National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for timer motion sensor

  1. Presentation Timer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-23

    Abstract Conferences and Meetings feature many presentations on a tight schedule. The Session Timer system provides an electronic display for showing the remaining time in a presentation. It provides continuous feedback so the speaker can judge the pace throughout a presentation. The timer automates the job so the session chairman does not have to awkwardly interrupt the speaker.

  2. Microelectromechanical timer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.; Plummer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    A microminiature timer having an optical readout is disclosed. The timer can be formed by surface micromachining or LIGA processes on a silicon substrate. The timer includes an integral motor (e.g. an electrostatic motor) that can intermittently wind a mainspring to store mechanical energy for driving a train of meshed timing gears at a rate that is regulated by a verge escapement. Each timing gear contains an optical encoder that can be read out with one or more light beams (e.g. from a laser or light-emitting diode) to recover timing information. In the event that electrical power to the timer is temporarily interrupted, the mechanical clock formed by the meshed timing gears and verge escapement can continue to operate, generating accurate timing information that can be read out when the power is restored.

  3. Ultra-wideband radar motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-11-01

    A motion sensor is based on ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. UWB radar range is determined by a pulse-echo interval. For motion detection, the sensors operate by staring at a fixed range and then sensing any change in the averaged radar reflectivity at that range. A sampling gate is opened at a fixed delay after the emission of a transmit pulse. The resultant sampling gate output is averaged over repeated pulses. Changes in the averaged sampling gate output represent changes in the radar reflectivity at a particular range, and thus motion. 15 figs.

  4. Full-wave receiver architecture for the homodyne motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haugen, Peter C; Dallum, Gregory E; Welsh, Patrick A; Romero, Carlos E

    2013-11-19

    A homodyne motion sensor or detector based on ultra-wideband radar utilizes the entire received waveform through implementation of a voltage boosting receiver. The receiver includes a receiver input and a receiver output. A first diode is connected to the receiver output. A first charge storage capacitor is connected from between the first diode and the receiver output to ground. A second charge storage capacitor is connected between the receiver input and the first diode. A second diode is connected from between the second charge storage capacitor and the first diode to ground. The dual diode receiver performs voltage boosting of a RF signal received at the receiver input, thereby enhancing receiver sensitivity.

  5. Full-wave receiver architecture for the homodyne motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haugen, Peter C.; Dallum, Gregory E.; Welsh, Patrick A.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2015-09-29

    A homodyne motion sensor or detector based on ultra-wideband radar utilizes the entire received waveform through implementation of a voltage boosting receiver. The receiver includes a receiver input and a receiver output. A first diode is connected to the receiver output. A first charge storage capacitor is connected from between the first diode and the receiver output to ground. A second charge storage capacitor is connected between the receiver input and the first diode. A second diode is connected from between the second charge storage capacitor and the first diode to ground. The dual diode receiver performs voltage boosting of a RF signal received at the receiver input, thereby enhancing receiver sensitivity.

  6. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, William D.; Naughton, Jonathan; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  7. Phase coded, micro-power impulse radar motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-05-21

    A motion sensing, micro-power impulse radar MIR impresses on the transmitted signal, or the received pulse timing signal, one or more frequencies lower than the pulse repetition frequency, that become intermediate frequencies in a ``IF homodyne`` receiver. Thus, many advantages of classical RF receivers can be thereby be realized with ultra-wide band radar. The sensor includes a transmitter which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal at a nominal pulse repetition frequency. A receiver samples echoes of the sequence of electromagnetic pulses from objects within the field with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The relative timing of the transmit timing signal and the receive timing signal is modulated between a first relative delay and a second relative delay at an intermediate frequency, causing the receiver to sample the echoes such that the time between transmissions of pulses in the sequence and samples by the receiver is modulated at the intermediate frequency. Modulation may be executed by modulating the pulse repetition frequency which drives the transmitter, by modulating the delay circuitry which controls the relative timing of the sample strobe, or by modulating amplitude of the transmitted pulses. The electromagnetic pulses will have a nominal center frequency related to pulse width, and the first relative delay and the second relative delay between which the timing signals are modulated, differ by less than the nominal pulse width, and preferably by about one-quarter wavelength at the nominal center frequency of the transmitted pulses. 5 figs.

  8. Phase coded, micro-power impulse radar motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A motion sensing, micro-power impulse radar MIR impresses on the transmitted signal, or the received pulse timing signal, one or more frequencies lower than the pulse repetition frequency, that become intermediate frequencies in a "IF homodyne" receiver. Thus, many advantages of classical RF receivers can be thereby be realized with ultra-wide band radar. The sensor includes a transmitter which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal at a nominal pulse repetition frequency. A receiver samples echoes of the sequence of electromagnetic pulses from objects within the field with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The relative timing of the transmit timing signal and the receive timing signal is modulated between a first relative delay and a second relative delay at an intermediate frequency, causing the receiver to sample the echoes such that the time between transmissions of pulses in the sequence and samples by the receiver is modulated at the intermediate frequency. Modulation may be executed by modulating the pulse repetition frequency which drives the transmitter, by modulating the delay circuitry which controls the relative timing of the sample strobe, or by modulating amplitude of the transmitted pulses. The electromagnetic pulses will have a nominal center frequency related to pulse width, and the first relative delay and the second relative delay between which the timing signals are modulated, differ by less than the nominal pulse width, and preferably by about one-quarter wavelength at the nominal center frequency of the transmitted pulses.

  9. Apparatus, system, and method for synchronizing a timer key

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condit, Reston A; Daniels, Michael A; Clemens, Gregory P; Tomberlin, Eric S; Johnson, Joel A

    2014-04-22

    A timer key relating to monitoring a countdown time of a countdown routine of an electronic device is disclosed. The timer key comprises a processor configured to respond to a countdown time associated with operation of the electronic device, a display operably coupled with the processor, and a housing configured to house at least the processor. The housing has an associated structure configured to engage with the electronic device to share the countdown time between the electronic device and the timer key. The processor is configured to begin a countdown routine based at least in part on the countdown time, wherein the countdown routine is at least substantially synchronized with a countdown routine of the electronic device when the timer key is removed from the electronic device. A system and method for synchronizing countdown routines of a timer key and an electronic device are also disclosed.

  10. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, John Kyle P; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  11. Methods for synchronizing a countdown routine of a timer key and electronic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condit, Reston A.; Daniels, Michael A.; Clemens, Gregory P.; Tomberlin, Eric S.; Johnson, Joel A.

    2015-06-02

    A timer key relating to monitoring a countdown time of a countdown routine of an electronic device is disclosed. The timer key comprises a processor configured to respond to a countdown time associated with operation of the electronic device, a display operably coupled with the processor, and a housing configured to house at least the processor. The housing has an associated structure configured to engage with the electronic device to share the countdown time between the electronic device and the timer key. The processor is configured to begin a countdown routine based at least in part on the countdown time, wherein the countdown routine is at least substantially synchronized with a countdown routine of the electronic device when the timer key is removed from the electronic device. A system and method for synchronizing countdown routines of a timer key and an electronic device are also disclosed.

  12. Force sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  13. Force sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  14. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  15. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  16. R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an...

  17. Ultra-wideband radar sensors and networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leach, Jr., Richard R; Nekoogar, Faranak; Haugen, Peter C

    2013-08-06

    Ultra wideband radar motion sensors strategically placed in an area of interest communicate with a wireless ad hoc network to provide remote area surveillance. Swept range impulse radar and a heart and respiration monitor combined with the motion sensor further improves discrimination.

  18. Image-based occupancy sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polese, Luigi Gentile; Brackney, Larry

    2015-05-19

    An image-based occupancy sensor includes a motion detection module that receives and processes an image signal to generate a motion detection signal, a people detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a people detection signal, a face detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a face detection signal, and a sensor integration module that receives the motion detection signal from the motion detection module, receives the people detection signal from the people detection module, receives the face detection signal from the face detection module, and generates an occupancy signal using the motion detection signal, the people detection signal, and the face detection signal, with the occupancy signal indicating vacancy or occupancy, with an occupancy indication specifying that one or more people are detected within the monitored volume.

  19. Current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-01-16

    A current sensor is described that uses a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. The sensor can be hinged to allow clamping to a conductor. The current sensor provides high measurement accuracy for both DC and AC currents, and is substantially immune to the effects of temperature, conductor position, nearby current carrying conductors and aging.

  20. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  1. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  2. Sandia Motion Measurement Processor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-01

    SANDIA-MMP is used to estimate the motion of the belly and wing pods of an aircraft given various indirect in-flight measurements.

  3. Wireless sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, JR, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2016-02-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting a target material. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon exposure to vapor or liquid from the target material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The target material is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  4. DOE Opposes Injunction Motion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 23, 2010, the Department of Energy opposed the State of Washington’s motion to enjoin the Department's efforts to wind down the Yucca Mountain Program. The Department's filing, made in the...

  5. Hydrogen sensor (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen sensor Title: Hydrogen sensor A hydrogen sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites ...

  6. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  7. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  8. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  9. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  10. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  11. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  12. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  13. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  14. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  15. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  16. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  17. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  18. Influenza Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2006-03-28

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  19. Influenza Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2005-05-17

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  20. Influenza sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2003-09-30

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  1. Microcantilever sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, T.G.; Wachter, E.A.

    1998-02-17

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. 16 figs.

  2. Microcantilever sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Wachter, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere.

  3. MHK ISDB/Instruments/AirMar 42183 Heading Sensor | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2-IPS CDL MiniSense 2 CDL MiniPOSNAV ... further results 3-axis Acceleration (Translation) (6) Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS CDL MiniPOSNAV3 AIRMAR 200WX Weather Station...

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Mian; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-11-01

    This review article provides a comprehensive review on sensors and biosensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  5. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  6. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  7. Soliton trains in motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hause, A.; Mitschke, F.

    2010-10-15

    Two solitons in an optical fiber can form pairs in which the double-humped shape is maintained even when the pair is shifted in frequency by the Raman effect. We show here analytically that this is possible even when the two solitons have unequal power. We discuss the forces that cause relative motion of the two solitons, and determine a condition for balance, i.e., for a pair to maintain their separation while the phase keeps evolving. At a specific parameter point we find a solution in which even the phase profile of the pulse pair is maintained. We then discuss that this special point exists also for multipeak structures, or soliton trains. These trains can move as an entity due to Raman shifting. The results are tested by numerical simulation. A comparison to literature reveals that both the rotating phase pair and the constant phase soliton pair apparently have been seen before by others in numerical simulations. Our treatment provides the general framework.

  8. Session Timer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or for questions and answers. The system is a computer software program, written in Java, that can run on Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems. No.: M-804 Inventor(s):...

  9. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  10. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  11. Secure Sensor Platform

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-08-25

    The Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) software provides a framework of functionality to support the development of low-power autonomous sensors for nuclear safeguards. This framework provides four primary functional blocks of capabilities required to implement autonomous sensors. The capabilities are: communications, security, power management, and cryptography. Utilizing this framework establishes a common set of functional capabilities for seamless interoperability of any sensor based upon the SSP concept.

  12. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  13. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  14. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

  15. High temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  16. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  17. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  18. Multifuctional integrated sensors (MFISES).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homeijer, Brian D.; Roozeboom, Clifton

    2015-10-01

    Many emerging IoT applications require sensing of multiple physical and environmental parameters for: completeness of information, measurement validation, unexpected demands, improved performance. For example, a typical outdoor weather station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light intensity, rainfall, wind speed and direction. Existing sensor technologies do not directly address the demand for cost, size, and power reduction in multi-paramater sensing applications. Industry sensor manufacturers have developed integrated sensor systems for inertial measurements that combine accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers, but do not address environmental sensing functionality. In existing research literature, a technology gap exists between the functionality of MEMS sensors and the real world applications of the sensors systems.

  19. Blue Motion Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motion Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue Motion Energy Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and...

  20. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  1. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  2. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josten, Nicholas E.; Svoboda, John M.

    1999-01-01

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency.

  3. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josten, N.E.; Svoboda, J.M.

    1999-05-25

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency. 13 figs.

  4. R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings July 23, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms to detect movement and human presence in a room with an accuracy of more than 90 percent -- an

  5. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  6. Clementine sensor suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.

    1994-11-15

    LLNL designed and built the suite of six miniaturized light-weight space-qualified sensors utilized in the Clementine mission. A major goal of the Clementine program was to demonstrate technologies originally developed for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Programs. These sensors were modified to gather data from the moon. This overview presents each of these sensors and some preliminary on-orbit performance estimates. The basic subsystems of these sensors include optical baffles to reject off-axis stray light, light-weight ruggedized optical systems, filter wheel assemblies, radiation tolerant focal plane arrays, radiation hardened control and readout electronics and low mass and power mechanical cryogenic coolers for the infrared sensors. Descriptions of each sensor type are given along with design specifications, photographs and on-orbit data collected.

  7. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  8. Speech articulator measurements using low power EM-wave sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.; Ng, L.C.; Lea, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions as speech is produced. Glottal tissue oscillations, jaw, tongue, soft palate, and other organs have been measured. Previously, microwave imaging (e.g., using radar sensors) appears not to have been considered for such monitoring. Glottal tissue movements detected by radar sensors correlate well with those obtained by established laboratory techniques, and have been used to estimate a voiced excitation function for speech processing applications. The noninvasive access, coupled with the small size, low power, and high resolution of these new sensors, permit promising research and development applications in speech production, communication disorders, speech recognition and related topics. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  9. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  10. Beam imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAninch, Michael D; Root, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  11. Sensors, Instrumentation Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors, Instrumentation Systems Sensors, Instrumentation Systems National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Sensors Los Alamos National Laboratory's Kevin Farinholt holds a prototype rectifying antenna array used in experiments designed to monitor the structural health of bridges around the United States. Overview Charlie

  12. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  13. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  14. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  15. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  16. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  17. Beam imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  18. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris; Larson, David

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  19. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  20. Intake Air Oxygen Sensor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ignition can occur at elevated gas temperatures and with aged sensor Next Steps FMEA Study to understand ignition risk for failure modes identified by FMEA Identify...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Sensors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Existing techniques for detecting hydrogen have numerous drawbacks: limited dynamic range; ... such as density and viscosity and to act as in situ chemical sensors for liquids. ...

  2. Ion mobility sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  3. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  4. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart Barometric Pressure Sensor | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sensor 2810 HWS Barometric Pressure Sensor ... further results Also made by Onset Computer Corporation HOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring SystemHOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring...

  5. Advancing Sensor Web Interoperability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar, Mallikarjun; Gorman, Bryan L.; Smith, Cyrus M.

    2005-01-01

    SensorNet is a framework being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to tie together sensor data from all over the country to create a real-time detection and alert system for various threats, whether they are chemical, radiological, biological, nuclear, or explosive.

  6. Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has created codes that ensure that a robot will come to a stop at a precise, specified distance from any obstacle regardless of the robot's initial speed, its physical characteristics, and the responsiveness of the low-level motor control schema. This Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots system iteratively adjusts the robot's action in response to information about the robot's environment.

  7. Anharmonicity in nuclear wobbling motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oi, M.

    2007-09-15

    An unexpected strong anharmonicity was observed in the wobbling spectrum in {sup 163}Lu. In an attempt to understand what causes the deviation from the original wobbling model by Bohr and Mottelson, an analysis is presented using several different approaches, such as exact diagonalization, a semiclassical model to deal with anharmonic wobbling motion, and a microscopic method based on the self-consistent cranking calculation.

  8. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  9. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  10. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L.; Vogt, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  11. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-09-12

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  12. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  13. RF current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  14. Collective cell motion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collective cell motion Share Topic Programs Materials science Materials simulation & theory Mathematics, computing, & computer science Modeling, simulation, & visualization Over ...

  15. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring; Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul; Kershaw, Christopher Patrick; Kyker, Ronald Dean

    2008-06-10

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  16. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  17. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  18. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Taylor, Paul L.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  20. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  1. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P.; Staple, Bevan D.; Smith, James H.

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  2. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2010-02-23

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  3. High Density Sensor Network Development | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Density Sensor Network Development

  4. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information.

  5. Wireless radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, Jr, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Kress, Reid L.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting radiation. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a radiation sensitive material coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The radiation sensitive material is operable to change a tensile stress of the ferromagnetic metal upon exposure to radiation. The radiation is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  6. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  7. Space and Sensors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space and Sensors Space and Sensors Create, deliver, support, and exploit innovative sensing systems for space-based, airborne and ground-based applications to address critical national security and scientific challenges. Contact thumbnail of Business Development Executive Michael Erickson Business Development Executive Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 667-8087 Email Space Create, deliver, support, and exploit innovative sensing systems for space-based, airborne and ground-based

  8. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  9. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2010-11-01

    NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications

  10. Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

  11. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  12. Fiber optic and laser sensors IV: SPIE volume 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Paula, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following: Sensors overview I; Sensors overview II; Specialized fiber optic sensors I; Specialized fiber optic sensors II; and Specialized fiber optic sensors III.

  13. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  15. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  16. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  17. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W.

    2008-04-08

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  18. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  19. Distributed Sensors Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-08-30

    The Distributed Sensors Simulator (DSS) is an infrastructure that allows the user to debug and test software for distributed sensor networks without the commitment inherent in using hardware. The flexibility of DSS allows developers and researchers to investigate topological, phenomenological, networking, robustness, and scaling issues; explore arbitrary algorithms for DSNs; and is particularly useful as a proof-of-concept tool. The user provides data on node location and specifications, defines event phenomena, and plugs in the application(s)more » to run. DSS in turn provides the virtual environmental embedding — but exposed to the user like no true embedding could ever be.« less

  20. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  1. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  2. Chemical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  3. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  4. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  5. Hydrogen Sensor Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3a. The Agenda HYDROGEN SENSOR WORKSHOP AGENDA June 8 th , 2011  Chicago, IL 8:00 am - 8:30 am Registration Workshop will take place in a room at the Convention Center. Exact room 21. 8:30 am - 8:50 am Welcome Remarks William Buttner, NREL DOE Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Program; Role of Sensors 8:50 am - 9:00 am Scott McWorter, SRNL; DOE 9:00 am - 9:20 am 2007 Workshop Robert Glass/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2011 Workshop Background and Objectives; Technology Update Robert Burgess,

  6. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter will be released periodically to inform program stakeholders about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) R&D programs.

  7. High frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avicola, K.; Salmon, J.T.; Brase, J.; Waltjen, K.; Presta, R.; Balch, K.S.

    1992-03-01

    A two-stage intensified 192 {times} 239 pixel imager developed by Eastman Kodak for motion analysis was used to construct a 1 kHz frame-rate Hartmann wavefront sensor. The sensor uses a monolithic array of lenslets with a focal length that is adjusted by an index fluid between the convex surface and an optical flat. The accuracy of the calculated centroid position, which is related to wavefront measurement accuracy, was obtained as a function of spot power and spot size. The sensor was then dynamically tested at a 1 kHz frame-rate with a 9 {times} 9 lenslet array and a fast steering mirror, which swept a plane wavefront across the wavefront sensor. An 8 cm diameter subaperture will provide a return signal (589 nm) level of about 1000 photons/ms using the AVLIS 1 kW laser (stretched pulse) as guide star source, which is sufficient to yield a wavefront measurement of better than {gamma}/10 rms. If an area of 6 {times} 6 pixels per Hartmann spot were allocated, this wavefront sensor could support a 32 {times} 32, or 1024, element deformable mirror.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  9. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  10. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  11. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  12. Composite sensor membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arun; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Yue, Min

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  13. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  14. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy; Straub, Douglas L.; Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Huckaby, David

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  15. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  16. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  17. SensorNet Node Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-01

    The software in the SensorNet Node adopts and builds on IEEE 1451 interface principles to read data from and control sensors, stores the data in internal database structures, and transmits it in adapted Web Feature Services protocol packets to the SensorNet database. Failover software ensures that at least one available mode of communication remains alive.

  18. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  19. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sleefe, Gerard E.; Rudnick, Thomas J.; Novak, James L.

    2002-01-01

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  20. Coeur dAlene Tribe Benewah Market Energy Efficiency Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Conditions Lighting * Type * Power Rating * Controls * Occupancy Sensors * Photocells * Timers * Efficacy Plug ... Energy Opportunities * Solar Energy * 5.1 Peak Sun Hours ...

  1. Coeur dAlene Tribe Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Conditions Lighting * Type * Power Rating * Controls * Occupancy Sensors * Photocells * Timers * Efficacy Plug ... Energy Opportunities * Solar Energy * 5.1 Peak Sun Hours ...

  2. Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouchard, Line Catherine; Poole, Stephen W; Lothian, Josh

    2009-07-01

    This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

  3. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  4. Alarm sensor apparatus for closures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, James A.; Stoddard, Lawrence M.

    1986-01-01

    An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

  5. Alarm sensor apparatus for closures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

    1984-01-31

    An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

  6. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  7. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harben, Philip E. (Oakley, CA); Rodgers, Peter W. (Santa Barbara, CA); Ewert, Daniel W. (Patterson, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A seismic switching device that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period.

  8. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A.; Noda, Frank T.; Mitchell, Dean J.; Etzkin, Joshua L.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  9. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  10. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  11. Microelectromechanical inertial sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2012-06-26

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) inertial sensor is disclosed which can be used to sense a linear acceleration, or a Coriolis acceleration due to an angular rotation rate, or both. The MEM inertial sensor has a proof mass which is supported on a bridge extending across an opening through a substrate, with the proof mass being balanced on the bridge by a pivot, or suspended from the bridge by the pivot. The proof mass can be oscillated in a tangential direction in the plane of the substrate, with any out-of-plane movement of the proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration being optically detected using transmission gratings located about an outer edge of the proof mass to generate a diffracted light pattern which changes with the out-of-plane movement of the proof mass.

  12. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  13. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  14. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  15. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Remote Sensor Placement Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email The goal of this work is to develop a new autonomous capability for remotely deploying

  16. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  17. Ripeness sensor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  18. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Wave and Tide Sensor 5218 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ISDBSensorsWave and Tide Sensor 5218 < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company...

  19. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Air Pressure Sensor 2810 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ISDBSensorsAir Pressure Sensor 2810 < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company...

  20. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of

  1. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  2. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  3. MHK ISDB/Sensors/HWS Barometric Pressure Sensor | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by ONSET Data Logger. Spec Sheet: http:www.onsetcomp.comfilesmanualpdfs6122-D-MAN-S-BPA.pdf Description The Barometric Pressure Sensor provides average barometric...

  4. Airborne Sensor Thermal Management Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K. K.

    2015-06-03

    The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft. The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft.

  5. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; Battaglia, M.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Caberera, B.; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C. L.; Cooper, W.; Da Via, C.; Demarteau, M.; Fast, J.; Frisch, H.

    2013-10-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  6. Help:Motion Chart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information, visit the Google Help page for Motion Charts Step 2 - Setting up the Chart Once you have the data in the google doc, and it is displaying the ranges you'd like, its...

  7. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  8. Structure functions and intrinsic quark orbital motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavada, Petr

    2007-06-13

    Covariant version of the quark model is studied. It is shown how the polarized and unpolarized structure functions depend on the quark intrinsic motion. The important role of the quark orbital momentum, by which the intrinsic motion is generated, appears as a direct consequence of the covariant description. At the same time, the procedure for obtaining 3D quark momentum distribution from the structure functions is suggested.

  9. Foldtrack in Motion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Motion Foldtrack in Motion Addthis Description Resembling a small bulldozer, Foldtrack is a remotely operated, track-mounted system that uses a plow blade to move radioactive waste from the floor of Hanford's underground storage tanks. In addition to the front-facing blade, the unit is also armed with two onboard water jet systems, three high-pressure turbo nozzles, and a sluicing cannon for sweeping the tank floor. This video was taken during testing at Hanford's Cold Test Facility

  10. Diabaticity of nuclear motion: problems and perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, W [Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The assumption of adiabatic motion lies in foundations of many models of nuclear collective motion. To what extend can nuclear modes be treated adiabatically? Due to the richness and complexity of the nuclear many-body problem there is no unique answer to this question. The challenges of nuclear collective dynamics invite exciting interactions between several areas of physics such as nuclear structure, field theory, nonlinear dynamics, transport theory, and quantum chaos.

  11. Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines Title: Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines Authors: ...

  12. Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application March 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis ...

  13. Motion for Leave to File Consolidated Answer and Consolidated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Motion for Leave to Answer and Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company Motion of Robert G. Burnley, Director the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to ...

  14. Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application DOE's withdraws it's pending license application for a permanent geologic ...

  15. MHK Technologies/Blue Motion Energy marine turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Motion Energy marine turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Blue Motion Energy marine turbine.jpg Technology Profile...

  16. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  17. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  18. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  19. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  20. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  1. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zidong; Lee, Jung Heon; Lu, Yi

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  2. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  3. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1987-01-01

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner.

  4. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1987-06-23

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner. 2 figs.

  5. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-09-30

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron tunneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner.

  6. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  7. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  8. Expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCoy, Kim O.; Downing, Jr., John P.; DeRoos, Bradley G.; Riches, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus is deployed from an airplane or a ship to make oceanographic observations in a profile of the surface-to-ocean floor, while deployed on the floor, and then a second profile when returning to the ocean surface. The device then records surface conditions until on-board batteries fail. All data collected is stored and then transmitted from the surface to either a satellite or other receiving station. The apparatus is provided with an anchor that causes descent to the ocean floor and then permits ascent when the anchor is released. Anchor release is predetermined by the occurrence of a pre-programmed event.

  9. Integrating smart sensors into grid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrating smart sensors into grid systems will enable more complex modeling and ... in currents at A levels in electric grids, which can enable the early detection of ...

  10. Microelectromechanical inertial sensor (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) inertial sensor is disclosed which can be used to sense a linear acceleration, or a Coriolis acceleration due to an angular rotation rate, or both. ...

  11. Sensor Technology Innovators are Invited!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about JUMP, an online community seeking your input for sensor technology innovation. Winning submissions will have an opportunity to further develop their ideas with National Laboratories and...

  12. Giant magnetoresistive sensor (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable ... element; three-dimensional; micro-architecture; capable; significantly; improved; ...

  13. sensors | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    relevant to instrumentation and sensors. Sharing information on MHK instrumentation and lessons learned from laboratory testing and field deployments will help the MHK community...

  14. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  15. Hydrogen Sensor Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor Workshop Agenda Hydrogen Sensor Workshop Agenda Agenda for the Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held June 8, 2011, in Chicago, Illinois.The workshop was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Hydrogen Sensor Workshop Agenda (570.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Codes and Standards and Permitting Hydrogen Safety Sensors 2012 Smart Grid Peer Review

  16. Modeling, system identification, and control for slosh-free motion of an open container of liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddema, J.; Baty, R.; Dykhuizen, R.; Dohrmann, C.; Parker, G.; Robinett, R.; Romero, V.; Schmitt, D.

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses work performed under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) with Corning, Inc., to analyze and test various techniques for controlling the motion of a high speed robotic arm carrying an open container of viscous liquid, in this case, molten glass. A computer model was generated to estimate the modes of oscillation of the liquid based on the shape of the container and the viscosity of the liquid. This fluid model was experimentally verified and tuned based on experimental data from a capacitive sensor on the side of the container. A model of the robot dynamics was also developed and verified through experimental tests on a Fanuc S-800 robot arm. These two models were used to estimate the overall modes of oscillation of an open container of liquid being carried by a robot arm. Using the estimated modes, inverse dynamic control techniques were used to determine a motion profile which would eliminate waves on the liquid`s surface. Experimental tests showed that residual surface waves in an open container of water at the end of motion were reduced by over 95% and that in-motion surface waves were reduced by over 75%.

  17. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  18. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  19. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  20. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  1. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  2. NOx sensor development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sensor development NOx sensor development pm005_glass_2012_o.pdf (835.92 KB) More Documents & Publications NOxsensor development NOx Sensor Development Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

  3. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    updates occur. Search Related Instruments Related Measurement 3-axis Acceleration (Translation) (6) CDL MiniPOSNAV INS AIRMAR 200WX Weather Station AIRMAR 150WX Weather Station...

  4. Energy efficient sensor network implementations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, Janette R; Raby, Eric Y; Brennan, Sean M; Kulathumani, Vinod; Rosten, Ed; Wolinski, Christophe; Wagner, Charles; Charot, Francois

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

  5. Hydrogen Sensor Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor Workshop Hydrogen Sensor Workshop On June 8, 2011, the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory hosted a hydrogen sensors workshop to survey emerging fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure applications that require or would benefit from hydrogen sensors. The workshop also served to identify deficiencies (i.e., technical gaps) of current sensor technologies and to evaluate sensor performance and specification targets for each application in order to meet the defined

  6. Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R. (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

    2008-01-01

    This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

  7. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  8. Fuel cell CO sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen Andreas; Meltser, Mark Alexander; Gutowski, Stanley; Neutzler, Jay Kevin; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Weisbrod, Kirk

    1999-12-14

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  9. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  12. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  13. Hukseflux Thermal Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1993 Technology pyranometer1 , pyrheliometer2, solar concentrator, heat flux sensor "pyranometer1 , pyrheliometer2, solar concentrator, heat flux sensor" cannot be...

  14. Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors Authors: Cole, G D ; Lin, K L ; ...

  15. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  16. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  17. Millimeter Wave Sensor Technologies Track Biometrics; Detect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne's millimeter wave (mmW) sensor technologies measure a wide range of threat ... Argonne's millimeter wave (mmW) sensor technologies measure a wide range of threat ...

  18. Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Active Sensors page? For detailed information on exploration...

  19. Review of High-Speed Fiber Optic Grating Sensors Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udd, E; Benterou, J; May, C; Mihailov, S J; Lu, P

    2010-03-24

    Fiber grating sensors can be used to support a wide variety of high speed measurement applications. This includes measurements of vibrations on bridges, traffic monitoring on freeways, ultrasonic detection to support non-destructive tests on metal plates and providing details of detonation events. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the techniques that have been used to support high speed measurements using fiber grating sensors over frequency ranges from 10s of kHz, to MHZ and finally toward frequencies approaching the GHz regime. Very early in the development of fiber grating sensor systems it was realized that a high speed fiber grating sensor system could be realized by placing an optical filter that might be a fiber grating in front of a detector so that spectral changes in the reflection from a fiber grating were amplitude modulated. In principal the only limitation on this type of system involved the speed of the output detector which with the development of high speed communication links moved from the regime of 10s of MHz toward 10s of GHz. The earliest deployed systems involved civil structures including measurements of the strain fields on composite utility poles and missile bodies during break tests, bridges and freeways. This was followed by a series of developments that included high speed fiber grating sensors to support nondestructive testing via ultrasonic wave detection, high speed machining and monitoring ship hulls. Each of these applications involved monitoring mechanical motion of structures and thus interest was in speeds up to a few 10s of MHz. Most recently there has been interest in using fiber grating to monitor the very high speed events such as detonations and this has led to utilization of fiber gratings that are consumed during an event that may require detection speeds of hundreds of MHz and in the future multiple GHz.

  20. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Solar Radiation Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Light (PAR) with 3m cable Smart Sensor ... further results Also made by Onset Computer Corporation HOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring SystemHOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring...

  1. UAV sensor and survivability issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    This report discusses the most significant tradeoffs between the operating altitude and the complexity and cost of UAVs and sensors. Low altitudes allow less complex, smaller sensors and platforms, but are vulnerable to ground fire. High altitudes require more numerous and capable sensors, but provide wider swaths for more rapid coverage and reduced vulnerability to ground fire. It is shown that for mission requirements and air defenses that higher is not necessarily better and that optimal flight altitudes exist that can be determined analytically.

  2. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Nuyts, Johan; Kuncic, Zdenka; Fulton, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  3. REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasi Sridhar; Garth Tormoen; Ashok Sabata

    2005-10-31

    wireless data transmission, corrosion sensor development, sensor system motion and delivery, and consideration of other pipeline operations issues. In the first year of the program, focus was on sensor development and wireless data transmission. The second year of the program, which was discontinued due to funding shortfall, would have focused on further wireless transmission development, packaging of sensor on wireless, and other operational issues. Because, the second year funding has been discontinued, recommendations are made for future studies.

  4. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  5. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Hughes, Robert C.; Smith, James H.; Moreno, Daniel J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Senturia, Stephen D.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

  6. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  8. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  9. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  10. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2000-01-01

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  11. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  12. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  13. Downhole Sensor Holds Transformative Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Long-term operation of electronics at high temperatures remains a challenge for the geothermal sector; many downhole sensors are prone to failure when deployed in high-temperature wells, which limits the availability and complexity of logging tools av

  14. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  15. Compact Potentiometric NOx Sensor | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potentiometric NOx Sensor Compact Potentiometric NOx Sensor 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm023_singh_2011_p.pdf (1.09 MB) More Documents & Publications Compact Potentiometric O2/NOx Sensor Compact Potentiometric NOx Sensor Compact Potentiometric NOx

  16. Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  17. Battery system with temperature sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  18. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  19. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R.; Alford, W. J.; Gruetzner, James K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  20. Particulate matter sensor with a heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-08-16

    An apparatus to detect particulate matter. The apparatus includes a sensor electrode, a shroud, and a heater. The electrode measures a chemical composition within an exhaust stream. The shroud surrounds at least a portion of the sensor electrode, exclusive of a distal end of the sensor electrode exposed to the exhaust stream. The shroud defines an air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud and an opening toward the distal end of the sensor electrode. The heater is mounted relative to the sensor electrode. The heater burns off particulate matter in the air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud.

  1. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P.

    2012-05-15

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  2. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  3. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Monoxide Sensor Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryScientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed an electrochemical carbon monoxide (CO) sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other CO sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for calibration of every sensor coming off the production line.DescriptionInaccurate CO

  5. The effects of the topographic bench on ground motion from mining explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, J.L.; Blomberg, W.S.; Hopper, H.; Leidig, M.

    2005-07-01

    Understanding the effects of the bench on ground motion can improve the design of cast blasts and achieve improved blast efficiency while remaining below vibration requirements. A new dataset recorded in September 2003 from a coal mine in Arizona has allowed us to examine the excitation of short-period Rayleigh-type surface waves from four simultaneously-detonated explosions in and below a topographic bench of a mine. The explosions were recorded on a network of over 150 seismic sensors, providing an extensive understanding of the ground motion radiation patterns from these explosions. We detonated two separate explosions in the deepest pit of the mine, thus the explosions were shot to solid rock. Within 25 meters of these two explosions, we detonated two additional explosions of similar explosive yields in a bench, thus these explosions were shot to the free face. Radiation patterns and spectral ratios from the explosions show increased amplitudes at azimuths behind the bench relative to the amplitudes in front of the bench. We compared these findings to seismic observations from two {approximately} 1.5 million pound cast blasts at the same mine and found similar radiations patterns. Modeling of these blasts shows that the variations in ground motion are caused by the topographic bench as a result of 1) horizontal spalling of the rock falling into the pit and 2) non-linear scattering near the free-face. Shooting to a buffer also causes the azimuthal variations to be significantly reduced.

  6. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  7. Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Variable valve actuation with onoff IEGR pre-bump is ...

  8. Compression of ground-motion data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    Ground motion data has been recorded for many years at Nevada Test Site and is now stored on thousands of digital tapes. The recording format is very inefficient in terms of space on tape. This report outlines a method to compress the data onto a few hundred tapes while maintaining the accuracy of the recording and allowing restoration of any file to the original format for future use. For future digitizing a more efficient format is described and suggested.

  9. motion-of-large-riprap-rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of a Computational Approach to Detect Instability and Incipient Motion of Large Riprap Rocks" Presentation at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting Washington DC, January 14, 2014 Paper number 14-3035 Cezary Bojanowski Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC), Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory Steven Lottes Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC), Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory Abstract

  10. Video: Collective cell motion - rotation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video: Collective cell motion - rotation Share Topic Environment Biology Computational biology Programs Materials science Materials simulation & theory Mathematics, computing, & ...

  11. INL Subsurface Wireless Sensor Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; John M. Svoboda; James T. Johnson

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a versatile micro-power sensor interface platform for periodic subsurface sensing of environmental variables important to waste disposal sites such as volumetric moisture, water potential, and temperature. The key characteristics of the platform architecture are that the platform is passive until externally energized --no internal power source is required -- and that it communicates with a "reader" via short-range telemetry - no wires penetrate the subsurface. Other significant attributes include the potential for a long service life and a compact size that makes it well suited for retrofitting existing landfill structures. Functionally, the sensor package is "read" by a short-range induction coil that activates and powers the sensor platform as well as detects the sensor output via a radio frequency signal generated by the onboard programmable interface controller microchip. As a result, the platform has a functional subsurface communication range of approximately 10 to 12 ft. and can only accept sensors that require low power to operate.

  12. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  13. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  14. Information-based self-organization of sensor nodes of a sensor network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Teresa H.; Berry, Nina M.

    2011-09-20

    A sensor node detects a plurality of information-based events. The sensor node determines whether at least one other sensor node is an information neighbor of the sensor node based on at least a portion of the plurality of information-based events. The information neighbor has an overlapping field of view with the sensor node. The sensor node sends at least one communication to the at least one other sensor node that is an information neighbor of the sensor node in response to at least one information-based event of the plurality of information-based events.

  15. Sensors and Controls Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors. ...

  16. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Barometric Pressure Sensor | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ISDBInstrumentsBarometric Pressure Sensor < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company...

  17. Template:SpectralImagingSensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is the 'Spectral Imaging Sensor' template. To define a new Spectral Imaging Sensor, please use the Spectral Imaging Sensor Form. Parameters Name - Full, spelled-out name...

  18. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for ...

  19. Carbon nanotube array based sensor (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbon nanotube array based sensor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Carbon nanotube array based sensor A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of ...

  20. Solid-State Sensors for Monitoring Hydrogen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-State Sensors for Monitoring Hydrogen Solid-State Sensors for Monitoring Hydrogen New Sensors Rapidly and Accurately Detect Hydrogen, Improving Industrial Safety and ...

  1. SU-E-J-190: Development of Abdominal Compression & Respiratory Guiding System Using Gas Pressure Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T; Kim, D; Kang, S; Cho, M; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Abdominal compression is known to be effective but, often makes external-marker-based monitoring of breathing motion not feasible. In this study, we developed and evaluated a system that enables both abdominal compression and monitoring of residual abdominal motion simultaneously. The system can also provide visual-biofeedback capability. Methods: The system developed consists of a compression belt, an abdominal motion monitoring sensor (gas pressure sensor) and a visual biofeedback device. The compression belt was designed to be able to compress the frontal side of the abdomen. The pressure level of the belt is controlled by air volume and monitored in real time using the gas pressure sensor. The system displays not only the real-time monitoring curve but also a guiding respiration model (e.g., a breath hold or shallow breathing curve) simultaneously on the head mounted display to help patients keep their breathing pattern as consistent as possible. Three healthy volunteers were enrolled in this pilot study and respiratory signals (pressure variations) were obtained both with and without effective abdominal compression to investigate the feasibility of the developed system. Two guidance patterns, breath hold and shallow breathing, were tested. Results: All volunteers showed smaller abdominal motion with compression (about 40% amplitude reduction compared to without compression). However, the system was able to monitor residual abdominal motion for all volunteers. Even under abdominal compression, in addition, it was possible to make the subjects successfully follow the guide patterns using the visual biofeedback system. Conclusion: The developed abdominal compression & respiratory guiding system was feasible for residual abdominal motion management. It is considered that the system can be used for a respiratory motion involved radiation therapy while maintaining the merit of abdominal compression. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R

  2. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  3. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  4. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  5. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David

    1999-01-01

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  6. Electric/magnetic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schill, Jr., Robert A.; Popek, Marc [Las Vegas, NV

    2009-01-27

    A UNLV novel electric/magnetic dot sensor includes a loop of conductor having two ends to the loop, a first end and a second end; the first end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a first conductor within a first sheath; the second end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a second conductor within a second sheath; and the first sheath and the second sheath positioned adjacent each other. The UNLV novel sensor can be made by removing outer layers in a segment of coaxial cable, leaving a continuous link of essentially uncovered conductor between two coaxial cable legs.

  7. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, Franklin R.

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  8. System and method for generating motion corrected tomographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gleason, Shaun S.; Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2012-05-01

    A method and related system for generating motion corrected tomographic images includes the steps of illuminating a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged being part of an unrestrained live subject and having at least three spaced apart optical markers thereon. Simultaneous images are acquired from a first and a second camera of the markers from different angles. Motion data comprising 3D position and orientation of the markers relative to an initial reference position is then calculated. Motion corrected tomographic data obtained from the ROI using the motion data is then obtained, where motion corrected tomographic images obtained therefrom.

  9. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter- Issue 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter includes information about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy R&D programs.

  10. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter- Issue 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter includes information about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy R&D programs.

  11. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter- Issue 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter includes information about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy R&D programs.

  12. Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfister, Thorsten; Guenther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Juergen

    2010-05-28

    Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

  13. Error Reduction in Weigh-In-Motion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-21

    Federal and State agencies need certifiable vehicle weights for various applications, such as highway inspections, border security, check points, and port entries. ORNL weigh-in-motion (WIM) technology was previously unable to provide certifiable weights, due to natural oscillations, such as vehicle bounding and rocking. Recent ORNL work demonstrated a novel filter to remove these oscillations. This work shows further filtering improvements to enable certifiable weight measurements (error < 0.1%) for a higher traffic volume with lessmore » effort (elimination of redundant weighing)« less

  14. Error Reduction for Weigh-In-Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hively, Lee M; Abercrombie, Robert K; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2009-01-01

    Federal and State agencies need certifiable vehicle weights for various applications, such as highway inspections, border security, check points, and port entries. ORNL weigh-in-motion (WIM) technology was previously unable to provide certifiable weights, due to natural oscillations, such as vehicle bouncing and rocking. Recent ORNL work demonstrated a novel filter to remove these oscillations. This work shows further filtering improvements to enable certifiable weight measurements (error < 0.1%) for a higher traffic volume with less effort (elimination of redundant weighing).

  15. The equation of motion of an electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.; Sessler, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    We review the current status of understanding of the equation of motion of an electron. Classically, a consistent, linearized theory exists for an electron of finite extent, as long as the size of the electron is larger than the classical electron radius. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics seems to offer a fine theory even in the point particle limit. Although there is as yet no convincing calculation, it is probable that a quantum electrodynamical result will be at least as well-behaved as is the nonrelativistic quantum mechanical results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes in a casting system which including an apparatus for monitoring the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting surface of a substrate during casting of molten material, wherein the molten material is provided through a channel of the casting nozzle for casting onto the casting surface of the substrate for solidification. It comprises: a pneumatic gap mounted at least partially within a cavity in the casting nozzle adjacent the channel and having a sensor face located within the gap between the nozzle and the casting surface of the substrate, means for supply gas under predetermined pressure to the inlet orifice; and means for measuring the pressure of the gas within the sensor chamber during casting procedures, whereby relative changes in the gap can be determined by corresponding changes in the measured pressure. This patent also describes a method for monitoring the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting surface of a substrate for continuous casting of molten material. It comprises: providing a casting nozzle with a channel for directing the flow of molten material, locating the nozzle and the casting surface is proximity with one another and having a predetermined gap there-between, and dressing the sensor face to correspond in conformation to the casting surface and to adjust the predetermined distance as desired; providing a molten material to the nozzle for casting onto and casting surface; supplying gas at a predetermined pressure to the inlet orifice of the sensor during casting procedures.

  17. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  18. SO.sub.2 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalla Betta, Ralph A. (Mountain View, CA); Sheridan, David R. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a process for detecting low concentration levels of sulfur oxides (SO.sub.2) in a flowing gas stream (typically a combustion exhaust gas stream) and a catalytic SO.sub.2 sensor system which may be used in that process.

  19. Embedding Sensors During Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbriglia, Lexey Raylene

    2015-08-10

    This PowerPoint presentation had the following headings: Fused deposition modeling (FDM); Open source 3D printing; Objectives; Vibration analysis; Equipment; Design; Material choices; Failure causes, such as tension, bubbling; Potential solutions; Simulations; Embedding the sensors; LabView programming; Alternate data acquisition; Problem and proposed solution; and, Conclusions

  20. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  1. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagdal, Karl T.; King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

  2. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment. 6 figs.

  3. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2007-12-25

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  4. Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a piezoelectric micromachined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mechanical scanning was used to image a 2D polydimethylsiloxane fingerprint phantom ... PIEZOELECTRICITY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SENSORS; SILICON; STEELS Word Cloud ...

  5. Sensors and Controls Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » Sensors and Controls » Sensors and Controls Reports Sensors and Controls Reports Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide (PNNL, April 2013) Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems (PNNL, Jan 2013) Small- and Medium-Sized Commercial Building Monitoring and Controls Needs: A Scoping Study (PNNL, Oct 2012) Buildings Home About Emerging Technologies HVAC, Water Heating, & Appliances Windows and Building Envelope Lighting

  6. Hydrogen Safety Sensors Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Sensors Workshop Hydrogen Safety Sensors Workshop A DOE-sponsored workshop was held in Washington, DC on April 4, 2007 with approximately 50 experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities. The workshop included technical briefings on Today's Commercial Hydrogen Sensors, Standards Issues related to Hydrogen Gas Detection Systems, NFPA 52 Hydrogen Sensor Placement Requirements, and the Committee Draft of the ISO TC197 WG13 on Hydrogen Detectors. A panel of end

  7. Combustible gas sensor interference test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-30

    Result of Laboratory Interference testing of the Sierra Monitor Corporation Gas Sensor, number model 4101-2, are documented.

  8. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  9. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  10. Hyperion 5113/GP Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated an infrasound sensor, the 5113/GP manufactured by Hyperion. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by the University of Mississippi. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, and seismic sensitivity. These sensors are being evaluated prior to deployment by the U.S. Air Force.

  11. Motion and color analysis for animat perception

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabie, T.F.; Terzopoulos, D.

    1996-12-31

    We propose novel gaze control algorithms for active perception in mobile autonomous agents with directable, foveated vision sensors. Our agents are realistic artificial animals, or animals, situated in physics-based virtual worlds. Their active perception systems continuously analyze photorealistic retinal image streams to glean information useful for controlling the animal`s eyes and body. The vision system computes optical flow and segments moving targets in the low-resolution visual periphery. It then matches segmented targets against mental models of colored objects of interest. The eyes saccade to increase acuity by foveating objects, The resulting sensorimotor control loop supports complex behaviors, such as predation.

  12. Weigh-In-Motion Waveform Capture Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-01

    Input data is generated from multiple weight sensor signals embedded in a thin weighing pad. This information is then reduced to total weight and position of a wheel rolling over the pad. This produces a signal which includes both the wheel weight and it inertial effects due to vehicle bounce, engine noise, and other mechanical vibrations. In order to extract accurate weight information of the wheel from the extraneous information, it is necessary to firstmore » capture the waveform and then perform a form of modal analysis. This program captures the above data and formats it into a useable form for analysis.« less

  13. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  14. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  15. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  16. Multi-center airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) is an airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar designed to acquire remote multi-dimensional measurements of winds and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. These measurements enable study of atmospheric dynamic processes and features at scales of motion that may be undersampled by, or may be beyond the capability of, existing or planned sensors. MACAWS capabilities enable more realistic assessments of concepts in global tropospheric wind measurement with satellite Doppler lidar, as well as a unique capability to validate the NASA Scatterometer currently scheduled for launch in late 1996. MACAWS consists of a Joule-class CO{sub 2} coherent Doppler lidar on a ruggedized optical table, a programmable scanner to direct the lidar beam in the desired direction, and a dedicated inertial navigation system to account for variable aircraft attitude and speed. MACAWS was flown for the first time in September 1995, over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western US. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  18. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  19. A Laser Interferometric Miniature Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Dustin W., PhD.; Baldwin, Patrick C.; Milburn, Howard; Robinson, David

    2011-09-12

    This is the second year of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract geared towards the development of a new seismic sensor. Ground-based seismic monitoring systems have proven to be very capable in identifying nuclear tests, and can provide somewhat precise information on the location and yield of the explosive device. Making these measurements, however, currently requires very expensive and bulky seismometers that are difficult to deploy in places where they are most needed. A high performance, compact device can enable rapid deployment of large scale arrays, which can in turn be used to provide higher quality data during times of critical need. The use of a laser interferometer-based device has shown considerable promise, while also presenting significant challenges. The greatest strength of this optical readout technique is the ability to decouple the mechanical design from the transducer, thus enabling a miniaturized design that is not accessible with conventional sensing techniques. However, the nonlinearity in the optical response must be accounted for in the sensor output. Previously, we had proposed using a force-feedback approach to position the sensor at a point of maximum linearity. However, it can be shown that the combined nonlinearities of the optical response and the force-feedback curve necessarily results in a significant amount of unwanted noise at low frequencies. Having realized this, we have developed a new approach that eliminates force feedback, allowing the proof mass to move freely at all times. This takes advantage of some advanced optical spatial filtering that was developed at Symphony Acoustics for other types of sensors, and was recently adapted to this work. After processing the signals in real time, the digital output of the device is intrinsically linear, and the sensor can operate at any orientation with the same level of resolution, while instantly adapting to significant changes in orientation. Ultimately, we

  20. Target motion tracking with a scanned particle beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert, Christoph; Saito, Nami; Schmidt, Alexander; Chaudhri, Naved; Schardt, Dieter; Rietzel, Eike

    2007-12-15

    Treatment of moving targets with scanned particle beams results in local over- and under-dosage due to interplay of beam and target motion. To mitigate the impact of respiratory motion, a motion tracking system has been developed and integrated in the therapy control system at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung. The system adapts pencil beam positions as well as the beam energy according to target motion to irradiate the planned position. Motion compensation performance of the tracking system was assessed by measurements with radiographic films and a 3D array of 24 ionization chambers. Measurements were performed for stationary detectors and moving detectors using the tracking system. Film measurements showed comparable homogeneity inside the target area. Relative differences of 3D dose distributions within the target volume were 1{+-}2% with a maximum of 4%. Dose gradients and dose to surrounding areas were in good agreement. The motion tracking system successfully preserved dose distributions delivered to moving targets and maintained target conformity.

  1. Fast antibody fragment motion: flexible linkers act as entropic spring

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stingaciu, Laura R.; Ivanova, Oxana; Ohl, Michael; Biehl, Ralf; Richter, Dieter

    2016-03-29

    A flexible linker region between three fragments allows antibodies to adjust their binding sites to an antigen or receptor. Using Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy we observed fragment motion on a timescale of 7 ns with motional amplitudes of about 1 nm relative to each other. The mechanistic complexity of the linker region can be described by a spring model with Brownian motion of the fragments in a harmonic potential. Displacements, timescale, friction and force constant of the underlying dynamics are accessed. The force constant exhibits a similar strength to an entropic spring, with friction of the fragment matching the unboundmore » state. The observed fast motions are fluctuations in pre-existing equilibrium configurations. In conclusion, the Brownian motion of domains in a harmonic potential is the appropriate model to examine functional hinge motions dependent on the structural topology and highlights the role of internal forces and friction to function.« less

  2. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  3. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  4. Solid state engine with alternating motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1980-01-21

    Heat energy is converted to mechanical motion utilizing apparatus including a cylinder, a piston having openings therein reciprocable in the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for warm water at one end of the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for cool water at the other end of the cylinder, gates movable with the piston and slidably engaging the cylinder wall to alternately open and close the warm and cool water ports, a spring bearing against the warm water side of the piston and a double helix of a thermal shape memory material attached to the cool end of the cylinder and to the piston. The piston is caused to reciprocate by alternately admitting cool water and warm water to the cylinder.

  5. Solid state engine with alternating motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golestaneh, Ahmad A. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1982-01-01

    Heat energy is converted to mechanical motion utilizing apparatus including a cylinder, a piston having openings therein reciprocable in the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for warm water at one end of the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for cool water at the other end of the cylinder, gates movable with the piston and slidably engaging the cylinder wall to alternately open and close the warm and cool water ports, a spring bearing against the warm water side of the piston and a double helix of a thermal shape memory material attached to the cool end of the cylinder and to the piston. The piston is caused to reciprocate by alternately admitting cool water and warm water to the cylinder.

  6. High Frequency Ground Motion Simulation for Seismic Hazard Analysis |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Ground motion simulations reveal regions at risk Ground motion simulations reveal regions at risk of strong shaking during a possible magnitude-8 earthquake on the San Andreas fault. For the CyberShake project, reciprocal simulations of all known possible quakes are combined to estimate the total probabilistic hazard for California. Credit: Geoffrey Ely, Argonne National Laboratory High Frequency Ground Motion Simulation for Seismic Hazard Analysis PI

  7. DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application May 27, 2010 - 2:22pm Addthis Today, the United States Department of Energy filed with the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board a reply brief making clear that its motion to withdraw the pending application to license the Yucca Mountain geologic repository is authorized by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and consistent with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). As

  8. Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application | Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application March 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to withdraw the license application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain with prejudice. "President Obama is fully committed to ensuring that the

  9. Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blade Sensors and Instrumentation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  10. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  11. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  12. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  13. Green Growth in Motion: Sharing Korea's Experience | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English Green Growth in Motion: Sharing Korea's Experience Screenshot References:...

  14. ARM - Evaluation Product - MPL Corrected for Ship Motion (MPLPOLFSSHIP...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is provided as an evaluation product for the MAGIC and ACAPEX campaigns. The signal return values and the rangebinwidth are corrected to account for the motion (pitch,...

  15. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C.

    2009-03-15

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  16. Widget:Motion Chart Visualizations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References usenergyconsumption: SED data usconsumption2010: SED data worldenergysupply: OECD data Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWidget:MotionChartVisuali...

  17. Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Jay Amin - Structural Mechanics, Principal Engineer Shawn Carey, PhD, PE - Structural Mechanics, ...

  18. Simulation of Explosion Ground Motions Using a Hydrodynamic-to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulation of Explosion Ground Motions Using a Hydrodynamic-to-Elastic Coupling Approach in Three-Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation of Explosion ...

  19. Motion of Robert G. Burnley, Director the Commonwealth of Virginia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Robert G. Burnley, Director the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Environmental ... Motion of Robert G. Burnley, Director the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of ...

  20. Joint Motion to Intervene of Northern States Power Company (Minnesota...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    States Power Company (Minnesota) et al. on the Proposed Open Access Requirements Joint Motion to Intervene of Northern States Power Company (Minnesota) et al. on the Proposed ...

  1. Ripeness sensor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 {times} 10{sup 12} BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on {sup 1}H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on {sup 1}H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  2. Engineering characterization of ground motion. Task II. Observational data on spatial variations of earthquake ground motion. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.Y.; Power, M.S.; Idriss, I.M.; Somerville, P.G.; Silva, W.; Chen, P.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report presents the results of part of a two-task study on the engineering characterization of earthquake ground motion for nuclear power plant design. The overall objective of this research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is to develop recommendations for methods for selecting design response spectra or acceleration time histories to be used to characterize motion at the foundation level of nuclear power plants. Volume 3 presents observational data on spatial variations of earthquake ground motion.

  3. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  4. Ground Motion Studies at NuMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda M. Velasco; Michal Szleper

    2012-02-20

    Ground motion can cause significant deterioration in the luminosity of a linear collider. Vibration of numerous focusing magnets causes continuous misalignments, which makes the beam emittance grow. For this reason, understanding the seismic vibration of all potential LC sites is essential and related efforts in many sites are ongoing. In this document we summarize the results from the studies specific to Fermilab grounds as requested by the LC project leader at FNAL, Shekhar Mishra in FY04-FY06. The Northwestern group focused on how the ground motion effects vary with depth. Knowledge of depth dependence of the seismic activity is needed in order to decide how deep the LC tunnel should be at sites like Fermilab. The measurements were made in the NuMI tunnel, see Figure 1. We take advantage of the fact that from the beginning to the end of the tunnel there is a height difference of about 350 ft and that there are about five different types of dolomite layers. The support received allowed to pay for three months of salary of Michal Szleper. During this period he worked a 100% of his time in this project. That include one week of preparation: 2.5 months of data taking and data analysis during the full period of the project in order to guarantee that we were recording high quality data. We extended our previous work and made more systematic measurements, which included detailed studies on stability of the vibration amplitudes at different depths over long periods of time. As a consequence, a better control and more efficient averaging out of the daytime variation effects were possible, and a better study of other time dependences before the actual depth dependence was obtained. Those initial measurements were made at the surface and are summarized in Figure 2. All measurements are made with equipment that we already had (two broadband seismometers KS200 from GEOTECH and DL-24 portable data recorder). The offline data analysis took advantage of the full Fourier spectra

  5. Response Relationship Between Juvenile Salmon and an Autonomous Sensor in Turbulent Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Deng, Zhiqun; McKinstry, Craig A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2009-01-27

    Juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawythscha) and an autonomous sensor device (Sensor Fish) were exposed to turbulent shear flows in order to determine how hydraulic conditions effected fish injury response. Studies were designed to establish correlation metrics between Sensor Fish device measurements and live fish injuries by conducting concurrent releases in a range of turbulent shear flows. Comparisons were made for two exposure scenarios. In the fast-fish-to-slow-water scenario, test fish were carried by the fast-moving water of a submerged turbulent jet and exposed into the standing water of a flume. In the slow-fish-to-fast-water scenario, test fish were introduced into a turbulent jet from standing water through an introduction tube placed just outside the edge of the jet. Motion-tracking analysis was performed on high-speed, high-resolution digital videos of all the releases at water jet velocities ranging from 3 to 22.9 m · s-1. Velocities of the Sensor Fish were very similar to those of live fish, but maximum accelerations of live fish were larger than those by Sensor Fish for all the nozzle velocities of both cenarios. A 10% probability of major injury threshold was found to occur at sensor fish accelerations of 513 and 260 (m · s-2) for the fast-fish-to-slow-water and slow-fish-to-fast-water scenarios, respectively. The findings provide a linkage between laboratory experiments of fish injury, field survival studies, and numerical modeling.

  6. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  7. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  8. Panoramic imaging perimeter sensor design and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the conceptual design and preliminary performance modeling of a 360-degree imaging sensor. This sensor combines automatic perimeter intrusion detection with immediate visual assessment and is intended to be used for fast deployment around fixed or temporary high-value assets. The sensor requirements, compiled from various government agencies, are summarized. The conceptual design includes longwave infrared and visible linear array technology. An auxiliary millimeter-wave sensing technology is also considered for use during periods of infrared and visible obscuration. The infrared detectors proposed for the sensor design are similar to the Standard Advanced Dewar Assembly Types Three A and B (SADA-IIIA/B). An overview of the sensor and processor is highlighted. The infrared performance of this sensor design has been predicted using existing thermal imaging system models and is described in the paper. Future plans for developing a prototype are also presented.

  9. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W. [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  10. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  11. Ultrasensitive surveillance of sensors and processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegerich, Stephan W.; Jarman, Kristin K.; Gross, Kenneth C.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a source of data for determining an operating state of a working system. The method includes determining a sensor (or source of data) arrangement associated with monitoring the source of data for a system, activating a method for performing a sequential probability ratio test if the data source includes a single data (sensor) source, activating a second method for performing a regression sequential possibility ratio testing procedure if the arrangement includes a pair of sensors (data sources) with signals which are linearly or non-linearly related; activating a third method for performing a bounded angle ratio test procedure if the sensor arrangement includes multiple sensors and utilizing at least one of the first, second and third methods to accumulate sensor signals and determining the operating state of the system.

  12. Ultrasensitive surveillance of sensors and processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegerich, Stephan W.; Jarman, Kristin K.; Gross, Kenneth C.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a source of data for determining an operating state of a working system. The method includes determining a sensor (or source of data) arrangement associated with monitoring the source of data for a system, activating a method for performing a sequential probability ratio test if the data source includes a single data (sensor) source, activating a second method for performing a regression sequential possibility ratio testing procedure if the arrangement includes a pair of sensors (data sources) with signals which are linearly or non-linearly related; activating a third method for performing a bounded angle ratio test procedure if the sensor arrangement includes multiple sensors and utilizing at least one of the first, second and third methods to accumulate sensor signals and determining the operating state of the system.

  13. Method and apparatus for planning motions of robot manipulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Pang C.; Hwang, Yong K.

    1996-01-01

    Method and apparatus for automatically planning motions of robot manipulators. The invention rapidly finds a collision-free path in a cluttered robot environment, if one exists, from any starting configuration of the robot manipulator to any ending configuration. The time to solution of a motion planning problem is not uniform, but proportional to the complexity of the problem.

  14. Motion to intervene and comments of the energy services group...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services (U.S.) Inc, on FE 99-1 Motion to intervene and comments of the energy services group of Hydro-Quebec and H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc, on FE 99-1 Motion to intervene ...

  15. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  16. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  17. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2004-05-18

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  18. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2003-07-22

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  19. Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Our goal is to develop critical security technologies to prevent and manage events

  20. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  1. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensors and Instrumentation Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation The ASI subprogram plans to develop the scientific basis for sensors and supporting infrastructure technology that will address crosscutting technology gaps relating to measurements at existing and advanced nuclear power plants as well as within their fuel cycles. The focus of the program is on the following technical challenges and objectives: Identify needed physical measurement accuracy of nuclear system process parameters and

  2. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  3. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  4. Sensors and Detectors | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors and Detectors Sensors and Detectors Today, much of science focuses on observing signals that are extremely small, faint, or far away. In order to help push the boundaries of research, scientists and engineers at Argonne have pioneered the development of state-of-the-art sensors and detectors with capabilities that range from revolutionizing high-energy physics to helping to ensure our national security. Argonne detector technology can be found everywhere from deep underground as part of

  5. GAIA: A WINDOW TO LARGE-SCALE MOTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusser, Adi; Branchini, Enzo; Davis, Marc E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it

    2012-08-10

    Using redshifts as a proxy for galaxy distances, estimates of the two-dimensional (2D) transverse peculiar velocities of distant galaxies could be obtained from future measurements of proper motions. We provide the mathematical framework for analyzing 2D transverse motions and show that they offer several advantages over traditional probes of large-scale motions. They are completely independent of any intrinsic relations between galaxy properties; hence, they are essentially free of selection biases. They are free from homogeneous and inhomogeneous Malmquist biases that typically plague distance indicator catalogs. They provide additional information to traditional probes that yield line-of-sight peculiar velocities only. Further, because of their 2D nature, fundamental questions regarding vorticity of large-scale flows can be addressed. Gaia, for example, is expected to provide proper motions of at least bright galaxies with high central surface brightness, making proper motions a likely contender for traditional probes based on current and future distance indicator measurements.

  6. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  7. Capacitively-coupled inductive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1984-01-01

    A capacitively coupled inductive shunt current sensor which utilizes capacitive coupling between flanges having an annular inductive channel formed therein. A voltage dividing capacitor is connected between the coupling capacitor and ground to provide immediate capacitive division of the output signal so as to provide a high frequency response of the current pulse to be detected. The present invention can be used in any desired outer conductor such as the outer conductor of a coaxial transmission line, the outer conductor of an electron beam transmission line, etc.

  8. Thin-film spectroscopic sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burgess, Jr., Lloyd W.; Goldman, Don S.

    1992-01-01

    There is disclosed an integrated spectrometer for chemical analysis by evanescent electromagnetic radiation absorption in a reaction volume. The spectrometer comprises a noninteractive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device. There is further disclosed a chemical sensor to determine the pressure and concentration of a chemical species in a mixture comprising an interactive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device.

  9. Thin film mixed potential sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2007-09-04

    A mixed potential sensor for oxidizable or reducible gases and a method of making. A substrate is provided and two electrodes are formed on a first surface of the substrate, each electrode being formed of a different catalytic material selected to produce a differential voltage between the electrodes from electrochemical reactions of the gases catalyzed by the electrode materials. An electrolytic layer of an electrolyte is formed over the electrodes to cover a first portion of the electrodes from direct exposure to the gases with a second portion of the electrodes uncovered for direct exposure to the gases.

  10. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  11. Borehole optical lateral displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, R.E.

    1998-10-20

    There is provided by this invention an optical displacement sensor that utilizes a reflective target connected to a surface to be monitored to reflect light from a light source such that the reflected light is received by a photoelectric transducer. The electric signal from the photoelectric transducer is then imputed into electronic circuitry to generate an electronic image of the target. The target`s image is monitored to determine the quantity and direction of any lateral displacement in the target`s image which represents lateral displacement in the surface being monitored. 4 figs.

  12. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  13. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris B.

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  14. Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF...

  15. Sensors and Controls Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of plug loads, reduction of standby losses, detection of faulty devices, and demand response management CBERD: Integrated Sensors and Controls Lead Performer: Lawrence ...

  16. Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: IEEE Sensors 2007, Atlanta, GA, United States, Oct 28 - Oct 31, 2007 ...

  17. A small, rugged and inexpensive hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Hughes, R.C.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a new generation hydrogen sensor developed at Sandia National laboratories that is smaller, faster, sturdier, and less expensive to manufacture.

  18. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  19. Solid State Gas Sensors - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Solid State Gas Sensors Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology LANLs...

  20. MB3a Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.; McDowell, Kyle D.

    2014-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated a new infrasound sensor, the MB3a, manufactured by Seismo Wave. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by researchers at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the technology was recently licensed to Seismo Wave for production and sales. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, seismic sensitivity, and self- calibration ability. The MB3a infrasound sensors are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  1. Hyperion 5113/A Infrasound Sensor Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion John

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated an infrasound sensor, the 5113/A manufactured by Hyperion. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by the University of Mississippi. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, and dynamic range. The 5113/A infrasound sensor is a new revision of the 5000 series intended to meet the infrasound application requirements for use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  2. Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes Oak Ridge National ... It can also quickly identify a potentially harmful chemical. The invention's sensitivity ...

  3. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that use a wide range of sensors to develop and characterize building energy performance. ... Sponsoring Org: EE USDOE - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) ...

  4. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Mooney, Larry R.; Duncan, Michael G.; Turner, John C.; Treece, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  5. The allwise motion survey and the quest for cold subdwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Gelino, Christopher R.; Fowler, John W.; Cutri, Roc M.; Schneider, Adam; Cushing, Michael C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Balokovi?, Mislav; Burgasser, Adam J.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Lansbury, George B.; Rich, J. A.; Skrzypek, Nathalie; and others

    2014-03-10

    The AllWISE processing pipeline has measured motions for all objects detected on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) images taken between 2010 January and 2011 February. In this paper, we discuss new capabilities made to the software pipeline in order to make motion measurements possible, and we characterize the resulting data products for use by future researchers. Using a stringent set of selection criteria, we find 22,445 objects that have significant AllWISE motions, of which 3525 have motions that can be independently confirmed from earlier Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) images, yet lack any published motions in SIMBAD. Another 58 sources lack 2MASS counterparts and are presented as motion candidates only. Limited spectroscopic follow-up of this list has already revealed eight new L subdwarfs. These may provide the first hints of a 'subdwarf gap' at mid-L types that would indicate the break between the stellar and substellar populations at low metallicities (i.e., old ages). Another object in the motion listWISEA J154045.67510139.3is a bright (J ? 9 mag) object of type M6; both the spectrophotometric distance and a crude preliminary parallax place it ?6 pc from the Sun. We also compare our list of motion objects to the recently published list of 762 WISE motion objects from Luhman. While these first large motion studies with WISE data have been very successful in revealing previously overlooked nearby dwarfs, both studies missed objects that the other found, demonstrating that many other nearby objects likely await discovery in the AllWISE data products.

  6. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    Low-cost, durable, and reliable Hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle, stationary, and infrastructure applications. A new zirconia, electrochemical-based sensor technology is being transitioned out of the laboratory and into an advanced testing phase for vehicular and stationary H{sub 2} safety applications. Mixed potential sensors are a class of electrochemical devices that develop an open-circuit electromotive force due to the difference in the kinetics of the redox reactions of various gaseous species at each electrode/electrolyte/gas interface, referred to as the triple phase boundary (TPB). Therefore, these sensors have been considered for the sensing of various reducible or oxidizable gas species in the presence of oxygen. Based on this principle, a unique sensor design was developed by LANL and LLNL. The uniqueness of this sensor derives from minimizing heterogeneous catalysis (detrimental to sensor response) by avoiding gas diffusion through a catalytically active material and minimizing diffusion path to the TPB. Unlike the conventional design of these devices that use a dense solid electrolyte and porous thin film electrodes (similar to the current state-of-the-art zirconia-based sensors and fuel cells), the design of this sensor uses dense electrodes and porous electrolytes. Such a sensor design facilitates a stable and reproducible device response, since dense electrode morphologies are easy to reproduce and are significantly more stable than the conventional porous morphologies. Moreover, these sensors develop higher mixed potentials since the gas diffusion is through the less catalytically active electrolyte than the electrode. Lastly, the choice of electrodes is primarily based on their O2 reduction kinetics and catalytic properties vis-a-vis the target gas of interest.

  7. Transducer Signal Noise Analysis for Sensor Authentication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Svoboda; Mark J. Schanfein

    2012-07-01

    The abstract is being passed through STIMS for submision to the conference. International safeguards organizations charged with promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy employ unattended and remote monitoring systems supplemented with onsite inspections to ensure nuclear materials are not diverted for weaponization purposes. These systems are left unattended for periods of several months between inspections. During these periods physical security means are the main deterrent used to detect intentional monitoring system tampering. The information gathering components are locked in secure and sealed rooms. The sensor components (i.e. neutron and gamma detectors) are located throughout the plant in unsecure areas where sensor tampering could take place during the periods between inspections. Sensor tampering could allow the diversion of nuclear materials from the accepted and intended use to uses not consistent with the peaceful use of nuclear energy. A method and an apparatus is presented that address the detection of sensor tampering during the periods between inspections. It was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the IAEA. The method is based on the detailed analysis of the sensor noise floor after the sensor signal is removed. The apparatus consists of a 2.1” x 2.6” electronic circuit board containing all signal conditioning and processing components and a laptop computer running an application that acquires and stores the analysis results between inspection periods. The sensors do not require any modification and are remotely located in their normal high radiation zones. The apparatus interfaces with the sensor signal conductors using a simple pass through connector at the normal sensor electronics interface package located in the already secure and sealed rooms. The apparatus does not require hardening against the effects of radiation due to its location. Presented is the apparatus design

  8. Electro-chemical sensors, sensor arrays and circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Howard E.; Kong, Hoyoul

    2014-07-08

    An electro-chemical sensor includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and a semiconductor channel in electrical contact with the first and second electrodes. The semiconductor channel includes a trapping material. The trapping material reduces an ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct a current of charge carriers by trapping at least some of the charge carriers to localized regions within the semiconductor channel. The semiconductor channel includes at least a portion configured to be exposed to an analyte to be detected, and the trapping material, when exposed to the analyte, interacts with the analyte so as to at least partially restore the ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct the current of charge carriers.

  9. Particle motion at fluidized bed tube surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, J.F.; Hocking, W.R.; Howard, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    Metal loss from in-bed heat transfer tubes in fluidized bed combustors is recognized as a problem that is affecting the commercialization of FBC technology for coal utilization. A program has been initiated to address the erosion aspect of the wastage problem. Objectives were: (1) to develop a method for measuring the particle impact velocities and mass flux at a fluidized bed tube surface, (2) to obtain wear data from test tubes in an operating cold flow model, and (3) to correlate the results. An instrumented probe was develop during Phase I that could be used to obtain the three orthogonal velocity components and mass flux at a fluidized bed tube surface. The sensors were contained in a 2 inch diameter schedule 40 pipe that can be installed in the cold flow model in place of one of the test tubes. This arrangement allows measurements to be made non-intrusively. The velocity measuring portion used a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) for obtaining the resultant impact velocity and impact angle of the bed particles at the immersed tube surface. Mass flux was derived from the output of a high speed force transducer that measured the individual particle impact momentum signals. The above system was used successfully to measure particle impact velocities and momentum during a limited test program. Test were run in a 1 ft {times} 2 ft ambient temperature fluidized bed test facility using sand and acrylic test tubes. Measurements were taken in the center of the bed at eight circumferential location, by rotating the probe to the desired tube angle. Tube erosion data were also taken at locations corresponding to the above measurement points. The instrumentation provided a wealth of information about the internal hydrodynamics of the fluidized bed. 3 refs., 49 figs., 17 tabs.

  10. Porous Si structure as moisture sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.W.; Nguyen, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    Development and characterization of a capacitive moisture sensor made from porous Si is presented. The sensor development was in support of the DoD funded Plastic Package Availability program and was intended for the detection of pinholes and defects in moisture barrier coatings applied to ICs during fabrication or during the plastic encapsulation assembly process.

  11. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  12. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  13. Sensor device and methods for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothgeb, Timothy Michael; Gansle, Kristina Marie Rohal; Joyce, Jonathan Livingston; Jordan, James Madison; Rohwer, Tedd Addison; Lockhart, Randal Ray; Smith, Christopher Lawrence; Trinh, Toan; Cipollone, Mark Gary

    2005-10-25

    A sensor device and method of employment is provided. More specifically, a sensor device adapted to detect, identify and/or measure a chemical and/or physical characteristic upon placement of the device into an environment, especially a liquid medium for which monitoring is sought is provided.

  14. Motion characteristics of long ac arcs in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu Shanqiang; He Jinliang; Zeng Rong; Zhang Bo; Xu Guozheng; Chen Weijiang

    2007-01-29

    Experiments on the motion of long alternating current arcs in atmospheric air show that the anode and cathode arc roots have different motion characteristics because of different formation mechanisms. During a half cycle of the arc current, the anode arc root moves towards the direction of magnetic force and occasionally has a jumping motion, while the cathode arc root moves sufficiently slow to consider it stationary and hardly has any jump. The arc column has a complex shape and moves under the drive of the magnetic force and is also quickened by the lower arc root.

  15. Proton spin tracking with symplectic integration of orbit motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Dutheil, Y.; Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ranjbar, V.

    2015-05-03

    Symplectic integration had been adopted for orbital motion tracking in code SimTrack. SimTrack has been extensively used for dynamic aperture calculation with beam-beam interaction for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Recently proton spin tracking has been implemented on top of symplectic orbital motion in this code. In this article, we will explain the implementation of spin motion based on Thomas-BMT equation, and the benchmarking with other spin tracking codes currently used for RHIC. Examples to calculate spin closed orbit and spin tunes are presented too.

  16. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the

  17. Pd conductor for thick film hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, J.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Cooperation between a materials developer and sensor designers has resulted in a palladium conductor used ro design and build a new hydrogen sensor that has superior performance characteristics and is also inexpensive to manufacture. Material characteristics give it faster response time and greater thermal/mechanical stability. The thick film palladium conductor paste, which can be fired at 850{degrees}C-950{degrees}C, has provided device designers a practical conductor paste with which to produce the improved sensor. The conductor uses a high surface area Pd powder combined with a binder glass that is chemically very inert, which combination produces a porous conductor that has good adhesion and chemical resistance. The current sensor design consists of three or four thick film Layers. Because of the flexibility of thick film techniques, the sensor element can be configured to any desired size and shape for specific instrument needs.

  18. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohler, Stewart M.; Allen, James J.

    2007-05-01

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  19. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohler, Stewart M.; Allen, James J.

    2006-06-27

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator for drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows, for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  20. MEMS inertial sensors with integral rotation means.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Stewart M.

    2003-09-01

    The state-of-the-art of inertial micro-sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) has advanced to the point where they are displacing the more traditional sensors in many size, power, and/or cost-sensitive applications. A factor limiting the range of application of inertial micro-sensors has been their relatively poor bias stability. The incorporation of an integral sensitive axis rotation capability would enable bias mitigation through proven techniques such as indexing, and foster the use of inertial micro-sensors in more accuracy-sensitive applications. Fabricating the integral rotation mechanism in MEMS technology would minimize the penalties associated with incorporation of this capability, and preserve the inherent advantages of inertial micro-sensors.

  1. Sensor system for fuel transport vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; West, David L.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary sensor system for a fuel transport vehicle can comprise a fuel marker sensor positioned between a fuel storage chamber of the vehicle and an access valve for the fuel storage chamber of the vehicle. The fuel marker sensor can be configured to measure one or more characteristics of one or more fuel markers present in the fuel adjacent the sensor, such as when the marked fuel is unloaded at a retail station. The one or more characteristics can comprise concentration and/or identity of the one or more fuel markers in the fuel. Based on the measured characteristics of the one or more fuel markers, the sensor system can identify the fuel and/or can determine whether the fuel has been adulterated after the marked fuel was last measured, such as when the marked fuel was loaded into the vehicle.

  2. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  3. Sensor array for toxic gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Zaromb, Solomon; Penrose, William R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

  4. PC Board Mountable Corrosion Sensors - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search PC Board Mountable Corrosion Sensors Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (1,115 KB) PC-mount corrosion sensors of various serpentine widths. Capacitive sensor shown on far right. PC-mount corrosion sensors of various serpentine widths. Capacitive sensor shown on far right. A line of corrosion sensors of various widths and thicknesses

  5. Compact Orthogonal NMR Field Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compact Orthogonal NMR Field Sensor DOE Grant Recipients Argonne National Laboratory Contact GRANT About This Technology Example NMR Image Example NMR Image Example Enhanced Sensor Example Enhanced Sensor Technology Marketing Summary Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has created an enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) sensor that serves as a drop-in replacement sensor for existing NMR systems. Existing sensors receive only information that can be used to determine the composition of a

  6. Motion to Intervene Out of Time and Comments of FirstEnergy Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motion to Intervene Out of Time and Comments of FirstEnergy Service Company PP-230-3 Motion to Intervene Out of Time and Comments of FirstEnergy Service Company PDF icon Motion to ...

  7. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  8. Printable sensors for explosive detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Matthew J. Cooling, Nathan A.; Elkington, Daniel C.; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.; Muller, Elmar

    2014-10-06

    Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

  9. Circular chemiresistors for microchemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-03-13

    A circular chemiresistor for use in microchemical sensors. A pair of electrodes is fabricated on an electrically insulating substrate. The pattern of electrodes is arranged in a circle-filling geometry, such as a concentric, dual-track spiral design, or a circular interdigitated design. A drop of a chemically sensitive polymer (i.e., chemiresistive ink) is deposited on the insulating substrate on the electrodes, which spreads out into a thin, circular disk contacting the pair of electrodes. This circularly-shaped electrode geometry maximizes the contact area between the pair of electrodes and the polymer deposit, which provides a lower and more stable baseline resistance than with linear-trace designs. The circularly-shaped electrode pattern also serves to minimize batch-to-batch variations in the baseline resistance due to non-uniform distributions of conductive particles in the chemiresistive polymer film.

  10. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles The water vapor ...

  11. Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors Poster presented at the 16th Directions in ...

  12. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions ...

  13. Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring O2 and NOx in Combustion Environments Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring ...

  14. Advanced Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Particulate Filter Loading and Regeneration Advanced Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Particulate Filter ...

  15. Sensor Technologies for a Smart Transmission System | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Developmetn of newer better sensors that allow diagnose equipment health to optimize maintenance and prevent catastrophic failures. Sensor Technologies for a Smart Transmission ...

  16. Wireless Sensor Network for Electric Transmission Line Monitoring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Wireless Sensor Network for Electric Transmission Line Monitoring Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wireless Sensor Network for Electric Transmission ...

  17. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a ... Title: Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer ...

  18. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 failure analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 failure analysis activities. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 ...

  19. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with energy other than acoustic energy A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a ... When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined ...

  20. Machine Learning Techniques Applied to Sensor Data Correction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Given this reliance on sensors, ensuring that sensor data are valid is a crucial problem. Solutions being researched are machine learning techniques, namely: artificial neural ...

  1. Interferometrically Defined 3D Pyrolyzed-Carbon Sensors. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Interferometrically Defined 3D Pyrolyzed-Carbon Sensors. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interferometrically Defined 3D Pyrolyzed-Carbon Sensors. Abstract ...

  2. Carbon nanotube array based sensor (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbon nanotube array based sensor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Carbon nanotube array based sensor You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's ...

  3. Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal ...

  4. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. This report ...

  5. Multifunctional Nanowire/film Composites based Bi-modular Sensors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    innovation, bimodular sensor demonstration, and new understanding and discoveries. ... include: 1) Successful development of a new class of high temperature stable gas sensor ...

  6. Retro-Commissioning Sensor Suitcase Fact Sheet | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retro-Commissioning Sensor Suitcase Fact Sheet Retro-Commissioning Sensor Suitcase Fact Sheet Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ...

  7. An Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel Engine Closed-loop Control An Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel Engine Closed-loop Control ...

  8. Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological Species DOE Grant ... gaps for various applications, including chemical and biological sensors, magnetoresistive ...

  9. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor A ...

  10. The Use of Humidity Sensors to Develop BIPV Packaging Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Use of Humidity Sensors to Develop BIPV Packaging Solutions The Use of Humidity Sensors to Develop BIPV Packaging Solutions Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, ...

  11. EERE-SBIR Technology Transfer Opportunity: H2 Safety Sensors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors for H2 EERE-SBIR Technology Transfer Opportunity Develop low cost electronics packaging manufacturable at high volume, and integrate LANL sensor into a commercial package...

  12. Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor ...

  13. Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling in geothermal wells Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling in geothermal wells ...

  14. ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain ARM Data Discovery Browse ... Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air ...

  15. Design and Control of a Ship Motion Simulation Platform from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design and Control of a Ship Motion Simulation ... Pumps are selected based upon required peak power demands, valves are chosen primarily for ...

  16. Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion for Leave to Answer and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

  17. Cataclysmic variables in the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Julie N.; Thorstensen, John R.; Lépine, Sébastien

    2014-12-01

    We have discovered a new high proper motion cataclysmic variable (CV) in the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey, which is sensitive to stars with proper motions greater than 40 mas yr{sup −1}. This CV was selected for follow-up observations as part of a larger search for CVs selected based on proper motions and their near-UV−V and V−K{sub s} colors. We present spectroscopic observations from the 2.4 m Hiltner Telescope at MDM Observatory. The new CV's orbital period is near 96 minutes, its spectrum shows the double-peaked Balmer emission lines characteristic of quiescent dwarf novae, and its V magnitude is near 18.2. Additionally, we present a full list of known CVs in the SUPERBLINK catalog.

  18. Prototype Weigh-In-Motion Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Beshears, David L; Hively, Lee M; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2006-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed and patented methods to weigh slowly moving vehicles. We have used this technology to produce a portable weigh-in-motion system that is robust and accurate. This report documents the performance of the second-generation portable weigh-in-motion prototype (WIM Gen II). The results of three modes of weight determination are compared in this report: WIM Gen II dynamic mode, WIM Gen II stop-and-go mode, and static (parked) mode on in-ground, static scales. The WIM dynamic mode measures axle weights as the vehicle passes over the system at speeds of 3 to 7 miles per hour (1.3 to 3.1 meters/second). The WIM stop-and-go mode measures the weight of each axle of the vehicle as the axles are successively positioned on a side-by-side pair of WIM measurement pads. In both measurement modes the center of balance (CB) and the total weight are obtained by a straight-forward calculation from axle weights and axle spacings. The performance metric is measurement error (in percent), which is defined as 100 x (sample standard deviation)/(average); see Appendix A for details. We have insufficient data to show that this metric is predictive. This report details the results of weight measurements performed in May 2005 at two sites using different types of vehicles at each site. In addition to the weight measurements, the testing enabled refinements to the test methodology and facilitated an assessment of the influence of vehicle speed on the dynamic-mode measurements. The initial test at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN, involved measurements of passenger and light-duty commercial vehicles. A subsequent test at the Arrival/Departure Airfield Control Group (A/DACG) facility in Ft. Bragg, NC, involved military vehicles with gross weights between 3,000 and 75,000 pounds (1,356 to 33,900 kilograms) with a 20,000-pound (9,040 kilograms) limit per axle. For each vehicle, four or more separate measurements were done

  19. Sandia Laboratories hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, W. H.; French, R. E.

    1980-05-01

    Hybrid computer and motion simulator facilities at Sandia National Laboratories include an AD/FIVE-AD10-PDP11/60, an AD/FIVE-PDP11/45, an EAI7800-EAI640, an EAI580/TR48-Nova 800, and two Carco S-45OR-3/R-493A three-axis motion simulators. An EAI680 is used in the analog mode only. This report describes the current equipment.

  20. John Papanikolas: Visualizing Charge Carrier Motion in Nanowires Using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy | Center for Energy Efficient Materials John Papanikolas: Visualizing Charge Carrier Motion in Nanowires Using Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy Apr 17, 2014 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM John Papanikolas Professor of Chemistry & Deputy Director, EFRC on Solar Fuels University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Visualizing Charge Carrier Motion in Nanowires Using Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy April 17, 2014 | 4:00pm | ESB 1001 Faculty host: Dan Morse

  1. The interplay between regular and chaotic motion in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotter, I.

    1987-04-01

    The regular motion of nucleons in the low-lying nuclear states and the chaotic motion in the compound nuclei are shown to arise from the interplay of conservative and dissipative forces in the open quantum mechanical nuclear system. The regularity at low level density is caused by self-organization in a conservative field of force. At high level density, chaoticity appears since information on the environment is transferred into the system by means of dissipative forces.

  2. SISMA (Site of Italian Strong Motion Accelerograms): a Web-Database of Ground Motion Recordings for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scasserra, Giuseppe; Lanzo, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Beniamino; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes a new website called SISMA, i.e. Site of Italian Strong Motion Accelerograms, which is an Internet portal intended to provide natural records for use in engineering applications for dynamic analyses of structural and geotechnical systems. SISMA contains 247 three-component corrected motions recorded at 101 stations from 89 earthquakes that occurred in Italy in the period 1972-2002. The database of strong motion accelerograms was developed in the framework of a joint project between Sapienza University of Rome and University of California at Los Angeles (USA) and is described elsewhere. Acceleration histories and pseudo-acceleration response spectra (5% damping) are available for download from the website. Recordings can be located using simple search parameters related to seismic source and the recording station (e.g., magnitude, V{sub s30}, etc) as well as ground motion characteristics (e.g. peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, peak ground displacement, Arias intensity, etc.)

  3. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  4. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  5. Overview of North American Hydrogen Sensor Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Malley, Kathleen; Lopez, Hugo; Cairns, Julie; Wichert, Richard; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Buttner, William

    2015-08-11

    An overview of the main North American codes and standards associated with hydrogen safety sensors is provided. The distinction between a code and a standard is defined, and the relationship between standards and codes is clarified, especially for those circumstances where a standard or a certification requirement is explicitly referenced within a code. The report identifies three main types of standards commonly applied to hydrogen sensors (interface and controls standards, shock and hazard standards, and performance-based standards). The certification process and a list and description of the main standards and model codes associated with the use of hydrogen safety sensors in hydrogen infrastructure are presented.

  6. Sensorpedia: Information Sharing Across Autonomous Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, Bryan L; Resseguie, David R; Tomkins-Tinch, Christopher H

    2009-01-01

    The concept of adapting social media technologies is introduced as a means of achieving information sharing across autonomous sensor systems. Historical examples of interoperability as an underlying principle in loosely-coupled systems is compared and contrasted with corresponding tightly-coupled, integrated systems. Examples of ad hoc information sharing solutions based on Web 2.0 social networks, mashups, blogs, wikis, and data tags are presented and discussed. The underlying technologies of these solutions are isolated and defined, and Sensorpedia is presented as a formalized application for implementing sensor information sharing across large-scale enterprises with incompatible autonomous sensor systems.

  7. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, Richard F.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  8. Battery management system with distributed wireless sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Bandhauer, Todd M.

    2016-02-23

    A system for monitoring parameters of an energy storage system having a multiplicity of individual energy storage cells. A radio frequency identification and sensor unit is connected to each of the individual energy storage cells. The radio frequency identification and sensor unit operates to sense the parameter of each individual energy storage cell and provides radio frequency transmission of the parameters of each individual energy storage cell. A management system monitors the radio frequency transmissions from the radio frequency identification and sensor units for monitoring the parameters of the energy storage system.

  9. Respiratory motion effects on whole breast helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeckly, Steven R.; Lamba, Michael; Elson, Howard R.

    2008-04-15

    The effects of intrafraction respiratory motion on nonhelical intensity-modulated radiotherapy have been well addressed in the literature, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the consequences of respiratory motion on helical tomotherapy, for patient-specific treatment plans, are less well known. Parameters specific to this treatment modality such as pitch, gantry speed, and degree of modulation may play prominent roles in radiation delivery with respect to intrafraction respiratory motion. This phantom-based study specifically addressed the effects of intrafraction respiratory motion on whole breast helical tomotherapy. A device capable of driving an acrylic phantom with reproducible, one-dimensional, anterior-posterior motion resembling a sinusoid of 4.6 mm crest-trough amplitude was developed. A plan to irradiate the corner of an acrylic phantom using parameters typical of a whole breast helical tomotherapy technique was developed using the TomoTherapy Hi-Art-II System registered . The treatment was delivered to the phantom, with Kodak EDR2 film in the axial plane, for each of the following conditions: (i) phantom at 270 deg. initial sinusoidal phase and 12 cycles/min motion, (ii) phantom at 270 deg. initial sinusoidal phase and 18 cycles/min motion, and (iii)-(v) phantom at 18 cycles/min motion with 0 deg., 90 deg., and 180 deg. initial sinusoidal phases. A measure of technique reproducibility was also performed for several irradiations with the phantom static at 270 deg. initial sinusoidal phase. Films were processed using a Kodak MIN-R mammography film processor, scanned with a Vidar NXR-16 Dosimetry Pro scanner and analyzed with RIT113 v.4.2 software. Films were compared to a reference film irradiated under the conditions of no motion and 270 deg. sinusoidal phase. For all comparisons, 5% dose difference threshold, 3% dose difference and 2 mm distance-to-agreement gamma analysis, and isodose plots were generated. The results of this study show a

  10. PREDICTING MERGER-INDUCED GAS MOTIONS IN ?CDM GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.; Avestruz, Camille; Rudd, Douglas H.; Nelson, Kaylea

    2013-11-10

    In the hierarchical structure formation model, clusters of galaxies form through a sequence of mergers and continuous mass accretion, which generate significant random gas motions especially in their outskirts where material is actively accreting. Non-thermal pressure provided by the internal gas motions affects the thermodynamic structure of the X-ray emitting intracluster plasma and introduces biases in the physical interpretation of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations. However, we know very little about the nature of gas motions in galaxy clusters. The ASTRO-H X-ray mission, scheduled to launch in 2015, will have a calorimeter capable of measuring gas motions in galaxy clusters at the level of ?< 100 km s{sup 1}. In this work, we predict the level of merger-induced gas motions expected in the ?CDM model using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. We show that the gas velocity dispersion is larger in more massive clusters, but exhibits a large scatter. We show that systems with large gas motions are morphologically disturbed, while early forming, relaxed groups show a smaller level of gas motions. By analyzing mock ASTRO-H observations of simulated clusters, we show that such observations can accurately measure the gas velocity dispersion out to the outskirts of nearby relaxed galaxy clusters. ASTRO-H analysis of merging clusters, on the other hand, requires multi-component spectral fitting and enables unique studies of substructures in galaxy clusters by measuring both the peculiar velocities and the velocity dispersion of gas within individual sub-clusters.

  11. Low-cost, compact, robust laser-based ultrasound sensors using photo-EMF detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, D.M.; Dunning, G.J.; Chiao, M.P.; O`Meara, T.R.; Mitchell, P.V.

    1996-12-31

    There is a great need in the manufacturing, aerospace, commercial, energy, automotive, microelectronics and DoD communities for diagnostic systems that can improve the efficiency, yield and performance of various materials processes--while reducing cost, labor, scrap, and machine downtime. Laser-based ultrasound (LBU) represents a noncontact, reconfigurable, high-bandwidth ultrasonic inspection and process control technology. LBU enables remote ultrasonic sensing by replacing conventional PZT transducers, squirters, and immersion systems with laser beams. One laser beam generates the ultrasound in an opaque workpiece, while a second laser beam probes the sample to sense minute surface displacements, induced by the ultrasound or via other acoustic emission mechanisms. LBU systems have yet to be fielded commercially, owing primarily to the cost, size, and complexity of the system components. The authors have developed a low-cost, compact sensor which can potentially enable LBU systems to become a reality. The sensor employs a semiconductor crystal (GaAs) using a mechanism called nonsteady-state photo-induced emf. When combined with a laser diode as an optical source, the result is a very compact, low-cost robust sensor, which can function under in-factory conditions, including inspection of rough-cut workpieces which undergo rapid platform motion, such as high-speed, scanning laser welders. Experimental results will be discussed, including the potential for optical fiber delivery.

  12. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is of the sensor. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt's configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna.

  13. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  14. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, John

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  15. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, J.

    1995-05-30

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 29 figs.

  16. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  17. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, John

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  18. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Dieckman, Stephen L.

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  19. Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling 1 for Manufacturing (Smart Manufacturing): 2 Technology Assessment 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 5 1.1 Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 2 6 1.2 Challenges and opportunities

  20. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  1. Sonic Temperature Sensor for Food Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akers, D. W.; Porter, A. M.; Tow, D. M.

    1997-09-01

    The lack of adequate temperature measurement is the major barrier to the development of more efficient and better quality food processing methods. The objective of the sonic temperature sensor for food processing project is to develop a prototype sensor system to noninvasively measure the interior temperature of particulate foods during processing. The development of the prototype sensor is a collaborative project with the National Food Processors Association. The project is based on the property of materials that involves a change in the temperature of a material having a corresponding change in the speed of sound. The approach for the sonic sensor system is to determine the speed of sound through particulate foods using a tomographic reconstruction process.

  2. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  3. Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K.; Swartz, Scott L.; Holt, Christopher T.; Revur, Ramachandra Rao

    2006-01-10

    A sensor and method of use for detection of low levels of carbon monoxide in gas mixtures. The approach is based on the change in an electrical property (for example: resistance) that occurs when carbon monoxide is selectively absorbed by a film of copper chloride (or other metal halides). The electrical property change occurs rapidly with both increasing and decreasing CO contents, varies with the amount of CO from the gas stream, and is insensitive to the presence of hydrogen. To make a sensor using this approach, the metal halide film will deposited onto an alumina substrate with electrodes. The sensor may be maintained at the optimum temperature with a thick film platinum heater deposited onto the opposite face of the substrate. When the sensor is operating at an appropriate (and constant) temperature, the magnitude of the electrical property measured between the interdigital electrodes will provide a measure of the carbon monoxide content of the gas.

  4. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  5. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, D.K.; Allgood, G.O.; Mooney, L.R.; Duncan, M.G.; Turner, J.C.; Treece, D.A.

    1998-10-20

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric. 13 figs.

  6. Horizon Sensor(tm) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Horizon Sensor(tm) Remote Sensing Cuts Coal and Other Minerals More Efficiently Future mining will be from deeper and thinner seams; profiles of deep coal seams reveal multiple ...

  7. A new method for tracking organ motion on diagnostic ultrasound images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubota, Yoshiki Matsumura, Akihiko; Fukahori, Mai; Minohara, Shin-ichi; Yasuda, Shigeo; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-gated irradiation is effective in reducing the margins of a target in the case of abdominal organs, such as the liver, that change their position as a result of respiratory motion. However, existing technologies are incapable of directly measuring organ motion in real-time during radiation beam delivery. Hence, the authors proposed a novel quantitative organ motion tracking method involving the use of diagnostic ultrasound images; it is noninvasive and does not entail radiation exposure. In the present study, the authors have prospectively evaluated this proposed method. Methods: The method involved real-time processing of clinical ultrasound imaging data rather than organ monitoring; it comprised a three-dimensional ultrasound device, a respiratory sensing system, and two PCs for data storage and analysis. The study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method by tracking the gallbladder in one subject and a liver vein in another subject. To track a moving target organ, the method involved the control of a region of interest (ROI) that delineated the target. A tracking algorithm was used to control the ROI, and a large number of feature points and an error correction algorithm were used to achieve long-term tracking of the target. Tracking accuracy was assessed in terms of how well the ROI matched the center of the target. Results: The effectiveness of using a large number of feature points and the error correction algorithm in the proposed method was verified by comparing it with two simple tracking methods. The ROI could capture the center of the target for about 5 min in a cross-sectional image with changing position. Indeed, using the proposed method, it was possible to accurately track a target with a center deviation of 1.54 0.9 mm. The computing time for one frame image using our proposed method was 8 ms. It is expected that it would be possible to track any soft-tissue organ or tumor with large deformations and

  8. MHK ISDB/Sensors/12-bit Temperature Smart Sensor | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Relative Humidity (2m cable) Smart Sensor ... further results Also made by Onset Computer Corporation HOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring SystemHOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring...

  9. Sensor-guided threat countermeasure system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stuart, Brent C.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Armstrong, James P.

    2012-12-25

    A countermeasure system for use by a target to protect against an incoming sensor-guided threat. The system includes a laser system for producing a broadband beam and means for directing the broadband beam from the target to the threat. The countermeasure system comprises the steps of producing a broadband beam and directing the broad band beam from the target to blind or confuse the incoming sensor-guided threat.

  10. Integrating smart sensors into grid systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    smart sensors into grid systems will enable more complex modeling and adaptation to unknown problems for preventing future catastrophic failures. Passive Microsensor for Autonomous Sensing Grid health and reliability forms the backbone of our Nation's infrastructure. Real time monitoring and fast failure location and identification is critical for electrical grid sustainability. We propose the development of a cheap, fast (µs), fully integrated, passive micro-sensor capable of detecting

  11. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C.; Stotlar, Suzanne C.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  12. ISDSN Sensor System Phase One Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gail Heath

    2011-09-01

    This Phase 1 Test Report documents the test activities and results completed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sensor systems that will be deployed in the meso-scale test bed (MSTB) at Florida International University (FIU), as outlined in the ISDSN-MSTB Test Plan. This report captures the sensor system configuration tested; test parameters, testing procedure, any noted changes from the implementation plan, acquired test data sets, and processed results.

  13. Handbook of actuators and edge alignment sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krulewich, D A

    1992-11-01

    This actuator and sensor handbook was developed during a cooperative project between the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, the SDI-Directed Energy Program and LLNL. The common purpose of the joint effort was to develop precision actuators and sensors for the NASA initiated SpacE Laser ENE-rgy Program (SELENE). The purpose of the SELENE Program is to develop a highly cost effective segmented adaptive optics system for beaming laser power directly to spacecraft in earth orbit.

  14. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  15. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-06-30

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card. 8 figs.

  16. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1998-01-01

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card.

  17. Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDaniel; Anthony H. , Medlin; J. Will , Bastasz; Robert J.

    2007-09-04

    Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

  18. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Thomas M.; Davidson, James R.; Woods, Gregory K.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  19. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  20. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  1. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90

  2. Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Instrumentation | Department of Energy Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation Project objectives: Develop advanced sensor technology for the direct monitoring of geothermal reservoirs. Engineer sensors to survive and operate in H2O pressures up to 220 bar and temperatures as high as 374o C. high_pisano_silicon_carbide_sensor.pdf (841.42 KB) More Documents &

  3. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Safety Sensor Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Sensor Testing Laboratory The Safety Sensor Testing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility aims to ensure that hydrogen sensor technology is available to meet end-user needs and to foster the proper use of sensors. Hydrogen sensors are an important enabling technology for the safe implementation of the emerging hydrogen infrastructure. Codes require hydrogen detectors (e.g., NFPA 2-Hydrogen Technologies Code), but currently provide little guidance on deployment. In

  4. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring Novel sensor design based on acoustics. Determine in real-timeand in a single sensor packagemultiple parameters: temperature, pressure, fluid flow; and fluid properties, such as density, viscosity, fluid composition. high_pantea_acoustic_sensor.pdf (829.2 KB) More Documents & Publications Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager Waveguide-based Ultrasonic and

  5. Multi-robot motion control for cooperative observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement--determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the authors investigate the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. They focus primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. This paper first formalizes the problem and discusses related work. The authors then present a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level reasoning control based on the ALLIANCE formalism. They analyze the effectiveness of the approach by comparing it to 3 other feasible algorithms for cooperative control, showing the superiority of the approach for a large class of problems.

  6. LARGE-SCALE MOTIONS IN THE PERSEUS GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Mantz, A.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2012-10-01

    By combining large-scale mosaics of ROSAT PSPC, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observations, we present evidence for large-scale motions in the intracluster medium of the nearby, X-ray bright Perseus Cluster. These motions are suggested by several alternating and interleaved X-ray bright, low-temperature, low-entropy arcs located along the east-west axis, at radii ranging from {approx}10 kpc to over a Mpc. Thermodynamic features qualitatively similar to these have previously been observed in the centers of cool-core clusters, and were successfully modeled as a consequence of the gas sloshing/swirling motions induced by minor mergers. Our observations indicate that such sloshing/swirling can extend out to larger radii than previously thought, on scales approaching the virial radius.

  7. Stirling engine power control and motion conversion mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, David T.

    1983-01-01

    A motion conversion device for converting between the reciprocating motion of the pistons in a Stirling engine and the rotating motion of its output shaft, and for changing the stroke and phase of the pistons, includes a lever pivoted at one end and having a cam follower at the other end. The piston rod engages the lever intermediate its ends and the cam follower engages a cam keyed to the output shaft. The lever pivot can be moved to change the length of the moment arm defined between the cam follower and the piston rod the change the piston stroke and force exerted on the cam, and the levers can be moved in opposite directions to change the phase between pistons.

  8. An externally and internally deformable, programmable lung motion phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Most clinically deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating and tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are based on a rigid exterior and a rigid or a deformable-interior. Such designs do not adequately represent respiration because the thoracic anatomy deforms internally as well as externally. In order to create a closer approximation of respiratory motion, the authors describe the construction and experimental testing of an externally as well as internally deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commercially available lung phantom (RS-1500, RSD, Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cage and sternum. A custom-made insert was designed using a piece of natural latex foam block. A motion platform was programmed with sinusoidal and ten patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam “diaphragm” that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of determining the reproducibility and the external–internal correlation of external and internal marker trajectories extracted from kV x-ray fluoroscopy. Experiments were conducted to illustrate three example applications of the phantom—(i) validating the geometric accuracy of the VisionRT surface photogrammetry system; (ii) validating an image registration tool, NiftyReg; and (iii) quantifying the geometric error due to irregular motion in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Results: The phantom correctly reproduced sinusoidal and patient-derived motion, as well as realistic respiratory motion-related effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0

  9. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  10. Motion of charged test particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the circular motion of charged test particles in the gravitational field of a charged mass described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We study in detail all the spatial regions where circular motion is allowed around either black holes or naked singularities. The effects of repulsive gravity are discussed by finding all the circles at which a particle can have vanishing angular momentum. We show that the geometric structure of stable accretion disks, made of only test particles moving along circular orbits around the central body, allows us to clearly distinguish between black holes and naked singularities.

  11. The application of quaternions and other spatial representations to the reconstruction of re-entry vehicle motion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Sapio, Vincent

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of spacecraft kinematics and dynamics requires an efficient scheme for spatial representation. While the representation of displacement in three dimensional Euclidean space is straightforward, orientation in three dimensions poses particular challenges. The unit quaternion provides an approach that mitigates many of the problems intrinsic in other representation approaches, including the ill-conditioning that arises from computing many successive rotations. This report focuses on the computational utility of unit quaternions and their application to the reconstruction of re-entry vehicle (RV) motion history from sensor data. To this end they will be used in conjunction with other kinematic and data processing techniques. We will present a numerical implementation for the reconstruction of RV motion solely from gyroscope and accelerometer data. This will make use of unit quaternions due to their numerical efficacy in dealing with the composition of many incremental rotations over a time series. In addition to signal processing and data conditioning procedures, algorithms for numerical quaternion-based integration of gyroscope data will be addressed, as well as accelerometer triangulation and integration to yield RV trajectory. Actual processed flight data will be presented to demonstrate the implementation of these methods.

  12. Motion as perturbation. II. Development of the method for dosimetric analysis of motion effects with fixed-gantry IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In this work, the feasibility of implementing a motion-perturbation approach to accurately estimate volumetric dose in the presence of organ motionpreviously demonstrated for VMAT-is studied for static gantry IMRT. The method's accuracy is improved for the voxels that have very low planned dose but acquire appreciable dose due to motion. The study describes the modified algorithm and its experimental validation and provides an example of a clinical application. Methods: A contoured region-of-interest is propagated according to the predefined motion kernel throughout time-resolved 4D phantom dose grids. This timed series of 3D dose grids is produced by the measurement-guided dose reconstruction algorithm, based on an irradiation of a staticARCCHECK (AC) helical dosimeter array (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). Each moving voxel collects dose over the dynamic simulation. The difference in dose-to-moving voxel vs dose-to-static voxel in-phantom forms the basis of a motion perturbation correction that is applied to the corresponding voxel in the patient dataset. A new method to synchronize the accelerator and dosimeter clocks, applicable to fixed-gantry IMRT, was developed. Refinements to the algorithm account for the excursion of low dose voxels into high dose regions, causing appreciable dose increase due to motion (LDVE correction). For experimental validation, four plans using TG-119 structure sets and objectives were produced using segmented IMRT direct machine parameters optimization in Pinnacle treatment planning system (v. 9.6, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI). All beams were delivered with the gantry angle of 0. Each beam was delivered three times: (1) to the static AC centered on the room lasers; (2) to a static phantom containing a MAPCHECK2 (MC2) planar diode array dosimeter (Sun Nuclear); and (3) to the moving MC2 phantom. The motion trajectory was an ellipse in the IEC XY plane, with 3 and 1.5 cm axes. The period was 5 s

  13. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called agents from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the

  14. Sensor system for buried waste containment sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Ann Marie; Gardner, Bradley M.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Partin, Judy K.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Pfeifer, May Catherine

    2000-01-01

    A sensor system is disclosed for a buried waste containment site having a bottom wall barrier and/or sidewall barriers, for containing hazardous waste. The sensor system includes one or more sensor devices disposed in one or more of the barriers for detecting a physical parameter either of the barrier itself or of the physical condition of the surrounding soils and buried waste, and for producing a signal representing the physical parameter detected. Also included is a signal processor for receiving signals produced by the sensor device and for developing information identifying the physical parameter detected, either for sounding an alarm, displaying a graphic representation of a physical parameter detected on a viewing screen and/or a hard copy printout. The sensor devices may be deployed in or adjacent the barriers at the same time the barriers are deployed and may be adapted to detect strain or cracking in the barriers, leakage of radiation through the barriers, the presence and leaking through the barriers of volatile organic compounds, or similar physical conditions.

  15. Electronic Position Sensor for Power Operated Accessory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haag, Ronald H.; Chia, Michael I.

    2005-05-31

    An electronic position sensor for use with a power operated vehicle accessory, such as a power liftgate. The position sensor includes an elongated resistive circuit that is mounted such that it is stationary and extends along the path of a track portion of the power operated accessory. The position sensor further includes a contact nub mounted to a link member that moves within the track portion such that the contact nub is slidingly biased against the elongated circuit. As the link member moves under the force of a motor-driven output gear, the contact nub slides along the surface of the resistive circuit, thereby affecting the overall resistance of the circuit. The position sensor uses the overall resistance to provide an electronic position signal to an ECU, wherein the signal is indicative of the absolute position of the power operated accessory. Accordingly, the electronic position sensor is capable of providing an electronic signal that enables the ECU to track the absolute position of the power operated accessory.

  16. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  17. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R.; Forman, Peter R.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  18. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  19. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  20. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  1. CORRELATING ELECTRONIC AND VIBRATIONAL MOTIONS IN CHARGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  2. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  3. Fiber-optic shock position sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work performed for the development of a fiber-optic shock position sensor used to measure the location of a shock front in the neighborhood of a nuclear explosion. Such a measurement would provide a hydrodynamic determination of nuclear yield. The original proposal was prompted by the Defense Nuclear Agency's interest in replacing as many electrical sensors as possible with their optical counterparts for the verification of a treaty limiting the yield of a nuclear device used in underground testing. Immunity to electromagnetic pulse is the reason for the agency's interest; unlike electrical sensors and their associated cabling, fiber-optic systems do not transmit to the outside world noise pulses from the device containing secret information.

  4. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  5. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  6. Hypervelocity impact testing of spacecraft optical sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    Hypervelocity tests of spacecraft optical sensors were conducted to determine if the optical signature from an impact inside the optical sensor sunshade resembled signals that have been observed on-orbit. Impact tests were conducted in darkness and with the ejected debris illuminated. The tests were conducted at the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility. The projectile masses and velocities that may be obtained at the facility are most representative of the hypervelocity particles thought to be responsible for a group of anomalous optical sensors responses that have been observed on-orbit. The projectiles are a few micrograms, slightly more massive than the microgram particles thought to be responsible for the signal source. The test velocities were typically 7.3 km/s, which are somewhat slower than typical space particles.

  7. Non-contact current and voltage sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Gary D; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C; Schappert, Michael A

    2014-03-25

    A detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient device to measure current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  8. Motion of small bodies in classical field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gralla, Samuel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics University of Chicago 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    I show how prior work with R. Wald on geodesic motion in general relativity can be generalized to classical field theories of a metric and other tensor fields on four-dimensional spacetime that (1) are second-order and (2) follow from a diffeomorphism-covariant Lagrangian. The approach is to consider a one-parameter-family of solutions to the field equations satisfying certain assumptions designed to reflect the existence of a body whose size, mass, and various charges are simultaneously scaled to zero. (That such solutions exist places a further restriction on the class of theories to which our results apply.) Assumptions are made only on the spacetime region outside of the body, so that the results apply independent of the body's composition (and, e.g., black holes are allowed). The worldline 'left behind' by the shrinking, disappearing body is interpreted as its lowest-order motion. An equation for this worldline follows from the 'Bianchi identity' for the theory, without use of any properties of the field equations beyond their being second-order. The form of the force law for a theory therefore depends only on the ranks of its various tensor fields; the detailed properties of the field equations are relevant only for determining the charges for a particular body (which are the ''monopoles'' of its exterior fields in a suitable limiting sense). I explicitly derive the force law (and mass-evolution law) in the case of scalar and vector fields, and give the recipe in the higher-rank case. Note that the vector force law is quite complicated, simplifying to the Lorentz force law only in the presence of the Maxwell gauge symmetry. Example applications of the results are the motion of 'chameleon' bodies beyond the Newtonian limit, and the motion of bodies in (classical) non-Abelian gauge theory. I also make some comments on the role that scaling plays in the appearance of universality in the motion of bodies.

  9. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R&D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R&D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts.

  10. NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betteridge, William J

    2006-02-28

    The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the

  11. Passive in-situ chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, Jonathan S.; Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-02-14

    A chemical sensor for assessing a chemical of interest. In typical embodiments the chemical sensor includes a first thermocouple and second thermocouple. A reactive component is typically disposed proximal to the second thermal couple, and is selected to react with the chemical of interest and generate a temperature variation that may be detected by a comparison of a temperature sensed by the second thermocouple compared with a concurrent temperature detected by the first thermocouple. Further disclosed is a method for assessing a chemical of interest and a method for identifying a reaction temperature for a chemical of interest in a system.

  12. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-02-27

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  13. 2015 Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program, in coordination with the Office of Nuclear Reactor Technologies and the Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies, conducted an Instrumentations and Controls (I&C) webinar on October 28-29, 2015. This webinar provided an opportunity to review the research and development being conducted in the areas of sensors, controls, communications, digital instrumentation, human-machine technologies, and related areas across the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and to promote greater coordination among the various NE R&D programs. The meeting presentations are available here.

  14. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  15. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY08 design summary. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY08 design summary. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY08 design summary. ...

  16. Test Protocol Document, Hydrogen Safety Sensor Testing; Phase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Protocol Document, Hydrogen Safety Sensor Testing Phase I: Non-Flammable Mixtures R. ... Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Test Protocol Document, Hydrogen Safety Sensor ...

  17. Test Protocol Document, Hydrogen Safety Sensor Testing; Phase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Protocol Document, Hydrogen Safety Sensor Testing Phase I: Non-Flammable Mixtures R. ... DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Test Protocol Document, Hydrogen Safety Sensor Testing Phase I: ...

  18. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter- Issue 5, September 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter includes information about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy R&D programs.

  19. Indiana: EERE's Wireless Sensors Can Save Companies Millions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indiana: EERE's Wireless Sensors Can Save Companies Millions of Dollars Indiana: EERE's Wireless Sensors Can Save Companies Millions of Dollars March 6, 2014 - 10:44am Addthis All ...

  20. Optical sensor for measuring American Lobster vitality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-10

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.