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  1. Tonga Capital Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tonga Capital Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tonga Capital Corporation Place: Arvada, Colorado Sector: Biofuels Product: Capital pool company, which ran out of...

  2. Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  3. Tonga: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Tonga Population 103,036 GDP 439,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TO 3-letter ISO code TON Numeric ISO...

  4. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Togo Population 5,337,000 GDP 3,685,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TG 3-letter ISO code TGO Numeric ISO...

  5. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Togo Population 7,154,237 GDP 3,685,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TG 3-letter ISO code TGO Numeric ISO...

  6. Office of Communication - Brochures Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tadjikistan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks & Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United...

  7. Timor-Leste: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 200,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 45 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 553,800,000 Barrels (bbl) 46 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  8. DIY2 () | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Republic ESA East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia ... Republic ESA East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia ...

  9. Arc-continent collision in Banda Sea region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowin, C.; Purdy, G.M.; Johnston, C.; Shor, G.; Lawver, L.; Hartono, H.M.S.; Jezek, P.

    1980-06-01

    A 2-month marine geophysical study of the Banda arc region was conducted in late 1976 using the R/V Atlantis II of WHOI' and the R/V Thomas Washington of SIO; 19 seismic refraction lines were successfully completed. Oceanic crust underlies the Banda Sea and Weber Deep. Continental crust 35 to 40 km thick underlies the Australian Shelf. Thick continental crust is also present beneath the Timor and Aru Troughs. Low-amplitude magnetic anomalies are present over the Australian Shelf and extend to near the western edge of the Banda outer arc and, together with the presence of metamorphic rocks, suggest that continental crust may extend to the eastern lip of the Weber Deep. Continuous seismic reflection profiling shows the Australian Shelf sedimentary sequence dipping beneath the accretionary prisms of the outer Banda arc at the Timor and Seram Troughs: the tectonic front of the subduction zone lies along the axis of these troughs. The bathymetric profile on the outer flank of the Timor and Seram Troughs is unusual in that the profile asymptotically approaches a shallow depth near sea level and no outer rise is present as at oceanic trenches. It is concluded that the Outer Banda arc from Buru around to Timor, and possibly to Sumba, contained Australian continental crustal blocks and fragments prior to its collision with the Australian margin in the last 3 to 6 m.y. Continuous convergence following the addition of a thick Australian margin sedimentary sequence to the south Banda subduction zone has led to deformation being distributed over the width of the arc and not simply being taken up on a single thrust surface. This scenario helps reconcile the geologic relations on Timor, Seram, and Buru with the structural continuity of the Timor Trough with the Java Trench. 30 figures, 1 table.

  10. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Convene in Australia to Plan International Cloud Experiment Bookmark and Share During TWP-ICE, cloud property data will be obtained from numerous research aircraft and a network of surface-based remote sensing sites, including a ship operating in the Timor Sea and numerous ground sites in a 200 km diameter around the ARM Climate Research Facility site in Darwin, Australia. Coming from as far away as Italy, Switzerland, and the United States, a 45 member team gathered in Darwin,

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Rod Rimando- NCW 2015 - TD Session 150929 Rimando Opening

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A Big Step Increase in the EM TD Program Office of Environmental Management No EM Mission Completed State Completed Site Remaining EM Mission MISSION SUCCESS AND CHALLENGE MISSION SUCCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 2014 $152 billion total spent. Completed 91 of 107 major sites. Profile of Historical EM Annual Costs US Dollars in Billions Average Annual Budget = $6B MISSION CHALLENGE 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2016 2026 2036 2046 2056 2066 $235 billion to-go estimate. 2065 completion

  13. SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 15, 2015 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.env.nm.gov CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED RYAN FLYNN Cabinet Secretary BUTCH TONGA TE Deputy Secretary Dana C. Bryson, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy Philip J. Breidenbach, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P .0. Box 2078 P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad,NewMexico 88221-2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico

  14. SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2016 State of New Mexico ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Harold Runnels Building 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5469 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Telephone (505) 827-2855 Fax (505) 827-2836 www.env.nm.gov CERTIFIED MAIL- RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED RYAN FLYNN Cabinet SecretaJy BUTCH TONGA TE Deputy Secretary Todd A. Shrader, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Philip J. Breidenbach, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-2078

  15. SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOfiN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JOfiN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor May 20,2015 State of New Mexico ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Harold Runnels Building I 190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5469 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Telephone (505) 827-2855 Fax (505) 827-2836 www.nmenv.state.nm.us CERTIFIED MAIL- RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED RYAN FLYNN Cabinet Secretary BUTCII TONGA TE Deputy Secretary Jose Franco, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Robert L. McQuinn, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P.O. Box

  16. 1987 may mirror 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This article is a survey of the Australian Pacific region and its oil activity. Highlights of the article include the fact that 1987 drilling rates should be approximately comparable to 1986 rates especially in Australia. Details of the activity include the fact that the Australian Government seems to be reducing taxes and that New Zealand has also changed its tax policy. Drilling remains successful in the Timor Sea and a new production has been opened in the Bass Strait. Activity is also beginning on the Papua New Guinea area.

  17. SOPAC marine geology atlases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, T.E.; Seekins, B.A.; Young, J.D.; Wahler, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    The US Geological Survey conducted a series of marine geologic and geophysical cruises in the southwest Pacific Ocean in 1982 and 1984 as part of a program with participation by Australia and New Zealand. These two SOPAC expeditions obtained various data, which have been compiled into a series of charts and thematic products for the offshore areas of Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, and Papua New Guinea. The maps and charts presently being compiled or revised combine previously collected data with information from the SOPAC expeditions. Regional charts at a scale of approximately 1:3 million are included, and more detailed coverage is available at 1:1 million. Additional geologic information-such as gravity, magnetics, and possibly sediment isopachs-is provided on overlays to the topographic base charts. Reproductions of the seismic reflection data are also included, and tracklines with both time marks and shotpoints will permit correlation with the analog and digital seismic records.

  18. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.; Herzer, R.H.

    1985-10-01

    New Zealand had an increase in petroleum production, while exploration drilling continued at 1983's high level. Although there was an overall drop in licensed acreage, the amount of seismic exploration increased markedly, with 1,100 km of acquisition onshore and 4,300 km offshore. A new oil discovery, Toetoe-1A, was made near McKee field. Combined production from Kapuni, Maui, McKee, and Kaimiro fields was 2,978.56 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of gas (up 25%) and 962,323 m/sup 3/ of condensate (up 14%). The combined McKee and Pouri fields, which came on line in November, are producing oil at about 5,200 b/d (830 m/sup 3//day). All licenses in Tonga have been relinquished, and all company data are on open file. New petroleum legislation will be in force in 1985. Fiji had no exploration activities. Three license blocks have been renewed at reduced acreage. Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands are still awaiting legislation for petroleum exploration. A second stage of a CCOP/SOPAC-sponsored tripartite project (S. P. Lee cruise) was carried out in both countries, and also in Tonga and the New Ireland basin of Papua New Guinea. On the mainland of Papua New Guinea, 5 wells were drilled to a combined depth of 10,158 m (up 10.9%). All were dry. Concession areas comprise 11 Petroleum Prospecting Licences with a total of 1,062 blocks (at 5-min graticules).

  19. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.; Herzer, R.H.

    1985-10-01

    New Zealand had an increase in petroleum production, while exploration drilling continued at 1983's high level. Although there was an overall drop in licensed acreage, the amount of seismic exploration increased markedly, with 1100 km of acquisition onshore and 4300 km offshore. A new oil discovery, Toetoe-1A, was made near McKee field. Combined production from Kapuni, Maui, McKee, and Kaimiro fields was 2978.56 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of gas (up 25%) and 962,323 m/sup 3/ of condensate (up 14%). The combined McKee and Pouri fields, which came on line in November, are producing oil at about 5200 b/d (830 m/sup 3//day). All licenses in Tonga have been relinquished, and all company data are on open file. New petroleum legislation will be in force in 1985. Fiji had no exploration activities. Three license blocks have been renewed at reduced acreage. Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands are still awaiting legislation for petroleum exploration. A second stage of a CCOP/SOPAC-sponsored tripartite project (S.P. Lee cruise) was carried out in both countries, and also in Tonga and the New Ireland basin of Papua New Guinea. On the mainland of Papua New Guinea, 5 wells were drilled to a combined depth of 10,158 m (up 10.9%). All were dry. Concession areas comprise 11 Petroleum Prospecting Licenses with a total of 1062 blocks (at 5-min graticules). 5 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Australia/Pacific: Industry watchers expect the worst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This article presents the outlook for the Australia/Pacific area with respect to petroleum. The main observations are: ATEA forsees Australia drilling declining by nearly 50% this year compared to last; With no tax relief in sight for crude, major Aussie oil projects are delayed; New Zealand's leasing moratorium has ended, and licensing policies have improved; Australia's self-sufficiency dream vanishes as Bass Strait exports dwindle; Gulf has more finds onshore Papua/New Guinea, but well economics still questionable; Australian gas projects enjoy some insulation from poor crude markets; Jabiru find in Timor Sea due onstream, and Northwest Shelf LNG export plans continue; Australia's largest operators each announce budget cuts; rig count continues to plunge.

  1. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  2. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.; Herzer, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    In New Zealand, a moratorium on petroleum exploration licensing was in effect throughout 1985. Seismic surveying activity was greatly reduced, with 960 km shot offshore and 780 km shot onshore. Drilling continued at a high rate, with 25 wells drilled, 5 offshore and 20 onshore. Total meterage exceeded 41,000 m. Although there were good indications of hydrocarbons, no major discoveries were made. At the end of 1985, the government lifted the licensing moratorium with the announcement of an offer of 50 blocks in the offshore Taranaki basin. Total petroleum production figures for New Zealand were 3802 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1095 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, and 452 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. The entire production is from fields in the Taranaki basin. In 1985, production of synthetic gasoline began at the Motunui synfuels plant using Maui and Kapuni gas and condensate as feedstock. Tonga introduced new petroleum legislation and is offering license blocks for exploration. No activity was reported from Fiji, Vanuatu, and Solomon Islands. License holdings in Papua New Guinea increased 78.3% to 16 petroleum prospecting licenses with a total of 1894 blocks. Seismic surveys amounts to 1500 km on land and 500 km offshore in 1985, after virtually no seismic in 1984. Drilling was up 23.9%. 3 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N.

    1996-12-31

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

  4. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N. )

    1996-01-01

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

  5. Relating electronic and geometric structure of atomic layer deposited BaTiO3 to its electrical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Torgersen, Jan; Acharya, Shinjita; Dadlani, Anup Lal; Petousis, Ioannis; Kim, Yongmin; Trejo, Orlando; Nordlund, Dennis; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-03-24

    Atomic layer deposition allows the fabrication of BaTiO3 (BTO) ultrathin films with tunable dielectric properties, which is a promising material for electronic and optical technology. Industrial applicability necessitates a better understanding of their atomic structure and corresponding properties. Through the use of element-specific X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, O K-edge of BTO as a function of cation composition and underlying substrate (RuO2 and SiO2) is revealed. By employing density functional theory and multiple scattering simulations, we analyze the distortions in BTO’s bonding environment captured by the XANES spectra. The spectral weight shifts to lower energy with increasing Timore » content and provides an atomic scale (microscopic) explanation for the increase in leakage current density. Differences in film morphologies in the first few layers near substrate–film interfaces reveal BTO’s homogeneous growth on RuO2 and its distorted growth on SiO2. As a result, this work links structural changes to BTO thin-film properties and provides insight necessary for optimizing future BTO and other ternary metal oxide-based thin-film devices.« less

  6. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzer, R.H.; Katz, H.R.

    1987-10-01

    In New Zealand, 5 new licenses were granted in offshore Taranaki and 4 licenses were relinquished in other parts of the country. Seismic survey activity increased, partly due to a dense survey over Maui field. Sniffer surveys were used for the first time in New Zealand in 5 licensees. Onshore seismic totaled 717 line-km, and offshore seismic totaled 3693 line-km. Drilling continued at a high level for New Zealand with 12 onshore and 5 offshore wells totaling 57,147 m. Two gas and condensate discoveries, Tariki-1A and Ahuroa-2A, were made in the overthrust play of eastern Taranaki, and a gas and condensate (possible oil) discovery was made off the south Taranaki coast at Kupe South-1. Total petroleum production increased to 4546 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1208 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, 186.7 thousand m/sup 3/ of LPG, and 501 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. Early depletion of the D-sand reservoir in Maui-A field led Shell BP Todd to shoot 1598 km of seismic over the field and to drill 3 appraisal wells. Tonga has released a new license map with 119 blocks offered. Significant changes in legislation include increased royalties, a reduction of exploration license duration to 11 years (but 25 years for development of a discovery), and replacement of expenditure commitments by license work programs. In Papua New Guinea, Iagifu-2X discovery was confirmed with the drilling of Iagifu-3X, which established 4 oil pay zones in the field. The Papuan foldbelt is now considered a very attractive oil province, and most of the basin is under license. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  7. Developments in New Zealand and Southwest Pacific island region in 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1980-11-01

    Exploration in New Zealand in 1979 reached one of the lowest levels recorded. Offshore, there was no drilling or seismic work, and the remaining concession area amounts to a mere 9088 sq km. Onland concession areas, all owned by the government company Petrocorp, are 14,771.4 sq km; 2 important areas were relinquished and others were enlarged. One rig was drilling throughout the year, totaling 6230 m. Seismic surveys amounted to 7 party-months and 554.55 km, which is 66% of 1978. Platform A of the Maui field started production in June. Despite this, the combined production of the Kapuni and Maui fields decreased to 61.5% for gas and 64.3% for condensate - or 1,307.464 x 10/sup 6/ cu m of gas and 476,893 cu m of condensate. LPG was obtained at some higher rates, that is, 19,577.93 cu m or 128.8% of last year's production, and natural gasoline at 8,591.61 cu m or 102.1%. In Tonga, last year's unsuccessful drilling of 3 dry holes was followed by marine seismic surveys north and east of Tongatapu Island. In Fiji, offshore seismic surveys of 6000 line-km were completed, as well as geochemical surveys looking for sea-bottom anomalies. With the farm-in of Chevron Overseas Inc., drilling is planned for at least 2 offshore wells early in 1980. In the New Hebrides, draft legislation is now underway for a petroleum act. Also, in the Solomon Islands, draft legislation was put before parliament near year end, and final arrangements are to be completed in 1980. In Papua New Guinea no seismic or geologic field surveys were conducted. No drilling was undertaken, but access and site preparations were carried out for Kiunga 1 well to be drilled by Niugini Gulf Oil Pty. Ltd. early in 1980. Minor concession changes have been made.

  8. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, J.P.; Katz, H.R.

    1988-10-01

    In New Zealand, 14 new licenses were granted: 6 in the East Coast region, 6 offshore Taranaki, and 2 in the South Island. Two licenses were relinquished, and the onshore Taranaki license held by petrocorp expired. Onshore seismic activity totaled 525 km; offshore seismic activity totaled 3,221 km (reconnaissance seismic surveys by TCPL accounted for much of the offshore activity). Drilling decreased slightly, with 18 wells drilled (13 onshore and 5 offshore) total 55,203 m. The drilling of Kora-1 on a volcanic structure in the North Taranaki basin has led to speculation about a possible oil discovery. Total petroleum production remained steady at 4,360 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1,127 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, 190 thousand m/sup 3/ of LPG, and 509 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. In Papua New Guinea, further discoveries in the overthrust belt of the Papuan basin have confirmed the highly prospective nature of this area. A major gas and condensate field with 4 pay zones was established in the Hides structure east of Juha field, and early in 1988 gas, condensate, and oil were found in the Hedinia structure south of the Iagifu oil field discovered in 1986. Total drilling amounted to 15,725.55 m during 1987. Seismic surveys covered 858 km onshore and 4,747 km offshore. There are 36 active Petroleum Prospecting Licenses: 32 in the Papuan basin and 4 in the North New Guinea basin. No new developments were reported in Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Vanuatu. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1984-10-01

    New Zealand had an increase in exploration activity, particularly drilling. 30,876 m were drilled onshore (up 62%) and 14,034 m offshore. Concession holdings slightly increased offshore (to 230,665 km), but dropped to nearly half onshore (to 34,353 km). Seismic surveys decreased to 477.5 line-km onshore and 1128 km offshore, down 56% and 93%, respectively. Oil, gas, and condensate were found in several wells on small structures close to the recently discovered McKee field. Regular production from McKee began in April 1984, at an initial rate of 1000 BOPD. Production from Kapuni and Maui fields combined was 2,381.313 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ of gas (up 9.4%) and 845,286 m/sup 3/ of condensate (down 2.3%). Construction of a 1200-MT/day methanol plant, which uses natural gas from these fields, was completed. No exploration was carried out in Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. In Fiji, all prospecting licenses expired, but renewal terms on areas reduced by 50% were agreed on in principle. Papua New Guinea had 4 wells drilled to a combined depth of 9158 m (up 23.2%). The Juha-2X appraisal well confirmed the discovery of gas and condensate in the Juha anticline. In the Gulf of Papua, the offshore appraisal well, Pasca-A3, blew out and was abandoned. The total area of petroleum prospecting licenses slightly increased to 74,715 km. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  10. How to stabilize highly active Cu+ cations in a mixed-oxide catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Luo, Si; Kim, Hyun You; Yang, Xiaofang; Baber, Ashleigh E.; Hoffmann, Friedrich M.; Senanayake, Sananayake; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Chen, Jingguang G.; Liu, Ping; et al

    2015-09-12

    Mixed-metal oxides exhibit novel properties that are not present in their isolated constituent metal oxides and play a significant role in heterogeneous catalysis. In this study, a titanium-copper mixed-oxide (TiCuOx) film has been synthesized on Cu(111) and characterized by complementary experimental and theoretical methods. At sub-monolayer coverages of titanium, a Cu2O-like phase coexists with TiCuOx and TiOx domains. When the mixed-oxide surface is exposed at elevated temperatures (600–650 K) to oxygen, the formation of a well-ordered TiCuOx film occurs. Stepwise oxidation of TiCuOx shows that the formation of the mixed-oxide is faster than that of pure Cu2O. As the Timore » coverage increases, Ti-rich islands (TiOx) form. The adsorption of CO has been used to probe the exposed surface sites on the TiOx–CuOx system, indicating the existence of a new Cu+ adsorption site that is not present on Cu2O/Cu(111). Adsorption of CO on Cu+ sites of TiCuOx is thermally more stable than on Cu(111), Cu2O/Cu(111) or TiO2(110). The Cu+ sites in TiCuOx domains are stable under both reducing and oxidizing conditions whereas the Cu2O domains present on sub-monolayer loads of Ti can be reduced or oxidized under mild conditions. Furthermore, the results presented here demonstrate novel properties of TiCuOx films, which are not present on Cu(111), Cu2O/Cu(111), or TiO2(110), and highlight the importance of the preparation and characterization of well-defined mixed-metal oxides in order to understand fundamental processes that could guide the design of new materials.« less

  11. Crustal structure beneath two seismic stations in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone derived from receiver function analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syuhada; Hananto, Nugroho D.; Handayani, Lina; Puspito, Nanang T; Yudistira, Tedi; Anggono, Titi

    2015-04-24

    We analyzed receiver functions to estimate the crustal thickness and velocity structure beneath two stations of Geofon (GE) network in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. The stations are located in two different tectonic regimes: Sumbawa Island (station PLAI) and Timor Island (station SOEI) representing the oceanic and continental characters, respectively. We analyzed teleseismic events of 80 earthquakes to calculate the receiver functions using the time-domain iterative deconvolution technique. We employed 2D grid search (H-κ) algorithm based on the Moho interaction phases to estimate crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio. We also derived the S-wave velocity variation with depth beneath both stations by inverting the receiver functions. We obtained that beneath station PLAI the crustal thickness is about 27.8 km with Vp/Vs ratio 2.01. As station SOEI is covered by very thick low-velocity sediment causing unstable solution for the inversion, we modified the initial velocity model by adding the sediment thickness estimated using high frequency content of receiver functions in H-κ stacking process. We obtained the crustal thickness is about 37 km with VP/Vs ratio 2.2 beneath station SOEI. We suggest that the high Vp/Vs in station PLAI may indicate the presence of fluid ascending from the subducted plate to the volcanic arc, whereas the high Vp/Vs in station SOEI could be due to the presence of sediment and rich mafic composition in the upper crust and possibly related to the serpentinization process in the lower crust. We also suggest that the difference in velocity models and crustal thicknesses between stations PLAI and SOEI are consistent with their contrasting tectonic environments.

  12. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination

  13. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOEs Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of

  14. New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, H.R.

    1981-10-01

    In New Zealand, new incentives by the government have greatly stimulated interest in exploration. On land, four wells were completed during 1980 at a total depth of 10,120 m. One well was a commercial oil and gas discovery. Offshore, the first exploratory well since 1978 was spudded shortly before the end of 1980. Offshore concession areas have increased over ten-fold, to 107,044 km/sup 2/; on-land licenses, which are all owned by the government company Petrocorp, decreased to 11,591 km/sup 2/. During 1980, the combined output of Kapuni and Maui gas was 1,069,049 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/, a decrease of 18.23%. This reflects the new gas-recycling operation at the Kapuni field, which started in April. Combined condensate production was down only 12.15%, amounting to 418,941 m/sup 3/. Natural gasoline was down 17.44%, to 7093 m/sup 3/, whereas LPG production went up 39.44%, to 27,301 m/sup 3/. In Tonga, 925 km of offshore multichannel seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys run in 1979 have been processed and interpreted. In Fiji, the first two exploratory wells ever drilled were dry. In Vanuatu, the newly independent republic of the former New Hebrides Condominium, no petroleum legislation has so far been introduced. CCOP/SOPAC and ORSTOM jointly ran a 4000-km single-channel reflection seismic survey between the northern islands. Several sedimentary basins with over 2500 m of slightly deformed sediments of Miocene-Pliocene age have been delineated. In the Solomon Islands, there is still no petroleum legislation, but the draft of the Petroleum (Exploration and Development) Act has been completed and will go before Parliament during 1981. In Papua New Guinea, one well was drilled to 3027 m and abandoned as dry. It confirmed the regional stratigraphic interpretation and had encouraging hydrocarbon indications in the Mesozoic part of the sequence. 6 figures, 5 tables.