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Sample records for timor togo tonga

  1. Tonga Capital Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tonga Capital Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tonga Capital Corporation Place: Arvada, Colorado Sector: Biofuels Product: Capital pool company, which ran out of...

  2. Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  3. Tonga: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Tonga Population 103,036 GDP 439,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TO 3-letter ISO code TON Numeric ISO...

  4. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Togo Population 5,337,000 GDP 3,685,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TG 3-letter ISO code TGO Numeric ISO...

  5. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Togo Population 7,154,237 GDP 3,685,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TG 3-letter ISO code TGO Numeric ISO...

  6. Office of Communication - Brochures Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tadjikistan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks & Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United...

  7. Timor-Leste: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 200,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 45 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 553,800,000 Barrels (bbl) 46 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  8. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  9. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OAPM Red Yellow Report Office of Acquisition and Project Management (OAPM) MA-60 U. S. Department of Energy July 2014 Achieving Management and Operational Excellence Analysis Reports - Project Analysis SOP Page 2 APM DepSec Monthly Reports * APM DepSec Monthly Reports * Verification Reports (Project) - APM Red/Yellow Detail 1 - 6 Month Trend - APM Red/Yellow Detail 2 - 12 Month Plan v Actual - APM Red/Yellow Detail 3 - Contractor Completion Forecast - APM Red/Yellow Detail 4 - TPC To-Go - APM

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Rod Rimando- NCW 2015 - TD Session 150929 Rimando Opening

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A Big Step Increase in the EM TD Program Office of Environmental Management No EM Mission Completed State Completed Site Remaining EM Mission MISSION SUCCESS AND CHALLENGE MISSION SUCCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 2014 $152 billion total spent. Completed 91 of 107 major sites. Profile of Historical EM Annual Costs US Dollars in Billions Average Annual Budget = $6B MISSION CHALLENGE 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2016 2026 2036 2046 2056 2066 $235 billion to-go estimate. 2065 completion

  11. SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 15, 2015 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.env.nm.gov CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED RYAN FLYNN Cabinet Secretary BUTCH TONGA TE Deputy Secretary Dana C. Bryson, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy Philip J. Breidenbach, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P .0. Box 2078 P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad,NewMexico 88221-2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico

  12. SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOfiN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JOfiN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor May 20,2015 State of New Mexico ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Harold Runnels Building I 190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5469 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Telephone (505) 827-2855 Fax (505) 827-2836 www.nmenv.state.nm.us CERTIFIED MAIL- RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED RYAN FLYNN Cabinet Secretary BUTCII TONGA TE Deputy Secretary Jose Franco, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Robert L. McQuinn, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P.O. Box

  13. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  14. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  15. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.