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1

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

2

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and its application to the Coso and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurements of temporal changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and assume that any differences in the structural results arise from real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural

3

Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography of the Coso Geothermal Area, 1996-2004 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dependent Seismic Tomography of the Coso Geothermal Area, 1996-2004 Dependent Seismic Tomography of the Coso Geothermal Area, 1996-2004 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network at the Coso geothermal area, California. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio VP/VS at shallow depths. These changes result predominately from progressive relative increase in VS with respect to VP, and could result from processes associated with geothermal operations such as decrease in fluid pressure

4

Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004 of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network at the Coso geothermal area, California. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio VP/VS at shallow depths. These changes result predominately from progressive relative increase in VS with respect to VP, and could result from processes associated with geothermal operations such as decrease in fluid pressure and the drying of argillaceous minerals such as illite.

5

Crosswell Seismic Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Seismic Tomography Citation Schlumberger. Crosswell Seismic...

6

Parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data was presented. Classical approach to travel time tomography assumes straight line of seismic rays between sources and receives points and isotropy of geological ... Keywords: inverse problem, master-slave paradigm, seismic anisotropy, seismic tomography

Maciej Dwornik; Anna Pi?ta

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Development of a seismic tomography system for use on a geotechnical centrifuge.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Seismic tomography has been extensively used in geophysics for different purposes such as geological mapping and prospecting for oil and gas. In geophysics, (more)

Rammah, Khader Ibrahim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Dynamic ray tracing and traveltime corrections for global seismic tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a dynamic ray tracing program for a spherically symmetric Earth that may be used to compute Frechet kernels for traveltime and amplitude anomalies at finite frequency. The program works for arbitrarily defined phases and background models. The numerical precisions of kinematic and dynamic ray tracing are optimized to produce traveltime errors under 0.1 s, which is well below the data uncertainty in global seismology. This tolerance level is obtained for an integration step size of about 20 km for the most common seismic phases. We also give software to compute ellipticity, crustal and topographic corrections and attenuation.

Tian Yue [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: ytian@princeton.edu; Hung, S.-H. [Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Nolet, Guust [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Montelli, Raffaella [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, P.O. Box 22189, GW03-940A, Houston, TX 77252-2189 (United States); Dahlen, F.A. [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

Seismic surface wave tomography of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'The objective of the Seismic Surface Wave Tomography of Waste Sites is to develop a robust technique for field acquisition and analysis of surface wave data for the interpretation of shallow structures, such as those associated with the burial of wastes. The analysis technique is to be developed and tested on an existing set of seismic data covering the K-901 burial site at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Also, a portable prototype for a field acquisition system will be designed and developed to obtain additional data for analysis and testing of the technique. The K-901 data have been examined and a preliminary Single Valued Decomposition inversion has been obtained. The preliminary data indicates a need for additional seismic data to ground-truth the inversion. The originally proposed gravity data acquisition has been dropped because sufficient gravity data are now available for a preliminary analysis and because the seismic data are considered more critical to the interpretation. The proposed prototype for the portable acquisition and analysis system was developed during the first year and will be used in part of the acquisition of additional seismic data.'

Long, T.L.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Using seismic tomography to characterize fracture systems induced by hydraulic fracturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing have been studied by many investigators to characterize fracture systems created by the fracturing process and to better understand the locations of energy resources in the earth`s subsurface. The pattern of the locations often contains a great deal of information about the fracture system stimulated during the hydraulic fracturing. Seismic tomography has found applications in many areas for characterizing the subsurface of the earth. It is well known that fractures in rock influence both the P and S velocities of the rock. The influence of the fractures is a function of the geometry of the fractures, the apertures and number of fractures, and the presence of fluids in the fractures. In addition, the temporal evolution of the created fracture system can be inferred from the temporal changes in seismic velocity and the pattern of microearthquake locations. Seismic tomography has been used to infer the spatial location of a fracture system in a reservoir that was created by hydraulic fracturing.

Fehler, M.; Rutledge, J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Robust inverse scattering full waveform seismic tomography for imaging complex structure  

SciTech Connect

Seismic tomography becomes important tool recently for imaging complex subsurface. It is well known that imaging complex rich fault zone is difficult. In this paper, The application of time domain inverse scattering wave tomography to image the complex fault zone would be shown on this paper, especially an efficient time domain inverse scattering tomography and their run in cluster parallel computer which has been developed. This algorithm is purely based on scattering theory through solving Lippmann Schwienger integral by using Born's approximation. In this paper, it is shown the robustness of this algorithm especially in avoiding the inversion trapped in local minimum to reach global minimum. A large data are solved by windowing and blocking technique of memory as well as computation. Parameter of windowing computation is based on shot gather's aperture. This windowing technique reduces memory as well as computation significantly. This parallel algorithm is done by means cluster system of 120 processors from 20 nodes of AMD Phenom II. Benchmarking of this algorithm is done by means Marmoussi model which can be representative of complex rich fault area. It is shown that the proposed method can image clearly the rich fault and complex zone in Marmoussi model even though the initial model is quite far from the true model. Therefore, this method can be as one of solution to image the very complex mode.

Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Sukmana, Indriani; Wibowo, Satryo; Deny, Agus; Kurniadi, Rizal; Widowati, Sri; Mubarok, Syahrul; Susilowati; Kaswandhi [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research (WISFIR) Lab., Complex System Research Division, Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung. and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster C (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster Computing Center, Bandung (Indonesia); Physics Department of Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster Computing Center, Bandung, Indonesia and Institut Teknologi Telkom, Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster Computing Center, Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Personalised time-dependent learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-dependent instruction appears to shape next-generation learning systems, where the value of instruction is as important as the time it takes to learn. The ability to grasp the exact knowledge required to accomplish a specific task, in the ... Keywords: adaptive learning, authoring tools, knowledge management, learning granularity, learning objects, learning resources, learning technology, learning web, ontology, personalised learning, semantic web, time constraints, time-dependent learning, timeliness

R. Benlamri; Y. Atif; J. Berri

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography  

SciTech Connect

In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Gttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range  

SciTech Connect

Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Visualization of time-dependent seismic vector fields with glyphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eases computation in the fragment shader. This technique islookup [AMHH08], while the shader code for procedural dipolegenerate 25 to 58 fragment shader operations. There are

McQuinn, Emmett

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography  

SciTech Connect

In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear dynamics in time-dependent picture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the time-dependent theory of quantum mechanics, we investigate nuclear electric dipole responses. The time evolution of a wave function is explicitly calculated in the coordinate-space representation. The particle continuum is treated with the absorbing boundary condition. Calculated time-dependent quantities are transformed into those of familiar energy representation. We apply the method to a three-body model for 11Li and to the mean-field model for 22O, then discuss properties of E1 response.

Takashi Nakatsukasa; Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Time dependence of liquid-helium fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluorescence following an ionizing radiation event in liquid helium is observed and studied in the temperature range from 250 mK to 1.8 K. The fluorescence exhibits significant structure including a short ({approx}10 ns) strong initial pulse followed by single photons whose emission rate decays exponentially with a 1.6-{mu}s time constant. At an even longer time scale, the emission rate varies as '1/time' (inversely proportional to the time after the initial pulse). The intensity of the '1/time' component from {beta} particles is significantly weaker than those from {alpha} particles or neutron capture on {sup 3}He. It is also found that for {alpha} particles, the intensity of this component depends on the temperature of the superfluid helium. Proposed models describing the observed fluorescence are discussed.

McKinsey, D.N.; Brome, C.R.; Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golub, R.; Habicht, K.; Korobkina, E. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin-Wannsee (Germany); Huffman, P.R.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Time-dependent quasi-spherical accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differentially rotating, "advection-dominated" accretion flows are considered in which the heat generated by viscous dissipation is retained in the fluid. The equations of time-dependent quasi-spherical accretion are solved in a simplified one-dimensional model that neglects the latitudinal dependence of the flow. A self-similar solution is presented that has finite size, mass, angular momentum and energy. This may be expected to be an attractor for the initial-value problem in which a cool and narrow ring of fluid orbiting around a central mass heats up, spreads radially and is accreted. The solution provides some insight into the dynamics of quasi-spherical accretion and avoids many of the strictures of the steady self-similar solution of Narayan & Yi. Special attention is given to the astrophysically important case in which the adiabatic exponent gamma=5/3; even in this case, the flow is found to be differentially rotating and bound to the central object, and accretion can occur without the need for powerful outflows.

G. I. Ogilvie

1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method, Water Resources Research 36 (8), 2095-2105 Yeh, T. -determine the water saturation. However, Yeh at al. , 2000Yeh (2005), Characterization of aquifer heterogeneity using transient hydraulic tomography, Water

Brauchler, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1996 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To look at time dependent seismic tomography Notes Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio V p/V s at shallow depths. The period from 1996 through 2006 was studied, and the results to date using the traditional method show, for a 2-km horizontal grid spacing, an irregular strengthening

24

Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation ... Keywords: Riemann solvers, finite methods, radiative transfer, spherical harmonics, time dependent transport

Thomas A. Brunner; James Paul Holloway

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fragment-based Time-dependent Density-functional Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Runge-Gross theorem that establishes the foundation of Time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) we prove that for a given electronic Hamiltonian, choice of initial state, and choice of fragmentation, there is a unique single-particle potential (dubbed time-dependent partition potential) which, when added to each of the pre-selected fragment potentials, forces the fragment densities to evolve in such a way that their sum equals the exact molecular density at all times. This uniqueness theorem suggests new ways of computing time-dependent properties of electronic systems via fragment-TDDFT calculations. We derive a formally exact relationship between the partition potential and the total density, and illustrate our approach on a simple model system for binary fragmentation in a laser field.

Mosquera, Martin A; Wasserman, Adam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Formal specification of real-time dependable systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex and critical nature of real-time, dependable systems (henceforth referred to as RTD systems) necessitates the use of analyzable specifications and specification analysis techniques supporting the assessment of behavioral, safety-critical, ... Keywords: analyzable specifications, behavioral quality, consistency check, fault-tolerant quality, formal reasoning systems, formal specification, multilevel description, nonfunctional qualities, precise specification language, real-time dependable systems, real-time systems, safety-critical quality, safety-critical software, security of data, security quality, software fault tolerance, specification analysis techniques, specification languages, system monitoring

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Time-Dependent Two-Layer Hydraulic Exchange Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory is presented for time-dependent two-layer hydraulic flows through straits. The theory is used to study exchange flows forced by a periodic barotropic (tidal) flow. For a given strait geometry the resulting flow is a function of two ...

Karl R. Helfrich

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inverse problem of time-dependent heat sources numerical reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: This work studies the inverse problem of reconstructing a time-dependent heat source in the heat conduction equation using the temperature measurement specified at an internal point. Problems of this type have important applications in several ... Keywords: 35R30, 49J20, Green function, Heat source, Inverse problem, Landweber iteration, Numerical results

Liu Yang; Mehdi Dehghan; Jian-Ning Yu; Guan-Wei Luo

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Time dependent Directional Profit Model for Financial Time Series Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time dependent Directional Profit Model for Financial Time Series Forecasting Jingtao YAO Chew Lim@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Goodness­of­fit is the most popular criterion for neural network time series forecasting. In the context of financial time series forecasting, we are not only concerned at how good the forecasts fit

Yao, JingTao

30

Scintillation time dependence and pulse shape discrimination in liquid argon  

SciTech Connect

Using a single-phase liquid argon detector with a signal yield of 4.85 photoelectrons per keV of electronic-equivalent recoil energy (keVee), we measure the scintillation time dependence of both electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid argon down to 5 keVee. We develop two methods of pulse shape discrimination to distinguish between electronic and nuclear recoils. Using one of these methods, we measure a background- and statistics-limited level of electronic recoil contamination to be 7.6x10{sup -7} between 52 and 110 keV of nuclear recoil energy (keVr) for a nuclear recoil acceptance of 50% with no nuclear recoil-like events above 62 keVr. Finally, we develop a maximum likelihood method of pulse shape discrimination based on the measured scintillation time dependence.

Lippincott, W. H.; McKinsey, D. N.; Nikkel, J. A. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Coakley, K. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Gastler, D.; Kearns, E. [Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Hime, A.; Stonehill, L. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analytic Controllability of Time-Dependent Quantum Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of controllability is investigated for a quantum control system in which the Hamiltonian operator components carry explicit time dependence which is not under the control of an external agent. We consider the general situation in which the state moves in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, a drift term is present, and the operators driving the state evolution may be unbounded. However, considerations are restricted by the assumption that there exists an analytic domain, dense in the state space, on which solutions of the controlled Schrodinger equation may be expressed globally in exponential form. The issue of controllability then naturally focuses on the ability to steer the quantum state on a finite-dimensional submanifold of the unit sphere in Hilbert space -- and thus on analytic controllability. A relatively straightforward strategy allows the extension of Lie-algebraic conditions for strong analytic controllability derived earlier for the simpler, time-independent system in which the drift Hamiltonian and the interaction Hamiltonia have no intrinsic time dependence. Enlarging the state space by one dimension corresponding to the time variable, we construct an augmented control system that can be treated as time-independent. Methods developed by Kunita can then be implemented to establish controllability conditions for the one-dimension-reduced system defined by the original time-dependent Schrodinger control problem. The applicability of the resulting theorem is illustrated with selected examples.

Chunhua Lan; Tzyh-Jong Tarn; Quo-Shin Chi; John W. Clark

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Modeling Time-dependent Responses of Piezoelectric Fiber Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of polymer constituent in piezoelectric fiber composites (PFCs) could lead to significant viscoelastic behaviors, affecting overall performance of PFCs. High mechanical and electrical stimuli often generate significant amount of heat, increasing temperatures of the PFCs. At elevated temperatures, most materials, especially polymers show pronounced time-dependent behaviors. Predicting time-dependent responses of the PFCs becomes important to improve reliability in using PFCs. We study overall performance of PFCs having unidirectional piezoceramic fibers, such as PZT fibers, dispersed in viscoelastic polymer matrix. Two types of PFCs are studied, which are active fiber composites (AFCs) and macro fiber composites (MFCs). AFCs and MFCs consist of unidirectional PZT fibers dispersed in epoxy placed between two interdigitated electrode and kapton layers. The AFCs have a circular fiber cross-section while the MFCs have a square fiber cross-section. Finite element (FE) models of representative volume elements (RVEs) of active PFCs, having square and circular fiber cross-sections, are generated for composites with 20, 40, and 60 percent fiber contents. Two FE micromechanical models having one fiber embedded in epoxy matrix and five fibers placed in epoxy matrix are considered. A continuum 3D piezoelectric element in ABAQUS FE is used. A general time-integral function is applied for the mechanical, electrical, and piezoelectric properties in order to incorporate the time-dependent effect and histories of loadings. The effective properties of PZT-5A/epoxy and PZT-7A/LaRC-SI piezocomposites determined from the FE micromechanical models are compared to available experimental data and analytical solutions in the literature. Furthermore, the effect of viscoelastic behaviors of the LaRC-SI matrix at an elevated temperature on the overall electro-mechanical and piezoelectric constants are examined.

Li, Kuo-An

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport  

SciTech Connect

A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

Baker, Randal S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Time-dependent, lattice approach to atomic collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress in developing and applying methods of direct numerical solution of atomic collision problems is described. Various forms of the three-body problem are used to illustrate these techniques. Specifically, the process of ionization in proton-, antiproton-, and electron-impact of atomic hydrogen is considered in applications ranging in computational intensity from collisions simulated in two spatial dimensions to treatment of the three-dimensional, fully correlated two-electron Schroedinger equation. These examples demonstrate the utility and feasibility of treating strongly interacting atomic systems through time-dependent, lattice approaches.

Schultz, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Conservation Properties in the Time-Dependent Hartree Fock Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the conservation of angular momentum in nuclear time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations for a numerical representation of wave functions and potentials on a three-dimensional cartesian grid. Free rotation of a deformed nucleus performs extremely well even for relatively coarse spatial grids. Heavy ion collisions produce a highly excited compound system associated with substantial nucleon emission. These emitted nucleons reach the bounds of the numerical box which leads to a decrease of angular momentum. We discuss strategies to distinguish the physically justified loss from numerical artifacts.

Lu Guo; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard; Y. Hashimoto

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Seismic CD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEISMIC CD Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Background Resource Findings and Recovery Timeline Oil Program ADIS Overview Gas Program ADIS Overview SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT...

37

Time-dependent resilience assessment and improvement of urban infrastructure systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an approach to assess and improve the time-dependent resilience of urban infrastructure systems

Min Ouyang; Leonardo Dueas-Osorio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CORTICAL PHASE TRANSITIONS, NONEQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMICS AND THE TIME-DEPENDENT GINZBURG LANDAU EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics and Time-Dependent GL EquationNONEQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMICS AND THE TIME-DEPENDENTour attention on the thermodynamics of the nonequilibrium

Freeman, Walter J.; Livi, Robert; Obinata, Masashi; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Length and Time-Dependent Rates in Diffusion-Controlled Reactions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Length and Time-Dependent Rates in Diffusion-Controlled Reactions with Conjugated Polymers Paiboon Sreearunothai, Sadayuki Asaoka, Andrew R. Cook and John R. Miller J. Phys. Chem....

40

Visualization of Time-Dependent Remote Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data Ralf Kaehler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

addressed the problem of visualizing remote, time- dependent data defined on AMR grids. In order to handle as the network is fast enough and local resources are capable of handling the data, we believe that using remoteVisualization of Time-Dependent Remote Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data Ralf Kaehler Zuse

Andrzejak, Artur

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surface harmonics method equations for solving the time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finite-difference time-dependent equations of Surface Harmonics method have been obtained for plane geometry. Verification of these equations has been carried out by calculations of tasks from 'Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416'. The capacity and efficiency of the Surface Harmonics method have been demonstrated by solution of the time-dependent neutron transport equation in diffusion approximation. The results of studies showed that implementation of Surface Harmonics method for full-scale calculations will lead to a significant progress in the efficient solution of the time-dependent neutron transport problems in nuclear reactors. (authors)

Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A. [National Research Center, Kurchatov Inst., Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An Explicit One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Tilting Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An explicit one-dimensional time-dependent tilting cloud model has been developed for use in cumulus parameterizations. The tilting axis is not necessarily orthogonal to the (r, ?) plane, making the horizontal axisymmetric assumption more ...

Shu-Hua Chen; Wen-Yih Sun

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Three-Dimensional Time-Dependent Global Model of the Thermosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global, three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical model of the thermosphere has been created to simulate the dynamical behavior of the earth's thermosphere under a wide variety of geophysical conditions. Comparison of the model's predictions ...

T. J. Fuller-Rowell; D. Rees

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Modeling of GATE Cumulonimbus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional time-dependent cumulonimbus model is designed that, unlike in previous one-dimensional models, simulates cloud-top heights, vertical velocities, and water contents that are reasonably consistent with those observed in real ...

Brad Schoenberg Ferrier; Robert A. Houze Jr.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Case study: visual analysis of complex, time-dependent simulation results of a diesel exhaust system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous work we have presented visualization techniques that provide engineers with a high degree of interactivity and flexibility for analyzing large, time-dependent, and high-dimensional data sets resulting from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) ...

Helmut Doleisch; Michael Mayer; Martin Gasser; Roland Wanker; Helwig Hauser

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Optimal Fingerprints for the Detection of Time-dependent Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimal linear filter (fingerprint) is derived for the detection of a given time-dependent, multivariate climate change signal in the presence of natural climate variability noise. Application of the fingerprint to the observed (or model ...

K. Hasselmann

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Time dependent estimates of delays and delay costs at major airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two queuing models appropriate for estimating time dependent delays and delay costs at major airports are reviewed. The models use the demand and capacity profiles at any given airport as well as the number of runways there ...

Hengsbach, Gerd

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Time-Dependent Adjustment in a Simple Model of the Mid-Depth Meridional Overturning Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recently proposed reduced-gravity model of the warm-water branch of the middepth meridional overturning circulation in a rectangular basin with a circumpolar connection is extended to include time dependence. The model describes the balance ...

R. M. Samelson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Time-Dependent Hydraulic Flow and Dissipation over the Still of Observatory Inlet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent hydraulic flow over the sill of a tidally energetic fjord, Observatory Inlet, British Columbia, is studied. Acoustic observations of streamlines and velocity were made near the sill crest during the summer of 1982, a time when ...

Michael W. Stacey; Len J. Zedel

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Transportation Center Seminar........ "Adaptive Routing in Stochastic Time-Dependent Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Center Seminar........ "Adaptive Routing in Stochastic Time-Dependent Networks: Transportation Center, Chambers Hall Lower Level, 600 Foster St., Evanston Abstract Transportation systems networks with traveler information, with applications in intelligent transportation systems (ITS

Bustamante, Fabián E.

51

Summer Drought in Northern Midlatitudes in a Time-Dependent CO2 Climate Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent climate-change experiment with a coupled oceanatmosphere general circulation model has been used to study changes in the occurrence of drought in summer in southern Europe and central North America. In both regions, ...

J. M. Gregory; J. F. B. Mitchell; A. J. Brady

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Time-dependent Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and Generalized SIC-Slater approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simplification of the full "2 sets" Time dependent Self Interaction Correction (TD-SIC) method, applying the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) method. The new resulting scheme is called time-dependent "Generalized SIC-OEP". A straightforward approximation, using the spatial localization of one set of orbitals, leads to the "Generalized SIC-Slater" formalism. We show that it represents a great improvement compared to the traditional SIC-Slater/KLI formalisms.

Messud, J; Reinhard, P -G; Suraud, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Time-dependent Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and Generalized SIC-Slater approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simplification of the full "2 sets" Time dependent Self Interaction Correction (TD-SIC) method, applying the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) method. The new resulting scheme is called time-dependent "Generalized SIC-OEP". A straightforward approximation, using the spatial localization of one set of orbitals, leads to the "Generalized SIC-Slater" formalism. We show that it represents a great improvement compared to the traditional SIC-Slater/KLI formalisms.

J. Messud; P. M. Dinh; P. -G. Reinhard; E. Suraud

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

Extending quantum control of time-independent systems to time-dependent systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish that if a scheme can control a time-independent system arbitrarily coupled to a generic finite bath over a short period of time $T$ with control precision $O(T^{N+1})$, it can also realize the control with the same order of precision on smoothly time-dependent systems. This result extends the validity of various universal dynamical control schemes to arbitrary analytically time-dependent systems.

Zhen-Yu Wang; Ren-Bao Liu

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Understanding the Origins of Time-Dependent Inhibition by Polypeptide Deformylase Inhibitors  

SciTech Connect

The continual bacterial adaptation to antibiotics creates an ongoing medical need for the development of novel therapeutics. Polypeptide deformylase (PDF) is a highly conserved bacterial enzyme, which is essential for viability. It has previously been shown that PDF inhibitors represent a promising new area for the development of antimicrobial agents, and that many of the best PDF inhibitors demonstrate slow, time-dependent binding. To improve our understanding of the mechanistic origin of this time-dependent inhibition, we examined in detail the kinetics of PDF catalysis and inhibition by several different PDF inhibitors. Varying pH and solvent isotope led to clear changes in time-dependent inhibition parameters, as did inclusion of NaCl, which binds to the active site metal of PDF. Quantitative analysis of these results demonstrated that the observed time dependence arises from slow binding of the inhibitors to the active site metal. However, we also found several metal binding inhibitors that exhibited rapid, non-time-dependent onset of inhibition. By a combination of structural and chemical modification studies, we show that metal binding is only slow when the rest of the inhibitor makes optimal hydrogen bonds within the subsites of PDF. Both of these interactions between the inhibitor and enzyme were found to be necessary to observe time-dependent inhibition, as elimination of either leads to its loss.

Totoritis, Rachel; Duraiswami, Chaya; Taylor, Amy N.; Kerrigan, John J.; Campobasso, Nino; Smith, Katherine J.; Ward, Paris; King, Bryan W.; Murrayz-Thompson, Monique; Jones, Amber D.; Van Aller, Glenn S.; Aubart, Kelly M.; Zalacain, Magdalena; Thrall, Sara H.; Meek, Thomas D.; Schwartz, Benjamin (GSKPA)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Effects of time dependency and efficiency on information flow in financial markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated financial market data to determine which factors affect information flow between stocks. Two factors, the time dependency and the degree of efficiency, were considered in the analysis of Korean, the Japanese, the Taiwanese, the Canadian, and US market data. We found that the frequency of the significant information decreases as the time interval increases. However, no significant information flow was observed in the time series from which the temporal time correlation was removed. These results indicated that the information flow between stocks evidences time-dependency properties. Furthermore, we discovered that the difference in the degree of efficiency performs a crucial function in determining the direction of the significant information flow.

Eom, Cheoljun; Choi, Sunghoon; Oh, Gabjin; Kim Seungh Wan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Wormholes with a space- and time-dependent equation of state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion has suggested the existence of an evolving equation of state. This paper discusses various wormhole solutions in a spherically symmetric spacetime with an equation of state that is both space and time dependent. The solutions obtained are exact and generalize earlier results on static wormholes supported by phantom energy.

Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Limit theorem for a time-dependent coined quantum walk on the line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study time-dependent discrete-time quantum walks on the one-dimensional lattice. We compute the limit distribution of a two-period quantum walk defined by two orthogonal matrices. For the symmetric case, the distribution is determined by one of two matrices. Moreover, limit theorems for two special cases are presented.

Takuya Machida; Norio Konno

2010-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Time-Dependent Response to Cooling in a Beta-Plane Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent response of an ocean basin to the imposition of cooling (or heating) is examined in the context of a quasigeostrophic, two-layer model on the beta plane. The focus is on the structure and magnitude of the vertical motion and ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Multidimensional time-dependent discrete variable representations in multiconfiguration Hartree calculations  

SciTech Connect

In the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach, the wave function is expanded in time-dependent basis functions, called single-particle functions, to increase the efficiency of the wave-packet propagation. The correlation discrete variable representation (CDVR) approach, which is based on a time-dependent discrete variable representation (DVR), can be employed to evaluate matrix elements of the potential energy. The efficiency of the MCTDH method can be further enhanced by using multidimensional single-particle functions. However, up to now the CDVR approach could not be used in MCTDH calculations employing multidimensional single-particle functions, since this would require a general multidimensional non-direct-product DVR scheme. Recently, Dawes and Carrington presented a practical scheme to implement general non-direct-product multidimensional DVRs [R. Dawes and T. Carrington, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 726 (2004)]. The present work utilizes their scheme in the MCTDH/CDVR approach. The accuracy is tested using the photodissociation of NOCl as example. The results show that the CDVR scheme based on multidimensional time-dependent DVRs allows for an accurate evaluation of the potential in MCTDH calculations with multidimensional single-particle functions.

Harrevelt, Rob van; Manthe, Uwe [Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Algorithm for the Calculation of the Time-Dependent Mixing Height in Coastal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple algorithm for the calculation of the time-dependent mixing height h(t) in coastal sites using wind, temperature, momentum flux, and heat flux time series as input data. A stationary expression for the coastal ...

Paolo Martano

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Single machine scheduling with time-dependent deterioration and exponential learning effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the single machine scheduling problems with time-dependent deterioration and exponential learning effect, i.e., the actual processing time of a job depends not only on the processing times of the jobs already processed but also ... Keywords: Deteriorating jobs, Learning effect, Scheduling, Single machine

Xue Huang; Ji-Bo Wang; Li-Yan Wang; Wen-Jun Gao; Xue-Ru Wang

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Determination of a time-dependent heat transfer coefficient from non-standard boundary measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the determination of the time-dependent heat transfer coefficient in one-dimensional transient heat conduction from a non-standard boundary measurement is investigated. For this inverse nonlinear ill-posed problem the uniqueness of the ... Keywords: Boundary element method, Heat conduction, Heat transfer coefficient, Inverse problem

T. T. M. Onyango; D. B. Ingham; D. Lesnic; M. Slodi?ka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Author's personal copy The time dependent vehicle routing problem with time windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy The time dependent vehicle routing problem with time windows: Benchmark routing problems with hard or soft time windows without any alteration in its structure is presented of congested urban settings are proposed. Solution quality, time window pertur- bations, and computational time

Bertini, Robert L.

67

An Evaluation of Time Dependent Leak Rates in Degraded Steam Generator Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has performed leak rate testing of degraded steam generator tubing for a number of years as part of the Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program, under the sponsorship of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This document describes the results of a review and evaluation of ANL time-dependent leak rate information.

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Orientational ordering of colloidal dispersions by application of time dependent external forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method of organizing incoherent motion of a colloidal suspension to produce synchronized, coherent motion. This method exploits general features of rotational response to time-dependent forcing, and it does not require interaction between the particles. We report two methods of achieving orientational alignment of an ensemble of identical colloids by means of a time-dependent, but spatially uniform forcing: a) a piecewise constant force alternating between two directions and b) a force uniformly rotating about an axis. The physical origin of the forcing may be e.g., sedimentation or electrophoresis. We will demonstrate that these forcing methods achieve alignment both by analyzing the equations of motion and by simulation. We find the conditions guaranteeing alignment, discuss the limitations of these methods, and suggest possible applications. Examples of such forcing include electrophoresis and sedimentation.

Brian Moths; T. A. Witten

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

69

An Evaluation of Time Dependent Leak Rates in Degraded Steam Generator Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored leak rate tests of steam generator (SG) tubing with stress corrosion cracks and electrodischarged machining (EDM) notches at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Some test specimens displayed time-dependent leak rate increases when the pressure was held constant. Post-test visual examination clearly revealed that the outside diameter (OD) crack length of these specimens had increased. It was suspected that fatigue due to jet/structure interaction was respons...

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Creation of quasiparticles in graphene by a time-dependent electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the creation of massless quasiparticle pairs from the vacuum state in graphene by the space homogeneous time-dependent electric field. For this purpose the formalism of (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics is applied to the case of a nonstationary background with arbitrary time dependence allowing the S-matrix formulation of the problem. The number of created pairs per unit graphene area is expressed via the asymptotic solution at $t\\to\\infty$ of the second-order differential equation of an oscillator type with complex frequency satisfying some initial conditions at $t\\to-\\infty$. The obtained results are applied to the electric field with specific dependence on time admitting the exact solution of Dirac equation. The number of created pairs per unit area is calculated analytically in a wide variety of different regimes depending on the parameters of electric field. The investigated earlier case of static electric field is reproduced as a particular case of our formalism. It is shown that the creation rate in a time-dependent field is often larger than in a static field.

G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Deterministic-Monte Carlo Hybrid Method for Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new deterministic-Monte Carlo hybrid solution technique is derived for the time-dependent transport equation. This new approach is based on dividing the time domain into a number of coarse intervals and expanding the transport solution in a series of polynomials within each interval. The solutions within each interval can be represented in terms of arbitrary source terms by using precomputed response functions. In the current work, the time-dependent response function computations are performed using the Monte Carlo method, while the global time-step march is performed deterministically. This work extends previous work by coupling the time-dependent expansions to space- and angle-dependent expansions to fully characterize the 1D transport response/solution. More generally, this approach represents and incremental extension of the steady-state coarse-mesh transport method that is based on global-local decompositions of large neutron transport problems. An example of a homogeneous slab is discussed as an example of the new developments.

Justin Pounders; Farzad Rahnema

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Time-Dependent Optical Spectroscopy of GRB 010222: Clues to the GRB Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present sequential optical spectra of the afterglow of GRB 010222 obtained one day apart using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) and the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the Keck telescopes. Three low-ionization absorption systems are spectroscopically identified at z1=1.47688, z2=1.15628, and z3=0.92747. The higher resolution ESI spectrum reveals two distinct components in the highest redshift system at z1a=1.47590 and z1b=1.47688. We interpret the z1b=1.47688 system as an absorption feature of the disk of the host galaxy of GRB 010222. The best fitted power-law optical continuum and [Zn/Cr] ratio imply low dust content or a local gray dust component near the burst site. In addition, we do not detect strong signatures of vibrationally excited states of H_2. If the GRB took place in a superbubble or young stellar cluster, there are no outstanding signatures of an ionized absorber, either. Analysis of the spectral time dependence at low resolution shows no significant evidence for absorption-line variability. This lack of variability is confronted with time-dependent photoionization simulations designed to apply the observed flux from GRB 010222 to a variety of assumed atomic gas densities and cloud radii. The absence of time dependence in the absorption lines implies that high-density environments are disfavored. In particular, if the GRB environment was dust free, its density was unlikely to exceed nH=10^2 cm^-3. If depletion of metals onto dust is similar to Galactic values or less than solar abundances are present, then nH > 2 x 10^4 cm^-3 is probably ruled out in the immediate vicinity of the burst.

N. Mirabal; J. P. Halpern; S. R. Kulkarni; S. Castro; J. S. Bloom; S. G. Djorgovski; T. J. Galama; F. A. Harrison; D. A. Frail; P. A. Price; D. E. Reichart; H. Ebeling

2002-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

Additional time-dependent phase in the flavor-conversion formulas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of intermediate wave-packets for treating flavor oscillations, we quantify the modifications which appear when we assume a strictly peaked momentum distribution and consider the second-order corrections in a power series expansion of the energy. By following a sequence of analytic approximations, we point out that an extra time-dependent phase is merely the residue of second-order corrections. Such phase effects are usually ignored in the relativistic wave-packet treatment, but they do not vanish non-relativistically and can introduce some small modifications to the oscillation pattern even in the ultra-relativistic limit.

Alex E. Bernardini

2006-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Time-dependent unitary perturbation theory for intense laser driven molecular orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a time-dependent perturbation theory based on unitary transformations combined with averaging techniques, on molecular orientation dynamics by ultrashort pulses. We test the validity and the accuracy of this approach on LiCl described within a rigid-rotor model and find that it is more accurate than other approximations. Furthermore, it is shown that a noticeable orientation can be achieved for experimentally standard short laser pulses of zero time average. In this case, we determine the dynamically relevant parameters by using the perturbative propagator, that is derived from this scheme, and we investigate the temperature effects on the molecular orientation dynamics.

D. Sugny; A. Keller; O. Atabek; D. Daems; S. Gurin; H. R. Jauslin

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

A California Statewide Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Model from Both Absolute and Differential Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A California Statewide Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Model from Both Absolute and Differential of the California crust and uppermost mantle using a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm. We begin using S picks from both the Southern California Seismic Network and USArray, assuming a starting model

Shearer, Peter

76

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Time dependent modelisation of TeV blazars by a stratified jet model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new time-dependent inhomogeneous jet model of non-thermal blazar emission. Ultra-relativistic leptons are injected at the base of a jet and propagate along it. We assume continuous reacceleration and cooling, producing a relativistic quasi-maxwellian (or "pile-up") particle energy distribution. The synchrotron and Synchrotron-Self Compton jet emissivity are computed at each altitude. Klein-Nishina effects as well as intrinsic gamma-gamma absorption are included in the computation. Due to the pair production optical depth, considerable particle density enhancement can occur, particularly during flaring states.Time-dependent jet emission can be computed by varying the particle injection, but due to the sensitivity of pair production process, only small variations of the injected density are required during the flares. The stratification of the jet emission, together with a pile-up distribution, allows significantly lower bulk Lorentz factors, compared to one-zone models. Applying this model to the case of PKS 2155-304 and its big TeV flare observed in 2006, we can reproduce simultaneously the average broad band spectrum of this source from radio to TeV, as well as TeV light curve of the flare with bulk Lorentz factor lower than 15.

Timoth Boutelier; Gilles Henri; Pierre-Olivier Petrucci

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Elastic capsules in shear flow: Analytical solutions for constant and time-dependent shear rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dynamics of microcapsules in linear shear flow within a reduced model with two degrees of freedom. In previous work for steady shear flow, the dynamic phases of this model, i.e. swinging, tumbling and intermittent behaviour, have been identified using numerical methods. In this paper, we integrate the equations of motion in the quasi-spherical limit analytically for time-constant and time-dependent shear flow using matched asymptotic expansions. Using this method, we find analytical expressions for the mean tumbling rate in general time-dependent shear flow. The capsule dynamics is studied in more detail when the inverse shear rate is harmonically modulated around a constant mean value for which a dynamic phase diagram is constructed. By a judicious choice of both modulation frequency and phase, tumbling motion can be induced even if the mean shear rate corresponds to the swinging regime. We derive expressions for the amplitude and width of the resonance peaks as a function of the modulation frequency.

Steffen Kessler; Reimar Finken; Udo Seifert

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Seismic sources  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Time-dependent Protein-directed Growth of Gold Nanoparticles within a Single Crystal of Lysozyme  

SciTech Connect

Gold nanoparticles are useful in biomedical applications due to their distinct optical properties and high chemical stability. Reports of the biogenic formation of gold colloids from gold complexes has also led to an increased level of interest in the biomineralization of gold. However, the mechanism responsible for biomolecule-directed gold nanoparticle formation remains unclear due to the lack of structural information about biological systems and the fast kinetics of biomimetic chemical systems in solution. Here we show that intact single crystals of lysozyme can be used to study the time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles. The protein crystals slow down the growth of the gold nanoparticles, allowing detailed kinetic studies to be carried out, and permit a three-dimensional structural characterization that would be difficult to achieve in solution. Furthermore, we show that additional chemical species can be used to fine-tune the growth rate of the gold nanoparticles.

H Wei; Z Wang; J Zhang; S House; Y Gao; L Yang; H Robinson; L Tan; H Xing; C Hou

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles within a single crystal of lysozyme  

SciTech Connect

Gold nanoparticles are useful in biomedical applications due to their distinct optical properties and high chemical stability. Reports of the biogenic formation of gold colloids from gold complexes has also led to an increased level of interest in the biomineralization of gold. However, the mechanism responsible for biomolecule-directed gold nanoparticle formation remains unclear due to the lack of structural information about biological systems and the fast kinetics of biomimetic chemical systems in solution. Here we show that intact single crystals of lysozyme can be used to study the time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles. The protein crystals slow down the growth of the gold nanoparticles, allowing detailed kinetic studies to be carried out, and permit a three-dimensional structural characterization that would be difficult to achieve in solution. Furthermore, we show that additional chemical species can be used to fine-tune the growth rate of the gold nanoparticles.

Wei, H.; Robinson, H.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, J.; House, S.; Gao, Y.-G.; Yang, L.; Tan, L. H.; Xing, H.; Hou, C.; Robertson, I. M.; Zuo, J.-M.; Lu, Y.

2011-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Influence of time-dependent factors in the evaluation of critical infrastructure protection measures.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The examination of which protective measures are the most appropriate to be implemented in order to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from attacks on critical infrastructures and key resources typically involves a comparison of the consequences that could occur when the protective measure is implemented to those that could occur when it is not. This report describes a framework for evaluation that provides some additional capabilities for comparing optional protective measures. It illustrates some potentially important time-dependent factors, such as the implementation rate, that affect the relative pros and cons associated with widespread implementation of protective measures. It presents example results from the use of protective measures, such as detectors and pretrained responders, for an illustrative biological incident. Results show that the choice of an alternative measure can depend on whether or not policy and financial support can be maintained for extended periods of time. Choice of a time horizon greatly influences the comparison of alternatives.

Buehring, W. A.; Samsa, M. E.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Decay of the Loschmidt echo in a time-dependent environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay rate of the Loschmidt echo or fidelity in a chaotic system under a time-dependent perturbation $V(q,t)$ with typical strength $\\hbar/\\tau_{V}$. The perturbation represents the action of an uncontrolled environment interacting with the system, and is characterized by a correlation length $\\xi_0$ and a correlation time $\\tau_0$. For small perturbation strengths or rapid fluctuating perturbations, the Loschmidt echo decays exponentially with a rate predicted by the Fermi Golden Rule, $1/\\tilde{\\tau}= \\tau_{c}/\\tau_{V}^2$, where typically $\\tau_{c} \\sim \\min[\\tau_{0},\\xi_0/v]$ with $v$ the particle velocity. Whenever the rate $1/\\tilde{\\tau}$ is larger than the Lyapunov exponent of the system, a perturbation independent Lyapunov decay regime arises. We also find that by speeding up the fluctuations (while keeping the perturbation strength fixed) the fidelity decay becomes slower, and hence, one can protect the system against decoherence.

Fernando M. Cucchietti; Caio H. Lewenkopf; Horacio M. Pastawski

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

84

Canonical-basis time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory and linear-response calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present simple equations for a canonical-basis formulation of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (TDHFB) theory. The equations are obtained from the TDHFB theory with an approximation that the pair potential is assumed to be diagonal in the canonical basis. The canonical-basis formulation significantly reduces the computational cost. We apply the method to linear-response calculations for even-even light nuclei and demonstrate its capability and accuracy by comparing our results with recent calculations of the quasi-particle random-phase approximation with Skyrme functionals. We show systematic studies of E1 strength distributions for Ne and Mg isotopes. The evolution of the low-lying pygmy strength seems to be determined by the interplay of several factors, including the neutron excess, separation energy, neutron shell effects, deformation, and pairing.

Shuichiro Ebata; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Tsunenori Inakura; Kenichi Yoshida; Yukio Hashimoto; Kazuhiro Yabana

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Troubleshooting time-dependent density-functional theory for photochemical applications: Oxirane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of analytic-gradient methodology for excited states within conventional time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) would seem to offer a relatively inexpensive alternative to better established quantum-chemical approaches for the modeling of photochemical reactions. However, even though TDDFT is formally exact, practical calculations involve the use of approximate functional, in particular the TDDFT adiabatic approximation, the use of which in photochemical applications must be further validated. Here, we investigate the prototypical case of the symmetric CC ring opening of oxirane. We demonstrate by direct comparison with the results of high-quality quantum Monte Carlo calculations that, far from being an approximation on TDDFT, the Tamm-Dancoff approximation is a practical necessity for avoiding triplet instabilities and singlet near instabilities, thus helping maintain energetically reasonable excited-state potential energy surfaces during bond breaking. Other difficulties one would encounter in modeling oxirane photodynamics are pointed out.

Cordova, Felipe; Doriol, L. Joubert; Ipatov, Andrei; Casida, Mark E.; Filippi, Claudia; Vela, Alberto [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Departement de Chimie Molecularie (DCM, UMR CNRS/UJF 5250), Institut de Chimie Moleculaire de Grenoble (ICMG, FR2607), Universite Joseph Fourier - Grenoble I, 301 rue de la Chimie, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden NL-2333 CA Netherlands (Netherlands); Departamento de Quimica, Cinvestav, Avenida Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, A.P. 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Extension of continuum time-dependent Hartree-Fock method to proton states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the solution of the spherically symmetric time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation applied to nuclear giant monopole resonances in the small amplitude regime. The problem is spatially unbounded as the resonance state is in the continuum. The practical requirement to perform the calculation in a finite-sized spatial region yields an artificial boundary, which is not present physically. The question of how to ensure the boundary does not interfere with the internal solution, while keeping the overall calculation time low is studied. Here we propose an absorbing boundary condition scheme to handle the conflict. The derivation, via a Laplace transform method, and implementation is described. An inverse Laplace transform required by the absorbing boundaries is calculated using a method of non-linear least squares. The accuracy and efficiency of the scheme is tested and results presented to support the case that they are a effective way of handling the artificial boundary.

C. I. Pardi; P. D. Stevenson; K. Xu

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

A cyclic time-dependent Markov process to model daily patterns in wind turbine power production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy is becoming a top contributor to the renewable energy mix, which raises potential reliability issues for the grid due to the fluctuating nature of its source. To achieve adequate reserve commitment and to promote market participation, it is necessary to provide models that can capture daily patterns in wind power production. This paper presents a cyclic inhomogeneous Markov process, which is based on a three-dimensional state-space (wind power, speed and direction). Each time-dependent transition probability is expressed as a Bernstein polynomial. The model parameters are estimated by solving a constrained optimization problem: The objective function combines two maximum likelihood estimators, one to ensure that the Markov process long-term behavior reproduces the data accurately and another to capture daily fluctuations. A convex formulation for the overall optimization problem is presented and its applicability demonstrated through the analysis of a case-study. The proposed model is capable of r...

Scholz, Teresa; Estanqueiro, Ana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Case study: Visual analysis of complex, time-dependent simulation results of a diesel exhaust system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In previous work we have presented visualization techniques that provide engineers with a high degree of interactivity and flexibility for analyzing large, time-dependent, and high-dimensional data sets resulting from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. In this case study we apply our techniques in the fields of the automotive engineering industry and demonstrate how users benefit from using them during their routine analysis, as well as for exploring new phenomena. For coping with some of the special requirements in this application, we adapted and extended parts of the system. A comparison of two related cases of a diesel exhaust system is presented, and some important questions about these cases are addressed. 1.

Helmut Doleisch; Michael Mayer; Martin Gasser; Helwig Hauser

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An implicit fast Fourier transform method for integration of the time dependent Schrodinger or diffusion equation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have found that the conventional exponentiated split operator procedure is subject to difficulties in energy conservation when solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for Coulombic systems. By rearranging the kinetic and potential energy terms in the temporal propagator of the finite difference equations, one can find a propagation algorithm for three dimensions that looks much like the Crank-Nicholson and alternating direction implicit methods for one- and two-space-dimensional partial differential equations. They report comparisons of this novel implicit split operator procedure with the conventional exponentiated split operator procedure on hydrogen atom solutions. The results look promising for a purely numerical approach to certain electron quantum mechanical problems.

Ritchie, A.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Riley, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser, Optics, and Remote Sensing Dept.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Time Dependent Leptonic Model for Microquasar Jets: Application to LSI 61 303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Galactic high-mass X-ray binary and jet source (microquasar) LSI +61 303 has recently been detected at TeV gamma-ray energies by the MAGIC telescope. We have applied a time-dependent leptonic jet model to the broadband spectral energy distribution and suggested (though not unambiguously detected) orbital modulation of the very high energy gamma-ray emission of this source. Our model takes into account time dependent electron injection and acceleration, and the adiabatic and radiative cooling of non-thermal electrons. It includes synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and external inverse Compton (with seed photons from the companion star), as well as gamma-gamma absorption of gamma-rays by starlight photons. The model can successfully reproduce the available multiwavelength observational data. Our best fit to the SED indicates that a magnetic field of B_0 ~ 5 X 10^3 G at ~ 10^3 R_g is required, and electrons need to be accelerated out to TeV energies (gamma_2 = 10^6) with a nonthermal injection spectrum with a spectral index of q = 1.7, indicating the operation of acceleration mechanisms beyond the standard first-order Fermi mechanism at relativistic or non-relativistic shocks. The orbital modulation of the VHE gamma-ray emission can be explained solely by the geometrical effect of changes in the relative orientation of the stellar companion with respect to the compact object and jet as it impacts the position and depth of the gamma-gamma absorption trough. Such a scenario predicts a trend of spectral hardening during VHE gamma-ray low orbital phases.

Swati Gupta; Markus Boettcher

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Body and surface wave tomography are two of the primary methods for estimation of regional scale seismic velocity variations. Seismic velocity is affected by temperature and rock composition in complex ways, but when combined with geologic and structural maps, relative temperature can in some cases be estimated. We present preliminary tomographic models for compressional and shear-wave velocity using local and regional earthquakes recorded by Earthscope Transportable Array stations, network

92

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

93

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

94

A One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Model for the Vertical Stratification of the Upper Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional time-dependent model of the upper Arctic Ocean is presented. It describes the circulation above a dynamically passive reservoir of Atlantic water. The model is driven by freshwater runoff from land, ice production and export, ...

Gran Bjrk

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Global Time-Dependent Model of Thunderstorm Electricity. Part I: Mathematical Properties of the Physical and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent model that simulates the interaction of a thunderstorm with its electrical environment is introduced. The model solves the continuity equation of the Maxwell current density that includes conduction, displacement, and source ...

G. L. Browning; I. Tzur; R. G. Roble

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B[superscript 0]-->D(*)[superscript +]D(*)[superscript -] decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries for B[superscript 0]-->D(*)[superscript +]D(*)[superscript -] decays using (4675)10[superscript 6] B[bar-over B] pairs collected with the BABAR detector ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

97

Ions and Precipitation Charging in Warm and Cold Clouds as Simulated in One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-dimensional time-dependent models of warm and cold clouds were constructed to test the electrical and precipitation development in the presence of a variety of charge separation mechanisms. The, models simulate charging by ion diffusion, the ...

I. Tzur; Z. Levin

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Regime Transitions of Steady and Time-Dependent Hadley Circulations: Comparison of Axisymmetric and Eddy-Permitting Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steady-state and time-dependent Hadley circulations are investigated with an idealized dry GCM, in which thermal forcing is represented as relaxation of temperatures toward a radiative-equilibrium state. The latitude 0 of maximum radiative-...

Simona Bordoni; Tapio Schneider

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A simple and efficient evolution operator for time-dependent Hamiltonians: the Taylor expansion  

SciTech Connect

No compact expression of the evolution operator is known when the Hamiltonian operator is time dependent, like when Hamiltonian operators describe, in a semiclassical limit, the interaction of a molecule with an electric field. It is well known that Magnus [N. Magnus, Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 7, 649 (1954)] has derived a formal expression where the evolution operator is expressed as an exponential of an operator defined as a series. In spite of its formal simplicity, it turns out to be difficult to use at high orders. For numerical purposes, approximate methods such as 'Runge-Kutta' or 'split operator' are often used usually, however, to a small order (<5), so that only small time steps, about one-tenth or one-hundredth of the field cycle, are acceptable. Moreover, concerning the latter method, split operator, it is only very efficient when a diagonal representation of the kinetic energy operator is known. The Taylor expansion of the evolution operator or the wave function about the initial time provides an alternative approach, which is very simple to implement and, unlike split operator, without restrictions on the Hamiltonian. In addition, relatively large time steps (up to the field cycle) can be used. A two-level model and a propagation of a Gaussian wave packet in a harmonic potential illustrate the efficiency of the Taylor expansion. Finally, the calculation of the time-averaged absorbed energy in fluoroproprene provides a realistic application of our method.

Lauvergnat, David; Blasco, Sophie; Chapuisat, Xavier; Nauts, Andre [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR8000, Batiment 490, Orsay F-91405 (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR8000, Batiment 490, Orsay F-91405 (France); Unite PAMO (Departement de Physique), Universite Catholique de Louvain, 2 Chemin du Cyclotron, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Time-dependent 2-D modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs  

SciTech Connect

The results on time-dependent 2-D fluid modeling of edge plasmas with non-diffusive intermittent transport across the magnetic field (termed cross-field) based on the novel macro-blob approach are presented. The capability of this approach to simulate the long temporal evolution ({approx}0.1 s) of the background plasma and simultaneously the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs ({approx}10{sup -4} s) is demonstrated. An analysis of a periodic sequence of many macro-blobs (PSMB) is given showing that the resulting plasma attains a dynamic equilibrium. Plasma properties in the dynamic equilibrium are discussed. In PSMB modeling, the effect of macro-blob generation frequency on edge plasma parameters is studied. Comparison between PSMB modeling and experimental profile data is given. The calculations are performed for the same plasma discharge using two different models for anomalous cross-field transport: time-average convection and PSMB. Parametric analysis of edge plasma variation with transport coefficients in these models is presented. The capability of the models to accurately simulate enhanced transport due to blobs is compared. Impurity dynamics in edge plasma with macro-blobs is also studied showing strong impact of macro-blob on profiles of impurity charge states caused by enhanced outward transport of high-charge states and simultaneous inward transport of low-charge states towards the core. Macro-blobs cause enhancement of sputtering rates, increase radiation and impurity concentration in plasma, and change erosion/deposition patterns.

Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Time-Dependent Optical Spectroscopy of GRB 010222 Clues to the GRB Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present sequential optical spectra of the afterglow of GRB 010222 obtained one day apart using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) and the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the Keck telescopes. Three low-ionization absorption systems are spectroscopically identified at z1=1.47688, z2=1.15628, and z3=0.92747. The higher resolution ESI spectrum reveals two distinct components in the highest redshift system at z1a=1.47590 and z1b=1.47688. We interpret the z1b=1.47688 system as an absorption feature of the disk of the host galaxy of GRB 010222. The best fitted power-law optical continuum and [Zn/Cr] ratio imply low dust content or a local gray dust component near the burst site. In addition, we do not detect strong signatures of vibrationally excited states of H_2. If the GRB took place in a superbubble or young stellar cluster, there are no outstanding signatures of an ionized absorber, either. Analysis of the spectral time dependence at low resolution shows no significant evidence for ab...

Mirabal, N; Kulkarni, S R; Castro, S; Bloom, J S; Djorgovski, S G; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Frail, D A; Price, P A; Reichart, D E; Ebeling, H

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Analysis of time-dependent radiation-induced conductivity in dielectrics and effect on cable SGEMP  

SciTech Connect

Analytic and numerical solutions are presented for a simple time-dependent solid-state band model of radiation-induced conductivity in polyethelene and Teflon. The analytic solution is found to provide insight to physical processes dominant in various intervals of time throughout the radiation pulse. The numerical solution provides a representation for the dose-dependent proportionality factor F(..gamma..), proposed by van Lint et al, used to calculate prompt conductivity from sigma/rho/ = F(..gamma..)..gamma... At high doses, F(..gamma..) is an order of magnitude smaller than at low doses. This decrease of F(..gamma..) is due to bimolecular recombination, an effect apparently not previously reported experimentally. The reduction in F(..gamma..) at high doses is shown to enhance the short circuit current for a cable SGEMP model of residual gaps by a factor of three. In addition, the dose-dependent behavior of F(..gamma..) can significantly alter the shape and time of occurrence of the peak of the waveform of this short circuit current compared to corresponding results for a dose-independent factor.

Shaeffer, D.L.; Siegel, J.M.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Photon and Neutrino Spectra of Time-Dependent Photospheric Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal photons from the photosphere may be the primary source of the observed prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to produce the observed non-thermal spectra, some kind of dissipation mechanism near the photosphere is required. In this paper we numerically simulate the evolution of the photon spectrum in a relativistically expanding shell with a time-dependent numerical code. We consider two basic models. One is a leptonic model, where a dissipation mechanism heats the thermal electrons maintaining their high temperature. The other model involves a cascade process induced by $pp$($pn$)-collisions which produce high-energy electrons, modify the thermal spectrum, and emit neutrinos. The qualitative properties of the photon spectra are mainly determined by the optical depth at which the dissipation mechanism sets in. Too large optical depths lead to a broad and curved spectrum contradicting the observations, while for optical depths smaller than unity the spectral hardness becomes softer than observed. A significant shift of the spectral peak energy to higher energies due to a large energy injection can lead to an overly broad spectral shape. We show ideal parameter ranges for which these models are able to reproduce the observed spectra. For the $pn$-collision model, the neutrino fluence in the 10-100 GeV range is well above the atmospheric neutrino fluence, but its detection is challenging for presently available detectors.

K. Asano; P. Mszros

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Time-dependent simulations of large-scale quantum mechanical processes  

SciTech Connect

Time dependent linear and nonlinear equations govern the evolution of an extensive set of physical systems and processes describing, to enumerate just a few, Bose-Einstein condensates; soliton propagation in optical and photonic band-gap fibers; quantum control of atomic and molecular collisions and reactions; highly-compressed liquids; and dense and ultracold plasmas. While the media vary substantially, the basic computational procedures have many common features. We focus on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and discuss two powerful approaches to its propagation: the Arnoldi/Lanczos(AL)l and Real Space Product Formula(RSPF)2. Both provide efficient systematic approximations to the short-time exponential propagator that moves the solution between time steps. We implement the former in a discrete variable representation (DVR)3 both in spatial grid and finite element forms and the latter in a spatial mesh with a finite difference representation of the kinetic energy operator. Both approaches require O(N) operations to propagate the wavefunction between time steps and handle multidimensional systems. We shall also draw connections with Liouville formulations used in quantum molecular dynamics simulations of large collections of atoms and molecules. After briefly outlining these formulations, we shall discuss some of the varied applications.

Collins, L. A. (Lee A.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in B0 --> KS pi0 gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays for two regions of K{sub S}{sup 0}-{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass, m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}), using the final BABAR data set of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They find 339 {+-} 24 B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.03 {+-} 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and C{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.14 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.03. In the range 1.1 < m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} they find 133 {+-} 20 B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.59 {+-} 0.09 and C{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.36 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.04. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Time-independent and time-dependent contributions to the unavailability of standby safety system components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unavailability of standby safety system components due to failures in nuclear power plants is considered to involve a time independent and a time dependent part. The former relates to the component`s unavailability from demand stresses due to usage, and the latter represents the component`s unavailability due to standby time stresses related to the environment. In this paper, data from the nuclear plant reliability data system (NPRDS) were used to partition the component`s unavailability into the contributions from standby time stress (i.e., due to environmental factors) and demand stress (i.e., due to usage). Analyses are presented of motor operated valves (MOVs), motor driven pumps (MDPs), and turbine driven pumps (FDPs). MOVs fail predominantly (approx. 78%) from environmental factors (standby time stress failures). MDPs fail slightly more frequently from demand stresses (approx. 63%) than standby time stresses, while TDPs fail predominantly from standby time stresses (approx. 78%). Such partitions of component unavailability have many uses in risk informed and performance based regulation relating to modifications to Technical Specification, in-service testing, precise determination of dominant accident sequences, and implementation of maintenance rules.

Lofgren, E.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Fairfax Station, VA (United States); Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Probability of loss of assured safety in systems with multiple time-dependent failure modes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) systems are important parts of the overall operational design of high-consequence systems. In such designs, the SL system is very robust and is intended to permit operation of the entire system under, and only under, intended conditions. In contrast, the WL system is intended to fail in a predictable and irreversible manner under accident conditions and render the entire system inoperable before an accidental operation of the SL system. The likelihood that the WL system will fail to deactivate the entire system before the SL system fails (i.e., degrades into a configuration that could allow an accidental operation of the entire system) is referred to as probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS). Representations for PLOAS for situations in which both link physical properties and link failure properties are time-dependent are derived and numerically evaluated for a variety of WL/SL configurations, including PLOAS defined by (i) failure of all SLs before failure of any WL, (ii) failure of any SL before failure of any WL, (iii) failure of all SLs before failure of all WLs, and (iv) failure of any SL before failure of all WLs. The effects of aleatory uncertainty and epistemic uncertainty in the definition and numerical evaluation of PLOAS are considered.

Helton, Jon Craig; Pilch, Martin M.; Sallaberry, Cedric M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fusion process studied with preequilibrium giant dipole resonance in time dependent Hartree-Fock theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equilibration of macroscopic degrees of freedom during the fusion of heavy nuclei, like the charge and the shape, are studied in the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock theory. The pre-equilibrium Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) is used to probe the fusion path. It is shown that such isovector collective state is excited in N/Z asymmetric fusion and to a less extent in mass asymmetric systems. The characteristics of this GDR are governed by the structure of the fused system in its preequilibrium phase, like its deformation, rotation and vibration. In particular, we show that a lowering of the pre-equilibrium GDR energy is expected as compared to the statistical one. Revisiting experimental data, we extract an evidence of this lowering for the first time. We also quantify the fusion-evaporation enhancement due to gamma-ray emission from the pre-equilibrium GDR. This cooling mechanism along the fusion path may be suitable to synthesize in the future super heavy elements using radioactive beams with strong N/Z asymmetries in the entrance channel.

Cdric Simenel; Philippe Chomaz; Gilles De France

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

The time dependent resistance and inductance of the electric discharges in pulsed gas lasers  

SciTech Connect

A method of finding the time dependent resistances and inductances in the discharges in pulsed gas lasers is described in this work. According to this method the waveforms of the laser circuit voltages are digitized and their first and second derivatives are calculated. There are substituted into the differential equations governing the behavior of the system and relationships among the resistances and inductances are formed for every time. Using relationships from a sequence of four very closed adjacent time instants and considering that during this short time interval the resistances and inductances are varied linearly, their values can be found for this particular time interval. Repeating the same procedure for other time intervals and scanning the entire time region of the discharge, the time histories of the resistances and inductances of the discharges are revealed. These show strong variations in the formation phase of the discharge (first 50 nsec). Specifically the resistances drop rapidly (first 10 nsec) from very high values to low values, while the inductances increase to high values and subsequently decrease, forming an abrupt high peak. The steep drop of the resistances is due to the electron avalanche multiplication, while the peak of the inductances is due to the centripetal magnetic forces (Laplace forces), which cause a temporary constriction of the plasma. In the main phase of the discharge the resistances present a damping oscillation with the same frequency as the voltages, while the inductances present light fluctuations around constant values.

Persephonis, P.; Giannetas, V.; Ioannou, A.; Parthenios, J.; Georgiades, C. [Univ. of Patras, Patra (Greece). Dept. of Physics

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

111

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian...

113

Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a new framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high-order harmonic generation spectra of a one-dimensional model of atomic beryllium interacting with a strong laser pulse, the TD-RASSCF method is reasonably accurate while largely reducing the computational complexity. The TD-RASSCF method has the potential to treat large atoms and molecules beyond the capability of the MCTDHF method.

Miyagi, Haruhide

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Systematic study of low-lying E1 strength using the time-dependent mean field theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carry out systematic investigation of electric dipole (E1) mode from light to heavy nuclei, using a new time-dependent mean field theory: the Canonical-basis Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (Cb-TDHFB) theory. The Cb-TDHFB in the three-dimensional coordinate space representation can deal with pairing correlation and any kind of deformation in the timedependent framework. We report the neutron-number dependence of the low-energy E1 mode for light (A > 40) and heavy isotopes (A < 100) around N= 82.

Ebata, S.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Inakura, T. [Center for Nuclear Study, Univ. of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0033, Japan and Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako-shi, 351-0198 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako-shi, 351-0198 (Japan) and Center for Computational Sciences, Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba-shi, 305-8571 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako-shi, 351-0198 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

IPEEE Seismic Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes results of the seismic portion of the Individual Plant Examination for External Events (IPEEE) conducted for each U.S. nuclear plant. Utilities can use trends developed from these results -- together with their individual plant-specific results -- to address future seismic issues on a risk-informed basis.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

Seismic Fragility Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Seismic Fragility Applications Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for performing fragility analysis as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA). These cost-effective and practical procedures and the resulting SPRA can support risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications. To download a pdf file of the product description for this report, click here.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Use of a Two-Dimensional, Time-Dependent Cloud Model to Predict Convective and Stratiform Clouds and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, time-dependent cloud model has been used in two field projects to forecast the convective development during the day from the morning sounding. In effect, the cloud model gives a dynamic analysis of the sounding as affected by ...

Fred J. Kopp; Harold D. Orville

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Direct atomic-orbital-based time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations of frequency-dependent polarizabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct atomic-orbital-based time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations of frequencyDepartment, Universityof Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (Received 27 September 1991; accepted 13 November 1991) We have formulated and implemented a direct atomic integral driven method for the calculation of frequency

Simons, Jack

119

Breakdown of time-dependent mean-field theory for a one-dimensional condensate of impenetrable bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the time-dependent nonlinear Schrodinger equation of mean-field theory has limited utility for a one-dimensional condensate of impenetrable bosons. Mean-field theory with its associated order parameter predicts interference between split condensates that are recombined, whereas an exact many-body treatment shows minimal interference.

M. D. Girardeau; E. M. Wright

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Inclusion of In-Situ Velocity Measurements intotheUCSD Time-Dependent Tomography toConstrain and Better-Forecast Remote-Sensing Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Constrain and Better-Forecast Remote-Sensing Observationsa decade to reconstruct and forecast coronal mass ejectionset al. , 2009b). In this forecast, IPS results are compared

Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Bisi, M. M.; Clover, J. M.; Buffington, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Ileana Tibuleac, Leiph Preston (2008) Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=425638" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

122

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Voltage- and time-dependent action of histrionicotoxin on the endplate current of the frog muscle.J. Gen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arrow poison frog, Dendrobates histrionicus, decreased the amplitude and timecourse of the endplate current, and altered the voltage dependence of the halfdecay time. In addition, the toxin produced a characteristic nonlinearity in the current-voltage relationship of the endplate current when 3-s voltage conditioning steps were used. Reduction in time of the conditioning steps to 10 ms made the current-voltage relationship linear. The decrease in peak amplitude of the endplate current (epc) produced by histrionicotoxin measured during long hyperpolarizing conditioning steps was fitted by a single exponential function. The calculated rate constants ranged from 0.03 to 0.14 s-1 and varied with membrane potential at hyperpolarizing levels. The voltage- and time-dependent action of histrionicotoxin does not require an initial activation of receptors by acetylcholine (ACh). The characteristic of the current-voltage relationship can be accounted for by the observed voltage and time dependency of the attenuation of the endplate current amplitude in the presence of histrionicotoxin during long conditioning steps. These effects of histrionicotoxin on the peak amplitude, and on the voltage and time dependence of the epc were concentration-dependent and slowly reversible upon washing out the toxin. Thus, the voltage- and time-dependent action of histrionicotoxin at the endplate is related to an increase in the affinity between the toxin and the ACh receptor-ionic channel complex. This increase in affinity is postulated to be due to a conformational change of the macromolecule in the presence of histrionicotoxin which is demonstrated to be relatively slow, i.e., on the order of tens of seconds.

Leona M. Masukawa; Edson X. Albuquerque

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Use of a fast Fourier transform (FFT) 3D time-dependent Schroedinger equation solver in molecular electronic structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An implicit split-operator FFT algorithm for the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is implemented for the electronic structure of H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 2}. The covalent versus separated-atoms behavior is described by two distinct steady states to which the imaginary-time Schroedinger solution evolves for small or large internuclear distances, respectively.

Ritchie, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Weatherford, C.A. [Florida A and M Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Physics Dept.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

126

In-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of time-dependent Xenon-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, it has been shown that the time dependent Xe-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna, Austria can be measured via gamma spectrometry even in the presence of strong background radiation. It is focussing on the measurement of (but not limited to) the nuclide Xe-135. The time dependent Xe-135 inventory of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna has been measured using a temporary beam line between one fuel element of the core placed onto the thermal column after shutdown and a detector system located just above the water surface of the reactor tank. For the duration of one week, multiple gamma ray spectra were recorded automatically, starting each afternoon after reactor shutdown until the next morning. One measurement series has been recorded over the weekend. The Xe-135 peaks were extracted from a total of 1227 recorded spectra using an automated peak search algorithm and analyzed for their time-dependent properties. Although the background gamma radiation present in the core after shutdown was large especially in the lower energy range, the Xe-135 peak located at 249.8 keV could be extracted from the most spectra where present and could be compared to theoretical calculations.

Julia Riede; Helmuth Boeck

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Seismic Ruggedness of Relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relay GERS (Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectra) provide utilities with generic seismic capability for more than 100 electrical relays most commonly used in nuclear power plants. The data can be used directly for the assessment of relays in the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, "Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Plants" and for the Individual Plant Evaluation for External Events (IPEEE) for resolution of USNRC severe accident policy issues.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Probing the Earth's Interior with SeismicTomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the structure is evident from the experiment by Donev et al. 1 , who studied the coordinations in an ensemble

129

The Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and the Generalized SIC-Slater approximation (stationary and time-dependent cases)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a generalized formulation of the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) approach to the Self Interaction Correction (SIC) problem in Time Dependent (TD) Density Functional Theory (DFT). The formulation relies on the introduction of a double set of single electron orbitals. It allows the derivation of a generalized Slater approximation to the full OEP formulation, which extends the domain of validity of the standard Slater approximation. We discuss both formal aspects and practical applications of the new formalism and give illustrations in cluster and molecules. The new formalism provides a valuable ansatz to more elaborate (and computationally very demanding) full TD OEP and full TD SIC calculations especially in the linear domain.

Messud, J; Reinhard, P -G; ~Suraud, E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and the Generalized SIC-Slater approximation (stationary and time-dependent cases)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a generalized formulation of the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) approach to the Self Interaction Correction (SIC) problem in Time Dependent (TD) Density Functional Theory (DFT). The formulation relies on the introduction of a double set of single electron orbitals. It allows the derivation of a generalized Slater approximation to the full OEP formulation, which extends the domain of validity of the standard Slater approximation. We discuss both formal aspects and practical applications of the new formalism and give illustrations in cluster and molecules. The new formalism provides a valuable ansatz to more elaborate (and computationally very demanding) full TD OEP and full TD SIC calculations especially in the linear domain.

J. Messud; P. M. Dinh; P. -G. Reinhard; E. ~Suraud

2010-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Self-Similar Nonlinear Dynamical Solutions for One-Component Nonneutral Plasma in a Time-Dependent Linear Focusing Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a linear trap confining a one-component nonneutral plasma, the external focusing force is a linear function of the configuration coordinates and/or the velocity coordinates. Linear traps include the classical Paul trap and the Penning trap, as well as the newly proposed rotating-radio- frequency traps and the Mobius accelerator. This paper describes a class of self-similar nonlinear solutions of nonneutral plasma in general time-dependent linear focusing devices, with self-consistent electrostatic field. This class of nonlinear solutions includes many known solutions as special cases.

Hong Qin and Ronald C. Davidson

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

Approximate analytical solutions for the time-dependent Emden-Fowler-type equations by Variational Homotopy Perturbation Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper, variational homotopy perturbation method (VHPM) is used to obtain analytical solution for the time-dependent Emden-Fowler type of equations with singular behavior. The advantage of this work is twofold. Firstly, the VHPM reduces the computational work. Secondly, in comparison with existing techniques, the VHPM is an improvment with regard to its accuracy and rapid convergence. To show the efficiency of the VHPM, several examples are presented. Comparisons with exact solution show that the VHPM is a powerfull method for the solution of linear and nonlinear equations.

Mashallah Matinfar; Maryam Mahdavi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

TEMPEST: A three-dimensional time-dependent computer program for hydrothermal analysis: Volume 1, Numerical methods and input instructions  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the numerical methods, current capabilities, and the use of the TEMPEST (Version L, MOD 2) computer program. TEMPEST is a transient, three-dimensional, hydrothermal computer program that is designed to analyze a broad range of coupled fluid dynamic and heat transfer systems of particular interest to the Fast Breeder Reactor thermal-hydraulic design community. The full three-dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion, continuity, and heat transport are solved for either laminar or turbulent fluid flow, including heat diffusion and generation in both solid and liquid materials. 10 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Core and Valence Excitations in Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy using Restricted Excitation Window Time-dependent Density Functional Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur K and L2,3 edges. The simulated XANES signals from the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the static exchange (STEX) method are compared with experiments, showing that REW-TDDFT is more accurate and computationally less expensive than STEX. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals from REW-TDDFT give some insights on the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

$^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni fusion reaction calculated with the density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study fusion reactions of the $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni system using the density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) formalism. In this formalism the fusion barriers are directly obtained from TDHF dynamics. In addition, we incorporate the entrance channel alignments of the slightly deformed (oblate) $^{64}$Ni nuclei due to dynamical Coulomb excitation. We show that alignment leads to a fusion barrier distribution and alters the naive picture for defining which energies are actually sub-barrier. We also show that core polarization effects could play a significant role in fusion cross section calculations.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Induced seismicity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

Segall, P.

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measurement of the Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry of Partially Reconstructed B0 to D*+D*- Decays  

SciTech Connect

We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B{sup 0} {yields}D*{sup +}D*{sup -} decays using (471 {+-} 5) million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Using the technique of partial reconstruction, we measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S = -0.34 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05 and C = +0:15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. Using the value for the CP-odd fraction R{perpendicular} = 0.158 {+-} 0.028 {+-} 0.006, previously measured by BABAR with fully reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup *+}D{sup *-} events, we extract the CP-even components S{sub +} = -0.49 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and C{sub +} = +0.15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic; the third uncertainty on S{sub +} is the contribution from the uncertainty on R{perpendicular}. The measured value of the CP-even component S{sub +} is consistent with the value of sin 2{beta} measured in b {yields} (c{bar c})s transitions, and with the Standard Model expectation of small penguin contributions.

Lees, J. P.

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

139

Optimal Decision Making and the Value of Information in a Time-Dependent Version of the Cost-Loss Ratio Situation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent version of the cost-loss ratio situation is described and the optimal use and economic value of meteorological information are investigated in this decision-making problem. The time-dependent situation is motivated by a decision ...

Allan H. Murphy; Qian Ye

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Two-Dimensional Time-Dependent Model of a Wind-Driven Coastal Polynya: Application to the St. Lawrence Island Polynya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional time-dependent model of a wind-driven coastal polynya is presented. The model combines and extends previous one-dimensional time-dependent and two-dimensional steady-state flux formulations. Given the coastline geometry, and the ...

M. A. Morales Maqueda; A. J. Willmott

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Long-Lived Time-Dependent Remnants During Cosmological Symmetry Breaking: From Inflation to the Electroweak Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through a detailed numerical investigation in three spatial dimensions, we demonstrate that long-lived time-dependent field configurations emerge dynamically during symmetry breaking in an expanding de Sitter spacetime. We investigate two situations: a single scalar field with a double-well potential and the bosonic sector of an SU(2) non-Abelian Higgs model. For the single scalar, we show that large-amplitude oscillon configurations emerge spontaneously and persist to contribute about 1.2% of the energy density of the universe. We also show that for a range of parameters, oscillon lifetimes are enhanced by the expansion and that this effect is a result of parametric resonance. For the SU(2) case, we see about 4% of the final energy density in oscillons.

Marcelo Gleiser; Noah Graham; Nikitas Stamatopoulos

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Long-lived time-dependent remnants during cosmological symmetry breaking: From inflation to the electroweak scale  

SciTech Connect

Through a detailed numerical investigation in three spatial dimensions, we demonstrate that long-lived time-dependent field configurations emerge dynamically during symmetry breaking in an expanding de Sitter spacetime. We investigate two situations: a single scalar field with a double-well potential and an SU(2) non-Abelian Higgs model. For the single scalar, we show that large-amplitude oscillon configurations emerge spontaneously and persist to contribute about 1.2% of the energy density of the Universe. We also show that for a range of parameters, oscillon lifetimes are enhanced by the expansion and that this effect is a result of parametric resonance. For the SU(2) case, we see about 4% of the final energy density in oscillons.

Gleiser, Marcelo; Stamatopoulos, Nikitas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Graham, Noah [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Time-Dependent B-Spline R-Matrix Approach to Double Ionization of Atoms by XUV Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an {\\it ab initio} and non-perturbative time-dependent approach to the problem of double ionization of a general atom driven by intense XUV laser pulses. After using a highly flexible $B$-Spline $R$-matrix method to generate field-free Hamiltonian and electric dipole matrices, the initial state is propagated in time using an efficient Arnoldi-Lanczos scheme. Test calculations for double ionization of He by a single laser pulse yield good agreement with benchmark results obtained with other methods. The method is then applied to two-color pump-probe processes, for which momentum and energy distributions of the two outgoing electrons are presented.

Guan, Xiaoxu; Noble, C J; Bartschat, K; Schneider, B I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Develop Seismic Equipment List (SEL) * Perform seismic screening - Perform DOEEH-0545 seismic walkdowns - Perform structural and anchorage seismic analysis to DOEEH-...

146

Seismic fragility estimates for corroded reinforced concrete bridge structures with two-column bents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To assess the losses associated with future earthquakes, seismic vulnerability functions are commonly used to correlate the damage or loss of a structure to the level of seismic intensity. A common procedure in seismic vulnerability assessment is to estimate the seismic fragility, which is defined as the conditional probability that a structure fails to meet the specific performance level for given level of seismic intensity. This dissertation proposes a methodology to estimate the fragility of corroded reinforced concrete (RC) bridges with two-column bents subject to seismic excitation. Seismic fragility functions are first developed for the RC bridges with two-column bents. All available information from science/engineering laws, numerical analysis, laboratory experiments, and field measurements has been used to construct the proper form of the fragility functions. The fragility functions are formulated, at the individual column, bent, and bridge levels, in terms of the spectral acceleration and the ratio between the peak ground velocity and the peak ground acceleration. The developed fragility functions properly account for the prevailing uncertainties in fragility estimation. The probabilistic capacity and demand models are then combined with the probabilistic models for chloride-induced corrosion and the time-dependent corrosion rate. The fragility estimates for corroded RC bridges incorporates the uncertainties in the parameters of capacity and demand models, and the inexactness (or model error) in modeling the material deterioration, structural capacity, and seismic demands. The proposed methodology is illustrated by developing the fragility functions for an example RC bridge with 11 two-column bents representing current construction in California. The developed fragility functions provide valuable information to allocate and spend available funds for the design, maintenance, and retrofitting of structures and networks. This study regarding the vulnerability of corroding RC bridges will be of direct value to those making decisions about the condition assessment, residual life, and the ability of lifeline structures to withstand future seismic demands.

Zhong, Jinquan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

148

Seismic scaling laws revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at fast speed Local energy balance Gc U Dc slip friction i n i Es = U Gc #12; Main result: Energy Mo= DSL3 D S L Moment Seismic energy ES=¿ D S L3 Es Mo Energy moment ratio #12; Thus Es ~ 105 Mo ~ U Summary of Observed Radiated Energy vs Moment log Mo=1.5 Mw9.6 Beroza et al, 2001 #12

Madariaga, Raúl

149

ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

Bob A. Hardage

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Time dependent simulations of multiwavelength variability of the blazar Mrk 421 with a Monte Carlo multi-zone code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We present a new time-dependent multi-zone radiative transfer code and its application to study the SSC emission of Mrk 421. The code couples Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo methods, in a 2D geometry. For the first time all the light travel time effects (LCTE) are fully considered, along with a proper treatment of Compton cooling, which depends on them. We study a set of simple scenarios where the variability is produced by injection of relativistic electrons as a `shock front' crosses the emission region. We consider emission from two components, with the second one either being pre-existing and co-spatial and participating in the evolution of the active region, or spatially separated and independent, only diluting the observed variability. Temporal and spectral results of the simulation are compared to the multiwavelength observations of Mrk 421 in March 2001. We find parameters that can adequately fit the observed SEDs and multiwavelength light curves and correlations. There remain however a few o...

Chen, Xuhui; Liang, Edison; Boettcher, Markus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

Cline, M.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A proper time dependent measurement of delta M{sup D} using jet charge and soft lepton flavor tagging  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents a proper time dependent measurement of the B{sup 0}{sub d} mixing frequency {Delta}m{sub d} using jet charge and soft lepton flavor tagging in p-{anti p} collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV. The measurement uses the inclusive e and {mu} trigger data of the CDF detector from an integrated luminosity of 91 pb{sup -1}. The proper time at decay is measured from a partial reconstruction of the B associated with the trigger lepton. The measurement of {Delta}m{sub d} yields {Delta}m{sub d}=0.50{+-}0.05{+-}0.05 {h_bar} ps{sup -1} where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The flavor tagging methods used give a measured effective efficiency {epsilon}D{sup 2} of - Jet Charge: {epsilon}D{sup 2} = (0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.09) % - Soft Lepton: {epsilon}D{sup 2} = (1.07 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.10) % where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

O.R. Long

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

A proper time dependent measurement of Delta M {sub D} using jet charge and soft lepton flavor tagging  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents a proper time dependent measurement of the B{sup 0}{sub d} mixing frequency {Delta}M{sub d} using jet charge and soft lepton flavor tagging in p - {anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The measurement uses the inclusive e and {mu} trigger data of the CDF detector from an integrated luminosity of 91 pb{sub -1}. The proper time at decay is measured from a partial reconstruction of the B associated with the trigger lepton. The measurement of {Delta}M{sub d} yields {Delta}M{sub d} = 0.50 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.05 {bar h} ps{sup -1} where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The flavor tagging methods used give a measured effective efficiency {epsilon}D{sup 2} of o Jet Charge: {epsilon}D{sup 2} (0.78 + 0.12 + 0.09) % o Soft Lepton: {epsilon}D{sup 2} (1.07 + 0.09 + 0.10) % where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ACCURATE TIME-DEPENDENT WAVE PACKET STUDY OF THE H{sup +}+LiH REACTION AT EARLY UNIVERSE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics and kinetics of the H{sup +} + LiH reaction have been studied using a quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel quantum mechanical method on an ab initio potential energy surface at conditions of the early universe. The total reaction probabilities for the H{sup +} + LiH(v = 0, j = 0) {yields} H{sup +} {sub 2} + Li process have been calculated from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 110. Using a Langevin model, integral cross sections have been calculated in that range of collision energies and extrapolated for energies below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV. The calculated rate constants are found to be nearly independent of temperature in the 10-1000 K interval with a value of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with estimates used in evolutionary models of the early universe lithium chemistry.

Aslan, E.; Bulut, N. [Department of Physics, Firat University, 23169 Elazig (Turkey); Castillo, J. F.; Banares, L.; Aoiz, F. J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica I, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas (Unidad Asociada CSIC), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Roncero, O., E-mail: jfernand@quim.ucm.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, C/Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

156

Seismic analysis of lattice towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the absence of specific guidelines for the seismic analysis of self-supporting telecommunication towers, designers may be tempted to apply simplified building code approaches to (more)

Khedr, Mohamed Abdel Halim.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Mat Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of building types including high-rise residential towers, healthcare, and ... bearing pressure for transient loads (wind or seismic ... Tower Seismic Force ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Category: NEPA Resources What links...

159

DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chaos and dynamical trends in barred galaxies: bridging the gap between N-body simulations and time-dependent analytical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent N-body simulations are an efficient tool to study galactic dynamics. However, it can be challenging to use them for the detailed study of individual trajectories (or ensembles of trajectories). Such orbital studies are important to shed light on global phase space properties, which are the underlying cause of observed structures. The potentials needed to describe self-consistent models are in this case time-dependent. For this reason, we aim to investigate the different dynamical properties (such as regular and chaotic motion) of a non-autonomous galactic system, whose time-dependent potential adequately mimics certain realistic trends arising from N-body barred galaxy simulations. We construct a fully time-dependent analytical model, which manages to capture and reproduce several features of an N-body simulation. We model the gravitational potentials of three components (disc, bar and dark matter halo), whose time-dependent parameters are derived from an N-body simulation. We start by studying the dynamical stability of its reduced time-independent 2-degrees of freedom model by charting the different islands of stability associated with certain orbital morphologies and detecting the chaotic and regular regions. We then turn our interest to the full 3-degrees of freedom time-dependent case, where we show a few representative trajectories which experience different typical dynamical behaviours, i.e., an interplay between regular and chaotic motion for different epochs. Finally, we focus on the study of the underlying global dynamical transitions of the time-dependent system in terms of estimating the relative total fraction of (un)stable motion of an ensemble of initial conditions taken from the simulation and evolved with the time-dependent potential. We find that, for such an ensemble, the fraction of regular motion increases with time.

T. Manos; Rubens E. G. Machado

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Data Mining for Seismic Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic exploration plays an important role in petroleum industry. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional data analysis ways in oil and gas industry. Traditional methods in petroleum engineering are knowledge-driven ... Keywords: seismic exploration, data mining, cluster analysis

Zhongbin Ouyang; Jing He; Keliang Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Induced Seismicity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Induced Seismicity Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

164

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Micromachined silicon seismic transducers  

SciTech Connect

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425676"

171

Low-Frequency Variability in Shallow-Water Models of the Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation. Part II: Time-Dependent Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent wind-driven ocean circulation is investigated for both a rectangular and a North Atlanticshaped basin. Multiple steady states in a 2-layer shallow-water model and their dependence on various parameters and other model ...

Eric Simonnet; Michael Ghil; Kayo Ide; Roger Temam; Shouhong Wang

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Time-dependent transport in graphene nanoribbons Enrico Perfetto,1 Gianluca Stefanucci,1,2 and Michele Cini1,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of equilibrium by the sudden switching of the bias voltage. This is an ultrafast process and excites high energy graphenic reservoirs. The linear drop of the bias voltage in region C is also shown. FIG. 2. Color online dotted line min W/L / 0= /2 W/L are also shown. TIME-DEPENDENT TRANSPORT IN GRAPHENE NANORIBBONS PHYSICAL

Stefanucci, Gianluca

173

Vertical-Structure Functions for Time-Dependent Flow in a Well-Mixed Fluid with Turbulent Boundary Layers at the Bottom and Top  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The elements of an eigenfunction expansion for time-dependent currents as a function of depth are worked out for viscosity that is given as a parabolic function of depth that goes to zero at both the bottom and top of the water. This yields ...

James R. Baker; Thomas F. Jordan

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of partially reconstructed B[superscript 0]?D[superscript *+]D[superscript *-] decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B[superscript 0]?D[superscript *+]D[superscript *-] decays using (4715) million BB? pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

175

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

176

Position paper: Seismic design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

Farnworth, S.K.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

Range tomography: combining the practicality of boolean tomography with the resolution of analog tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of early network tomography approaches was to produce a point estimate for the performance of each network link (Analog tomography). When it became clear that the previous approach is error-prone in practice, research shifted to Boolean ... Keywords: Network tomography, localization, performance metric

Sajjad Zarifzadeh; Madhwaraj Gowdagere; Constantine Dovrolis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Definition: Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Active Seismic Techniques Active seismic techniques study the behavior of artificially-generated elastic waves in the subsurface. A seismic wave or pulse is generated at the surface by an active seismic source which can be a vibration, mechanical impact, or near-surface explosion.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave fields are recorded by a seismometer,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Computed Tomography Status  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

Hansche, B. D.

1983-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

182

Computed tomography status  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

Hansche, B.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Experimental Adaptive Bayesian Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental realization of an adaptive quantum state tomography protocol. Our method takes advantage of a Bayesian approach to statistical inference and is naturally tailored for adaptive strategies. For pure states we observe close to 1/N scaling of infidelity with overall number of registered events, while best non-adaptive protocols allow for $1/\\sqrt{N}$ scaling only. Experiments are performed for polarization qubits, but the approach is readily adapted to any dimension.

Konstantin Kravtsov; Stanislav Straupe; Igor Radchenko; Neil Houlsby; Sergey Kulik

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Semiclassical pair production rate for time-dependent electrical fields with more than one component: -WKB-approach and world-line instantons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analytic calculation of the semiclassical electron-positron pair creation rate by time-dependent electrical fields. We use two methods, first the imaginary time method in the WKB-approximation and second the world-line instanton approach. Both methods are generalized to time-dependent electric fields with more than one component. The two methods give the same result if the momentum spectrum of the produced pairs is peaked around $\\vec{p}=0$. The result in the world-line instanton approach can be obtained from the WKB result by a Taylor expansion around this peak. For the examples usually discussed in the literature the field has one component and the momentum spectrum is peaked at $\\vec{p}=0$ so that the two methods agree. By studying the case of rotating electric fields we however show that for fields with more components this is generally not true.

Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Comment on 'Geometric phase of the gyromotion for charged particles in a time-dependent magnetic field'[Phys. Plasmas 18, 072505 (2011)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geometric analysis of the gyromotion for charged particles in a time-dependent magnetic field by Liu and Qin [Phys. Plasmas 18, 072505 (2011)] is reformulated in terms of the spatial angles that represent the instantaneous orientation of the magnetic field. This new formulation, which includes the equation of motion for the pitch angle, clarifies the decomposition of the gyroangle-averaged equation of motion for the gyrophase into its dynamic and geometric contributions.

Brizard, Alain J. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, Vermont 05439 (United States); Guillebon, Loiec de [Centre de Physique Theorique Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS (UMR 7332), 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

187

FAST Simulation of Seismic Wind Turbine Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent additions to the computer simulation code FAST that allow a user to consider seismic loads.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Nuclear Renaissance & the NRC Seismic Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing and New Reactor Licensing Offices ... Seismic Isolation Small Modular Reactors SSI modeling of NPPs under non-traditional loads ...

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

Seismic Regionalization In Northeast Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize seismicity in support of nuclear explosion monitoring for the continental regions of northeast Russia, we have been analyzing information obtained from regional seismic network operators. Our goal is to merge catalog, bulletin, waveform, and other ground truth data from several regional networks into a comprehensive data set that we will use for various seismic research projects. To date we have compiled a bulletin from published and unpublished event data of about 200,000 events and over 150,000 arrival times. We have also determined that the Russian regional network catalogs are contaminated with mining-explosion events. Hence, one of our primary efforts is to identify mining events when possible and move them into a separate bulletin from the natural earthquakes. We have extended our preliminary analysis of explosion contamination of Russian seismicity catalogs using temporal analysis into the Irkutsk and Chita districts and the Buryat Republic. Based on analysis of epicenters and origin times reported in Material po Seismichnost' Sibiri for 1970 -- 1993, it is likely that considerable explosion contamination occurs in the gold (Bodaibo, northern Irkutsk Region, and in the Chita region), mica (Vitim, northern Irkutsk Region), and other mining areas (Bushulei, Nerchinsk, and Petrovsk in the Buryat and Chita areas). Explosion contamination is also observed in northernmost Mongolia in the mining and industrial district near Darkhan. Explosions associated with the construction of the Baikal-Amur Mainline Railroad are likely, as was observed in the Amur district; however, the amount of natural seismicity dominates the activity and makes it impossible to resolve the railroad separately. In conjunction with the Magadan Seismic Network operators,...

Kevin Mackey Kazuya; Kazuya Fujita; Lee K. Steck; Hans E. Hartse

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

194

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

195

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

196

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

197

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

198

Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

First-order quantum correction to the Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First-order quantum correction to the Larmor radiation is investigated on the basis of the scalar QED on a homogeneous background of a time-dependent electric field, which is a generalization of a recent work by Higuchi and Walker so as to be extended for an accelerated charged particle in a relativistic motion. We obtain a simple approximate formula for the quantum correction in the limit of the relativistic motion when the direction of the particle motion is parallel to that of the electric field.

Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Gen [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Grid-based methods for diatomic quantum scattering problems II: Time-dependent treatment of single- and two-photon ionization of H2+  

SciTech Connect

The time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation for H2+ in a time-varying electromagnetic field is solved in the fixed-nuclei approximation using a previously developed finite-element/ discrete variable representation in prolate spheroidal coordinates. Amplitudes for single- and two-photon ionization are obtained using the method of exterior complex scaling to effectively propagate the field-free solutions from the end of the radiation pulse to infinite times. Cross sections are presented for one-and two-photon ionization for both parallel and perpendicular polarization of the photon field, as well as photoelectron angular distributions for two-photon ionization.

Rescigno, Thomas N.; Tao, L.; McCurdy, C.W.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Caucasus Seismic Information Network: Data and Analysis Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geology and tectonics of the Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) are highly variable. Consequently, generating a structural model and characterizing seismic wave propagation in the region require data from local seismic networks. As of eight years ago, there was only one broadband digital station operating in the region an IRIS station at Garni, Armenia and few analog stations. The Caucasus Seismic Information Network (CauSIN) project is part of a nulti-national effort to build a knowledge base of seismicity and tectonics in the region. During this project, three major tasks were completed: 1) collection of seismic data, both in event catalogus and phase arrival time picks; 2) development of a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the region obtained through crustal tomography; 3) advances in geological and tectonic models of the region. The first two tasks are interrelated. A large suite of historical and recent seismic data were collected for the Caucasus. These data were mainly analog prior to 2000, and more recently, in Georgia and Azerbaijan, the data are digital. Based on the most reliable data from regional networks, a crustal model was developed using 3-D tomographic inversion. The results of the inversion are presented, and the supporting seismic data are reported. The third task was carried out on several fronts. Geologically, the goal of obtaining an integrated geological map of the Caucasus on a scale of 1:500,000 was initiated. The map for Georgia has been completed. This map serves as a guide for the final incorporation of the data from Armenia and Azerbaijan. Description of the geological units across borders has been worked out and formation boundaries across borders have been agreed upon. Currently, Armenia and Azerbaijan are working with scientists in Georgia to complete this task. The successful integration of the geologic data also required addressing and mapping active faults throughout the greater Caucasus. Each of the major faults in the region were identified and the probability of motion were assessed. Using field data and seismicity, the relative activity on each of these faults was determined. Furthermore, the sense of motion along the faults was refined using GPS, fault plane solutions, and detailed field studies. During the course of the integration of the active fault data, the existence of the proposed strike slip Borjomi-Kazbeki fault was brought into question. Although it had been incorporated in many active tectonic models over the past decade, field geologists and geophysicists in Georgia questioned its existence. Detailed field studies were carried out to determine the existence of the fault and estimate the slip along it; and it was found that the fault zone did not exist. Therefore, the convergence rate in the greater Caucasus must be reinterpreted in terms of thrust mechanisms, instead of strike-slip on the Borjomi-Kazbeki fault zone.

Randolph Martin; Mary Krasovec; Spring Romer; Timothy O'Connor; Emanuel G. Bombolakis; Youshun Sun; Nafi Toksoz

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

203

Linear-response and real-time time-dependent density functional theory studies of core-level near-edge x-ray absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss our implementation and application of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to core-level near-edge absorption spectroscopy, using both linear-response (LR) and real-time (RT) approaches. We briefly describe our restricted window TDDFT (REWTDDFT) approach for core excitations which has also been reported by others groups. This is followed by a detailed discussion of real-time TDDFT techniques tailored to core excitations, including obtaining spectral information through delta-function excitation, post-processing time-dependent signals, and resonant excitation through quasi-monochromatic excitation. We present results for the oxygen K-edge of water and carbon dioxide; the carbon K-edge of carbon dioxide; the ruthenium L3-edge for the hexaamminerutheium(III) ion, including scalar relativistic corrections via the zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA); and the carbon and fluorine K-edges for a series of fluorobenzenes. In all cases, the calculated spectra are found to be in good agreement with experiment, requiring only a uniform shift on the order of a few percent. Real-time TDDFT visualization of excited state charge densities are used to visually examine the nature of each excitation, which gives insight into the effects of atoms bound to the absorbing center.

Lopata, Kenneth A.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Khalil, Munira; Govind, Niranjan

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Proton computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

Hanson, K.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Statistical Physics Approaches to Seismicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This entry in the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science, Springer present a summary of some of the concepts and calculational tools that have been developed in attempts to apply statistical physics approaches to seismology. We summarize the leading theoretical physical models of the space-time organization of earthquakes. We present a general discussion and several examples of the new metrics proposed by statistical physicists, underlining their strengths and weaknesses. The entry concludes by briefly outlining future directions. The presentation is organized as follows. I Glossary II Definition and Importance of the Subject III Introduction IV Concepts and Calculational Tools IV.1 Renormalization, Scaling and the Role of Small Earthquakes in Models of Triggered Seismicity IV.2 Universality IV.3 Intermittent Periodicity and Chaos IV.4 Turbulence IV.5 Self-Organized Criticality V Competing mechanisms and models V.1 Roots of complexity in seismicity: dynamics or heterogeneity? V.2 Critical earthquakes ...

Sornette, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

211

Probabilistic economic evaluation of substation seismic upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology for deciding whether or not to implement seismic design modifications at Southern California Edison's (SCE) Substation facilities. The method considers the potential for substation capability loss resulting from earthquake damage, cost of seismic modification made today, the cost of damage restoration after that modification is made, the cost of doing nothing now, and the site specific earthquake probability. Based on these findings, recommendations for seismic modifications of substation facilities could be made.

Ong, T.L.; Ensign, R.L.; Martin, D.F.; Richter, H.L. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Influence of the time-dependent surfactant adsorption on the lifetime of a drop pressed by buoyancy against a planar interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS) of deformable droplets are used to study the influence of the time-dependent adsorption on the coalescence time of a 200-$\\mu$m drop of soybean oil pressed by buoyancy against a planar water/oil interface. The interface is represented by a 5000-$\\mu$m drop of oil fixed in the space. The movement of the small drop is determined by the interaction forces between the drops, the buoyancy force, and its thermal interaction with the solvent. The interaction forces depend on the surface concentration of surfactant molecules at the oil/water interfaces. Assuming diffusion limited adsorption, the surface excess of the surfactant becomes a function of its apparent diffusion constant, $D_{app}$. Distinct probability distributions of the coalescence time are obtained depending on the magnitude of $D_{app}$. The origin and the significance of these distributions are discussed.

Clara Rojas; Maximo Garcia-Sucre; German Urbina-Villalba

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

213

Long-time solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for an atom in an electromagnetic field using complex coordinate contours  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that exterior complex scaling (ECS) can be used to impose outgoing wave boundary conditions exactly on solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for atoms in intense electromagnetic pulses using finite grid methods. The procedure is formally exact when applied in the appropriate gauge and is demonstrated in a calculation of high harmonic generation in which multiphoton resonances are seen for long pulse durations. However, we also demonstrate that while the application of ECS in this way is formally exact, numerical error can appear for long time propagations that can only be controlled by extending the finite grid. A mathematical analysis of the origins of that numerical error, illustrated with an analytically solvable model, is also given.

Tao, Liang; Vanroose, Wim; Reps, Brian; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

THE FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE ADIABATIC INDEX IN THE SOLAR CORONA USING TIME-DEPENDENT SPECTROSCOPY OF HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use observations of a slow magnetohydrodynamic wave in the corona to determine for the first time the value of the effective adiabatic index, using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We detect oscillations in the electron density, using the CHIANTI atomic database to perform spectroscopy. From the time-dependent wave signals from multiple spectral lines the relationship between relative density and temperature perturbations is determined, which allows in turn to measure the effective adiabatic index to be {gamma}{sub eff} = 1.10 {+-} 0.02. This confirms that the thermal conduction along the magnetic field is very efficient in the solar corona. The thermal conduction coefficient is measured from the phase lag between the temperature and density, and is shown to be compatible with Spitzer conductivity.

Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Wardle, Nick; Jansari, Kishan; Verwichte, Erwin; Nakariakov, Valery M. [CFSA, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Del Zanna, Giulio, E-mail: Tom.VanDoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.BE [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND INDUCED SEISMICITY IN KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For some time the public has asked questions about seismic activity related to hydraulic fracturing and other oil-field related activities. In particular, there is concern that the energy that goes into the subsurface during hydraulic fracturing is sufficient to cause felt earthquakes. The following is a response to those questions. 1) Seismic activity that is related to human activities is generally referred to as induced seismicity or triggered seismicity. Induced seismicity is defined as seismic events attributable to human activities (National Research Council, 2012). The term triggered seismicity is also used to describe situations in which human activities could potentially trigger large and potentially damaging earthquakes (Shemeta et al., 2012). The following discussion uses only the term induced seismicity to refer to seismic activity in which human activity plays a role. 2) Because it uses energy to fracture rocks to release oil or natural gas, hydraulic fracturing does create microseismic events (of a magnitude less than 2.0). Felt earthquake activity (generally greater than a magnitude 3.0) resulting from hydraulic fracturing has been confirmed from only one location in the world (National Research Council, 2012). In the

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

217

Tentative Framework for Development of Advanced Seismic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3-30 4. Conceptual Reformulation of Seismic Design Parameters ..... ... 4-5 4.4.1 Maximum Considered Earthquake Basis for the RM Factor ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

219

Structural analysis of an LMFBR shield assembly duct under thermo-mechanical and seismic loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the stress analysis performed to assess structural adequacy of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) core removable shield assemblies. Removable shield assemblies are located in the peripheral region of the core (between blanket assemblies and the fixed radial shield), and are subjected to severe cross-sectional thermal gradients and seismic loads requiring a relatively complex duct load pad design. For cost-effectiveness, the analysis was conducted in two stages. First, an elasto-plastic seismic stress analysis was performed using a detailed nonlinear finite element model (with gaps) of the load pad configuration. Next, in order to determine the total strain accumulation and the creep-fatigue damage the maximum seismic stresses combined with the ''worst'' thermal stresses from a single assembly model were used to perform a simplified inelastic analysis using two sets of material properties to bound the changing material conditions during reactor operation. This work demonstrated the necessity and applicability of the two simplified analysis techniques in elevated temperature structural design, i.e., the treatment of time-dependent degradation of material properties due to temperature and nuclear irradiation, and the use of time-independent finite element stress analysis results to perform a simplified creep-fatigue analysis.

Malik, S.N.; Sazawal, V.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Category:Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Passive Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Passive Seismic Techniques,...

222

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and...

223

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

224

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

226

Seismic Studies of Substation Equipment: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE Standard 693, Recommended Practice for Seismic Design of Substations, is used by electric power utilities to qualify substation equipment for seismic movements. Deficiencies exist in the present standard, and information is unavailable for dynamic response that may be used to better analyze equipment and permit equipment evaluation in case of limited configuration changes, such as insulator substitution.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

Apparatus and method for detecting seismic waves  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an apparatus for transducing seismic signals and a method for placing said apparatus for detecting seismic signals. The apparatus comprises at least one geophone preferably embedded in a polymeric material contained in a tubular member. A lower portion of the tubular member preferably contains ballast. The tubular member is preferably cemented into a borehole.

O' Brien, T.T.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ambiguity-Free Measurement of cos2beta: Time-Intergrated and Time-Dependent Angular Analyses of B to J/psi K pi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results on B {yields} J/{psi} K{pi} decays using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. The detector is located at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Using approximately 88 million B{bar B} pairs, we measure the decay amplitudes for the flavor eigenmodes and observe strong-phase differences indicative of final-state interactions with a significance of 7.6 standard deviations. We use the interference between the K{pi} S-wave and P-wave amplitudes in the region of the K*(892) to resolve the ambiguity in the determination of these strong phases. We then perform an ambiguity-free measurement of cos 2{beta} using the angular and time-dependent asymmetry in B {yields} J/{psi} K*{sup 0} (K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) decays. With sin2{beta} fixed at its measured value and cos2{beta} treated as an independent parameter, we find cos 2{beta} = 2.72{sub -0.79}{sup +0.50}(stat) {+-} 0.27(syst), determining the sign of cos 2{beta} to be positive at 86% CL.

Aubert, B.

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer [Department Chemie und Pharmazie, Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and ICMM, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hieringer, Wolfgang [Department Chemie und Pharmazie, Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

A density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory investigation on the anchor comparison of triarylamine-based dyes  

SciTech Connect

To understand the effects of the anchor part in organic dyes on the energy conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), two different anchor groups used in metal-free triphenylamine (TPA)-based organic dyes for DSCs have been theoretically compared. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) study of geometry properties, excitations, and electronic structures of triarylamine-based dyes (TC1 and TPAR1) before and after binding to titanium has been performed under the level of TD-PBE1PBE/6-311G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The result shows that cyanoacrylic acid anchor favors better photoelectrochemical properties of DSCs than that of rhodanine-3-acetic acid anchor via providing more shift of TiO{sub 2} conduction band toward the vacuum energy levels (larger open circuit potentials) and more favorable conjugation with titanium. This study is expected to shed light on the design of metal-free organic dyes for DSCs.

Peng Bo; Yang Siqi; Li Lanlan; Cheng Fangyi; Chen Jun [Institute of New Energy Material Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Energy-Material Chemistry, Chemistry College, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

Resistivity Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Tomography Resistivity Tomography Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Resistivity Tomography Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Resistivity Log Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 60.986,098 centUSD 0.061 kUSD 6.098e-5 MUSD 6.098e-8 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 76.227,622 centUSD 0.0762 kUSD 7.622e-5 MUSD 7.622e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 106.7110,671 centUSD 0.107 kUSD 1.0671e-4 MUSD 1.0671e-7 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 1 days0.00274 years

235

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Aging, rejuvenation and thixotropy in complex fluids. Time-dependence of the viscosity at rest and under constant shear rate or shear stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex fluids exhibit time-dependent changes in viscosity that have been ascribed to both thixotropy and aging. However, there is no consensus for which phenomenon is the origin of which changes. A novel thixotropic model is defined that incorporates aging. Conditions under which viscosity changes are due to thixotropy and aging are unambiguously defined. Viscosity changes in a complex fluid during a period of rest after destructuring exhibit a bifurcation at a critical volume fraction PHIc2. For volume fractions less than PHIc2, the viscosity remains finite in the limit t => infinite. For volume fractions above critical the viscosity grows without limit, so aging occurs at rest. At constant shear rate there is no bifurcation, whereas under constant shear stress the model predicts a new bifurcation in the viscosity at a critical stress sB, identical to the yield stress sy observed under steady conditions. The divergence of the viscosity for stress s sB is best defined as aging. However, for s > sB, where the viscosity remains finite, it seems preferable to use the concepts of restructuring and destructuring, rather than aging and rejuvenation. Nevertheless, when a stress sA (sB) is applied during aging, slower aging is predicted and discussed as true rejuvenation. Plastic behaviour is predicted under steady conditions when s > sB. The Herschel-Bulkley model fits the flow curve for stresses close to sB, whereas the Bingham model gives a better fit for s >> sB. Finally, the model's predictions are shown to be consistent with experimental data from the literature for the transient behaviour of laponite gels.

Daniel Quemada

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Advanced Methods for Determination of Seismic Fragilities: Seismic Fragilities Using Scenario Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) is an increasingly important means of assessing the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The standard approach for incorporating the seismic hazard into an SPRA is to use the uniform hazard spectra (UHS), which is computed independently at each spectral frequency, resulting in an equal probability of exceeding the ground motion at any frequency. As a result, the UHS may not be representative of an actual earthquake spectrum, and is a potential source of con...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell ...  

Tom Daley and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have invented a seismic source that can be operated while fluid is being injected or withdrawn from an aquifer or oil well.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Seismic design verification of LMFBR structures  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an assessment of the seismic design verification procedures currently used for nuclear power plant structures, a comparison of dynamic test methods available, and conclusions and recommendations for future LMFB structures.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

243

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provides. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder of an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping. 4 figs.

Hardee, H.C.

1990-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

249

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

Korneev, Valeri A.

250

A Bayesian Perspective on Seismic Tomography With an application to the thermochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure beneath the North American continent A. Khan Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Z-specific parameters: A0, V0, K0, K0, 0, 0, q0, G0, G0, S0. EoS (Stixrude & Bukowinski, 1990; Stixrude & Lithgow-member scenarios for the present-day constitution of the Earth's mantle. (A) layered mantle convection. (B) whole

Cerveny, Vlastislav

251

Earthquake Forecast via Neutrino Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of forecasting earthquakes by means of (anti)neutrino tomography. Antineutrinos emitted from reactors are used as a probe. As the antineutrinos traverse through a region prone to earthquakes, observable variations in the matter effect on the antineutrino oscillation would provide a tomography of the vicinity of the region. In this preliminary work, we adopt a simplified model for the geometrical profile and matter density in a fault zone. We calculate the survival probability of electron antineutrinos for cases without and with an anomalous accumulation of electrons which can be considered as a clear signal of the coming earthquake, at the geological region with a fault zone, and find that the variation may reach as much as 3% for $\\bar \

Bin Wang; Ya-Zheng Chen; Xue-Qian Li

2010-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

1999-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

255

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atom probe tomography (APT) and analytical transmission .... of a Leaking Type 316 Socket Weld in a Boron Injection Tank Sampling Line.

257

Prospects for Atomic-Scale Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atomic-scale tomography (AST) may be defined as any technique that ... Initial Age Hardening and Nanostructural Evolution in a Cu-Ni-P Alloy.

258

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography  

SciTech Connect

Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons for imaging applications. Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data.

Morris, Christopher L; Saunders, Alexander; Sossong, Michael James; Schultz, Larry Joe; Green, J. Andrew; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Smith, Richard A; Colthart, James M; Klugh, David C; Scoggins, Gary E; Vineyard, David C

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiation interactions for tomography. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

There are new requirements emerging in the field of tomography: the need for spatial resolution in the micrometre range, atomic species specificity, and quantitative density discrimination.

Zolnay, A.S.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seismic hazard analysis overview and executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Specific Spectra Project (SSSP) described in this report was a multi-year study funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The main objective of this project was to provide assistance to the NRC by developing estimates of the seismic hazard at the nine oldest nuclear power plant sites east of the Rocky Mountains which were included in the SEP. This volume gives brief overview of the SEP and the SSSP including a discussion of the formal elicitation of expert opinion used to obtain a subjective representation of parameters that affect seismic hazard and the development of the seismic hazard at the nine SEP facilities.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Minichino, C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR5741 Proceedings, Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced Concrete Frames Gaithersburg, MD ...

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Seismic Qualification Case Study for a New Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews and compares methods used for the seismic qualification of safety related equipment at nuclear power plants and examines an alternative, hybrid approach. The report investigates the costs and lead times for each seismic qualification approach and also discusses the seismic capacity definitions that result from the application of each qualification approach. The report includes a case study that applies the new approach to the seismic qualification of an inverter.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

265

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

266

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure such as a building, bridge, or power plant such that it is isolated from seismic vibratory ground motion. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure by an isolation system which will not allow large dynamic loads to be transmitted to the supported structure due to seismic motions which have damaging energy at frequencies at or near the natural frequency of the structure and the overall structural systems. 4 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.  

SciTech Connect

Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

SMITH,G.C.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Application of Computed Tomography to Microgravity Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes applications of computed tomography (CT) to combustion phenomena under microgravity conditions. Infrared Thermography (IT) has been considered as a promising method for two-dimensional measurement of flames. We have applied IT to ... Keywords: computed tomography, diffusion flame, infrared thermography, microgravity combustion, spectroscopy

H. Sato; K. Itoh; M. Shimizu; S. Hayashi; Y. Fujimori; K. Maeno

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors - Energy ...  

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a ...

272

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

273

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

RISC-3 Seismic Assessment Guidelines: Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for establishing reasonable confidence that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear plants, categorized as RISC-3 under the 10 CFR 50.69 Risk Informed Safety Categorization Process, will perform their required functions under design basis seismic conditions.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "SPRA Implementation Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs). These cost-effective and practical procedures for SPRA support a variety of purposes, including risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

279

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography  

SciTech Connect

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

282

5h Other Seismic Stakeholder InteractionsGlenn Kelly- Appendix 5 Seismic.wpd Page 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decommissioning plants. During the course of the workshop, presentations by the NRC and the industry concluded that spent fuel pools possess substantial capability beyond their design basis to with stand seismic events but that variations in seismic capacity existed due to plant specific designs and locations. The consensus was that the risk was low enough that precise quantification was not necessary to support exemption requests but that this needed to be confirmed on a plant specific basis with deterministic criteria. It was recommended that a simple spent fuel pool (SFP) vulnerability check list be developed to provide additional assurance that no beyond-design-basis seismic structural vulnerabilities exist at decommissioning plants. Enclosed for your review is the "Seismic Screening Criteria For Assessing Potential Pool Vulnerabilities At Decommissioning Plants." Please contact me at (202) 739-8110 or by e-mail (apn@.nei.org) if you have any questions or if a meeting should be scheduled to discuss the enclosed seismic checklist.

Glenn Kelly Aee Attached; George Hubbard; Aee Attached; Glenn Kelly; Alan Nelson; Alan Nelson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

284

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

285

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Seismic responses of unanchored electrode storage fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Two anchored electrode storage fixtures will be installed in the process cell of the Integral Fast Reactor`s Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-W in Idaho. In addition to the concerns for structural integrity, the potential for uplifting and tipping of the fixtures during the design basis earthquake must also be examined. In the analysis, a response-spectrum method was employed to investigate tipping, while a static approach was used for the structural-integrity evaluations. The results show that the combined stresses from seismic and other loads are within the allowables permitted by the design codes. The overall vertical seismic reaction forces at the leveling pads are compressive, implying that the fixtures will remain in contact with the floor. No uplifting or tipping of the fixture will occur during the design basis earthquake.

Ting-shu Wu; Blomquist, C.A.; Haupt, H.J.; Herceg, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Buried Interface Analysis Using Atom Probe Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels Control of p-n ... Relationships in a Series of Co-Cr-Cu-Fe-Ni-Al High Entropy Alloys.

291

Atom Probe Tomography for Industrial Applications - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels Control of p-n ... Relationships in a Series of Co-Cr-Cu-Fe-Ni-Al High Entropy Alloys.

292

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves.

293

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

294

Use of experience data for DOE seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

As dictated by DOE Order 5480.28, seismic evaluations of essential systems and components at DOE facilities will be conducted over the next several years. For many of these systems and components, few, if any, seismic requirements applied to the original design, procurement, installation, and maintenance process. Thus the verification of the seismic adequacy of existing systems and components presents a difficult challenge. DOE has undertaken development of the criteria and procedures for these seismic evaluations that will maximize safety benefits in a timely and cost effective manner. As demonstrated in previous applications at DOE facilities and by the experience from the commercial nuclear power industry, use of experience data for these evaluations is the only viable option for most existing systems and components. This paper describes seismic experience data, the needs at DOE facilities, the precedent of application at nuclear power plants and DOE facilities, and the program being put in place for the seismic verification task ahead for DOE.

Barlow, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Budnitz, R. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Industry Approach to Seismic Severe Accident Policy Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utilities with industry recommended guidelines for cost-effective seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20. Guidance is provided on application of seismic probabilistic risk assessment and seismic margin methods for full-, focused-, and reduced-scope evaluations. It provides strategies for coordinating these evaluations with similar reviews needed for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mathematical Problems of Thermoacoustic Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is a newly emerging modality in biomedical imaging. It combines the good contrast of electromagnetic and good resolution of ultrasound imaging. The mathematical model of TAT is the observability problem for the wave equation: one observes the data on a hyper-surface and reconstructs the initial perturbation. In this dissertation, we consider several mathematical problems of TAT. The first problem is the inversion formulas. We provide a family of closed form inversion formulas to reconstruct the initial perturbation from the observed data. The second problem is the range description. We present the range description of the spherical mean Radon transform, which is an important transform in TAT. The next problem is the stability analysis for TAT. We prove that the reconstruction of the initial perturbation from observed data is not Holder stable if some observability condition is violated. The last problem is the speed determination. The question is whether the observed data uniquely determines the ultrasound speed and initial perturbation. We provide some initial results on this issue. They include the unique determination of the unknown constant speed, a weak local uniqueness, a characterization of the non-uniqueness, and a characterization of the kernel of the linearized operator.

Nguyen, Linh V.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

300

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

302

Microsoft Word - Calpine EGS_Seismic Eval Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Environmental Impacts of Induced Seismicity at the Calpine Enhanced Geothermal System Project, The Geysers, California prepared for RMT, Inc. 4 West Fourth Avenue,...

303

APPENDIX J: STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH DOE SEISMICITY PROTOCOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compliance with the "Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems". Calpine Corporation and other Geysers geothermal operators have long been...

304

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

305

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

306

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and...

307

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

308

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

309

Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2% in 50 years. Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: Southern California Earthquake Center...

310

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

311

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

312

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

313

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

314

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Seismic Technology Adapted to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ...

315

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

316

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

317

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

318

Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures. Awardees (Company Institution) OSKI Energy, LLC Awardee Website http:www.oskienergy.com Partner 1 Optim, Inc Partner 2...

319

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design Guidelines Program Plan for New and Existing Buildings FEMA-445 / August 2006 ...

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Seismic Design of Steel Special Concentrically Braced Frame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. 8 ... Dr. John (Jay) L. Harris, III, managed the project to produce this Technical Brief for EL. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Covering models with time-dependent demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The different solutions in the search space are given in terms of the variables yk .... symbolize the new facilities to enter the market, and the dark-grey circles...

323

The Time Dependent Traveling Salesman Problem - Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inequalities can be expressed in terms of the TDTSP variables as follows: ? j?S x0 ... at a vertex in S or it must enter S no later than layer n ? |S|. ..... The search.

324

Time-Dependent Fully Nonlinear Geostrophic Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock-capturing numerical methods are employed to integrate the fully nonlinear, rotating 1D shallow-water equations starting from steplike nongeostrophic initial conditions (a Rossby adjustment problem). Such numerical methods allow one to ...

Allen C. Kuo; Lorenzo M. Polvani

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms October 2011 Keywords: Global seismicity Declustered catalogue Earthquake energy distribution Plate tectonics In this paper, we analyse the distributions of number of events (N) and seismic energy (E

Doglioni, Carlo

326

Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred close to the Willow Creek coal mine in the Book Cliffs area on February 5, 1998 (UTC date), just prior to the start of this project; a magnitude 4.2 shock on March 7,2000 (UTC date), in the same area as the February 5 event; and a magnitude 4.3 shock that occurred on January 30,2000 (UTC and local date), associated with a panel collapse at the Solvay trona mine in southwestern Wyoming. This is the same mine in which an earlier collapse event of magnitude 5.2 occurred in February 1995, attracting considerable attention from the CTBT community.

Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE R&D Accomplishments DOE R&D Accomplishments Search All Database Web Pages for Go The Basics Home About What's New FAQ Contact Us Laureates Nobel Laureates Fermi Laureates Nobel Physicists Nobel Chemists Medicine Nobels Explore Insights SC Stories Snapshots R&D Nuggets Database Search Browse Reports Database Help Finding Aids Site Map A - Z Index Menu Synopsis Blog Archive QR Code RSS Archive Tag Cloud Videos Widget XML Bookmark and Share Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning Resources with Additional Information Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Positron Emission Tomography ... [is a medical imaging technique that] can track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging. Its strength has been in studies of the brain where there has been significant progress in investigations of drug addiction, aging, mental illness, and neurogenic disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) had its genesis in hot-atom chemical research supported by the Chemical Sciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Through this research it was learned, over many years, how to prepare short-lived positron emitters such as 18F whose half-life is 110 minutes. In 1975, the molecule [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose was successfully synthesized at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and set the stage for Positron Emission Tomography of the human brain.'

330

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as minor with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Knowledge Assisted Visualization: Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present novel techniques for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas exploration. We describe the existing procedure for oil and gas search which consists of manually extracting information ... Keywords: 2D textures, 3D textures, Illustrative visualization, Knowledge-assisted visualization, Rapid interpretation, Seismic interpretation

Daniel Patel; yvind Sture; Helwig Hauser; Christopher Giertsen; M. Eduard Grller

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack ... Keywords: Feed-forward neural network, Matlab, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

Emilson Pereira Leite; Alexandre Campane Vidal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

Yoshida, Nozomu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajo 1-13-1, Miyagi (Japan)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle Heimgartner, James B. Scott, Weston Thelen, Christopher R. Lopez, John N. Louie (2005) Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Refraction_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Heimgartner,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=401382

338

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401371

339

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401360"

340

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down

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341

The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution  

SciTech Connect

Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nonlinear acoustic/seismic waves in earthquake processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear dynamics induced by seismic sources and seismic waves are common in Earth. Observations range from seismic strong ground motion (the most damaging aspect of earthquakes), intense near-source effects, and distant nonlinear effects from the source that have important consequences. The distant effects include dynamic earthquake triggering-one of the most fascinating topics in seismology today-which may be elastically nonlinearly driven. Dynamic earthquake triggering is the phenomenon whereby seismic waves generated from one earthquake trigger slip events on a nearby or distant fault. Dynamic triggering may take place at distances thousands of kilometers from the triggering earthquake, and includes triggering of the entire spectrum of slip behaviors currently identified. These include triggered earthquakes and triggered slow, silent-slip during which little seismic energy is radiated. It appears that the elasticity of the fault gouge-the granular material located between the fault blocks-is key to the triggering phenomenon.

Johnson, Paul A. [Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TE Connectivity Finds Answers in TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography Print Thursday, 22 August 2013 10:50 TE Connectivity is a world leader in connectivity-the $13 billion global company designs and manufactures more than 500,000 different electronic connectivity products for the automotive, energy, industrial, broadband communications, consumer device, healthcare, aerospace, and defense industries. TE Connectivity has a long-standing commitment to innovation and engineering excellence. Their products help address challenges arising from companies' need for energy efficiency, always-on communications, and ever-increasing productivity. Recently, a team led by TE's senior manager of materials development, Dr. Jerzy Gazda (at left), has been investigating how ALS tomography capabilities can help the company develop more efficient connectors.

345

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Seismic imaging of the Medicine Lake Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50 km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. The USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. This experiment had two purposes: To produce high-quality velocity and attenuation images of the young magma body presumed to be the source for the young volcanic features, and to collect a dataset that can be used to develop and test seismic imaging methods that may be useful for understanding other geothermal systems. Eight large explosions were detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano, a distance chosen to produce strong upward traveling signals through the area of interest. The data were inverted using Aki's method to produce three-dimensional velocity and attenuation images of the sub-surface. Preliminary interpretation shows low velocity and attenuation on the flanks of the volcano, and coincident high attenuation values and low velocities (-20%) from 3 to 5 km beneath the center of the caldera. This zone may be a region of partial melt which fed the youngest eruptions.

Zucca, J.J.; Evans, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of the Neo-Deterministic Seismic Microzonation Procedure in Bulgaria and Validation of the Seismic Input Against Eurocode 8  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake record and the Code for design and construction in seismic regions in Bulgaria have shown that the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria is exposed to a high seismic risk due to local shallow and regional strong intermediate-depth seismic sources. The available strong motion database is quite limited, and therefore not representative at all of the real hazard. The application of the neo-deterministic seismic hazard assessment procedure for two main Bulgarian cities has been capable to supply a significant database of synthetic strong motions for the target sites, applicable for earthquake engineering purposes. The main advantage of the applied deterministic procedure is the possibility to take simultaneously and correctly into consideration the contribution to the earthquake ground motion at the target sites of the seismic source and of the seismic wave propagation in the crossed media. We discuss in this study the result of some recent applications of the neo-deterministic seismic microzonation procedure to the cities of Sofia and Russe. The validation of the theoretically modeled seismic input against Eurocode 8 and the few available records at these sites is discussed.

Ivanka, Paskaleva [CLSMEE--BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Mihaela, Kouteva [CLSMEE-BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Franco, Vaccari [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Panza, Giuliano F. [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of Turbine Blades Using Computed Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbine blades are high value castings having complex internal geometry. Computed Tomography has been employed on Turbine blades for finding out defects and internal details. The wall thickness, rib thickness and radius of curvature are measured from the CT slices. The discontinuities including blockages of cooling passages in the cast material can be detected. 3D visualization of the turbine blade provides in extracting its internal features including inaccessible areas nondestructively, which is not possible through conventional NDE methods. The salient features for evaluation of turbine blades using Tomography are brought out.

C. Muralidhar; S. N. Lukose; M. P. Subramanian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

1980-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

352

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Wireless Tomography, Part I: A Novel Approach to Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless Tomography, Part I: A Novel Approach to Remote Sensing R. C. Qiu, M. C. Wicks, L. Li, Z. Browning.12@us.af.mil Abstract--Wireless tomography, a novel approach to remote sensing, is proposed--radio frequency tomography, remote sensing, cognitive radar, cognitive radio. I. INTRODUCTION The ever increasing

Qiu, Robert Caiming

354

Analysis of seismic sloshing of reactor tanks considering submerged components and seismic isolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the seismic sloshing response of a large pool-type reactor tank with several deck-mounted components is presented. The main objective of the study is to investigate the effects of internal components on the sloshing response and to determine the sloshing loads on the components. The study shows that the presence of internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequencies of a tank with internal components are considerably higher than those of a tank without internals. The higher sloshing frequencies reduce the sloshing wave height on the free surface but the dynamic pressures of the fluid are increased. The effects of seismic isolation on sloshing response are also presented.

Ma, D.C.; Chang, Y.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description Historically, areas where the Earth surface is covered by an exposed high-velocity rock layer have been locations where conventional, single-component, seismic P-waves have failed to provide usable geological information. The research will use new seismic sources that emphasize shear waves and new seismic data-acquisition technology based on cable-free data recording to acquire seismic research data across two sites covered with surface-exposed highvelocity rocks. Research tasks will involve acquiring, processing, and interpreting both conventional seismic data and multicomponent seismic data. Scientists at BEG will analyze well logs, cores, and reservoir test data to construct geological models of the targeted geology across each study site.

356

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

N Reactor Seismic Task Force analysis and fix summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (SEP) and the Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program (ASEP) were established to implement recommendations made earlier by study groups assessing the safety of N Reactor. The recommendations which dealt with seismic issues were assigned to Safety Enhancement Programs, Defense Reactor Programs for implementation. A Seismic Task Force was assembled to perform the analyses, design the modifications, direct the performance of the work and provide program management of the effort to seismically qualify the facility. This document identifies the reports published by the task force to resolve each of the seismic issues raised by safety assessments. The reports, in turn, provide a list of recommended fixes (Fixes are potential problems, not resolved in the engineering analyses, which require repair, cleanup or modifications to hardware to establish seismic qualification). The purpose of this report is to provide a guide to seismic fixes implemented by the Seismic Task Force. This information is provided in the form of a ``fix log`` which lists fixes according to the report which recommended them and identifies the work authorization (WA), engineering documentation (Design Change, Field Change Notice or Engineering Change Notice) and acceptance dates for each fix. 5 refs., 6 tabs.

Rainey, T.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

De Paoli, Rosa Grazia [Department of Landscape Planning, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

1985-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J. [327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); 1011 Richardson Building, Photon Migration Laboratories, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); 327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Industrial tomography applied to reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Work has begun which explores the use of Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), boundary detection, and internal surface reconstruction techniques in industrial nondestructive testing applications. This initial work is intended to inform the reader of the existence and interrelated nature of these techniques through the use of a realistic simulation of an industrial inspection problem.

Kruger, R.P.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Review of seismicity and ground motion studies related to development of seismic design at SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC response spectra developed in Reg. Guide 1.60 is being used in the studies related to restarting of the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. Because it envelopes all the other site specific spectra which have been developed for SRS, it provides significant conservatism in the design and analysis of the reactor systems for ground motions of this value or with these probability levels. This spectral shape is also the shape used for the design of the recently licensed Vogtle Nuclear Station, located south of the Savannah River from the SRS. This report provides a summary of the data base used to develop the design basis earthquake. This includes the seismicity, rates of occurrence, magnitudes, and attenuation relationships. A summary is provided for the studies performed and methodologies used to establish the design basis earthquake for SRS. The ground motion response spectra developed from the various studies are also summarized. The seismic hazard and PGA`s developed for other critical facilities in the region are discussed, and the SRS seismic instrumentation is presented. The programs for resolving outstanding issues are discussed and conclusions are presented.

Stephenson, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Acree, J.R. [Westinghouse Environmental and Geotechnical Services, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Structural reliability analysis and seismic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a reliability analysis method for safety evaluation of nuclear structures. By utilizing this method, it is possible to estimate the limit state probability in the lifetime of structures and to generate analytically the fragility curves for PRA studies. The earthquake ground acceleration, in this approach, is represented by a segment of stationary Gaussian process with a zero mean and a Kanai-Tajimi Spectrum. All possible seismic hazard at a site represented by a hazard curve is also taken into consideration. Furthermore, the limit state of a structure is analytically defined and the corresponding limit state surface is then established. Finally, the fragility curve is generated and the limit state probability is evaluated. In this paper, using a realistic reinforced concrete containment as an example, results of the reliability analysis of the containment subjected to dead load, live load and ground earthquake acceleration are presented and a fragility curve for PRA studies is also constructed.

Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Shinozuka, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Shevenell & De Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=401374" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

368

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tibuleac Published: GRC, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009)...

369

Seismic Monitoring Of Blasting Activity In Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two significant mining regions in Russia lie near Novosibirsk and at the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly. A small percentage of events from these areas trigger the International Monitoring System (IMS). We have studied IMS recordings of events from these areas with the main goal of better understanding how these blasts are detonated and how these events will be most effectively monitored using IMS data. We have collected ground-truth information on the mining blasts and crustal structure in the area to facilitate modeling of the events. We have focused on sifting out from further consideration routine mining events and identifying detonation anomalies. We define master traces to represent tight clusters of mining events and to be used to identify anomalous events. We have examined recordings of events from eight significant event clusters in the 500-km-long Kuzbass/Abakan mining trend near Novosibirsk. The recordings were made by the IMS station ZAL. We see significant variations in the P onset and early coda between different events in clusters. We have found strong evidence of a detonation anomaly in just one of the events (out of 178 examined). Differences in the onset wave trains are attributed largely to differences in the firing patterns. Time independent spectral modulations have been observed in seismic signals produced by delay-fired mining events in mining regions throughout the world. The Novosibirsk trend is no exception to this rule. Delay-fired events in many mining regions, such as Kuzbass/Abakan, are also commonly associated with enhanced long-period (2- to 8-s) surface waves. The mine blasts in Russian mining regions appear, seismically, to resemble large blasts recorded in other regions (such as Wyoming). Techniques found to be effective in Wyoming, reviewed by...

Michael Hedlin University; Michael A. H. Hedlin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Determining Relative f and d Orbital Contributions to M?Cl Covalency in MCl62 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and UOCl5 Using Cl K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect

Chlorine K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and ground-state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) were used to probe electronic structure for O{sub h}-MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}(M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and C{sub 4v}-UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, and to determine the relative contributions of valence 3d, 4d, 5d, 6d, and 5f orbitals in M-Cl bonding. Spectral interpretations were guided by time-dependent DFT calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths, which agree well with the experimental XAS spectra. The data provide new spectroscopic evidence for the involvement of both 5f and 6d orbitals in actinide-ligand bonding in UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}. For the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, where transitions into d orbitals of t{sub 2g} symmetry are spectroscopically resolved for all four complexes, the experimentally determined Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond increases from 8.3(4)% (TiCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}) to 10.3(5)% (ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), 12(1)% (HfCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), and 26 18(1)% (UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}). Chlorine K-edge XAS spectra of UOCl{sub 5}{sup -} provide additional insights into the transition assignments by 27 lowering the symmetry to C{sub 4v}, where five pre-edge transitions into both 5f and 6d orbitals are observed. For UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, the XAS data 28 suggest that orbital mixing associated with the U 5f orbitals is considerably lower than that of the U 6d orbitals. For both UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}29 and UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, the ground-state DFT calculations predict a larger 5f contribution to bonding than is determined experimentally. 30 These findings are discussed in the context of conventional theories of covalent bonding for d- and f-block metal complexes.

Minasian, Stefan G.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Martin, Richard L.; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Shuh, David K.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Yang, Ping

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital

373

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal with CCS Sector. This law

374

Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic monitoring is a technique to seismically image an area utilizing earthquakes originating from distances greater than 1,000 km from the measurement site.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A teleseism is the tremor caused by an earthquake that is very far away. According to the USGS, the term, teleseismic refers to earthquakes that occur more than 1000 km from the measurement site. Often teleseismic events can be picked up only by seismometers that are in low background noise locations; whereas, in general, a tremor of a magnitude 5.3 earthquake can be seen anywhere in the world with modern seismic

375

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

377

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

378

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

379

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored.

380

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

State of Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment - Summary E.L Majer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the

382

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

383

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

384

The retrofitting of existing buildings for seismic criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the process for retrofitting a building for seismic criteria. It explains the need for a new, performance-based design code to provide a range of acceptable building behavior. It then outlines the ...

Besing, Christa, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non-nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized. Some key documents for understanding Japanese seismic design criteria are also listed with brief descriptions. The paper highlights the design criteria to determine the seismic demand and component capacity in comparison with US criteria, the background studies which have led to the current Japanese design criteria, and a survey of current research activities. More detailed technical descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hypercube performance for 2-D seismic finite-difference modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave-equation seismic modeling in two space dimensions is computationally intensive, often requiring hours of supercomputer CPU time to run typical geological models with 500 500 grids and 100 sources. This paper analyzes the performance of ACOUS2D, ...

L. J. Baker

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluation of Horizontal Seismic Hazard of Shahrekord, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents probabilistic horizontal seismic hazard assessment of Shahrekord, Iran. It displays the probabilistic estimate of Peak Ground Horizontal Acceleration (PGHA) for the return period of 75, 225, 475 and 2475 years. The output of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is based on peak ground acceleration (PGA), which is the most common criterion in designing of buildings. A catalogue of seismic events that includes both historical and instrumental events was developed and covers the period from 840 to 2007. The seismic sources that affect the hazard in Shahrekord were identified within the radius of 150 km and the recurrence relationships of these sources were generated. Finally four maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Shahrekord in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines for different hazard levels by using SEISRISK III software.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Iran University of Science and Technology--Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehkordi, M. Raeisi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamali, M. Koohi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.

Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The...

390

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity are diffuse and appear unsuitable for defining the areal extent of the reservoir. However, from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these regions a general discriminant was constructed that combines several physical parameters for identifying the presence of a geothermal system.

Hadley, D.M.; Cavit, D.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF A HIGH- TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR)" Kennedy, R.P. e.t. all. 1975 * NUREGCR-6957, CORRELATION OF ANALYSIS OF JNES SEISMIC WALL PRESSURE DATA FOR ABWR MODEL...

392

Effects of Recent Environmental Changes on Global Seismicity and Volcanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A covariation of recent global environmental changes and seismicity on Earth is demonstrated. Presently, rising concern about anthropogenic activities and their consequences on the cryosphere and environment have always overlooked changes related ...

Evgeny A. Podolskiy

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW 0.385 GW 3.85e-4 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 4 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 9 Geothermal Areas within the Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

394

Applicaiton of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Farhang Ostadan (BNI) & Raman Venkata (DOE-WTP-WED) Presented by Lisa Anderson (BNI) US DOE NPH Workshop October...

395

Design of innovative dynamic systems for seismic response mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rocking wall systems consist of shear walls, laterally connected to a building, that are moment-released in their strong plane. Their purpose is to mitigate seismic structural response by constraining a building primarily ...

Seymour, Douglas (Douglas Benjamin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, BRAZED AND GROOVED PIPE JOINTS Brent Gutierrez, PhD, PE George Antaki, PE, F.ASME DOE NPH Conference October 25-26, 2011 Motivation * Understand the...

397

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

398

Third Quater Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, 16 local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. The largest event (magnitude 2.0) occurred on April 16, 2007 and was located 4 km southwest of the 400 Area in the Columbia River basalts at a depth of approximately 3 km. Stratigraphically, 7 earthquakes occurred in the Columbia River basalts (approximately 0-5 km depth), 1 earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km depth), and 8 earthquakes in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km depth). Geographically, 8 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, and 8 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford SMA network was triggered on the 300 Area and the 400 Area SMA by the 2.0 Mc seismic event that occurred on April 16, 2007. The maximum vertical acceleration was 0.07 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.05% g at the 300 Area SMA, 13.5 km from the event. At the 400 Area SMA, only 5.2 km from the event, the maximum vertical acceleration was 0.25 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.23% g. These are the first recordings of a small local earthquake on the SMA network. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 8 times larger than the peak accelerations observed at the 400 Area and no action was required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

Preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0} - {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} mixing with kaon and charge dipole tags  

SciTech Connect

We report two preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0}- B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing using novel techniques with a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup O} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC. B decay vertices are reconstructed inclusively with a topological technique and the B hadron flavor at production is determined by exploiting the large left-right forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup O} {r_arrow} b {bar b} decays in combination with a jet charge technique. Two methods are used to tag the B flavor at decay. The first uses the charge of kaons attached to the B decay vertex and identified with the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. The second measurement is based on the construction of a charge dipole of the topological vertices to separate the B{sub d}{sup O}/B{sub d}{sup 0} decays by exploiting the B {r_arrow} D cascade charge structure. The measurement of the oscillation frequency yields {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.58 {+-} 0.07(stat){+-}0.08(syst) ps{sup -1} and 0.56 {+-} 0.08(stat){+-}0.04(syst) ps{sup {minus}1} for the kaon and dipole tags respectively.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Preliminary measurement of time-dependent B{sub d}{sup 0}-B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing using topology and charge selected semi-leptonic B decays  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0}-B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing has been measured using a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1995. The analysis identifies the semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p, p{sub t}) leptons and reconstructs the B meson decay length and charge by vertexing the lepton with a partially reconstructed D meson. Vertex charge is used to enrich the selection of neutral over charged B mesons. This method results in a sample of 581 neutral decays with high charge purity. The B candidate is tagged at production with a combined tag that exploits the large polarized b forward-backward asymmetry in conjunction with the opposite hemisphere b jet charge. The final state is tagged by the sign of the high (p, p{sub t}) lepton. From their preliminary analysis the authors find a mass difference between the two B{sub d}{sup 0} mass eigenstates of, {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.452 {+-} 0.074(stat) {+-} 0.049(syst) ps{sup {minus}1}.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experience Based Seismic Verification Guidelines for Overhead Crane Systems: Volume I - Seismic Review Procedure; Volume II - Performance of Overhead Cranes in Strong Motion Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic capability verification of overhead cranes systems at nuclear power plants. The report summarizes seismic experience data from strong-motion earthquakes for these systems and identifies the characteristics of systems that could lead to failure or unacceptable behavior in an earthquake. The seismic experience data show that overhead crane systems exhibit extremely good performance under strong-motion seismic loading, w...

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Seismicity related to geothermal development in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A ten-station seismic network was operated in and around the Dixie Valley area from January 1980 to November 1981; three of these stations are still in operation. Data from the Dixie Valley network were analyzed through 30 Jun 1981, and results of analysis were compared with analysis of somewhat larger events for the period 1970-1979. The seismic cycle in the Western Great Basic, the geologic structural setting, and the instrumentation are also described.

Ryall, A.S.; Vetter, U.R.

1982-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Seismic review of vault for MFTF upgrade project  

SciTech Connect

This letter report was prepared in accordance with the scope of work for the preconceptual seismic evaluation of the (..cap alpha.. + T) Tandem Mirror Fusion Machine concrete vault. The scope of the work was developed with the assistance of the Bechtel site representative Dr. Sunil Ghose. The report contains comments and preconceptual recommendations on wall upgrading for an 150-ton crane installation, concrete vault seismic capability for (..cap alpha.. + T) conditions, and recommendations for future work.

Franklin, H.A.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Virginia Regional Seismic Network. Final report (1986--1992)  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Virginia Regional Seismic Network was one of the few fully calibrated digital seismic networks in the United States. Continued operation has resulted in the archival of signals from 2,000+ local, regional and teleseismic sources. Seismotectonic studies of the central Virginia seismic zone showed the activity in the western part to be related to a large antiformal structure while seismicity in the eastern portion is associated spatially with dike swarms. The eastern Tennessee seismic zone extends over a 300x50 km area and is the result of a compressive stress field acting at the intersection between two large crustal blocks. Hydroseismicity, which proposes a significant role for meteoric water in intraplate seismogenesis, found support in the observation of common cyclicities between streamflow and earthquake strain data. Seismic hazard studies have provided the following results: (1) Damage areas in the eastern United States are three to five times larger than those observed in the west. (2) Judged solely on the basis of cataloged earthquake recurrence rates, the next major shock in the southeast region will probably occur outside the Charleston, South Carolina area. (3) Investigations yielded necessary hazard parameters (for example, maximum magnitudes) for several sites in the southeast. Basic to these investigations was the development and maintenance of several seismological data bases.

Bollinger, G.A.; Sibol, M.S.; Chapman, M.C.; Snoke, J.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US). Seismological Observatory

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Seismic design and evaluation criteria based on target performance goals  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy utilizes deterministic seismic design/evaluation criteria developed to achieve probabilistic performance goals. These seismic design and evaluation criteria are intended to apply equally to the design of new facilities and to the evaluation of existing facilities. In addition, the criteria are intended to cover design and evaluation of buildings, equipment, piping, and other structures. Four separate sets of seismic design/evaluation criteria have been presented each with a different performance goal. In all these criteria, earthquake loading is selected from seismic hazard curves on a probabilistic basis but seismic response evaluation methods and acceptable behavior limits are deterministic approaches with which design engineers are familiar. For analytical evaluations, conservatism has been introduced through the use of conservative inelastic demand-capacity ratios combined with ductile detailing requirements, through the use of minimum specified material strengths and conservative code capacity equations, and through the use of a seismic scale factor. For evaluation by testing or by experience data, conservatism has been introduced through the use of an increase scale factor which is applied to the prescribed design/evaluation input motion.

Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kennedy, R.P. [Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

407

Photon-number tomography and fidelity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scheme of photon-number tomography is discussed in the framework of star-product quantization. The connection of dual quantization scheme and observables is reviewed. The quantizer and dequantizer operators and kernels of star product of tomograms in photon-number tomography scheme and its dual one are presented in explicit form. The fidelity and state purity are discussed in photon{number tomographic scheme, and the expressions for fidelity and purity are obtained in the form of integral of the product of two photon-number tomograms with integral kernel which is presented in explicit form. The properties of quantumness are discussed in terms of inequalities on state photon{number tomograms.

O. V. Man'ko

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

408

A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Improving scintillation crystals using muon tomography  

SciTech Connect

The cosmic ray muon scanning array provides information on NaI(T1) crystals using some 65,536 trajectories, each measuring the NaI(T1) response to high energy muons. With this information, it is possible to use established computer-aided-tomography techniques to deconvolute these integrated responses and produce a detailed picture of the detector's interior.

Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.J.; Sandorfi, A.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Field implementation of geophysical diffraction tomography  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical diffraction tomography is a new technique that shows promise as a tool for quantitative subsurface (below-ground) imaging. The approach being used is based upon the filtered backpropagation algorithm, which is a mathematical extension of the reconstruction software used in conventional X-ray CAT scanners. The difference between this method and existing methods is that the new algorithm rigorously accounts for diffraction effects through an exact inversion of the wave equation. This refinement is necessary in that it admits the use of acoustic and long-wavelength electromagnetic waves, allowing tomography to be taken from the laboratory to the field. ORNL's effort in geophysical diffraction tomography involves reducing the filtered backpropagation algorithm to practice. This requires the design and construction of field instrumentation as well as the development of an improved algorithm. The original algorithm requires the imaged region to be illuminated by plane waves. This requirement simplifies the algorithm but complicates its field implementation in that plane waves are difficult to generate. Consequently, ORNL has been working to generalize the filtered backpropagation algorithm to allow a broader range of incoming wave fields which can more easily be realized in the field. The instrumentation aspects involve the selection of appropriate sonic sources and receivers along with the development of a state-of-art, portable, computer-controlled, multichannel data acquisition system. 5 references, 6 figures.

Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the sites seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012) 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2011 - 2012 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Map hydraulic structure within the field from seismic data Notes 2011: 16 years of seismicity were analyzed to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated since the 1980's. 2012: 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field were relocated using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for

414

Azimuthal variation of radiation of seismic energy from cast blasts  

SciTech Connect

As part of a series of seismic experiments designed to improve the understanding of the impact of mining blasts on verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a sixteen station network of three-component seismic sensors were deployed around a large cast shot in the Black Thunder Mine. The seismic stations were placed, where possible, at a range of 2.5 kilometers with a constant inter-station spacing of 22.5 degrees. All of the data were recorded with the seismometers oriented such that the radial component pointed to the middle point of the approximately 2 kilometer long shot. High quality data were recorded at each station. Data were scaled to a range of 2.5 kilometers and the sum of the absolute value of the vertical, radial, and transverse channels computed. These observations were used to construct radiation patterns of the seismic energy propagating from the cast shot. It is obvious that cast shots do not radiate seismic energy isotropically. Most of the vertical motion occurs behind the highwall while radial and transverse components of motion are enhanced in directions parallel to the highwall. These findings have implications for local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and possibly for regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic observations of cast blasting. Locally, it could be argued that peak particle velocities could be scaled not only by range but also by azimuthal direction from the shot. This result implies that long term planning of pit orientation relative to sensitive structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local radiation pattern may be important in determining the magnitude of large scale cast blasts. Improving the transparency of mining operations to international seismic monitoring systems may be possible with similar considerations.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Martin, R.L. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Computing traveltime and amplitude sensitivity kernels in finite-frequency tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficient computation of finite-frequency traveltime and amplitude sensitivity kernels for velocity and attenuation perturbations in global seismic tomography poses problems both of numerical precision and of validity of the paraxial approximation used. We investigate these aspects, using a local model parameterization in the form of a tetrahedral grid with linear interpolation in between grid nodes. The matrix coefficients of the linear inverse problem involve a volume integral of the product of the finite-frequency kernel with the basis functions that represent the linear interpolation. We use local and global tests as well as analytical expressions to test the numerical precision of the frequency and spatial quadrature. There is a trade-off between narrowing the bandpass filter and quadrature accuracy and efficiency. Using a minimum step size of 10 km for S waves and 30 km for SS waves, relative errors in the quadrature are of the order of 1% for direct waves such as S, and a few percent for SS waves, which are below data uncertainties in delay time or amplitude anomaly observations in global seismology. Larger errors may occur wherever the sensitivity extends over a large volume and the paraxial approximation breaks down at large distance from the ray. This is especially noticeable for minimax phases such as SS waves with periods >20 s, when kernels become hyperbolic near the reflection point and appreciable sensitivity extends over thousands of km. Errors becomes intolerable at epicentral distance near the antipode when sensitivity extends over all azimuths in the mantle. Effects of such errors may become noticeable at epicentral distances > 140{sup o}. We conclude that the paraxial approximation offers an efficient method for computing the matrix system for finite-frequency inversions in global tomography, though care should be taken near reflection points, and alternative methods are needed to compute sensitivity near the antipode.

Tian Yue [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: ytian@princeton.edu; Montelli, Raffaella [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, P.O. Box 22189, GW03-940A, Houston, TX 77252-2189 (United States); Nolet, Guust; Dahlen, F.A. [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Recent Advances in Atom Probe Tomography for Microstructural ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-situ Ultra Fast Micro-tomography for Material Characterization In situ Characterization of Surfaces and Buried Interfaces Using Total Reflection Inelastic...

417

The Application of Atom Probe Tomography to Oxide-Dispersion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels ... Investigation of the Microstructure-Property-Processing Relationships in a Series of...

418

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography - Energy Innovation ...  

Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data. Skip to Content. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies ...

419

Minimally invasive diagnostic imaging using high resolution Optical Coherence Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in medical imaging have given researchers unprecedented capabilities to visualize, characterize and understand biological systems. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high speed, high resolution imaging technique ...

Herz, Paul Richard, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Seismic response analyses for reactor facilities at Savannah River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactor facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were designed during the 1950's. The original seismic criteria defining the input ground motion was 0.1 G with UBC (uniform building code) provisions used to evaluate structural seismic loads. Later ground motion criteria have defined the free field seismic motion with a 0.2 G ZPA (free field acceleration) and various spectral shapes. The spectral shapes have included the Housner spectra, a site specific spectra, and the US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) Reg. Guide 1.60 shape. The development of these free field seismic criteria are discussed in the paper. The more recent seismic analyses have been of the following type: fixed base response spectra, frequency independent lumped parameter soil/structure interaction (SSI), frequency dependent lumped parameter SSI, and current state of the art analyses using computer codes such as SASSI. The results from these computations consist of structural loads and floor response spectra (used for piping and equipment qualification). These results are compared in the paper and the methods used to validate the results are discussed. 14 refs., 11 figs.

Miller, C.A. Costantino, C.J. (City Univ. of New York, NY (USA)); Xu, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Seismic Hazard Assessment of Tehran Based on Arias Intensity  

SciTech Connect

In this paper probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of Tehran for Arias intensity parameter is done. Tehran is capital and most populated city of Iran. From economical, political and social points of view, Tehran is the most significant city of Iran. Since in the previous centuries, catastrophic earthquakes have occurred in Tehran and its vicinity, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of this city for Arias intensity parameter is useful. Iso-intensity contour lines maps of Tehran on the basis of different attenuation relationships for different earthquake periods are plotted. Maps of iso-intensity points in the Tehran region are presented using proportional attenuation relationships for rock and soil beds for 2 hazard levels of 10% and 2% in 50 years. Seismicity parameters on the basis of historical and instrumental earthquakes for a time period that initiate from 4th century BC and ends in the present time are calculated using Tow methods. For calculation of seismicity parameters, the earthquake catalogue with a radius of 200 km around Tehran has been used. SEISRISKIII Software has been employed. Effects of different parameters such as seismicity parameters, length of fault rupture relationships and attenuation relationships are considered using Logic Tree.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Center of Excellence for Fundamental Studies in Structural Engineering, College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoodi, H. [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

THE THERMAL SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH TOMOGRAPHY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect directly measures the thermal pressure of free electrons integrated along the line of sight and thus contains valuable information on the thermal history of the universe. However, the redshift information is entangled in the projection along the line of sight. This projection effect severely degrades the power of the tSZ effect to reconstruct the thermal history. We investigate the tSZ tomography technique to recover this otherwise lost redshift information by cross-correlating the tSZ effect with galaxies of known redshifts, or alternatively with matter distribution reconstructed from weak-lensing tomography. We investigate in detail the three-dimensional distribution of the gas thermal pressure and its relation with the matter distribution, through our adiabatic hydrodynamic simulation and the one with additional gastrophysics including radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. (1) We find a strong correlation between the gas pressure and matter distribution, with a typical cross-correlation coefficient r {approx}> 0.7 at k {approx}tight correlation will enable robust cross-correlation measurement between SZ surveys such as Planck, ACT, and SPT and lensing surveys such as DES and LSST, at {approx}>20{sigma}-100{sigma} level. (2) We propose a tomography technique to convert the measured cross-correlation into the contribution from gas in each redshift bin to the tSZ power spectrum. Uncertainties in gastrophysics may affect the reconstruction at {approx}2% level, due to the {approx}1% impact of gastrophysics on r found in our simulations. However, we find that the same gastrophysics affects the tSZ power spectrum at {approx}40% level, so it is robust to infer the gastrophysics from the reconstructed redshift-resolved contribution.

Shao Jiawei; Zhang Pengjie; Lin Weipeng; Jing Yipeng, E-mail: jwshao@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

424

Seismic Hazard Characterization at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS): Status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Seismic Hazard Characterization project for the Savannah River Site (SRS-SHC) is to develop estimates of the seismic hazard for several locations within the SRS. Given the differences in the geology and geotechnical characteristics at each location, the estimates of the seismic hazard are to allow for the specific local conditions at each site. Characterization of seismic hazard is a critical factor for the design of new facilities as well as for the review and potential retrofit of existing facilities at SRS. The scope of the SRS seismic hazard characterization reported in this document is limited to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The goal of the project is to provide seismic hazard estimates based on a state-of-the-art method which is consistent with developments and findings of several ongoing studies which are deemed to bring improvements in the state of the seismic hazard analyses.

Savy, J.B.

1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Induced seismicity analysis for reservoir characterization at a petroleum field in Oman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the analysis and interpretation of passive seismic data collected in a 20-month monitoring period. The investigation is divided into four studies, each focusing on a different aspect of the seismic ...

Sze, Edmond Kin-Man

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

427

A Natural Seismic Isolating System: The Buried Mangrove Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Belleplaine test site, located in the island of Guadeloupe (French Lesser Antilles) includes a three-accelerometer vertical array, designed for liquefac- tion studies. The seismic response of the soil column at the test site is computed using three methods: the spectral ratio method using the vertical array data, a numerical method using the geotechnical properties of the soil column, and an operative fre- quency domain decomposition (FDD) modal analysis method. The Belleplaine test site is characterized by a mangrove layer overlaid by a stiff sandy deposit. This con- figuration is widely found at the border coast of the Caribbean region, which is exposed to high seismic hazard. We show that the buried mangrove layer plays the role of an isolation system equivalent to those usually employed in earthquake engineering aimed at reducing the seismic shear forces by reducing the internal stress within the structure. In our case, the flexibility of the mangrove layer reduces the distortion and the stress in the...

Gueguen, Philippe; Foray, Pierre; Rousseau, Christophe; Maury, Julie; 10.1785/0120100129

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Direct-Current Resistivity At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Central Nevada Seismic At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

429

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk (SAFER)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Analysis of Facilities Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Michael Salmon, LANL Larry, Goen, LANL Voice: 505-665-7244 Fax: 505-665-2897 salmon@lanl.gov 10/22/2008 p. 2, LA-UR 11-06024 Purpose * To discuss LANLs implementation of SAFER and lessons learned * Background * Results * Lessons learned 10/22/2008 p. 3, LA-UR 11-06024 SAFER Project * Project Mission - Conduct quantitative evaluation of seismic risk due to operations of Nuclear and High Hazard (DSA) Facilities at LANL operating under a Documented Safety Analysis/Safety Evaluation Report - and Non-nuclear (BOP) Facilities operating under E.O. 12941. 10/22/2008 p. 4, LA-UR 11-06024 Composition * SAFER comprised of two major efforts: - Non-nuclear Facilities termed "Balance of Plant" (BOP) Facilities

430

Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Authors Thomas M. Daley, Ernest L. Majer, Roland Gritto and Jerry M. Harris Conference 70th Annual International Meeting of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Expanded Abstracts; N/A; 2000/01/01 Published N/A, 2000 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Citation

431

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New

432

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401370"

433

Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden"

434

Effects of core barrel on vessel seismic loadings. [LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliability of reactor systems under seismic events is a major concern for the safety of the nuclear power plants. This paper deals with the effects of the core barrel on the seismic response of reactor tanks. The main emphases are the effects of core barrel on the free-surface wave height and the fluid coupling effects between the core barrel and primary tank. This study represents an initial step to investigate the effects of in-tank components, structures on the seismically-induced hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor tanks. To simplify the analysis, the tank used in the study is simulated by a two-dimensional model. Two parametric studies were carried out in which the wall flexibility and location of core barrel were used as parameters respectively.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

436

Program on Technology Innovation: Effect of Seismic Wave Incoherence on Foundation and Building Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task S2.1 of the New Plant Seismic Issues Resolution Programa joint effort of EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE)entails a research program into the effect of seismic wave incoherence on foundation and building response. The tasks objective is to systematically study seismic wave incoherence effects on structures/foundations similar to those being considered for advanced reactor designs. Seismic wave incoherence occurs because of horizontal spatial variation of both horizontal and vertical ground mot...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Project Plan: Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan outlines the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities (CEUS SSC) Project, which will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986. The objective of the CEUS SSC project is to develop an up-to-date assessment of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) SSC for CEUS. Input to a PSHA consists of both seismic source and ground motion characterization. These two components ...

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect

Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-dependent seismic tomography" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

443

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Error matrix in quantum process tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss characterization of experimental quantum gates by the error matrix, which is similar to the standard process matrix $\\chi$ in the Pauli basis, except the desired unitary operation is factored out, by formally placing it either before or after the error process. The error matrix has only one large element, which is equal to the process fidelity, while other elements are small and indicate imperfections. The imaginary parts of the elements along the left column and/or top row directly indicate the unitary imperfection and can be used to find the needed correction. We discuss a relatively simple way to calculate the error matrix for a composition of quantum gates. Similarly, it is rather straightforward to find the first-order contribution to the error matrix due to the Lindblad-form decoherence. We also discuss a way to identify and subtract the tomography procedure errors due to imperfect state preparation and measurement. In appendices we consider several simple examples of the process tomography and also discuss an intuitive physical interpretation of the Lindblad-form decoherence.

Alexander N. Korotkov

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

Seismic signal location program for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's dry hot rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During hydraulic fracturing, seismic signals produced as the fracture grows may be used to determine orientation, size, and shape of the fracture. This seismic signal location program has been written to utilize such signals, along with an experimentally determined seismic velocity model to help determine the fracture orientation, size, and shape.

Kintzinger, P.R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Guideline for the Seismic Technical Evaluation of Replacement Items for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques for reasonably assuring that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements. Meeting such requirements is necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. The guideline also offers a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Non-extensive statistical analysis of seismicity in the area of Javakheti, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of earthquake magnitudes in the Javakheti highlands was analyzed using a non-extensive statistical approach. The earthquakes occurring from 1960 to 2008 in this seismically active area of Southern Caucasus were investigated. The seismic ... Keywords: Dynamics, Energy density characteristic, Modified frequency-magnitude relationship, Non-extensivity parameter, Seismicity, Time series

T. Matcharashvili; T. Chelidze; Z. Javakhishvili; N. Jorjiashvili; U. Fra Paleo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Delivery Massager: A tool for propagating seismic inversion information into reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a new open-source program for transforming inversion data from the open-source Delivery seismic inversion software to industry-standard cornerpoint grid formats suitable for reservoir modelling and flow simulations. The seismic inversion ... Keywords: Bayesian, Cornerpoint grid, Downscaling, Geostatistics, Inversion, Open-source, Seismic, Shared earth model, Stochastic

James Gunning; Michael E. Glinsky; Chris White

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

Polly, David

453

Dynamic Inversion for Hydrological Process Monitoring with Electrical Resistance Tomography Under Model Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water content using electrical resistivity tomography, WaterJ. Nitao (1992), Electrical resistivity tomography of vadoseinverse model for electrical resistivity surveys and its

Lehikoinen, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Benchmark hydrogeophysical data from a physical seismic model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical fluid flow models are used regularly to predict and analyze porous media flow but require verification against natural systems. Seismic monitoring in a controlled laboratory setting at a nominal scale of 1:1000 in the acoustic frequency range ... Keywords: Gassmann, Hertz-Mindlin, Saturation, Sensors, Soil

Juan M. Lorenzo; David E. Smolkin; Christopher White; Shannon R. Chollett; Ting Sun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Long term study of the seismic environment at LIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO experiment aims to detect and study gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometry. A critical factor to the performance of the interferometers, and a major consideration in the design of possible future upgrades, is isolation of the interferometer optics from seismic noise. We present the results of a detailed program of measurements of the seismic environment surrounding the LIGO interferometers. We describe the experimental configuration used to collect the data, which was acquired over a 613 day period. The measurements focused on the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, in which the secondary microseismic peak and noise due to human activity in the vicinity of the detectors was found to be particularly critical to interferometer performance. We compare the statistical distribution of the data sets from the two interferometer sites, construct amplitude spectral densities of seismic noise amplitude fluctuations with periods of up to 3 months, and analyze the data for any long term trends in the amplitude of seismic noise in this critical frequency range.

E. J. Daw; J. A. Giaime; D. Lormand; M. Lubinski; J. Zweizig

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

Evaluation of seismic capacity of glovebox windows using deformation tests  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing emphasis on worker safety, gloveboxes are being relied upon in Safety Analyses to be a confinement boundary. Many of the accident scenarios result in a requirement that these gloveboxes be seismically qualified. Since there is currently no validated experience data category for gloveboxes, the qualification has generally been done by analysis. The weak link in assuring confinement integrity by analysis is in characterizing the glass and glass-to-glovebox seal in the analytical models. engineering judgement as to whether the windows will survive a seismic event based on total calculated deflection at the window. Most often the windows are assumed to lose their confinement capability during an earthquake. A quantitative basis is needed in order to evaluate the seismic capacity of these windows. A series of deformation tests are being performed at the Savannah River Site on glovebox mock-ups. This paper presents the results of the first two of these tests, including displacement profiles and leak rate data. Methods for using this data for evaluating the windows for seismic loads are proposed.

Hargett, S.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Seismic wave propagation in cracked porous media Tim Pointer,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pi plays an important role. There is much higher attenuation and dispersion for gas (which is more, as for PARTIAL ALIGN, there is no velocity dispersion; there is also increased P and SV attenuation as the gas in there is high attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Fluid £ow may be on either a wavelength scale

Edinburgh, University of

458

Neotectonics and seismicity of the Clearlake region in northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, topographic, and seismic methods were used to locate faults in the vicinity of Clearlake in northern California. The geological method, which seeks faults as discontinuities in the lithotope, found faults in the Tertiary-Cretaceous rocks east of Burns Valley. The topographic method, which is used to produce Fault Evaluation Reports, found a very active fault zone, the Konocti Bay fault zone, south of Highlands arm. It also found some active faults north of Highlands arm, in the eastern part of Burns Valley and on the lakeshore near Oak Park. The seismic method is the most enduring of the three methods but is limited by location accuracy; the results improve as monitoring continues because of increases in the density of events and improvements in the crustal velocity model. The seismic method identified faulting along the valley at Borax Lake and possibly also on a line running northeast from the city of Clearlake. The latter may be associated with the Burns Valley fault or with the line of scoria domes which runs parallel to it. Seismic observations over longer periods at higher resolution will be required in order to determine the location of active faults near the city. 47 refs., 13 figs.

Burns, K.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Seismic imaging for velocity and attenuation structure in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have applied the attenuation inversion technique developed by Evans and Zucca (1988) to a seismic tomographic data set taken at Newberry Volcano by Achauer et al. (1988). Our preliminary results suggest that the interpretation of the velocity data by Achauer et al. that a magma chamber is present 3 km beneath the caldera is not confirmed by the attenuation data.

Zucca, J.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Evans, J.R. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

EVALUATION OF MODAL COMBINATION METHODS FOR SEISMIC RESPONSE SPECTRUM ANALYSIS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory Guide 1.92 ''Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'' was last revised in 1976. The objective of this project was to re-evaluate the current regulatory guidance for combining modal responses in response spectrum analysis, evaluate recent technical developments, and recommend revisions to the regulatory guidance. This paper describes the qualitative evaluation of modal response combination methods.

MORANTE,R.

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z