit 1978,page C6-1097 AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF THE RIGID-MUFFIN-TIN APPROXIMATION USED IN THE THEORY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -1097 AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF THE RIGID-MUFFIN-TIN APPROXIMATION USED IN THE THEORY OF ELECTRON-PHONON INTERACTION W electron-phonon et B T sont prdsentdes. Abstract.- The validity of the rigidmuffin-tin approximation theoreticalwork on electron-phonon interaction in transition metals makes use of the rigid-muffin-tin (RMT

  7. Short Communication Application of bare gold nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    Short Communication Application of bare gold nanoparticles in open-tubular CEC separations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and peptides In this study, bare gold nanoparticles (GNPs) immobilized in the sol capillary wall and improving their resolution. Keywords: CE / Gold nanoparticles / Peptides / Polyaromatic

  8. MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

  9. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,410 9,800 3,170 5,630 6,200 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 4,540 60 -- -- -- Consumption: electrical, 29%; cans and containers, 18%; construction, 13%; transportation, 12%; and other, 28 as follows: primary metal consumed, $980 million; imports for consumption, refined tin, $1.36 billion

  10. Recycling of cadmium and selenium from photovoltaic modules and manufacturing wastes. A workshop report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K. [eds.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the development of the first silicon based photovoltaic cell in the 1950`s, large advances have been made in photovoltaic material and processing options. At present there is growing interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules. As the commercial potential of these technologies becomes more apparent, interest in the environmental, health and safety issues associated with their production, use and disposal has also increased because of the continuing regulatory focus on cadmium and selenium. In future, recycling of spent or broken CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes may be needed for environmental, economic or political reasons. To assist industry to identify recycling options early in the commercialization process, a Workshop was convened. At this Workshop, representatives from the photovoltaic, electric utility, and nonferrous metals industries met to explore technical and institutional options for the recycling of spent CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop. This report includes: (1) A discussion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and their potential implications to the photovoltaic industry; (2) an assessment of the needs of the photovoltaic industry from the perspective of module manufacturers and consumers; (3) an overview of recycling technologies now employed by other industries for similar types of materials; and, (4) a list of recommendation.

  11. First direct evidence of selenium deficiency in endangered Patagonian huemel deer (Hippocamelus bisulcus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner T Flueck; Jo Anne M. Smith-Flueck; Bruce J Mincher; Lenny H E Winkel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of osteopathology in 57% in the endangered adult Patagonian huemul deer 31 (Hippocamelus bisulcus), malformed antler development, and general lack of recovery were 32 previously suggested to possibly be related to mineral imbalances like selenium (Se) deficiency, 33 and not to stem from fluorosis. From recent bone analyses of these diseased huemul, fluoride 34 levels averaged 58 ppm (SE=10.7), thus eliminating fluorosis as a causal factor for the 35 osteopathology reported in huemul. In contrast, when analyzing high-elevation sites commonly 36 used by extant populations, we found soils deficient in Se. Ashes from recent volcanism also 37 were very low in Se. As Se-responsive diseases in livestock have been documented in Chile, we 38 reclassified recently published Se levels in huemul and determined that 73% were deficient and 39 18% marginal. Together with these several lines of indirect evidence, we conclude that Se 40 deficiency plays a role in the lack of recovery of huemul populations.

  12. Recycling of cadmium and selenium from photovoltaic modules and manufacturing wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the development of the first silicon based photovoltaic cell in the 1950's, large advances have been made in photovoltaic material and processing options. At present there is growing interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules. As the commercial potential of these technologies becomes more apparent, interest in the environmental, health and safety issues associated with their production, use and disposal has also increased because of the continuing regulatory focus on cadmium and selenium. In future, recycling of spent or broken CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes may be needed for environmental, economic or political reasons. To assist industry to identify recycling options early in the commercialization process, a Workshop was convened. At this Workshop, representatives from the photovoltaic, electric utility, and nonferrous metals industries met to explore technical and institutional options for the recycling of spent CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop. This report includes: (1) A discussion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and their potential implications to the photovoltaic industry; (2) an assessment of the needs of the photovoltaic industry from the perspective of module manufacturers and consumers; (3) an overview of recycling technologies now employed by other industries for similar types of materials; and, (4) a list of recommendation.

  13. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  14. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  15. MOSSBAUER STUDIES ON THE STATE OF TIN ATOMS SEGREGATED AT THE GRAIN BOUNDARY OF IRON AND IRON ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MOSSBAUER STUDIES ON THE STATE OF TIN ATOMS SEGREGATED AT THE GRAIN BOUNDARY OF IRON AND IRON iron and iron alloys is investigated by Mossbauer source experiments. It is found that the electronic. The Mossbauer effect should be potentially a powerful technique to investigate the binding state of individual

  16. Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfidegraphene nanocomposites with small crystal size for high performance lithium ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfide­graphene nanocomposites with small September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2jm34864k This study reports a novel strategy of preparing graphene composites by employing graphene oxide as precursor and oxidizer. It is demonstrated that graphene oxide can oxidize

  17. Tin-Based Reactive Solders for Ceramic/Metal Joints RAKESH R. KAPOOR and THOMAS W . EAGAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ( { ) Tin-Based Reactive Solders for Ceramic/Metal Joints RAKESH R. KAPOOR and THOMAS W . EAGAR engine com- ponents), wear parts, tool materials, electrical feed- throughs, and metal contacts on ceramics. To overcome this problem, reactive metals are added to the filler metai.11- 181These reactive

  18. Unifying the strain and temperature scaling laws for the pinning force density in superconducting niobium-tin multifilamentary wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    niobium-tin multifilamentary wires Najib Cheggoura) and Damian P. Hampshire Superconductivity Group critical current density (Jc) tolerance to strain , performed on a bronze processed niobium force Fp( Jc B) in a series of niobium alloys.3 Later, several authors4­6 found that variable tem

  19. Surface spectroscopic studies of the deposition of TiN thin films from tetrakis-(dimethylamido)-titanium and ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Surface spectroscopic studies of the deposition of TiN thin films from tetrakis-(dimethylamido)-titanium 1995 The adsorption and pyrolysis of tetrakis- dimethylamido -titanium TDMAT , Ti NMe2 4, on several , the growth of low-carbon-content 8 at. % titanium nitride films proceeds readily, via surface mediated

  20. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  1. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  2. Optimisation of the material properties of indium tin oxide layers for use in organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggart, P.; Bristow, N.; Kettle, J., E-mail: j.kettle@bangor.ac.uk [School of Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Dean St., Bangor, Gwynedd, Wales LL57 1UT (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of indium tin oxide [(In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn), ITO] material properties on the output performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices has been modelled and investigated. In particular, the effect of altering carrier concentration (n), thickness (t), and mobility (?{sub e}) in ITO films and their impact on the optical performance, parasitic resistances and overall efficiency in OPVs was studied. This enables optimal values of these parameters to be calculated for solar cells made with P3HT:PC{sub 61}BM and PCPDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM active layers. The optimal values of n, t and ?{sub e} are not constant between different OPV active layers and depend on the absorption spectrum of the underlying active layer material system. Consequently, design rules for these optimal values as a function of donor bandgap in bulk-heterojunction active layers have been formulated.

  3. Ohmic contact formation on n-type Ge by direct deposition of TiN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyota, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Keisuke [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Wang, Dong; Yang, Haigui; Nakashima, Hiroshi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We succeeded in Ohmic contact formation on an n-Ge substrate by direct sputter deposition from a TiN target and subsequent postmetallization annealing (PMA) at 350 deg. C. The Schottky barrier heights of the TiN/n-Ge and TiN/p-Ge contacts were 0.18 eV and 0.50 eV, respectively, and were maintained up to a PMA temperature of 550 deg. C. These electrical characteristics are likely to be associated with an approximately 1-nm-thick interlayer formed at a TiN/Ge interface, which leads to the alleviation of the Fermi level pinning. We demonstrated the validity of the TiN/n-Ge contact using an n{sup +}/p junction, which showed an excellent ideal factor of n=1.01.

  4. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

  5. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  6. Orbital dependent nucleonic pairing in the lightest known isotopes of tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain G. Darby; Robert K. Grzywacz; Jon C. Batchelder; Carrol R. Bingham; Lucia Cartegni; Carl J. Gross; Morten Hjorth-Jensen; David T. Joss; Sean N. Liddick; Witold Nazarewicz; Stephen Padgett; Robert D. Page; Thomas Papenbrock; Mustafa M. Rajabali; Jimmy Rotureau; Krzysztof P. Rykaczewski

    2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    By studying the 109Xe-->105Te-->101Sn superallowed alpha-decay chain, we observe low-lying states in 101Sn, the one-neutron system outside doubly magic 100Sn. We find that the spins of the ground state (J = 7=2) and first excited state (J = 5=2) in 101Sn are reversed with respect to the traditional level ordering postulated for 103Sn and the heavier tin isotopes. Through simple arguments and state-of-the-art shell model calculations we explain this unexpected switch in terms of a transition from the single-particle regime to the collective mode in which orbital-dependent pairing correlations, dominate.

  7. Tin Valence and Local Environments in Silicate Glasses as Determined From X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeown,D.; Buechele, A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterize the tin (Sn) environments in four borosilicate glass nuclear waste formulations, two silicate float glasses, and three potassium aluminosilicate glasses. Sn K-edge XAS data of most glasses investigated indicate Sn4+O6 units with average Sn-O distances near 2.03 Angstroms. XAS data for a float glass fabricated under reducing conditions show a mixture of Sn4+O6 and Sn2+O4 sites. XAS data for three glasses indicate Sn-Sn distances ranging from 3.43 to 3.53 Angstroms, that suggest Sn4+O6 units linking with each other, while the 4.96 Angstroms Sn-Sn distance for one waste glass suggests clustering of unlinked Sn4+O6 units.

  8. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  9. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  10. Effect of Sulfate on Selenium Uptake And Chemical Speciation in Convolvulus Arvensis L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz-Jimenez, G.; Peralta-Video, J.R.; Rosa, G.de la; Meitzner, G.; Parson, J.G.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroponic experiments were performed to study several aspects of Se uptake by C. arvensis plants. Ten day old seedlings were exposed for eight days to different combinations of selenate (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), and selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). The results showed that in C. arvensis, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} had a negative effect (P < 0.05) on SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} uptake. However, a positive interaction produced a significant increase in SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} uptake when SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} was at high concentration in the media. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies showed that C. arvensis plants converted more than 70% of the supplied SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} into organoselenium compounds. However, only approximately 50% of the supplied SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} was converted into organoselenium species while the residual 50% remained in the inorganic form. Analysis using LC-XANES fittings confirmed that the S metabolic pathway was affected by the presence of Se. The main Se compounds that resembled those Se species identified in C. arvensis were Se-cystine, Se-cysteine, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, whereas for S the main compounds were cysteine, cystine, oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. The results of these studies indicated that C. arvensis could be considered as a possible option for the restoration of soil moderately contaminated with selenium even in the presence of sulfate.

  11. Digital radiography using amorphous selenium: Photoconductively activated switch (PAS) readout system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznik, Nikita; Komljenovic, Philip T.; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, John A. [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new amorphous selenium (a-Se) digital radiography detector is introduced. The proposed detector generates a charge image in the a-Se layer in a conventional manner, which is stored on electrode pixels at the surface of the a-Se layer. A novel method, called photoconductively activated switch (PAS), is used to read out the latent x-ray charge image. The PAS readout method uses lateral photoconduction at the a-Se surface which is a revolutionary modification of the bulk photoinduced discharge (PID) methods. The PAS method addresses and eliminates the fundamental weaknesses of the PID methods--long readout times and high readout noise--while maintaining the structural simplicity and high resolution for which PID optical readout systems are noted. The photoconduction properties of the a-Se surface were investigated and the geometrical design for the electrode pixels for a PAS radiography system was determined. This design was implemented in a single pixel PAS evaluation system. The results show that the PAS x-ray induced output charge signal was reproducible and depended linearly on the x-ray exposure in the diagnostic exposure range. Furthermore, the readout was reasonably rapid (10 ms for pixel discharge). The proposed detector allows readout of half a pixel row at a time (odd pixels followed by even pixels), thus permitting the readout of a complete image in 30 s for a 40 cmx40 cm detector with the potential of reducing that time by using greater readout light intensity. This demonstrates that a-Se based x-ray detectors using photoconductively activated switches could form a basis for a practical integrated digital radiography system.

  12. Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids Lubricants Containing Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    O_(2) nanoparticles, and shown that functionalized SiO_(2) nanoparticles led to improved colloidal stability. Friction force profiles, friction coefficients, viscosity behavior, wear behavior of these mixtures at various nanoparticles concentrations...

  13. Nanofluidic preconcentration and detection of nanoparticles Anirban Mitra,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    Nanofluidic preconcentration and detection of nanoparticles Anirban Mitra,1 Filipp Ignatovich,2 nanofluidic scheme for preconcentration and subsequent detection of nanoparticle samples within a continuous characteriza- tion of nanoparticle and virus samples, several nanofluidic flow-through schemes have been

  14. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  15. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  16. Methods of making copper selenium precursor compositions with a targeted copper selenide content and precursor compositions and thin films resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Leisch, Jennifer (Denver, CO); Taylor, Matthew (West Simsbury, CT); Stanbery, Billy J. (Austin, TX)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Precursor compositions containing copper and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semi-conductor applications. Methods of forming the precursor compositions using primary amine solvents and methods of forming the thin films wherein the selection of temperature and duration of heating controls the formation of a targeted species of copper selenide.

  17. Changes in Selenium, Copper, Cadmium, and Zinc Concentrations in Mullet (Mugil cephalus) from the Southern Basin of Lake Macquarie, Australia, in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    attributed to power gener- ation activities and the production of selenium-contaminated fly ash. Two coal not been established but are believed to be partly from the activities of the coal-fired power station the Southern Basin of Lake Macquarie, Australia, in Response to Alteration of Coal-Fired Power Station Fly Ash

  18. Estimation of Loads of Mercury, Selenium, PCBs, PAHs, PBDEs, Dioxins, and1 Organochlorine Pesticides from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to San2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Estimation of Loads of Mercury, Selenium, PCBs, PAHs, PBDEs, Dioxins, and1 Organochlorine concentrations from the Sacramento- San Joaquin River watershed were9 determined in water samples during flood 1.6 and 6.1%, respectively. Also monitored were PAHs, PBDEs (two years of19 data), and dioxins

  19. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emrick, Todd S. (South Deerfield, MA); Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA); Dinsmore, Anthony (Amherst, MA); Skaff, Habib (Amherst, MA); Lin, Yao (Amherst, MA)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  20. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  1. Groundwater Quality and Groundwater Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    :______________________________ copper niobium bicarbonate carbonate germanium platinum sulfate nitrate iodide radium chloride fluoride phosphate tin rubidium tungsten selenium ytterbium titanium yttrium uranium zirconium vanadium zinc #12;are

  2. Lead Exposure: A Contributing Cause of the Current Breast Cancer Epidemic in Nigerian Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Schrauzer, Gerhard N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords Breast cancer . Lead . Cadmium . Tin . Chromium .selenium and low doses of lead on mammary tumor development2001) Prevalence of elevated blood lead levels in Nigerian

  3. Surface Plasmon-Driven Water Reduction: Gold Nanoparticle Size...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasmon-Driven Water Reduction: Gold Nanoparticle Size Matters. Surface Plasmon-Driven Water Reduction: Gold Nanoparticle Size Matters. Abstract: Water reduction under two visible...

  4. Preparation of Polymer-Coated Functionalized Ferrimagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Shi

    A simple chemical method to synthesize PMAA coated maghemite nanoparticles is described. Monomer methacrylic acid molecules were absorbed onto the synthesized ferrimagnetic nanoparticles followed by polymerization. The ...

  5. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and...

  6. Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Abstract: Previous experiments have demonstrated that...

  7. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Abstract:...

  8. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

  9. Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into nanowires in aqueous glucose solutions. Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into nanowires in...

  10. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

  11. Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application for formic acid oxidation. Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application...

  12. Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

  13. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  14. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries....

  15. A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles Released: March 31, 2013 First direct determination of the...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Titanium-di-oxide nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titanium-di-oxide nanoparticles Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells On July 1, 2014, in Capabilities, CINT, Energy, Energy...

  17. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

  18. Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly active oxygen reduction Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly...

  19. Fluorescent Multiblock ?-Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles for In Vivo Tumor Targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Eilaf

    Highly fluorescent multiblock conjugated polymer nanoparticles with folic acid surface ligands are highly effective for bioimaging and in vivo tumor targeting. The targeted nanoparticles were preferentially localized in ...

  20. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  1. With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molecular structures. And thanks to their promise of tunability, nanoparticle-based composites are also of great commercial interest for applications ranging from medicine and...

  2. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  3. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

  4. Silica Supported Ceria Nanoparticles: A Hybrid Nanostructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The surface chemical and vibrational spectroscopy analysis revealed cerium–silicate (Ce-O-Si) covalent bond linkage between silica and cerium oxide nanoparticles. The...

  5. Electronic Relaxation Dynamics in Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    of hot electrons for photoelectrochemical processes, including solar energy conversion or organic wasteElectronic Relaxation Dynamics in Coupled Metal Nanoparticles Mark J. Feldstein, Christine D

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: nanoparticle production method

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events, Photovoltaic, Research & Capabilities, Solar, Solid-State Lighting Titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles show great promise as fillers to tune the refractive...

  7. Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticle ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jin Sung; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Jongeun; Thomas Hahn, H.; Jang, Seonhee; Joung, Jae Woo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    providing printed electronics using copper nanoparticles.0049-3 Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticleand quality of the printed electronics. In this paper, we

  8. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a minimal increase in...

  9. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waychunas, G.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    true for nanoparticle goethite and hematite, where bulkcrystals, would have goethite stoichiometry. In effect,Figure 4, submicron sized goethite particles show a pattern

  10. Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

  11. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Haw (Moraga, CA); Cang, Hu (Berkeley, CA); Xu, Cangshan (Berkeley, CA); Wong, Chung M. (San Gabriel, CA)

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  12. Selective etching of TiN over TaN and vice versa in chlorine-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Hyungjoo; Zhu Weiye; Liu Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J. [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 (United States); Lenox, Chet; Lii, Tom [Texas Instruments Inc., Dallas, Texas 75243 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Selectivity of etching between physical vapor-deposited TiN and TaN was studied in chlorine-containing plasmas, under isotropic etching conditions. Etching rates for blanket films were measured in-situ using optical emission of the N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}) bandhead at 337 nm to determine the etching time, and transmission electron microscopy to determine the starting film thickness. The etching selectivity in Cl{sub 2}/He or HCl/He plasmas was poor (<2:1). There was a window of very high selectivity of etching TiN over TaN by adding small amounts (<1%) of O{sub 2} in the Cl{sub 2}/He plasma. Reverse selectivity (10:1 of TaN etching over TiN) was observed when adding small amounts of O{sub 2} to the HCl/He plasma. Results are explained on the basis of the volatility of plausible reaction products.

  13. High-efficiency indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1989-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in the performance of indium tin oxide/indium phosphide (ITO/InP) solar cells have been achieved by using dc magnetron sputter deposited /ital n/-ITO onto an epitaxial /ital p///ital p//sup +/ structure grown on good quality commercial /ital p//sup +/ bulk substrates. The composition of the sputtering gas has been investigated and the highest efficiency cells resulted when the surface of the epilayer was exposed to an Ar/H/sub 2/ plasma before depositing the bulk of the ITO in a more typical Ar/O/sub 2/ plasma. With H/sub 2/ processing, record efficiencies of 18.9% global, 1000 W m/sup /minus/2/, 25 /degree/C (17.0% air mass zero) were achieved. Without H/sub 2/ processing, the devices exhibited lower efficiencies and were unstable. Type conversion of the InP was shown to occur and was established as being associated with the ITO (possibly due to Sn donors) rather than sputter damage. These improvements in performance have resulted from the optimization of the doping, thickness, transport, and surface properties of the /ital p/-type base, as well as from better control over the ITO deposition procedure.

  14. Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface Ni/Sb and Ni/Sb alloys were found to efficiently minimize the negative effects of sulfur on the performance of Ni/zirconia anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Prior to operating on fuel gas containing low concentrations of H2S, the nickel/zirconia anodes were briefly exposed to antimony or tin vapor, which only slightly affected the SOFC performance. During the subsequent exposures to 1 and 5 ppm H2S, increases in anodic polarization losses were minimal compared to those observed for the standard nickel/zirconia anodes. Post-test XPS analyses showed that Sb and Sn tended to segregate to the surface of Ni particles, and further confirmed a significant reduction of adsorbed sulfur on the Ni surface in Ni/Sn and Ni/Sb samples compared to the Ni. The effect may be the result of weaker sulfur adsorption on bimetallic surfaces, adsorption site competition between sulfur and Sb or Sn on Ni, or other factors. The use of dilute binary alloys of Ni-Sb or Ni-Sn in the place of Ni, or brief exposure to Sb or Sn vapor, may be effective means to counteract the effects of sulfur poisoning in SOFC anodes and Ni catalysts. Other advantages, including suppression of coking or tailoring the anode composition for the internal reforming, are also expected.

  15. Performance enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes by chlorine plasma treatment of indium tin oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, X. A.; Zhang, Y. Q. [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated on ITO/glass substrates pretreated with low-energy O{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} plasma were compared. At 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, the OLEDs with O{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} plasma-treated indium tin oxide (ITO) had voltages of 9.6 and 7.6 eV, and brightness of 9580 and 12380 cd/m{sup 2}, respectively. At {approx}10{sup 4} cd/m{sup 2}, the latter had a 30% higher external quantum efficiency and a 74% higher power efficiency. Photoelectron spectroscopies revealed that Cl{sub 2} plasma treatment created stable In-Cl bonds and raised the work function of ITO by up to 0.9 eV. These results suggest that the better energy level alignment at the chlorinated ITO/organic interface enhances hole injection, leading to more efficient and more reliable operation of the OLEDs. The developed plasma chlorination process is very effective for surface modification of ITO and compatible with the fabrication of various organic electronics.

  16. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon (Si) has a very high lithium storage capacity and is being explored as a negative electrode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Si nanowires can exhibit relatively stable performance for many cycles of charging; however, conductive carbon must often be added to the electrode layer to improve the rate capability due to the relatively low electrical conductivity of Si. The added carbon lowers the capacity of the electrode. Here, we show that the rate capability of Si in LIBs can be substantially enhanced by incorporating tin (Sn) into Si nanowires. The solubility of Sn in Si is very low (0.015 at%); yet, Sn used as a seed for supercritical fluid–liquid–solid (SFLS) growth can be trapped in Si nanowires with relatively high concentration (10 at%). Such Sn-containing Si nanowires and no added conductive carbon in the electrode layer, could be cycled in LIBs with high capacity (*1000 mA h g*1 over 100 cycles) at a current density of 2.8 A g*1 (1 C). Capacities exceeding that of graphite could still be reached at cycle rates as high as 2 C. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that lithiation occurs five times faster in Si nanowires with significant amounts of Sn than in the Si nanowires without Sn, and twice as fast as in nanowires that were coated with carbon.

  17. Topological size effect in tin-dioxide cluster films produced by reactive sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimenko, L. S.; Matyash, I. E.; Mishchuk, O. N.; Rudenko, S. P.; Serdega, B. K., E-mail: bserdega@gmail.com [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of tin-dioxide nanofilms produced by reactive sputtering are studied by the internal reflection technique and modulation polarimetry. The angular and spectral characteristics of the reflection coefficients R{sub s}{sup 2} and R{sub p}{sup 2}are studied for linear-polarized radiations, for which the wave electric field is, correspondingly, orthogonal and parallel to the plane of incidence. The characteristics of the physical difference between the reflection coefficients, {rho} = R{sub s}{sup 2}-R{sub p}{sup 2}, are studied as well. From the experimental results, it follows that (i) the doping-induced finite conductivity of the film brings about the appearance of surface plasmon resonance; (ii) the shape of the spectral and angular characteristics of the parameter {rho} is indicative of the cluster structure of the film, which is in agreement with the phase topology data obtained by atomic force microscopy; and (iii) the nonspherical shape of the clusters is responsible for the splitting of resonances and for the dependence of their parameters on the angle of incidence, which defines the topological size effect.

  18. In situ formation of tin nanocrystals embedded in silicon nitride matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Shujuan; So, Yong Heng; Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin A. [ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin (Sn) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix have been fabricated in a cosputtering process employing low temperature (100 deg. C) substrate heating. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of uniformly sized Sn NCs of 5.2+-0.9 nm evenly distributed in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix. Both TEM and x-ray diffraction measurements showed that the Sn NCs adopted the semimetallic tetragonal beta-Sn structure rather than the cubic semiconducting alpha-Sn structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the semimetallic state (Sn{sup 0}) is the major component of Sn in the sample films. Our investigation demonstrates a pronounced effect of the substrate temperature on the formation of Sn NCs. The mechanism of in situ formation of Sn NCs is discussed. We suggest that the formation of uniformly sized Sn NCs is correlated with lowering the surface mobility of the nuclei due to the presence of the cosputtered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  19. Ag-Pd-Cu alloy inserted transparent indium tin oxide electrodes for organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyo-Joong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Han-Ki, E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics, Kyung-Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yong-Jin; Na, Seok-In [Graduate School of Flexible and Printable Electronics, Chonbuk National University, 664-14, Deokjin-dong, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the characteristics of Ag-Pd-Cu (APC) alloy-inserted indium tin oxide (ITO) films sputtered on a glass substrate at room temperature for application as transparent anodes in organic solar cells (OSCs). The effect of the APC interlayer thickness on the electrical, optical, structural, and morphological properties of the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer were investigated and compared to those of ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer electrodes. At the optimized APC thickness of 8?nm, the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer exhibited a resistivity of 8.55?×?10{sup ?5} ? cm, an optical transmittance of 82.63%, and a figure-of-merit value of 13.54?×?10{sup ?3} ?{sup ?1}, comparable to those of the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer. Unlike the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer, agglomeration of the metal interlayer was effectively relieved with APC interlayer due to existence of Pd and Cu elements in the thin region of the APC interlayer. The OSCs fabricated on the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer showed higher power conversion efficiency than that of OSCs prepared on the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer below 10?nm due to the flatness of the APC layer. The improved performance of the OSCs with ITO/APC/ITO multilayer electrodes indicates that the APC alloy interlayer prevents the agglomeration of the Ag-based metal interlayer and can decrease the thickness of the metal interlayer in the oxide-metal-oxide multilayer of high-performance OSCs.

  20. Interfacial reactions between indium tin oxide and triphenylamine tetramer layers induced by photoirradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Toshikazu; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ichiro; Murasaki, Takanori; Kato, Yoshifumi [Toyota Industries Corporation, 8 Chaya, Kyowa, Obu, Aichi 474-8601 (Japan)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of photoirradiation on the interfacial chemical reactions between indium tin oxide (ITO) films and layers of triphenylamine tetramer (TPTE) were investigated by using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin TPTE layers deposited onto sputter-deposited ITO films were irradiated with violet light-emitting diodes (peak wavelength: 380 nm). Shifts in the peak positions of spectral components that originated in the organic layer toward the higher binding-energy side were observed in the XPS profiles during the early stages of irradiation. No further peak shifts were observed after additional irradiation. An increase in the ratio of the organic component in the O 1s spectra was also observed during the photoirradiation. The ratio of the organic component increased in proportion to the cube root of the irradiation time. These results suggest that photoirradiation induces an increase in the height of the carrier injection barrier at the interface between TPTE and ITO in the early stages of the irradiation, possibly due to the rapid diffusion controlled formation and growth of an oxidized TPTE layer, which is considered to act as a high resistance layer.

  1. Retsch PM400 ball mill Nanoparticle preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    the presence of a low binding energy boride species (CexBy) XPS Catalyst Coated, Unoxidized Boron NanoparticlesRetsch PM400 ball mill pump Nanoparticle preparation Ball Milling Method Physically grind micron are coated with various ligands/capping agents to promote suspension in a variety of fuels and/or to protect

  2. Gold Nanoparticle Silica Nanopeapods Vu Thanh Cong,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Gold Nanoparticle Silica Nanopeapods Vu Thanh Cong,, Erdene-Ochir Ganbold,§ Joyanta K. Saha gold nanoparticle (AuNP) silica nanotube peapod (SNTP) was fabricated by self-assembly. The geometrical-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of bifunctional aromatic linker p-mercaptobenzoic acid (p-MBA)-coated

  3. Nanofabricated upconversion nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanofabricated upconversion nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy Baris Ungun,1 Robert K. Prud for the production of three-layer Composite Nanoparticles (CNPs) in the size range 100-300 nm with an up- converting phosphor interior, a coating of porphyrin photosensitizer, and a biocompatible PEG outer layer to prevent

  4. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Tháng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thông tin trong t ri này u có trên m ng. có thông tin chi ti t và c p nh t, xin vui lòng tra c u t i website c a chúng tôi : httpThông tin nhanh NTU, tr ng i h c t ng h p l n nh t và lâu i nh t ài Loan, ã thông báo các chng trình ào

  5. Nanoparticle Assembly DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkoli, Efie

    Nanoparticle Assembly DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006231 Silica-Nanoparticle Coatings by Adsorption from Lysine­Silica- Nanoparticle Sols on Inorganic and Biological Surfaces** Nicole Atchison, Wei Fan, Damien, Efrosini Kokkoli,* and Michael Tsapatsis* Silica nanoparticles have been used in applications including

  6. Microfluidic Reactors for the Controlled Synthesis of Monodisperse Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Emine Yegan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fast way compared to other fabrication techniques. Iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis was demonstrated using this reactor

  7. Gas-phase transport of WF6 through annular nanopipes in TiN during chemical vapor deposition of W on TiN/Ti/SiO2 structures for integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    Gas-phase transport of WF6 through annular nanopipes in TiN during chemical vapor deposition of W through the 106-nm-thick TiN film. W piles up at the TiN/Ti interface, while F rapidly saturates the TiN-sectional and scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses demonstrate that WF6 penetrates into the TiN layer

  8. High-rate and low-temperature synthesis of TiO2, TiN, and TiO2/TiN/TiO2 thin films and study of their optical and interfacial characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boo, Jin-Hyo

    High-rate and low-temperature synthesis of TiO2, TiN, and TiO2/TiN/TiO2 thin films and study with unbalanced magnetrons, we deposited advanced inorganic functional thin films such as TiO2, TiN, and TiO2/Ti sputtering. The TiO2 101 and TiN 100 thin films were stoichiometric and polycrystalline but highly oriented

  9. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Quarterly progress report, October 1995--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E.; Benson, S.M. [and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report describes the research on selenium (Se) cycling in the marshes and mudflats of the Carquinez Strait between October 1, 1995 and December 31, 1995. Chapter 2 contains descriptions of field activities and laboratory work related to chemical characterization of sediments and soils. Eh and pH data are presented. Chapter 3 contains a summary of work in progress on the extraction of various Se species from sediment/soil samples, and efforts in measuring suspended sediment Se. Chapter 4 describes advances made in the analysis of parts-per-trillion level Se, using a lanthanum hydroxide co-precipitation method, and the determination of matrix effects. Chapter 5 is an update on stable Se isotope research and Se purification techniques. The reader is referred to the 1995 Annual Report for details on the project design, site selection, and methodology.

  10. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Quarterly progress report, January 1996--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; Brownfield, A.A. [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report describes research on selenium (Se) cycling in the marshes and mudflats of the Carquinez Strait between January 1, 1996 and March 31, 1996. Chapter 2 contains descriptions of results of extractions and analyses of sediment cores from the intertidal zone of the Martinez and Benicia field sites, including some x-ray spectroscopy data related to the characterization of the sediment Eh-pH regime. Chapter 3 contains a summary of work in progress on the extraction of various Se species from sediment/soil samples, and efforts in measuring suspended sediment Se. Chapter 4 is an update on stable Se isotope research and Se purification techniques. Chapter 5 describes the rationale, design, and preliminary results of a plant-Se study. Chapter 6 presents the design of a recently initiated sediment dynamics study. The leader is referred to the 1995 Annual Report for details on the project design, site selection, and methodology.

  11. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of Carquinez Strait. Quarterly progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; Brownfield, A.A.; Chau, S. [and others

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report describes research on selenium (Se) cycling in the marshes and mudflats of the Carquinez Strait between 4/1/96 and 6/30/96. Chapter 2 contains descriptions of results of extractions and analyses of sediment cores from the intertidal zone of the Martinez and Benicia field sites, including Se fractionation data from Martinez Regional Park. Chapter 3 contains a summary of work in progress on the extraction of various Se species from sediment/soil samples, and efforts in measuring suspended sediment Se. Chapter 4 is an update on stable Se isotope research and Se purification techniques. Chapter 5 describes the recent developments in low-level Se analytical methods. Chapter 6 presents preliminary sedimentation rate data from the Martinez field site. Exciting new developments in x-ray spectroscopy of clams are presented in Chapter 7. The reader is referred to the 1995 Annual Report for details on the project design, site selection, and methodology.

  12. Microsoft Word - nanoparticles.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC - PatentJuly 2004 Nanoparticles:

  13. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

  14. Photochromic silver nanoparticles fabricated by sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okumu, J.; Dahmen, C.; Sprafke, A.N.; Luysberg, M.; Plessen, G. von; Wuttig, M. [Department of Physics, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi (Kenya); I. Physikalisches Institut (IA), Lehrstuhl fuer Physik neuer Materialien, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung (IFF)/ Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52428 Juelich (Germany); I. Physikalisches Institut (IA), Lehrstuhl fuer Physik neuer Materialien, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study a simple route to preparing photochromic silver nanoparticles in a TiO{sub 2} matrix is presented, which is based upon sputtering and subsequent annealing. The formation of silver nanoparticles with sizes of some tens of nanometers is confirmed by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The inhomogeneously broadened particle-plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle ensemble leads to a broad optical-absorption band, whose spectral profile can be tuned by varying the silver load and the annealing temperature. Multicolor photochromic behavior of this Ag-TiO{sub 2} system upon irradiation with laser light is demonstrated and discussed in terms of a particle-plasmon-assisted electron transfer from the silver nanoparticles to TiO{sub 2} and subsequent trapping by adsorbed molecular oxygen. The electron depletion in the nanoparticles reduces the light absorption at the wavelength of irradiation. A gradual recovery of the absorption band is observed after irradiation, which is explained with a slow thermal release of electrons from the oxygen trapping centers and subsequent capture into the nanoparticles. The recovery can be accelerated by ultraviolet irradiation; the explanation for this observation is that electrons photoexcited in the TiO{sub 2} are captured into the nanoparticles and restore the absorption band.

  15. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  16. Modeling of plasma-target interaction during reactive magnetron sputtering of TiN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, W.; Guettler, D. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nitrogen incorporation at the target during reactive magnetron sputtering of TiN is described by a simple stationary global model of the magnetron plasma, in combination with an analytical two-layer stationary surface model or dynamic collisional computer simulation (TRIDYN) of the surface processes. Results are shown for different nitrogen gas additions in Ar/N{sub 2} and Xe/N{sub 2} gas mixtures at a total pressure of 0.3 Pa and a magnetron current of 0.3 A. The nitrogen incorporation predicted by the analytical model is significantly less than obtained from computer simulation. The computer simulation yields nitrogen depth profiles which extend to about 2.5 nm, exhibiting a quasirectangular shape in case of stoichiometric saturation with an integrated nitrogen areal density of {approx}1.25x10{sup 16} N/cm{sup 2}. The stationary-state nitrogen incorporation results from the balance of surface adsorption in connection with recoil implantation, direct ion implantation, and resputtering. The most relevant species are nitrogen gas molecules for adsorption, molecular nitrogen ions for implantation, and inert gas ions for recoil implantation and sputtering. The model results are in good agreement with experiment provided that nonzero sticking of nitrogen gas molecules is assumed on the unsaturated surface. The analytical surface model is preferable, which favors the picture of a continuous transition to bulk and surface saturation rather than discrete local saturation which is inherent in TRIDYN. Also the relative nitrogen incorporation for Xe/N{sub 2} versus Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixtures is well described.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Reinforcement in Polyurethane Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    in biomedical field, like coatings on cardiovascular stents. Introduction Magnetic nanoparticles show remarkableSynthesis and characterization of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Reinforcement in Polyurethane: magnetite nanoparticles, synthesis, PU composite films Abstract: Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted

  18. DNA-Directed Assembly of Anisotropic Nanoparticles on Lithographically Defined Surfaces and in Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nanoparticles. These nanoparticles have been modified with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) oligomers of varying of this research is to assemble anisotropic nanoparticles into functional electronic devices, including memoryDNA-Directed Assembly of Anisotropic Nanoparticles on Lithographically Defined Surfaces

  19. Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning process and offers suggestions as to how the technical and institutional issues could have been resolved faster through early adoption of some of the core principles of sound EDSS design.

  20. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Draft annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E.; Benson, S.M.; Mountford, H.S. [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research aimed at gaining a better understanding of selenium cycling in marshes and mudflats of the Carquinez Strait is being performed by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and collaborators from the University of California at Davis. This work was initiated in the Fall of 1994 and is scheduled to continue through the Fall of 1996. This report summarizes the results of the effort to date.

  1. Polar state in freestanding strontium titanate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, Trevor A., E-mail: tyson@njit.edu, E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov, E-mail: Stanislaus.wong@stonybrook.edu; Yu, Tian [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Croft, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Scofield, Megan E.; Bobb-Semple, Dara [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Tao, Jing [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S., E-mail: tyson@njit.edu, E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov, E-mail: Stanislaus.wong@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ?10?nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (possibly with ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization, is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10?nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300?K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO{sub 3} may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability, and low toxicity are critical issues.

  2. Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vieth, Gabriel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

  3. A comparison of ZnO films deposited on indium tin oxide and soda lime glass under identical conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deka, Angshuman; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore - 560012 (India)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnO films have been grown via a vapour phase transport (VPT) on soda lime glass (SLG) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. ZnO film on ITO had traces of Zn and C which gives them a dark appearance while that appears yellowish-white on SLG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm the traces of C in the form of C-O. The photoluminescence studies reveal a prominent green luminescence band for ZnO film on ITO.

  4. Kinetics of local probe oxidation of ultrathin V, Nb, Ta, Ti, TiN, and W metal films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagunova, I. V., E-mail: pcfme@miee.ru; Shevyakov, V. I.; Gavrilov, S. A.; Belov, A. N. [Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology (Technical University) (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific features of the kinetics of local probe oxidation of ultrathin V, Nb, Ta, Ti, TiN, and W metal films are studied. It is established that the kinetics of the oxidation process depends on such properties of the material to be oxidized as the resistivity, the presence of a natural surface oxide film and its thickness, the relationship between the densities of the metal and oxide, and the electrochemical constant of the oxidation process. For the material that provides a high efficiency of formation of local insulator nanoregions, vanadium is chosen, since this metal exhibits the maximum rate of anodic probe oxidation.

  5. Formation of Light Isotopes by Protons and Deuterons of 3.65 GeV/nucleon on Separated Tin Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Balabekyan; A. S. Danagulyan; J. R. Drnoyan; G. H. Hovhannisyan; J. Adam; V. G. Kalinnikov; M. I. Krivopustov; V. S. Pronskikh; V. I. Stegailov; A. A. Solnyshkin; P. Chaloun; V. M. Tsoupko-Sitnikov; S. G. Mashnik; K. K. Gudima

    2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure cross sections for residual nuclide formation in the mass range 6 tin isotopes (112-Sn, 118-Sn, 120-Sn, 124-Sn). The experimental data are compared with calculations by the codes FLUKA, LAHET, CEM03, and LAQGSM03. Scaling behavior is observed for the whole mass region of residual nuclei, showing a possible multifragmentation mechanism for the formation of light products (6 < A < 31). Our analysis of the isoscaling dependence also shows a possible contribution of multifragmentation to the production of heavier nuclides, in the mass region 39 < A < 81.

  6. The tin impurity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 alloys | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department of Energy (DOE) notice ) )The tin

  7. Tin-117m-labeled stannic (Sn/sup 4 +/) chelate of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) for application in diagnosis and therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Richards, P.

    1983-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiopharmaceutical reagents of this invention and the class of Tin-117m radiopharmaceuticals are therapeutic and diagnostic agents that incorporate gamma-emitting nuclides that localize in bone after intravenous injection in mammals (mice, rats, dogs, and rabbits). Images reflecting bone structure or function can then be obtained by a scintillation camera that detects the distribution of ionizing radiation emitted by the radioactive agent. Tin-117m-labeled chelates of stannic tin localize almost exclusively in cortical bone. Upon intravenous injection of the reagent, the preferred chelates are phosphonate compounds, preferable, PYP, MDP, EHDP, and DTPA. This class of reagents is therapeutically and diagnostically useful in skeletal scintigraphy and for the radiotherapy of bone tumors and other disorders.

  8. Research Article Theme: Nanoparticles in Vaccine Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salem, Aliasger K.

    Research Article Theme: Nanoparticles in Vaccine Delivery Guest Editor: Aliasger K. Salem with the Der p2 coated on 9-m-sized empty PLGA particles showed increased levels of IgE and IgG1 antibodies

  9. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  10. The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Cancels DOE N 456.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-14-13, cancels DOE O 456.1.

  11. Toward multifunctional nanoparticle-based therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derfus, Austin Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this remote heating phenomenon to remotely cleave a heat-heat-labile bond. Collectively, our investigations into delivery, biocompatibility, and remoteheat-labile linker. The multifunctional nanoparticles are used to demonstrate remote,

  12. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kozhevin, V. M. [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  13. The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions, which frequently contaminate ground water at DOE and other government and industrial sites. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of these nanoparticles to select specific reaction pathways, potentially facilitating the formation of the most environmentally acceptable reaction products.

  14. Gallium nanoparticles grow where light is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. F. MacDonald; W. S. Brocklesby; V. I. Emelyanov; V. A. Fedotov; S. Pochon; K. J. Ross; G. Stevens; N. I. Zheludev

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of metallic nanoparticles has a long tradition in linear and nonlinear optics [1], with current emphasis on the ultrafast dynamics, size, shape and collective effects in their optical response [2-6]. Nanoparticles also represent the ultimate confined geometry:high surface-to-volume ratios lead to local field enhancements and a range of dramatic modifications of the material's properties and phase diagram [7-9]. Confined gallium has become a subject of special interest as the light-induced structural phase transition recently observed in gallium films [10, 11] has allowed for the demonstration of all-optical switching devices that operate at low laser power [12]. Spontaneous self-assembly has been the main approach to the preparation of nanoparticles (for a review see 13). Here we report that light can dramatically influence the nanoparticle self-assembly process: illumination of a substrate exposed to a beam of gallium atoms results in the formation of nanoparticles with a relatively narrow size distribution. Very low light intensities, below the threshold for thermally-induced evaporation, exert considerable control over nanoparticle formation through non-thermal atomic desorption induced by electronic excitation.

  15. Epitaxial growth and thermal stability of Fe{sub 4}N film on TiN buffered Si(001) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, H.; Shi, F.-Y.; Voyles, P. M.; Chang, Y. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Rzchowski, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial Fe{sub 4}N thin films were grown on TiN buffered Si(001) substrate by dc reactive sputtering deposition at different substrate temperatures. Fe{sub 4}N films epitaxially grew on TiN within the substrate temperature range from 250 to 350 deg. C. Lower than 250 deg. C there will be some other Fe{sub x}N compounds formed and higher than 400 deg. C there will be only Fe left. Fe{sub 4}N is metastable and the postannealing process in vacuum will decompose Fe{sub 4}N film to Fe. However, introducing 30% N{sub 2} in the postannealing atmosphere can stabilize the Fe{sub 4}N up to 350 deg. C in the (Ar,N{sub 2}) gas mixture. The surface roughness of the epitaxial Fe{sub 4}N films decreases with film thickness. There is in-plane biaxial magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial Fe{sub 4}N(001) on Si(001) with the [100] easy direction.

  16. Development of novel polymeric nanoparticles with tailored architectures and functionalities/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burts, Alan O. (Alan Omar)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a modular synthetic route to a combinatorial library of functional nanoparticles for applications like drug delivery is one of the main interests of our group. To this end, we have envisioned a novel nanoparticle ...

  17. Tribological Properties of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheireddin, Bassem

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and wear. A system consisting of silica nanoparticles dispersed in ionic liquids was examined at various concentrations. It was found that an optimum concentration of nanoparticles exists and yields the best tribological properties. Such work represents...

  18. Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery by Emulsification With Injected Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez Cedillo, Arturo Rey

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ oil-in-water emulsion generation, using modified silica hydrophilic nanoparticles as emulsifier, has been proposed as an enhanced oil recovery process. The nanoparticles are injected as an aqueous dispersion; its hydrophilic character allows...

  19. Precisely Tunable Engineering of Sub-30 nm Monodisperse Oligonucleotide Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yan

    a core-shell architecture with dense PEG brush coating. We characterized these nanoparticles using ITC of interest remains the major roadblock for clinical applications of RNAi therapy.2,3 Nanoparticles (NPs) hold

  20. Investigation of Nanoparticles for Use in Microwave Systems in Biomedicine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taghavi, Houra

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the microwave properties of nanoparticles for use as contrast and hyperthermia agents. Currently, visible light is used for irradiation of nanoparticles as hyperthermia agents. Additionally, visible/Near-infrared light...

  1. Nanostructure fabrication by electron and ion beam patterning of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, David Sun, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two modes of energetic beam-mediated fabrication have been investigated, namely focused ion beam (FIB) direct-writing of nanoparticles, and a technique for electrostatically patterning ionized inorganic nanoparticles, ...

  2. Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

  3. A first-principles study of the electronic structure of Iron-Selenium; Implications for electron-phonon superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koufos, Alexander P; Mehl, Michael J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the linearized augmented plane wave method (LAPW) with the local density approximation (LDA) functional to study the electronic structure of the iron-based superconductor Iron-Selenium (FeSe). In our study, we have performed a comprehensive set of calculations involving structural, atomic, and spin configurations. All calculations were executed using the tetragonal lead-oxide or P4/nmm structure, with various volumes, c/a ratios and internal parameters. Furthermore, we investigated the spin polarization using the LDA functional to assess ferromagnetism in this material. The paramagnetic LDA calculations find the equilibrium configuration of FeSe in the P4/nmm structure to have a volume of 472.5au$^3$ with a c/a ratio of 1.50 and internal parameter of 0.255, with the ferromagnetic having comparable results to the paramagnetic case. In addition, we calculated total energies for FeSe using a pseudopotential method, and found comparable results ...

  4. Hydrological and geochemical investigations of selenium behavior at Kesterson Reservoir. Progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.; Tokunaga, T.; Benson, S.M. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research relevant to selenium (Se) speciation, fractionation, physical redistribution, reduction and oxidation, and spatial distribution as related to Kesterson Reservoir. The work was carried out by scientists and engineers from the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory over a two year period from October 1994 to September 1996. Much of the focus of this research was on long-term, Reservoir-wide changes in Se concentrations and distribution; estimation and prediction of the physical extent ephemeral pools; and the quantification and prediction of Se levels in ephemeral pools waters and underlying sediments. Chapter 2 contains descriptions of field monitoring of soil processes. In Section 2.1, elevated Se concentrations observed in groundwater in the northern part of Pond 9 are investigated. The past removal of the original surface soil in the northern Pond 9 area resulted in the enhancement of Se transport into the shallow groundwater in this area. Removal of the most organic-rich surface soil horizon left the remaining profile with a lower capacity to generate and sustain reducing conditions needed to immobilize Se. Furthermore, removal of the lower permeability surface soil left the remaining profile more hydraulically conductive since sands are encountered at fairly shallow depths. These conditions result in Se remaining oxidized down to the 2.00 m depth throughout the year.

  5. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, Anand

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

  6. Plasmon Hybridization in Nanoparticle P. Nordlander* and C. Oubre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockman, Mark I.

    Plasmon Hybridization in Nanoparticle Dimers P. Nordlander* and C. Oubre Department of Physics March 30, 2004 ABSTRACT We apply the recently developed plasmon hybridization method to nanoparticle of dimer plasmons depend on nanoparticle separation. We show that the dimer plasmons can be viewed

  7. Diffusion of Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles Studied by Fluorescence Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve

    Diffusion of Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Jiang of Brownian motion of polystyrene nanoparticles is controlled by tuning their hydro- dynamic radius through coefficient of the particles. This study has initiated our further studies on the interaction of nanoparticles

  8. A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications coated with nanoparticles of multiple materials to realize the multicomponent coating. High resolution.1115/1.2787026 Keywords: carbon nanotubes, nanoparticles, electrostatic force directed assembly, coating, size selection

  9. Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery By Ji nanoparticles and drug molecules can be co- encapsulated in liposomes to simultaneously perform multiple and luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles to overcome such problems,[5,6] although these more complicated

  10. Enhanced electrostatic discrimination of proteins on nanoparticle-coated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubin, Paul D.

    Enhanced electrostatic discrimination of proteins on nanoparticle-coated surfaces Yisheng Xu gold nanoparticle (GNP) modified surface was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface-membrane ultraltration,6 and polyelectrolyte-induced phase separation.7 In recent years, nanoparticles (NP) modied

  11. 2007 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 5 Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    actuation. The topology of a nanoparticle--core, coating, and surface functional groups© 2007 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 5 Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Todd J ...................................................................................................................................... 70 5.1 INTRODUCTION The use of nanoparticles in cancer therapy is attractive for several reasons

  12. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles W. Brullot a coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized to chemical treatments and biocompatible [12]. An impression of an iron oxide nanoparticle coated with a PEG

  13. Complement receptor type 2conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Complement receptor type 2­conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles [CR2-Fc-SPIO] Kam: Complement receptor type 2­conjugated gold/superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles Abbreviated name: CR2, and oligodendroglial cells. SPIO nanoparticles are sometimes modified with dextran, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG

  14. Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Drumhead Resonators Pongsakorn Kanjanaboos,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    ABSTRACT: The self-assembly of nanoscale structures from functional nanoparticles has provided a powerful functionality of the nanoparticle building blocks to nanomechanical motion. KEYWORDS: Self to fabricate various freestanding nanoparticle membranes, including oleic acid capped CoO monolayers, DNA

  15. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Chen, Gang (Carlisle, MA); Poudel, Bed (West Newton, MA); Kumar, Shankar (Newton, MA); Wang, Wenzhong (Beijing, CN); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Arlington, MA)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  16. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  17. ME 379M Polymer Nanoparticles ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    ME 379M ­ Polymer Nanoparticles Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 379M ­ Polymer Nanoparticles Spring 2010 Required or Elective: Elective 2008-2010 Catalog Data: Course Topics Vary: Polymer Nanoparticles Prerequisite(s): Basic undergraduate level of materials science background Textbook(s): J.H. Koo, Polymer

  18. formation of the main deposit. At lower current densities, it is possible to deposit only this extremely thin tin film: it is 5 nm thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    . Whereas the 200-nm copper and 300-nm tin films in Fig. 4 have a thickness close to that predicted. We propose the following mechan- istic explanation of this effect. First, in thin cells problems of Li rechargeable batteries. Indeed, cycling efficiency of Li batteries is drastically reduced

  19. Growth and Properties of (001)-oriented Pb(Zr?.??Ti?.??)O?/LaNiO? Films on Si(001) Substrates with TiN Buffer Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Tie-Jun

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to grow Pb(Zr?.??Ti?.??)O? (PZT)/LaNiO? (LNO) heterostructures with restricted crystallographic orientations on bare Si(001) and SiO?-coated Si(001) substrates, using TiN buffer layers. ...

  20. Characterizatin of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, M. M. (Mary M.); Jorgensen, B. S. (Betty S.); Mang, J. T. (Joseph T.); Smith, B. L. (Bettina L.); Son, S. F. (Steven F.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from {approx}25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  1. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ?4?nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  2. Enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a silicon nanocrystal light-emitting diode by indium tin oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Chul, E-mail: chuh@etri.re.kr; Kim, Bong Kyu; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob [IT Convergence Technology Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chel-Jong [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a Si nanocrystal (NC) light-emitting diode (LED) by employing indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs). The formed ITO NWs (diameter?

  3. Resistive switching and conductance quantization in Ag/SiO{sub 2}/indium tin oxide resistive memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, S.; Chen, C.; Liu, H. Y.; Lin, Y. S.; Li, S. Z.; Lu, S. H.; Wang, G. Y.; Song, C.; Zeng, F., E-mail: zengfei@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Pan, F., E-mail: panf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhai, Z. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ag/SiO{sub 2}/indium tin oxide (ITO) devices exhibit bipolar resistive switching with a large memory window of ?10{sup 2}, satisfactory endurance of >500 cycles, good retention property of >2000?s, and fast operation speed of <100?ns, thus being a type of promising resistive memory. Under slow voltage sweep measurements, conductance plateaus with a conductance value of integer or half-integer multiples of single atomic point contact have been observed, which agree well with the physical phenomenon of conductance quantization. More importantly, the Ag/SiO{sub 2}/ITO devices exhibit more distinct quantized conductance plateaus under pulse measurements, thereby showing the potential for realizing ultra-high storage density.

  4. Spin coating of Ag nanoparticles: Effect of reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansari, A. A., E-mail: sdsartale@physics.unipune.ac.in; Sartale, S. D., E-mail: sdsartale@physics.unipune.ac.in [Thin Films and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune - 411007 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A surfactant free method for the growth of Ag nanoparticles on glass substrate by spin coating of Ag ions solution followed by chemical reduction in aqueous hydrazine hydrate (HyH) solution has been presented. Appearance of surface plasmon resonance confirms the formation of Ag nanoparticles. Morphology and absorbance spectra of Ag nanoparticles films are used to examine effect of hydrazine concentration on the growth of Ag nanoparticles. SEM images show uniformly distributed Ag nanoparticles. Rate constant was found to be dependent on HyH concentration as a consequence influence particle size.

  5. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  6. Size and Shape of Rhenium Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL, 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States); Vila, F. D.; Kas, J.; Rehr, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the results from a detailed XAFS characterization of supported rhenium nanoparticles are presented. The Re nanoparticles are formed by the reduction of dispersed supported rhenium oxide in the presence of moist hydrogen. The shape of the wet--reduced Re clusters is determined by comparing the EXAFS spectra of Re-metal to the Re-wet-reduced clusters to 6 A. A decrease in the signal from the 4th and 7th Re shells is an indication of sheet-like rather than spherical-like particles.

  7. Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  8. Tubular Organization of SnO? Nanocrystallites for Improved Lithium Ion Battery Anode Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong

    Porous tin oxide nanotubes were obtained by vacuum infiltration of tin oxide nanoparticles into porous aluminum oxide membranes, followed by calcination. The porous tin oxide nanotube arrays so prepared were characterized ...

  9. The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and assign responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Cancels DOE N 456.1. Canceled by DOE O 456.1 Admin Chg 1.

  10. The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, activities involving unbound engineered nanoparticles activities. DOE N 251.79 extends this Notice until 4-19-2011. Canceled by DOE O 456.1.

  11. Drug delivery Combinatorial Drug Conjugation Enables Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liangfang

    Drug delivery Combinatorial Drug Conjugation Enables Nanoparticle Dual-Drug Delivery Santosh Aryal, Che-Ming Jack Hu, and Liangfang Zhang* A new approach to loading multiple drugs onto the same drug through hydrolyzable linkers to form drug conjugates, is reported. In contrast to loading individual types

  12. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  13. Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breeze, Alison, J; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Reddy, Damoder; Sholin, Veronica; Carter, Sue

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these devices function. Inorganic solar cells with IR performance have previously been fabricated using traditional methods such as physical vapor deposition and sputtering, and solution-processed devices utilizing IR-absorbing organic polymers have been investigated. The solution-based deposition of nanoparticles offers the potential of a low-cost manufacturing process combined with the ability to tune the chemical synthesis and material properties to control the device properties. This work, in collaboration with the Sue Carter research group at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has greatly expanded the knowledge base in this field, exploring multiple material systems and several key areas of device physics including temperature, bandgap and electrode device behavior dependence, material morphological behavior, and the role of buffer layers. One publication has been accepted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells pending minor revision and another two papers are being written now. While device performance in the near-IR did not reach the level anticipated at the beginning of this grant, we did observe one of the highest near-IR efficiencies for a nanoparticle-based solar cell device to date. We also identified several key parameters of importance for improving both near-IR performance and nanoparticle solar cells in general, and demonstrated multiple pathways which showed promise for future commercialization with further research.

  14. Size and polydispersity effect on the magnetization of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Size and polydispersity effect on the magnetization of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles Paris 13, 93017 Bobigny, France. The magnetic properties of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) assemblies are investi- gated from Monte Carlo simulations. The case of iron oxide nanoparticles

  15. Controlled, Rapid Deposition of Structured Coatings from Micro-and Nanoparticle Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Controlled, Rapid Deposition of Structured Coatings from Micro- and Nanoparticle Suspensions Brian Thin nanoparticle coatings can also impart decorative functions to surfaces, modify their wetting of micro- and nanoparticle coatings require the development of rapid, inexpensive, and easily controlled

  16. Production of Crosslinked, Hollow Nanoparticles by Surface-Initiated Living Free-Radical Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harth, Eva M.

    Production of Crosslinked, Hollow Nanoparticles by Surface-Initiated Living Free alkoxyamine initiating groups are attached to the surface silanol groups of silica nanoparticles. This surface Keywords: living radical; nitroxide; nanoparticles; crosslinking; core­shell; poly- mers; nanotechnology

  17. Experimental observations and nucleation and growth theory of polyhedral magnetic ferrite nanoparticles synthesized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    Experimental observations and nucleation and growth theory of polyhedral magnetic ferrite the morphologies of ferrite nanoparticles synthesized using a radio frequency plasma torch. These nanoparticles. Keywords: Ferrite nanoparticles; High-resolution TEM; Polyhedral morphologies; Faceting; Critical nucleus

  18. Effects of varying ethanol and water concentrations as a gold nanoparticle gel solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Thomas Gerard

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Striped gold nanoparticles are unique in several of their characteristics and applications. Recent experiments have determined a new medium with which contain the nanoparticles is that of a chemical gel. The nanoparticles ...

  19. Khi i hc k thut thng tin (Undergraduateds School of IES) http://www.uec.ac.jp/ies/faculty/index.html (Jpns)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    lng Lng t hc Vt liu hc Cht bán dn - Siêu bán dn Thit b in t - Thit b quang in t - T - Vt liu quang Thông tin quang Vt lý rn Sinh hc - Thn kinh hc H thng sinh hc o lng sinh hc Tên thng qun lý doanh nghip... nh hng ngh nghip: K s h thng, K s qun lý sn xut - cht lng sn phm, Chuyên

  20. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A. [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, Materials and Engineering Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda [Plasma and Surface Division, Hiden Analytical Ltd., 420 Europa Boulevard, Warrington, WA5 7UN (United Kingdom); Safran, G.; Szekely, L.; Barna, P. B. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N{sub 2} atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (I{sub d}) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti{sup 1+}, Ti{sup 2+} and atomic nitrogen N{sup 1+}. Ti{sup 1+} ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high I{sub d}, N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} > 1 and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} > 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As I{sub d} reduced and N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low I{sub d}, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and properties are discussed.

  1. au-pd bimetallic nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the function of bimetallic alloys or nanoparticles whose Henkelman, Graeme 3 NANO EXPRESS Open Access AuPd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Energy Storage,...

  2. Selective heating of multiple nanoparticles as a new strategy for controlled release applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijaya, Andy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of nanoparticle heating for controlled release application was proposed and its feasibility was explored. The proposed method was formulated by realizing that biomolecule - nanoparticle conjugation is heat ...

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of transport phenomena in nanoparticle colloids (nanofluids)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Wesley Charles, 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the thermal transport behavior of nanoparticle colloids or nanofluids. The major efforts are: to determine methods to characterize a nanoparticle colloid's mass loading, chemical constituents, ...

  4. High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles and Polymers Enabled by Vapor Permeable Polymer Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demko, Michael Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles andHigh Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles andareas, and in a completely additive manner. In this work, a

  5. Area 2: Use Of Engineered Nanoparticle-Stabilized CO 2 Foams...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoparticle's surface, nanoparticle concentration, salinity, presence of surfactant, CO2:water ratio, and fluid flow rate are each discussed. This work on NP-CW foam...

  6. Stability of stainless-steel nanoparticle and water mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, You Young; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of such mixtures, especially for heavy metallic particles. For 0.017 wt% stainless steel-distilled water nanoparticle-fluid, the thermal conductivity increases by 8.3 % at the optimal stability condition of pH 11. Keywords: Stainless steel, Nanofluid, Stability... of larger particle density related to metallic particles, metallic nanoparticle-fluids have been studied much less than oxides or nanotube dispersions. An important characteristic of a nanoparticle-fluid mixture or nanofluid is its stability with respect...

  7. Surface Plasmon Resonance of Nanoparticles and Applications in Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib Ammari; Youjun Deng; Pierre Millien

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we provide a mathematical framework for localized plasmon resonance of nanoparticles. Using layer potential techniques associated with the full Maxwell equations, we derive small-volume expansions for the electromagnetic fields, which are uniformly valid with respect to the nanoparticle's bulk electron relaxation rate. Then, we discuss the scattering and absorption enhancements by plasmon resonant nanoparticles. We study both the cases of a single and multiple nanoparticles. We present numerical simulations of the localized surface plasmonic resonances associated to multiple particles in terms of their separation distance.

  8. Characterization of Magnetic NiFe Nanoparticles with Controlled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alloy nanoparticles for various technological applications requires the ability to control the morphology, composition, and surface properties. In this report, we describe...

  9. Direct Probes of 4 nm Diameter Gold Nanoparticles Interacting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the experiments. SHG charge screening experiments are consistent with an apparent zero net charge density associated with the positively charged gold nanoparticles when...

  10. High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric materials with embedded particles are evaluated shakouri.pdf More Documents &...

  11. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John, E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in [SMARTS, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu-603 102 (India)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689?°C as compared to 580?°C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  12. Microfluidic Reactors for the Controlled Synthesis of Monodisperse Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Emine Yegan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particles by using microfluidics: control over size, shape,nanoparticles using microfluidics," Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. ,particles by using microfluidics: control over size, shape,

  13. Photoinduced Formation of Zinc Nanoparticles by UV Laser Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metallic Zn nanoparticles growing on the exposed surface of the crystal. Higher fluence laser exposure generates accumulated surface metal just outside of the irradiated spot. We...

  14. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Abstract: Transition state searches have been...

  15. Self assembly of acetylcholinesterase on a gold nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self assembly of acetylcholinesterase on a gold nanoparticles-graphene nanosheet hybrid for organophosphate pesticide detection Self assembly of acetylcholinesterase on a gold...

  16. Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Michael S. (Houston, TX); Wachs, Israel E. (Bethlehem, PA); Knowles, William V. (Pearland, TX)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

  17. acid nanoparticle effectively: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corona effects: multi-phosphonic acid poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers for stable stealth iron oxide nanoparticles CERN Preprints Summary: When disperse in biological...

  18. approved iron nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thickness on magnetic interactions in self-assembled single domain iron nanoparticles Materials Science Websites Summary: of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, North Carolina...

  19. acid fluorescent nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Propionic-Acid-Terminated Silicon Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Optical Characterization Materials Science Websites Summary: Sato, and Mark T. Swihart*, Department of Chemical and...

  20. Recovery of Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Solution: Comparison...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simple washing of the nanoparticles during vacuum filtration (i.e., “flash drying”) can leave up to 17 weight percent residual moisture. Modeling calculations...

  1. Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions November 25, 2013 Bookmark and Share...

  2. Surface-Mediated Formation of Plutonium Nanoparticles | U.S....

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    represents a new heterogeneous pathway for immobilizing metal nanoparticles at mineral-water interfaces that can be significant in separating and isolating this type of element in...

  3. The reflection of very cold neutrons from diamond powder nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; E. V. Lychagin; A. Yu. Muzychka; A. V. Strelkov; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2008-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study possibility of efficient reflection of very cold neutrons (VCN) from powders of nanoparticles. In particular, we measured the scattering of VCN at a powder of diamond nanoparticles as a function of powder sample thickness, neutron velocity and scattering angle. We observed extremely intense scattering of VCN even off thin powder samples. This agrees qualitatively with the model of independent nanoparticles at rest. We show that this intense scattering would allow us to use nanoparticle powders very efficiently as the very first reflectors for neutrons with energies within a complete VCN range up to $10^{-4}$ eV.

  4. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maicu, Marina, E-mail: marina.maicu@fep.fraunhofer.de; Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter [Fraunhofer Institut für Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik, FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald [Institut für Festkörperelektronik, IFE, TU Dresden, Helmholtz Straße 18, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Hecker, Dominic [Fraunhofer Institut für Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik, FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden, Germany and Institut für Festkörperelektronik, IFE, TU Dresden, Helmholtz Straße 18, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  5. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Inger M

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  6. Influence of Aging and Environment on Nanoparticle Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of cerium in cerium oxide nanoparticles is studied in detail. The influence of synthesis medium, aging time and local environment on the oxidation state switching, between +3 and...

  7. amorphous silica nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arrays of metal nanoparticles hold great promise for many applications.1 The successful synthesis Kim, Sehun 6 PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 144303 (2014) Thermal conductivity...

  8. Heteroepitaxial Self Assembling Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Monocrystalline Silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Michael S.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Embedding metal nanoparticles in crystalline silicon possesses numerous possible applications to fabricate optoelectronic switches, increase efficiency of radiation detectors, decrease the thickness of monocrystalline silicon solar panels...

  9. Challenges in Applying Surface Analysis Methods to Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and other nanostructured materials present a variety of challenges. This paper reviews environmental effects on measurements of Ce-oxide nanoparticles and nanoporous silica...

  10. Lithium intercalation in sputter deposited antimony-doped tin oxide thin films: Evidence from electrochemical and optical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montero, J., E-mail: jose.montero@angstrom.uu.se; Granqvist, C. G.; Niklasson, G. A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The A°ngström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Guillén, C.; Herrero, J. [Department of Energy, Ciemat, Avda. Complutense 40, Ed. 42, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides are used as transparent electrical contacts in a variety of applications, including in electrochromic smart windows. In the present work, we performed a study of transparent conducting antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) thin films by chronopotentiometry in a Li{sup +}-containing electrolyte. The open circuit potential vs. Li was used to investigate ATO band lineups, such as those of the Fermi level and the ionization potential, as well as the dependence of these lineups on the preparation conditions for ATO. Evidence was found for Li{sup +} intercalation when a current pulse was set in a way so as to drive ions from the electrolyte into the ATO lattice. Galvanostatic intermittent titration was then applied to determine the lithium diffusion coefficient within the ATO lattice. The electrochemical density of states of the conducting oxide was studied by means of the transient voltage recorded during the chronopotentiometry experiments. These measurements were possible because, as Li{sup +} intercalation took place, charge compensating electrons filled the lowest part of the conduction band in ATO. Furthermore, the charge insertion modified the optical properties of ATO according to the Drude model.

  11. Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Zhang, Chuanlun (Columbia, MO); Roh, Yul (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

  12. Stochastic modelling of silicon nanoparticle synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menz, William Jefferson

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    potentially enhance process control [56], reduce waste [14] and improve product properties. Models for nanoparticle synthesis could also be used to investigate where particles are not formed. Such knowledge could be used to suppress particle formation... In order to calculate equilibrium coefficients, heat capacities, and other ther- modynamic properties of chemical species, reliable thermochemical data is required. Such data is readily available on-line [150] or in other peer- reviewed literature (e...

  13. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel B Reeves; John B Weaver

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging (MPI) or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion (MSB). Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

  14. Biosynthesis and structural characterization of silver nanoparticles from bacterial isolates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaki, Sahar, E-mail: saharzaki@yahoo.com [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)] [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt); El Kady, M.F. [Fabrication Technology Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute (ATNMRI), Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria (Egypt)] [Fabrication Technology Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute (ATNMRI), Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria (Egypt); Abd-El-Haleem, Desouky [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)] [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: In this study five bacterial isolates belong to different genera were found to be able to biosynthesize silver nanoparticles. Biosynthesis and spectral characterization are reported here. Highlights: {yields} About 300 bacterial isolates were screened for their ability to produce nanosilvers {yields} Five of them were potential candidates for synthesis of silver nanoparticles {yields} Production of silver nanoparticles was examined using UV-Vis, XRD, SEM and EDS. {yields} The presence of nanoparticles with all five bacterial isolates was confirmed. -- Abstract: This study aimed to develop a green process for biosynthesis of silver nanomaterials by some Egyptian bacterial isolates. This target was achieved by screening an in-house culture collection consists of 300 bacterial isolates for silver nanoparticle formation. Through screening process, it was observed that strains belonging to Escherichia coli (S30, S78), Bacillus megaterium (S52), Acinetobacter sp. (S7) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S54) were potential candidates for synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The extracellular production of silver nanoparticles by positive isolates was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results demonstrated that UV-visible spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver ion showed a peak at 420 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph showed formation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 15-50 nm. XRD-spectrum of the silver nanoparticles exhibited 2{theta} values corresponding to the silver nanocrystal that produce in hexagonal and cubic crystal configurations with different plane of orientation. In addition, the signals of the silver atoms were observed by EDS-spectrum analysis that confirms the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in all positive bacterial isolates.

  15. Nanoparticle-Enhanced Diffraction Gratings for Ultrasensitive Surface Plasmon Biosensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoparticle-Enhanced Diffraction Gratings for Ultrasensitive Surface Plasmon Biosensing Alastair W in a surface plasmon resonance geometry is observed due to the optical coupling of the planar surface plasmons in the grating to the localized surface plasmons in the gold nanoparticles. As a first example

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte-Coated Gold Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Christopher

    Preparation and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte-Coated Gold Nanoparticles Annie Dorris, Simona, Canada H3A 2K6 ReceiVed September 28, 2007. In Final Form: NoVember 15, 2007 Gold nanoparticles of 5 nm diameter, stabilized by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP), were coated with poly- (sodium 4-styrene

  17. Nanoparticle-Coated Chemiresistors with CMOS Baseline Tracking and Cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Nanoparticle-Coated Chemiresistors with CMOS Baseline Tracking and Cancellation D. Rairigh, G Abstract-- Chemiresistors (CR) with thiolate-monolayer- protected gold nanoparticle (MPN) interfacial for multi-VOC monitoring. This paper presents a new baseline cancellation and tracking system for MPN-coated

  18. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 is an important phenomenon in many biological systems. Assembly of virus coat proteins into capsids [1 diseases. This approach to studying the kinetics of nanoparticle self-assembly may also provide a valuable

  19. Lithographically directed deposition of silica nanoparticles using spin coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Lithographically directed deposition of silica nanoparticles using spin coating Deying Xia and S. R-assembly by spin coating to control particle placement. Three sizes of silica nanoparticles (mean diameters: 78, 50, and 15 nm) were employed for spin-coating processes. Single linear silica particle chain patterns

  20. Polymer Cisplatin Conjugate Nanoparticles for Acid-Responsive Drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liangfang

    Polymer Cisplatin Conjugate Nanoparticles for Acid-Responsive Drug Delivery Santosh Aryal, Che be further es- terified with carboxyl or acid anhydride groups to provide different functionality. Ang et al the synthesis of novel acid-responsive therapeutic nanoparticles (NPs) with sub-100 nm size consisting

  1. Aqueous Ferrofluid of Magnetite Nanoparticles: Fluorescence Labeling and Magnetophoretic Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles using citric acid to produce a stable aqueous dispersionAqueous Ferrofluid of Magnetite Nanoparticles: Fluorescence Labeling and Magnetophoretic ControlVed: October 8, 2004 A method is presented for the preparation of a biocompatible ferrofluid containing dye-functionalized

  2. Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics A thesis presented Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics Eric Mazur Brian R. Tull Abstract irradiated surface layer to the grain boundaries. #12;iv Lastly, we measure the photovoltaic properties

  3. The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group From Nano-Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group From Nano-Particles to Nano-Polymers Francesco Stellacci Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT frstella@mit.edu #12;S u N M a G The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group Supramolecular Materials Science Monolayer Protected Metal Nanoparticles Functionalized Carbon

  4. The therapeutic efficacy of camptothecin-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    The therapeutic efficacy of camptothecin-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles Kuan-Ju Chen a,1 of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign-Urbana, 1304 West Green Street October 2011 Available online 8 November 2011 Keywords: Supramolecular assembly Nanoparticles Drug

  5. Engineering Magnetic nanoparticles are of interest in a variety of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Engineering Abstract Magnetic nanoparticles are of interest in a variety of applications which take advantage of their manipulation using externally applied magnetic fields. Depending on the material used, these nanoparticles may possess either a freely rotating magnetic dipole or a dipole

  6. EFFECT OF BROWNIAN AND THERMOPHORETIC DIFFUSIONS OF NANOPARTICLES ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    EFFECT OF BROWNIAN AND THERMOPHORETIC DIFFUSIONS OF NANOPARTICLES ON NONEQUILIBRIUM HEAT CONDUCTION of Brownian and thermophoretic diffusions on nonequilibrium heat conduction in a nanofluid layer with periodic, and period of the surface heat flux. Effects of Brownian and thermophoretic diffusions of nanoparticles

  7. Light scattering by an array of electric and magnetic nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Light scattering by an array of electric and magnetic nanoparticles Braulio García-Cámara1, 2@unican.es Abstract: Light scattering by an array of alternating electric and magnetic nanoparticles is analyzed, "Polarization sensitive silicon photodiodes using nanostructured metallic grids," Appl. Phys. Lett. 94

  8. Functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for oral delivery of budesonide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoncheva, K., E-mail: krassi.yoncheva@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Sofia, 2 Dunav Str., 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Popova, M. [Institute of Organic Chemistry with Centre of Phytochemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Szegedi, A.; Mihaly, J. [Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri út. 59-67, 1025 Budapest (Hungary); Tzankov, B.; Lambov, N.; Konstantinov, S.; Tzankova, V. [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Sofia, 2 Dunav Str., 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Pessina, F.; Valoti, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Universita di Siena, via Aldo Moro 2, Siena (Italy)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-functionalized and amino-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticle were loaded with anti-inflammatory drug budesonide and additionally post-coated with bioadhesive polymer (carbopol). TEM images showed spherical shape of the nanoparticles and slightly higher polydispersity after coating with carbopol. Nitrogen physisorption and thermogravimetic analysis revealed that more efficient loading and incorporation into the pores of nanoparticles was achieved with the amino-functionalized silica carrier. Infrared spectra indicated that the post-coating of these nanoparticles with carbopol led to the formation of bond between amino groups of the functionalized carrier and carboxyl groups of carbopol. The combination of amino-functionalization of the carrier with the post-coating of the nanoparticles sustained budesonide release. Further, an in vitro model of inflammatory bowel disease showed that the cytoprotective effect of budesonide loaded in the post-coated silica nanoparticles on damaged HT-29 cells was more pronounced compared to the cytoprotection obtained with pure budesonide. -- Graphical abstract: Silica mesoporous MCM-41 particles were amino-functionalized, loaded with budesonide and post-coated with bioadhesive polymer (carbopol) in order to achieve prolonged residence of anti-inflammatory drug in GIT. Highlights: • Higher drug loading in amino-functionalized mesoporous silica. • Amino-functionalization and post-coating of the nanoparticles sustained drug release. • Achievement of higher cytoprotective effect with drug loaded into the nanoparticles.

  9. Elastic membranes of close-packed nanoparticle arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    -jaeger@uchicago.edu Published online: 22 July 2007; doi:10.1038/nmat1965 Nanoparticle superlattices are hybrid materials of sensor applications. The combination of organic molecules and inorganic nanoparticles into hybrid for applications ranging from separation membranes to high-resolution pressure sensors. In such nanocomposites

  10. Stability and Aggregation of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    dispersed three different metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CeO2) in samples taken from eight,river,andgroundwater,andmeasuredtheirelectrophoretic mobility, state of aggregation, and rate of sedimentation.g., sunscreens, paints, coatings, catalysts). A simplified con- ceptual model of a typical nanoparticle life

  11. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700091 Remotely Triggered Release from Magnetic Nanoparticles**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700091 Remotely Triggered Release from Magnetic Nanoparticles** By Austin M, and Sangeeta N. Bhatia* Multivalent nanoparticles have tremendous potential in the diagnosis and treatment nanoparticle homing, polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG)) to improve nanoparticle pharmacokinetics

  12. Coupling discrete metal nanoparticles to photonic crystal surface resonant modes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Brian

    Coupling discrete metal nanoparticles to photonic crystal surface resonant modes and application nanoparticles to the resonant mode of a photonic crystal surface has been demonstrated as a means for obtaining of the photonic crystal can couple to plasmon resonances of the metal nanoparticles. Because metal nanoparticles

  13. Neutron powder diffraction of carbon-coated FeCo alloy nanoparticles John Henry J. Scotta)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    Neutron powder diffraction of carbon-coated FeCo alloy nanoparticles John Henry J. Scotta in carbon-coated FexCo1 x nanoparticles produced using a radio frequency plasma torch. The nanoparticles roll and machine. In this work, the order­disorder trans- formation in C-coated FeCo nanoparticles

  14. Mapping the location and configuration of nitrogen in diamond nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, A. S.; Sternberg, M.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Oxford

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how impurities such as nitrogen are included in diamond nanoparticles is expected to be important for use in future nanodevices, such as qubits for quantum computing. Most commercial diamond nanoparticles contain approximately 2-3% nitrogen, but it is difficult to determine experimentally whether it is located within the core or at the surface of the nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration and potential energy surface of substitutional nitrogen in diamond nanoparticles, directly comparing results of different sizes, shapes and surface chemistry. The results predict that nitrogen is metastable within the core of both hydrogenated and dehydrogenated particles, but that the binding energy, coordination and preferred location is dependent upon the structure of the nanoparticle as a whole.

  15. The structure and properties of graphene supported on gold nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osváth, Zoltán; Kertész, Krisztián; Molnár, György; Vértesy, Gábor; Zámbó, Dániel; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene covered metal nanoparticles constitute a novel type of hybrid materials, which provide a unique platform to study plasmonic effects, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and metal-graphene interactions at the nanoscale. Such a hybrid material is fabricated by transferring graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition onto closely spaced gold nanoparticles produced on a silica wafer. The morphology and physical properties of nanoparticle-supported graphene is investigated by atomic force microscopy, optical reflectance spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. This study shows that the graphene Raman peaks are enhanced by a factor which depends on the excitation wavelength, in accordance with the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles, and also on the graphene-nanoparticle distance which is tuned by annealing at moderate temperatures. The observed SERS activity is correlated to the nanoscale corrugation of graphene. STM and...

  16. Graphdiyne as a Promising Substrate for Stabilizing Pt Nanoparticle Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zheng-Zhe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, Pt nanoparticle catalysts in fuel cells suffer from aggregation and loss of chemical activity. In this work, graphdiyne, which has natural porous structure, was proposed as substrate with high adsorption ability to stabilize Pt nanoparticles. Using multiscale calculations by ab initio method and the ReaxFF potential, geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics simulations, Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations and minimum energy paths calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and the rates of desorption and migration of Pt nanoparticles on graphdiyne and graphene. According to the comparison between graphdiyne and graphene, it was found that the high adsorption ability of graphdiyne can avoid Pt nanoparticle migration and aggregation on substrate. Then, simulations indicated the potential catalytic ability of graphdiyne-Pt-nanoparticle system to the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. In summary, graphdiyne should be an excellent material to replace graphite or amorphous ca...

  17. Ordered mesoporous silica nanoparticles with and without embedded iron oxide nanoparticles: structure evolution during synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    - functional nanocomposites, in which properties of individual components are combined to create new features with metals and metal oxides results in hybrid mesoporous silica nanoparticles with combi- nations of properties. Such hybrids could be used in applications, such as drug delivery, MRI and catalysis.3

  18. Photovoltaic devices having nanoparticle dipoles for enhanced performance and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, George M. (Portland, OR); Schut, David M. (Philomath, OR); Stonas, Andreas (Albany, OR)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic device has nanoparticles sandwiched between a conductive substrate and a charge selective transport layer. Each of the nanoparticles has a ligand shell attached to the nanoparticle core. A first type of ligand is electron rich and attached to one hemisphere of the nanoparticle core, while a second type of ligand is electron poor and attached to an opposite hemisphere of the core. Consequently, the ligand shell induces an electric field within the nanoparticle, enhancing the photovoltaic effect. The arrangement of ligands types on different sides of the nanoparticle is obtained by a process involving ligand substitution after adhering the nanoparticles to the conductive substrate.

  19. Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Daniel B., E-mail: dbr@Dartmouth.edu; Weaver, John B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

  20. A comparative study of TiN and TiC: Oxidation resistance and retention of xenon at high temperature and under degraded vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavarini, S.; Bes, R.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.; Gaillard, C. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, IPNL, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Cardinal, S.; Garnier, V. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, MATEIS, CNRS UMR 5510, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense TiN and TiC samples were prepared by hot pressing using micrometric powders. Xenon species (simulating rare gas fission products) were then implanted into the ceramics. The samples were annealed for 1 h at 1500 deg. C under several degraded vacuums with P{sub O{sub 2}} varying from 10{sup -6} to 2x10{sup -4} mbars. The oxidation resistance of the samples and their retention properties with respect to preimplanted xenon species were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear backscattering spectrometry. Results indicate that TiC is resistant to oxidation and does not release xenon for P{sub O{sub 2{<=}}}6x10{sup -6} mbars. When P{sub O{sub 2}} increases, geometric oxide crystallites appear at the surface depending on the orientation and size of TiC grains. These oxide phases are Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5}, and TiO{sub 2}. Apparition of oxide crystallites is associated with the beginning of xenon release. TiC surface is completely covered by the oxide phases at P{sub O{sub 2}}=2x10{sup -4} mbars up to a depth of 3 {mu}m and the xenon is then completely released. For TiN samples, the results show a progressive apparition of oxide crystallites (Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} mainly) at the surface when P{sub O{sub 2}} increases. The presence of the oxide crystallites is also directly correlated with xenon release, the more oxide crystallites are growing the more xenon is released. TiN surface is completely covered by an oxide layer at P{sub O{sub 2}}=2x10{sup -4} mbars up to 1 {mu}m. A correlation between the initial fine microstructure of TiN and the properties of the growing layer is suggested.