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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Graph Algorithms Tours in Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminates only at y. Graph Algorithms 14 #12;Combining the Main and the Secondary Cycles Let C = (x a secondary cycle C starting with y. - Combine the cycles C and C into C. Return the cycle C. Graph AlgorithGraph Algorithms Tours in Graphs Graph Algorithms #12;Special Paths and Cycles in Graphs Euler Path

Bar-Noy, Amotz

2

Graphs, Trees Pebbles, Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphs, Trees Pebbles, Robots 1 #12;Outline I. Robot Arms. II. Rigid Graphs. III. Characterizations. Applications: (a) Rigid Components. 2 #12;I. Robot arms and the Carpenter's Rule Problem. Can a robot arm

Haas, Ruth

3

Hyperbolic Graph Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks representing many complex systems in nature and society share some common structural properties like heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering. Recent research on network geometry has shown that those real networks can be adequately modeled as random geometric graphs in hyperbolic spaces. In this paper, we present a computer program to generate such graphs. Besides real-world-like networks, the program can generate random graphs from other well-known graph ensembles, such as the soft configuration model, random geometric graphs on a circle, or Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs. The simulations show a good match between the expected values of different network structural properties and the corresponding empirical values measured in generated graphs, confirming the accurate behavior of the program.

Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Krioukov, Dmitri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs Romain Boulet 10 Dec 2009 Abstract- cyclic graphs. An odd (resp. even) sun is a graph obtained by appending a pendant vertex to each vertex of an odd (resp. even) cycle. A broken sun is a graph obtained by deleting pendant vertices of a sun

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

5

The Hanford Story: Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This second chapter of The Hanford Story explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use.

6

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to determine a general groundwater protection strategy and groundwater quality standards for the state, to be approved by...

7

Convex Graph Invariants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 2, 2010 ... where A represents the adjacency matrix of a graph, and the maximum is taken over all ...... SDPT3 - a MATLAB software package for.

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Graph Generator Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

Lothian, Josh [ORNL; Powers, Sarah S [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Baker, Matthew B [ORNL; Schrock, Jonathan [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Graphs associated with semigroups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the empty graph is not td d t b pl t . A ~b* h 1 g ph G graph having all of its vertices and edges in G. The citations on the following pages follow the style f th ~fdt f th A t M th tt 1 ~S1 t A path is a sequence of distinct vertices, V , V... , . . . , V n' where V and V are adjacent for i 1, 2, . . . , n-l. If there exists a path between two vertices, the pair is said to be connected. A connected ~ra h is a graph in which every pair of vertices is joined by a path. The empty graph...

Baber, Stephen Asa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

Graph concatenation for quantum codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the ...

Beigi, Salman

11

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

12

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

13

13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bioaugmentation of Groundwater ............................ 2589 5 Intrinsic Bioremediation and Modeling attenuation. 1 Introduction A patent for in situ bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with gasoline13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation T. C. Hazen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley

Hazen, Terry

14

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater Protection Plans (GPPs) are required for all facilities having the potential to impact groundwater. They are “preventive maintenance” documents that cover all processes and materials at...

15

Querying graphs with data   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graph data is becoming more and more pervasive. Indeed, services such as Social Networks or the Semantic Web can no longer rely on the traditional relational model, as its structure is somewhat too rigid for the applications ...

Vrgoc, Domagoj

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Graph Concatenation for Quantum Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code, and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the construction of good quantum codes of relatively large block length, concatenated quantum codes and their generalizations play an important role. We develop a systematic method for constructing concatenated quantum codes based on "graph concatenation", where graphs representing the inner and outer codes are concatenated via a simple graph operation called "generalized local complementation." Our method applies to both binary and non-binary concatenated quantum codes as well as their generalizations.

Salman Beigi; Isaac Chuang; Markus Grassl; Peter Shor; Bei Zeng

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

Groundwater in the Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The importance of conservation 7 What is Groundwater? The Hydrologic Cycle 8 Groundwater flow patterns 9 Saturated and unsaturated zones 9 Aquifers 10 Sole source aquifers 10 Water wells 12 Groundwater Quality Contamination and pollution, measuring... The High Plains Aquifer 22 Population served by groundwater 23 Competing uses for a limited resource 23 Groundwater declines 24 Contamination and Health Issues Water Testing 26 Regulatory Standards, Treatment Options 27 Table of Contents 3 Public...

Jensen, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Graph dynamics : learning and representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphs are often used in artificial intelligence as means for symbolic knowledge representation. A graph is nothing more than a collection of symbols connected to each other in some fashion. For example, in computer vision ...

Ribeiro, Andre Figueiredo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Densities in graphs and matroids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

|E(H)| |V (H)|?1 ? |E(T)| |V (T)|?1 = 1 for all non-trivial subgraphs of T. In general, a balanced graph G is a graph such that |E(H)| |V (H)| ? |E(G)| |V (G)| and a 1-balanced graph is a graph such that |E(H)| |V (H)|?1 ? |E(G)| |V (G)|?1 for all non...

Kannan, Lavanya

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cliques in graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cliques in Graphs Siu Lun Allan Lo Christ’s College University of Cambridge A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 2010 Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work...

Lo, Allan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can ...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

23

Buying, Selling and Exporting Groundwater: Implications for Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Sales/ Lease Agreement, by Sandra Burns. Regulation of Exportation of Underground Water, by Doug Caroom. Roberts County Transportation Permits, by C.E. Williams. Export Fees: A Groundwater District Limits and Uses, by Jace Houston. The report also... in Texas, by Ronald Kaiser. Groundwater Transactions: Buyers Perspective, by Russell Johnson. Purchasing Groundwater for Export: The Kinney County Proposal, by Lynn Sherman. Model Lease of Groundwater Rights, by Ned Meister. Protecting Your Land and Water...

Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce A.; Silvey, Valeen

24

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

25

Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

26

Georgia Groundwater Use Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Georgia Groundwater Use Act is to establish procedures to be followed to obtain a permit to withdraw, obtain or utilize groundwater and for the submission of information...

27

Extremal Graph Numbers of Graphs on Few May 4, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremal Graph Numbers of Graphs on Few Vertices John Kim May 4, 2012 1 Introduction Let H this number to be the extremal graph number of H on n vertices, and we denote it by ex(n, H). When H(n, K3) n 2 2 . A precise formula for ex(n, K3) is given by: ex(n, K3) = n 2 n + 1 2 . The extremal

Zeilberger, Doron

28

Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

How to Resum Feynman Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we reformulate in a simpler way the combinatoric core of constructive quantum field theory We define universal rational combinatoric weights for pairs made of a graph and one of its spanning trees. These weights are nothing but the percentage of Hepp's sectors in which the tree is leading the ultraviolet analysis. We explain how they allow to reshuffle the divergent series formulated in terms of Feynman graphs into convergent series indexed by the trees that these graphs contain. The Feynman graphs to be used are not the ordinary ones but those of the intermediate field representation, and the result of the reshuffling is called the Loop Vertex Expansion.

Vincent Rivasseau; Zhituo Wang

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

30

Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- D-Area Groundwater Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report...

31

Graph/Network Visualization Data model: graph structures (relations,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of physics #12;8 The Spring Model Using springs to represent node-node relations. Minimizing energy1 1 Graph/Network Visualization Data model: graph structures (relations, knowledge) and networks hierarchies #12;7 Sugiyama : Building Hierarchy Domain knowledge based. Designing heuristic, e.g. minimizing

Fang, Shiaofen

32

Contraction semigroups on metric graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of the present work is to study contraction semigroups generated by Laplace operators on metric graphs, which are not necessarily self-adjoint. We prove criteria for such semigroups to be continuity and positivity preserving. Also we provide a characterization of generators of Feller semigroups on metric graphs.

Vadim Kostrykin; Jurgen Potthoff; Robert Schrader

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Phylogenetic Toric Varieties on Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define the phylogenetic model of a trivalent graph as a generalization of a binary symmetric model of a trivalent phylogenetic tree. If the underlining graph is a tree, the model has a parametrization that can be expressed in terms of the tree...

Buczynska, Weronika J.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

35

Groundwater monitoring system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

CE 473/573 Groundwater Course information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Groundwater modeling 4.1. Introduction to finite-difference models 4.2. Models of groundwater flow 4.3. ModelsCE 473/573 Groundwater Fall 2011 Course information Instructor: Prof. Chris Rehmann rehmann of water and contaminants in groundwater systems to solve problems of groundwater resource evaluation

Rehmann, Chris

37

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Questions about Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) are being created in many parts of Texas to allow local citizens to manage and protect their groundwater. This publication answers frequently asked questions about groundwater and GCDs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Silvy, Valeen

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

Harvey, Charles

40

Groundwater Recharge Simulator M. Tech. Thesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Groundwater Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.4 Groundwater Modelling System(GMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 1.5 Chapter Reservoir/Lake Modelling 44 3.1 Lake and Groundwater Interaction

Sohoni, Milind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Contractions of planar graphs in polynomial time?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contractions of planar graphs in polynomial time? Marcin Kami´nski??1 , Dani¨el Paulusma2 that for every graph H, there exists a polyno- mial-time algorithm deciding if a planar graph can be contracted to H. We introduce contractions and topological minors of embedded (plane) graphs and show that a plane

Dimitrios, Thilikos

42

Extremal Graph Problems, Degenerate Extremal Problems,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremal Graph Problems, Degenerate Extremal Problems, and Supersaturated Graphs Mikl´os Simonovits´an-type extremal problem. The graphs attaining the maximum will be called extremal and their family will be denoted and multi- ple edges. In 1940, P. Tur´an posed and solved the extremal problem of Kp+1, the complete graph

Simonovits, MiklĂłs

43

Groundwater Discharge Permit and Registration (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Groundwater Discharge Permitting and Registration Program seeks to protect groundwater quality by establishing standards, criteria, and procedures for wastewater discharges. The program...

44

Virasoro Representations on Fusion Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For any non-unitary model with central charge c(2,q) the path spaces associated to a certain fusion graph are isomorphic to the irreducible Virasoro highest weight modules.

J. Kellendonk; A. Recknagel

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Standards for graph algorithm primitives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is our view that the state of the art in constructing a large collection of graph algorithms in terms of linear algebraic operations is mature enough to support the emergence of a standard set of primitive building ...

Mattson, Tim

46

Doing time : inducing temporal graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of constructing a directed acyclic graph that encodes temporal relations found in a text. The unit of our analysis is a temporal segment, a fragment of text that maintains temporal coherence. The ...

Bramsen, Philip James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Graph anomalies in cyber communications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

Vander Wiel, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandine, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisk, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Groundwater protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a ``Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan`` (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as decision variables. Groundwater flow and particle-tracking models MODFLOW and MODPATH and a GO tool GLOBE; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem, the simulation is carried out with available groundwater models for flow and transport, and the op- timization

Neumaier, Arnold

50

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation Steven Noel Center a framework for managing network attack graph complexity through interactive visualization, which includes hierarchical aggregation of graph elements. Aggregation collapses non-overlapping subgraphs of the attack graph

Noel, Steven

54

Data collection for groundwater study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supporting data for a recent groundwater study at Fermilab are collected together in one document, and are described in the context of how they were obtained and how they were used in the study.

Wehmann, A.A.; Malensek, A.J.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

 Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the State of Illinois to restore, protect, and enhance the groundwaters of the State, as a natural and public resource. The State recognizes the essential and pervasive role of...

56

Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T. (University of New Mexico)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Optimization in Geometric Graphs: Complexity and Approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider several related problems arising in geometric graphs. In particular, we investigate the computational complexity and approximability properties of several optimization problems in unit ball graphs and develop algorithms to find exact...

Kahruman-Anderoglu, Sera

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

A discrete curvature on a planar graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a planar graph derived from a spherical, euclidean or hyperbolic tessellation, one can define a discrete curvature by combinatorial properties, which after embedding the graph in a compact 2d-manifold, becomes the Gaussian curvature.

M. Lorente

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Percolation in the Secrecy Graph Amites Sarkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Percolation in the Secrecy Graph Amites Sarkar Martin Haenggi July 8, 2011 Abstract Secrecy graphs. Department of Mathematics, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA. Email: amites.sarkar

Sarkar, Amites

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evan Marshall Trevathan Admissible SC-Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evan Marshall Trevathan Admissible SC-Graphs Page 1 Admissible SC-Graphs Define: ( , )G ( 2)nB n ( 4)nD n ( 6,7,8)nE n 4F 2G 2H 3H #12;Evan Marshall Trevathan Admissible SC-Graphs Page 2 the form of a #12;Evan Marshall Trevathan Admissible SC-Graphs Page 3 "loop", like ,with no other

Donnelly, Rob

62

Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NLS ground states on graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the existence of ground states for the subcritical NLS energy on metric graphs. In particular, we find out a topological assumption that guarantees the nonexistence of ground states, and give an example in which the assumption is not fulfilled and ground states actually exist. In order to obtain the result, we introduce a new rearrangement technique, adapted to the graph where it applies. Owing to such a technique, the energy level of the rearranged function is improved by conveniently mixing the symmetric and monotone rearrangement procedures.

Riccardo Adami; Enrico Serra; Paolo Tilli

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

A heuristic algorithm for graph isomorphism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polynomial time algorithm O(n?), ISO-MT, that seems' to solve the graph isomorphism decision problem correctly for all classes of graphs. Our algorithm is extremely useful from the practical point of view since counter examples (pairs of graphs for which our...

Torres Navarro, Luz

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

THE TUKEY ORDER FOR GRAPHS 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE TUKEY ORDER FOR GRAPHS 1. Introduction Given a graph G, we let VG stand for the vertex set of G. For graphs G without isolated vertices, the Tukey order can be characterized thus: () G H iff there exist) is called a (generalized) Galois-Tukey connection (abbreviated GT-connection) from R to S if the following

Nyikos, Peter J.

66

Bikini Atoll groundwater development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work.

Peterson, F.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Generalized Graph States Based on Hadamard Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graph states are widely used in quantum information theory, including entanglement theory, quantum error correction, and one-way quantum computing. Graph states have a nice structure related to a certain graph, which is given by either a stabilizer group or an encoding circuit, both can be directly given by the graph. To generalize graph states, whose stabilizer groups are abelian subgroups of the Pauli group, one approach taken is to study non-abelian stabilizers. In this work, we propose to generalize graph states based on the encoding circuit, which is completely determined by the graph and a Hadamard matrix. We study the entanglement structures of these generalized graph states, and show that they are all maximally mixed locally. We also explore the relationship between the equivalence of Hadamard matrices and local equivalence of the corresponding generalized graph states. This leads to a natural generalization of the Pauli $(X,Z)$ pairs, which characterizes the local symmetries of these generalized graph states. Our approach is also naturally generalized to construct graph quantum codes which are beyond stabilizer codes.

Shawn X Cui; Nengkun Yu; Bei Zeng

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

68

Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

Schild, Aaron V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Acyclic Coloring of Graphs of Maximum Degree Five: Nine Colors are Enough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphs with "large" girth [BKW99], 1-planar graphs [BKRS01], outerplanar graphs (see for instance [Sop97

Boyer, Edmond

70

EuroComb 2005 DMTCS proc. AE, 2005, 389396 Acyclic Coloring of Graphs of Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for several families F of graphs such as planar graphs [Bor79], planar graphs with "large" girth [BKW99], 1

Fertin, Guillaume

71

Acyclic Coloring of Graphs of Maximum Degree Five: Nine Colors are Enough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphs with ``large'' girth [BKW99], 1­planar graphs [BKRS01], outerplanar graphs (see for instance [Sop

Fertin, Guillaume

72

Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the water quality monitoring data obtained by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1998. The Bear Creek Regime contains many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program - require evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality near the Y-12 Plant to: (1) gauge groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by plant operations, (2) determine the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the figures (maps and trend graphs) and data tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Groundwater is not a Common-Pool resource: Ordering sustainability issues of groundwater use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-economic modeling Introduction Groundwater interaction with surface water bodies and dependent ecosystems of conclusions and recommendations of some economic models or social sciences approaches regarding groundwaterGroundwater is not a Common-Pool resource: Ordering sustainability issues of groundwater use

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lamplighter groups, de Bruijn graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the infinite family of spider-web graphs $S_{k,M,N }$, $k \\geq 2$, $M \\geq 1$ and $N \\geq 0$, studied in physical literature as tensor products of well-known de Brujin graphs $B_{k,N}$ and cyclic graphs $C_M$ and show that these graphs are Schreier graphs of the lamplighter groups $L_k = Z/kZ \\wr Z$. This allows us to compute their spectra and to identify the infinite limit of $S_{k,M,N}$, as $N, M \\to\\infty$, with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group $L_k$.

Rostislav Grigorchuk; Paul-Henry Leemann; Tatiana Nagnibeda

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

76

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

Groundwater Pollution David W. Watkins, Jr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II 21 Mor 2003/10/14 page 391 i i i i i i i i Chapter 21 Groundwater Pollution Control David W pollution has resulted from the use of agricultural chemicals, and localized pollution has resulted from is frequently used to address groundwater pollution problems. In par- ticular, numerical groundwater simulation

Morton, David

78

GROUNDWATER FLOW MODELS C. P. Kumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Uttaranchal) 1.0 INTRODUCTION The use of groundwater models is prevalent in the field of environmental scienceGROUNDWATER FLOW MODELS C. P. Kumar Scientist `E1' National Institute of Hydrology Roorkee ­ 247667, groundwater models are being applied to predict the transport of contaminants for risk evaluation. In general

Kumar, C.P.

79

CE 473/573 Groundwater Course information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reactive and reactive contaminants 4. Groundwater modeling 4.1. Introduction to finite-difference models 4.2. Models of groundwater flow 4.3. Models of contaminant transport 4.4. Available models #12;Recommended textbooks FetterCE 473/573 Groundwater Fall 2009 Course information Instructor: Prof. Chris Rehmann rehmann

Rehmann, Chris

80

Nuclear reactor multiphysics via bond graph formalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling nuclear reactor multiphysics problems using bond graphs. Conventional multiphysics simulation paradigms normally use operator splitting, which treats the ...

Sosnovsky, Eugeny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Generating Reports & Graphs in Portfolio Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on how to generate reports and graphs in Portfolio Manager.

82

Hamilton Decompositions of Graphs with Primitive Complements .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A graph G is a pair (V, E) where V is the set of vertices(or nodes) and E is the set of edges connecting the… (more)

OZKAN, SIBEL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Graph algorithms in the titan toolkit.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graph algorithms are a key component in a wide variety of intelligence analysis activities. The Graph-Based Informatics for Non-Proliferation and Counter-Terrorism project addresses the critical need of making these graph algorithms accessible to Sandia analysts in a manner that is both intuitive and effective. Specifically we describe the design and implementation of an open source toolkit for doing graph analysis, informatics, and visualization that provides Sandia with novel analysis capability for non-proliferation and counter-terrorism.

McLendon, William Clarence, III; Wylie, Brian Neil

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Generation of graph-state streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a protocol to generate a stream of mobile qubits in a graph state through a single stationary parent qubit and discuss two types of its physical implementation, namely, the generation of photonic graph states through an atom-like qubit and those of flying atoms through a cavity-mode photonic qubit. The generated graph states fall into an important class that can hugely reduce the resource requirement of fault-tolerant linear optics quantum computation, which was previously known to be far from realistic. In regard to the flying atoms, we also propose a heralded generation scheme, which allows for high-fidelity graph states even under the photon loss.

Daniel Ballester; Jaeyoon Cho; M. S. Kim

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Some algorithmic results in graph imbeddings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new technique called double bar amalgamation is developed. The second problem deals with constructing graph imbeddings on a sur- face of genus c (where c is an integer) less than the marimum genus 7, (G) the given graph G. We develop a polynomial... time algorithm that constructs an imbedding of a given upper imbbedable graph G with even Betti number, on an orientable surface of genus (7, (G) ? 1). TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Overview 1. 2 Graphs and Relationships Used...

Joshi, Sanjay

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

On Products and Line Graphs of Signed Graphs, their Eigenvalues and Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Products and Line Graphs of Signed Graphs, their Eigenvalues and Energy K.A. Germina, Shahul and Laplacian matrices and their eigenvalues and energies of the general product (non-complete extended p- sum product and the eigenvalues and energy of the product in terms of those of the factor graphs

Zaslavsky, Thomas

87

3D Graph Visualization with the Oculus Rift Virtual Graph Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Graph Visualization with the Oculus Rift Virtual Graph Reality Farshad Barahimi, Stephen Wismath regarding three- dimensional (3D) representations of graphs. However, the actual usefulness of such 3D reality environment such as a CAVE, or · printed as a physical model with a 3D printer. Early studies

Wismath, Stephen

88

Graph-Theoretic Generation of Assembly Plans Part I: Correct Generation of Precedence Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Graph-Theoretic Generation of Assembly Plans Part I: Correct Generation of Precedence Graphs Lehigh University Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Abstract Automatic generation and selection of assembly plans a graph-theoretic scheme for the generation of assembly plans. Our scheme involves decomposing the CSP

Wu, David

89

On the Cohen-Macaulay graphs and girth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the Cohen-Macaulay property of graphs versus girth. In particular, we classify Cohen-Macaulay graphs of girth at least five and planar Gorenstein graphs of girth four.

Hoang, Do Trong; Trung, Tran Nam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fuzzy Mathematics Fuzzy -Sets, -Relations, -Logic, -Graphs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuzzy Mathematics Fuzzy -Sets, -Relations, -Logic, -Graphs, -Mappings and The Extension Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 The Extension Principle 10 3 Fuzzy Graphs 16 4 Fuzzy Logic 19 Back View #12;Section 1: Fuzzy Olaf Wolkenhauer Control Systems Centre UMIST o.wolkenhauer@umist.ac.uk www

Rostock, Universität

91

Graph searching and a generalized parking function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduced a new generalization, the G-multiparking function, where G is a simple graph on a totally ordered vertex set {1, 2, . . . , n}. We give an algorithm that converts a G-multiparking function into a rooted spanning forest of G by using a graph...

Kostic, Dimitrije Nenad

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Spring Semester 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Spring Semester 2009 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description tracers · Regional groundwater · Geology and groundwater occurrence · Groundwater models · Water Quality: Intermediate-level study of aquifer geology, groundwater flow, and related design factors. Includes de

Walter, M.Todd

93

Directed Graphs, Decompositions, and Spatial Linkages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decomposition of a system of constraints into small basic components is an important tool of design and analysis. Specifically, the decomposition of a linkage into minimal components is a central tool of analysis and synthesis of linkages. In this paper we prove that every pinned 3-isostatic (minimally rigid) graph (grounded linkage) has a unique decomposition into minimal strongly connected components (in the sense of directed graphs) which we call 3-Assur graphs. This analysis extends the Assur decompositions of plane linkages previously studied in the mathematical and the mechanical engineering literature. These 3-Assur graphs are the central building blocks for all kinematic linkages in 3-space. They share a number of key combinatorial and geometric properties with the 2-Assur graphs, including an associated lower block-triangular decomposition of the pinned rigidity matrix which provides a format for extending the motion induced by inserting one driver in a bottom Assur linkage to the joints of the e...

Shai, Offer; Whiteley, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

AFBC Roadbed Project groundwater data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA permitted the use of AFBC material in a section of roadbed at Paducah, Kentucky, for the purpose of demonstrating its usability as a roadbed base. To determine if the material would leach and contaminate groundwater, four wells and seven lysimeters were installed beside and in the roadbed base material. In August 1991, TVA Field Engineering visited the AFBC Roadbed Project to collect samples and water quality data. The goal was to collect samples and data from four wells and seven lysimeters. All attempts to collect samples from the lysimeters failed with one exemption. All attempts to collect samples from the groundwater wells were successful. The analytical data from the four wells and one lysimeter are also attached. The well data is typical of groundwater in the Paducah, Kentucky area indicating that it was not affected by the AFBC roadbed material. The analysis of the lysimeter shows concentrations for iron and manganese above normal background levels, however, the data do not reflect significant concentrations of these heavy metals. Also, the difficulty in obtaining the lysimeter samples and the fact that the samples had to be composited to obtain sufficient quantity to analyze would make a qualitative evaluation of the data questionable.

Carpenter, W. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (United States). Engineering Lab.

1992-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Groundwater Use and Reporting Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control has established a groundwater management program, requiring entities withdrawing in excess of three million gallons during any one month to obtain...

97

Compendium of ordinances for groundwater protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater is an extremely important resource in the Tennessee Valley. Nearly two-thirds of the Tennessee Valley's residents rely, at least in part, on groundwater supplies for drinking water. In rural areas, approximately ninety-five percent of residents rely on groundwater for domestic supplies. Population growth and economic development increase the volume and kinds of wastes requiring disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal problems associated with increases in conventional wastewater and solid waste, technological advancements in recent decades have resulted in new chemicals and increased usage in agriculture, industry, and the home. Unfortunately, there has not been comparable progress in identifying the potential long-term effects of these chemicals, in managing them to prevent contamination of groundwater, or in developing treatment technologies for removing them from water once contamination has occurred. The challenge facing residence of the Tennessee Valley is to manage growth and economic and technological development in ways that will avoid polluting the groundwater resource. Once groundwater has been contaminated, cleanup is almost always very costly and is sometimes impractical or technically infeasible. Therefore, prevention of contamination -- not remedial treatment--is the key to continued availability of usable groundwater. This document discusses regulations to aid in this prevention.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer...

99

Energy Boom andEnergy Boom and Groundwater BustGroundwater Bust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and PolicySustainability and Policy Behind groundwater boom-bust cycles (e.g., Mexico) are energy supplyEnergy Boom andEnergy Boom and Groundwater BustGroundwater Bust MexicoMexico''s Waters Water--Energy) consequences for the other resource Sustainability ­ policy tools for water, energy need to be mutually

Keller, Arturo A.

100

Groundwater flow and groundwater-stream interaction in fractured and dipping sedimentary rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detailed numerical models to evaluate the effects of various factors that influence groundwater flow. Introduction [2] The rate and direction of groundwater flow at a given location is driven by hydraulic gradient], where groundwater occurs in tilted, fractured beds. A simple con- ceptual model of the hydrogeology

Toran, Laura

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A CONVERGENT EXPLICIT GROUNDWATER MODEL Victor M. Ponce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CONVERGENT EXPLICIT GROUNDWATER MODEL Victor M. Ponce Professor, Department of Civil Works, Ankara, Turkey. ABSTRACT: A groundwater model is developed by using an explicit formulation groundwater flow with excellent stability, convergence, and mass-conservation properties. 1 #12;INTRODUCTION

Ponce, V. Miguel

102

What Energy Functions Can Be Minimized via Graph Cuts?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Energy Functions Can Be Minimized via Graph Cuts? Vladimir Kolmogorov, Member, IEEE, and Ramin been developed to solve energy minimization problems in computer vision. Each of these techniques constructs a graph such that the minimum cut on the graph also minimizes the energy. Yet, because these graph

Field, David

103

What Energy Functions can be Minimized via Graph Cuts?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Energy Functions can be Minimized via Graph Cuts? Vladimir Kolmogorov and Ramin Zabih Computer. In the last few years, several new algorithms based on graph cuts have been developed to solve energy cut on the graph also minimizes the energy. Yet because these graph constructions are complex

Field, David

104

Attack Graphs for Sensor Placement, Alert Prioritization, and Attack Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Attack Graphs for Sensor Placement, Alert Prioritization, and Attack Response Steven Noel of IDS alarms, using attack graph analysis. Our attack graphs predict the various possible ways and attacker exploits provides an attack graph showing all possible paths to critical assets. We then place IDS

Noel, Steven

105

A Note on Hamilton Cycles in Kneser Graphs Ian Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Note on Hamilton Cycles in Kneser Graphs Ian Shields IBM P.O. Box 12195 Research Triangle Park) have Hamilton cycles when n #20; 27. A similar result is shown for bipartite Kneser graphs. 1 for Hamilton cycles in Kneser graphs, K(n; k), and bipartite Kneser graphs, H(n; k). With the exception

Savage, Carla D.

106

Gibbs Measures and Phase Transitions on Sparse Random Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regular graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 6.2 Hyper-loops, hypergraphs, cores and a peeling algorithm

Montanari, Annamaria

107

Discrete Applied Mathematics 121 (2002) 139153 NeST graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete Applied Mathematics 121 (2002) 139­153 NeST graphs Ryan B. Haywarda; , Paul E. Kearneyb; received in revised form 14 March 2001; accepted 26 March 2001 Abstract We establish results on NeST graphs show the equivalence of proper NeST graphs and unit NeST graphs, the equivalence of ÿxed distance NeST

Hayward, Ryan B.

108

EuroComb 2005 DMTCS proc. AE, 2005, 389--396 Acyclic Coloring of Graphs of Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for several families F of graphs such as planar graphs [Bor79], planar graphs with ``large'' girth [BKW99], 1

Fertin, Guillaume

109

Revisiting Interval Graphs for Network Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vertices of an interval graph represent intervals over a real line where overlapping intervals denote that their corresponding vertices are adjacent. This implies that the vertices are measurable by a metric and there exists a linear structure in the system. The generalization is an embedding of a graph onto a multi-dimensional Euclidean space and it was used by scientists to study the multi-relational complexity of ecology. However the research went out of fashion in the 1980s and was not revisited when Network Science recently expressed interests with multi-relational networks known as multiplexes. This paper studies interval graphs from the perspective of Network Science.

Loe, Chuan Wen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A role for matrices in graph theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A ROLE FOR MATRICES IN GRAPH THEORY A Thesis by John Patrick McLean Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Ma]or Subject: Mathematics... A ROLE FOR MATRICES IN GRAPH THEORY A Thesis by John Patrick McLean Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) I (Member) (Member) May 1971 tp Qey $ ABSTRACT A Role for Matrices in Graph Theory...

McLean, John Patrick

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons...

112

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

113

2000 Annual Interim Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes a discussion of the groundwater flow direction and rate, the groundwater analytical results, and the methane monitoring results.

Chase, J.A.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

115

Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters Jenniferof Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historicallyof lactate-enriched Hanford well H-100 groundwater sample.

Mosher, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

From graphs to signals and back: Identification of graph structures using spectral analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many systems comprising entities in interactions can be represented as graphs, whose structure gives significant insights about how these systems work. Network theory has undergone further developments, in particular in relation to detection of communities in graphs, to catch this structure. Recently, an approach has been proposed to transform a graph into a collection of signals: Using a multidimensional scaling technique on a distance matrix representing relations between vertices of the graph, points in a Euclidean space are obtained and interpreted as signals, indexed by the vertices. In this article, we propose several extensions to this approach, developing a framework to study graph structures using signal processing tools. We first extend the current methodology, enabling us to highlight connections between properties of signals and graph structures, such as communities, regularity or randomness, as well as combinations of those. A robust inverse transformation method is next described, taking into ac...

Hamon, Ronan; Flandrin, Patrick; Robardet, Céline

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

groundwater | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon Capture andDeepwaterfors | National91 Agrootvel AmesGroundwater

118

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

119

Continuous-time quantum walks on star graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs. It is shown that quantum central limit theorem for a continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs for N-fold star power graph, which are invariant under the quantum component of adjacency matrix, converges to continuous-time quantum walk on K{sub 2} graphs (complete graph with two vertices) and the probability of observing walk tends to the uniform distribution.

Salimi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 66177-15175, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: shsalimi@uok.ac.ir

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Minimum Rank Problem for Outerplanar Graphs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Given a simple graph G with vertex set V(G)={1,2,...,n} define S(G) to be the set of all real symmetric matrices A such that for all… (more)

Sinkovic, John Henry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Minimum rank of graphs that allow loops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The traditional "minimum rank problem" for simple graphs associates a set of symmetric matrices, the zero-nonzero pattern of whose off-diagonal entries are described by the… (more)

Mikkelson, Rana C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On semidefinite programming bounds for graph bandwidth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 24, 2011 ... We propose two new lower bounds on graph bandwidth and cyclic ... matrix computations, parallel computations, VLSI layout, etc; see, for example [19]. ...... problems by SeDuMi [30] using the Yalmip interface [22] with Matlab.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Graph Implementations for Nonsmooth Convex Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary. We describe graph implementations, a generic method for represent- ... object-oriented features of Matlab to turn it into an optimization modeling language: ..... For matrix and array expressions, these rules are applied on an elemen-.

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Forced orientation of graphs Babak Farzad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forced orientation of graphs Babak Farzad Mohammad Mahdian Ebad S. Mahmoodian Amin Saberi§ Bardia, USA. (saberi@cc.gatech.edu) ¶ Department of Computer Science, UIUC, Urbana, USA. (sadri@cs.uiuc.edu) 1

Toronto, University of

126

Hamilton Paths in Generalized Petersen Graphs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis puts forward the conjecture that for n > 3k with k > 2, the generalized Petersen graph, GP(n,k) is Hamilton-laceable if n is… (more)

Pensaert, William

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Graph Summarization with Bounded Error Saket Navlakha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Maryland College Park, MD, USA-20742 saket@cs.umd.edu Rajeev Rastogi Yahoo! Labs Bangalore, India rrastogi@yahoo-inc Graphs are a fundamental abstraction that have been em- ployed for centuries to model real-world systems

Gruner, Daniel S.

128

Accelerating semantic graph databases on commodity clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing a full software system for accelerating semantic graph databases on commodity cluster that scales to hundreds of nodes while maintaining constant query throughput. Our framework comprises a SPARQL to C++ compiler, a library of parallel graph methods and a custom multithreaded runtime layer, which provides a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model with fork/join parallelism and automatic load balancing over a commodity clusters. We present preliminary results for the compiler and for the runtime.

Morari, Alessandro; Castellana, Vito G.; Haglin, David J.; Feo, John T.; Weaver, Jesse R.; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

2013-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

2Cosmic Bar Graphs Galaxy Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the cluster are spirals? Problem 2 ­ Gamma-ray bursts happen about once each day. The bar graph to the right there are 160 total galaxies, the fraction of spirals is 137/160 = 0.86, or equivalently 86%. Problem 2 ­ Gamma-ray2Cosmic Bar Graphs 0 20 40 60 80 100 S E SB I Galaxy Type Number 0 200 400 600 800 1000 FB SB Burst

130

Graph representation of protein free energy landscape  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong, E-mail: shuo@clarku.edu [Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)] [Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Han, Li [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

On the spatial nature of the groundwater pumping externality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the spatial nature of the groundwater pumping externality Nicholas Brozovic´ a, *, David L and instantly to groundwater pumping. In this paper, we develop an economic model of groundwater manage- ment the magnitude of the groundwater pumping externality relative to spatially explicit models. In particular

Sunding, David

132

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project.

Walker, Thomas G.

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

GROUNDWATER DATA REQUIREMENT AND ANALYSIS C. P. Kumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 INTRODUCTION Groundwater is used for a variety of purposes, including irrigation, drinking, and manufacturing characteristics of groundwater. Numerical models are capable of solving large and complex groundwater problems/monitoring of required data form an integral part of any groundwater modelling exercise. 2.0 DATA REQUIREMENT

Kumar, C.P.

134

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Fall Semester 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Fall Semester 2006 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: Introduction, Field trip in afternoon Principles of groundwater flow Flow to Wells Properties of aquifiers Soil occurrence Groundwater models Water Quality Groundwater quality monitoring Vadose water quality monitoring

Walter, M.Todd

135

Groundwater Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data and interpreted information that supports the groundwater module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) used in Hanford Assessments. The objective of the groundwater module is to predict movement of radioactive and chemical contaminants through the aquifer to the Columbia River or other potential discharge locations. This data package is being revised as part of the deliverables under the Characterization of Systems Project (#49139) aimed at providing documentation for assessments being conducted under the Hanford Assessments Project (#47042). Both of these projects are components of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessments Projects, managed by the Management and Integration Project (#47043).

Thorne, Paul D.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Williams, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky L.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water Budget Analysis and Groundwater Inverse Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The groundwater modeling approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant...

Farid Marandi, Sayena

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From 1951 to 1992, the Unites States government conducted 828 underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site. About one-third of these tests occurred near, below or within the water table - the very top portion of the groundwater layer where rock and soil are completely saturated with water. As a result, some groundwater was contaminated. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began exploring the effects of groundwater contamination in the 1970s. Though contamination from underground testing has never been detected on public land, the DOE was committed to developing an advanced, reliable monitoring network that ensures the long-term protection of the public. An intensive groundwater investigation program was launched in 1989.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Groundwater Classification and Standards (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules established in this Subchapter 2L of North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A are intended to maintain and preserve the quality of the groundwaters, prevent and abate pollution and...

143

Delineating Groundwater Sources and Protection Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Groundwater protection zones for five city-owned water supply wells in Sebastopol, Calif. Zones were City of Sebastopol Demonstration Project report by Leah G. Walker, California Dept. of Health Services

Pasternack, Gregory B.

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerates groundwater clean Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater clean Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS Summary: MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS...

145

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

MadGraph 5 : Going Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MadGraph 5 is the new version of the MadGraph matrix element generator, written in the Python programming language. It implements a number of new, efficient algorithms that provide improved performance and functionality in all aspects of the program. It features a new user interface, several new output formats including C++ process libraries for Pythia 8, and full compatibility with FeynRules for new physics models implementation, allowing for event generation for any model that can be written in the form of a Lagrangian. MadGraph 5 builds on the same philosophy as the previous versions, and its design allows it to be used as a collaborative platform where theoretical, phenomenological and simulation projects can be developed and then distributed to the high-energy community. We describe the ideas and the most important developments of the code and illustrate its capabilities through a few simple phenomenological examples.

Johan Alwall; Michel Herquet; Fabio Maltoni; Olivier Mattelaer; Tim Stelzer

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

147

Streaming Graph Computations with a Helpful Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the trend to outsource work to commercial cloud computing services, we consider a variation of the streaming paradigm where a streaming algorithm can be assisted by a powerful helper that can provide annotations to the data stream. We extend previous work on such {\\em annotation models} by considering a number of graph streaming problems. Without annotations, streaming algorithms for graph problems generally require significant memory; we show that for many standard problems, including all graph problems that can be expressed with totally unimodular integer programming formulations, only a constant number of hash values are needed for single-pass algorithms given linear-sized annotations. We also obtain a protocol achieving \\textit{optimal} tradeoffs between annotation length and memory usage for matrix-vector multiplication; this result contributes to a trend of recent research on numerical linear algebra in streaming models.

Cormode, Graham; Thaler, Justin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Circuit and bond polytopes on series-parallel graphs$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 10, 2014 ... M0 = IS, for some star decomposition S of G, and Mi?Ni is a cut of G, for i = 1,..., k. 2. Circuit polytope on series-parallel graphs. Given a graph G ...

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

An efficient semidefinite programming relaxation for the graph ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The general graph partition problem (GPP) is defined as follows. Let G = (V ... We denote by A the adjacency matrix of G. For a given partition of the graph into k.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

150

Generating Random Graphs with Large Girth Mohsen Bayati  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Random Graphs with Large Girth Mohsen Bayati Andrea Montanari Amin Saberi Abstract We; saberi@stanford.edu. 1 #12;free graphs are close to bipartite. We show that our new algorithm guarantees

Saberi, Amin

151

GARNET : a Graphical Attack graph and Reachability Network Evaluation Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attack graphs are valuable tools in the assessment of network security, revealing potential attack paths an adversary could use to gain control of network assets. Creating an effective visualization for attack graphs is ...

Williams, Leevar (Leevar Christoff)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Codes on Graphs: Duality and MacWilliams Identities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A conceptual framework involving partition functions of normal factor graphs is introduced, paralleling a similar recent development by Al-Bashabsheh and Mao. The partition functions of dual normal factor graphs are shown ...

Forney, G. David, Jr.

153

Scalable Parallel Algorithms for Massive Scale-free Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiently storing and processing massive graph data sets is a challenging problem as researchers seek to leverage “Big Data” to answer next-generation scientific questions. New techniques are required to process large scale-free graphs in shared...

Pearce, Roger Allan

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

Math 564 Graph Theory Fall 2008 Instructor Amites Sarkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 564 Graph Theory Fall 2008 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Pearls in Graph Theory (Dover Edition and Fridays, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar@wwu.edu #12;

Sarkar, Amites

155

Math 564 Graph Theory Fall 2013 Instructor Amites Sarkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 564 Graph Theory Fall 2013 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Modern Graph Theory B´ela Bollob, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar

Sarkar, Amites

156

Reformulation of a model for hierarchical divisive graph modularity ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agarwal, G., & Kempe, D. (2008). Modularity-maximizing graph communities via mathematical program- ming. The European Physical Journal B - Condensed ...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Problems of Distance-Regular Graphs Hiroshi Suzuki  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biggs, Algebraic Graph Theory Second Edition, Cambridge U. P., Cambridge 1993. [16] N. L. Biggs, A. G

Xi, Changchang

158

Bose-Einstein condensation on quantum graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) on general compact quantum graphs, i.e., one-dimensional systems with a (potentially) complex topology. We first investigate non-interacting many-particle systems and provide a complete classification of systems that exhibit condensation. We then consider models with interactions that consist of a singular part as well as a hardcore part. In this way we obtain generalisations of the Tonks-Girardeau gas to graphs. For this we find an absence of phase transitions which then indicates an absence of BEC.

Jens Bolte; Joachim Kerner

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hiroshi Ishikawa A Practical Introduction to Graph Cut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Contents Overview / Brief history Energy minimization Graphs and their minimum cuts Energy Elevation map #12;History Probablistic methods (SA, ICM,...) have been used for energy minimization OR has Overview / Brief history Energy minimization Graphs and their minimum cuts Energy minimization via graph

Ishikawa, Hiroshi

160

Hamiltonian Cycles on Symmetrical Graphs Carlo H. Squin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamiltonian Cycles on Symmetrical Graphs Carlo H. SĂ©quin Computer Science Division, EECS Department-connected symmetrical graphs are colored so that they form Hamiltonian cycles. As an introduction we discuss is to color all edges in these graphs with multi- ple congruent copies of Hamiltonian cycles exhibiting

O'Brien, James F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimal IDS Sensor Placement And Alert Prioritization Using Attack Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimal IDS Sensor Placement And Alert Prioritization Using Attack Graphs Steven Noel and Sushil optimally place intrusion detection system (IDS) sensors and prioritize IDS alerts using attack graph. The set of all such paths through the network constitutes an attack graph, which we aggregate according

Noel, Steven

162

Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping John Homer1 Laboratory, USA Abstract. Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often

Ou, Xinming "Simon"

163

Compatible Hamilton cycles in Dirac graphs Michael Krivelevich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compatible Hamilton cycles in Dirac graphs Michael Krivelevich Choongbum Lee Benny Sudakov system F over a Dirac graph G, there exists a Hamilton cycle compatible with F. This settles in a very strong form, a conjecture of H¨aggkvist from 1988. 1 Introduction A Hamilton cycle in a graph G

Krivelevich, Michael

164

Infinite Hamilton Cycles in Squares of Locally Finite Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infinite Hamilton Cycles in Squares of Locally Finite Graphs Agelos Georgakopoulos Abstract We prove Diestel's conjecture that the square G2 of a 2-connected locally finite graph G has a Hamilton if and only if they have distance at most n in G. A Hamilton cycle in a graph is a cycle containing all its

Diestel, Reinhard

165

Robust Self-assembly of Graphs Stanislav Angelov1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust Self-assembly of Graphs Stanislav Angelov1 , Sanjeev Khanna2 , and Mirk´o Visontai3 1 Google, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA mirko@math.upenn.edu Abstract. Self-assembly studied model of self-assembly is the Accretive Graph Assembly Model whereby an edge-weighted graph

Pennsylvania, University of

166

Simultaneous Segmentation and Filtering via Reduced Graph Cuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides small graphs while preserving thin structures but do not offer low memory usage when the amount [7,4,13]. In [7], binary energy functions are minimized for the shape fitting problem with graph cutsSimultaneous Segmentation and Filtering via Reduced Graph Cuts N. Lermé F. Malgouyres LAGA UMR CNRS

Malgouyres, François

167

Cellular Algebras and Graph Invariants Based on Quantum Walks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider two graph invariants inspired by quantum walks- one in continuous time and one in discrete time. We will associate a matrix algebra called a cellular algebra with every graph. We show that, if the cellular algebras of two graphs have a similar structure, then they are not distinguished by either of the proposed invariants.

Jamie Smith

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Inference of Edge Replacement Graph Grammars Jacek P. Kukluk1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inference of Edge Replacement Graph Grammars Jacek P. Kukluk1 , Lawrence B. Holder2 , and Diane J@eecs.wsu.edu Abstract We describe an algorithm and experiments for inference of edge replacement graph grammars for inference of Node Replacement Recursive Graph Grammars [7]. In this paper we describe an approach

Holder, Lawrence B.

169

Bicycles and Left-Right Tours in Locally Finite Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bicycles and Left-Right Tours in Locally Finite Graphs von Melanie Win Myint, M. S. Dem Department-Right Tours 29 6 LRTs Generate the Bicycle Space 43 7 The ABL Planarity Criterion 53 8 Pedestrian Graphs 69 bicycles and some other concepts they relate to, such as left- right tours and pedestrian graphs

Diestel, Reinhard

170

Dominating Set on Bipartite Graphs Mathieu Liedloff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5263n ) time algorithm using polynomial space and an O(1.5137n ) time algorithm using exponential space ) time and polynomial space algorithm, and an O(1.5063n ) time algorithm that uses exponential space. We]). Known results. Given a graph G = (V, E), a subset D V is a dominating set of G if every vertex of V

Liedloff, Mathieu

171

Optimizing Path Query Performance: Graph Clustering Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ywh@us.ibm.com Ning Jingz Changsha Institute of Technology jning@eecs.umich.edu Elke A. Rundensteinerx not incur any run-time cost, requires no auxiliary data structures, and is complimentary to many of the performance of these graph clustering techniques using an actual city road network as well as randomly

172

Graph-Theoretic Scagnostics Leland Wilkinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tukey and Tukey scagnostics and develop graph- theoretic methods for implementing their procedure, statistical graphics 1 INTRODUCTION Around 20 years ago, John and Paul Tukey developed an ex- ploratory of the method were never published. Paul Tukey did offer more detail at an IMA visualization workshop a few

Grossman, Robert

173

Graph Grammars for Self Assembling Robotic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graph Grammars for Self Assembling Robotic Systems Eric Klavins Electrical Engineering University numbers of objects so that they perform some global task. Nevertheless, there are examples of sophisticated machines, such as the ribosome or the mechanical motor in the bacterial flagellum, that seem

Ghrist, Robert W.

174

NEST REPRESENTATIONS OF DIRECTED GRAPH ALGEBRAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST REPRESENTATIONS OF DIRECTED GRAPH ALGEBRAS KENNETH R. DAVIDSON AND ELIAS KATSOULIS Abstract. This paper is a comprehensive study of the nest rep- resentations for the free semigroupoid algebra LG that the finite dimensional nest representations sep- arate the points in LG, and a fortiori, in T + (G

Katsoulis, Elias G.

175

The Web Graph of a Tourism System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The website network of a tourism destination is examined. The main statistical characteristics of the underlying graph are calculated. The topology of the network is similar to the one characterizing similar systems. However, some differences are found, mainly due to the relatively poor connectivity among the vertices of the network.

Baggio, R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Flexible Layered Authentication Graph for Multimedia Streaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing demand on multimedia streaming in more and more applications, security issues such as integrity side, lost packets are dropped from the graph and a packet is verifiable if it has a path and all subsequent packets become not verifiable. EMSS [4] makes a great improvement by building multiple

Sun, Qibin

177

Lessons 6 Graphs of Functional Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 30, 2013 ... One of the problems (#1) illustrates the principle of supply and demand, ... All of the problems involve building up a function model (see Lesson 5) ... Granite Management rents out several apartment complexes in the .... Side. 0.001 per cm2. Bottom. 0.005 per cm2. Lessons 6 Graphs of Functional Models.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

Siegrist, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Murdoch, Lawrence C. (Clemson, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Line graphs e contrazioni: un approccio rigoroso alla space syntax  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The methods of the space syntax have been the subject of extensive discussion, and several techniques to identify the axis lines have been proposed. The space syntax can be represented in terms of line graph, a graphs defined on the edge of a given primary graph. By means of the line graph algorithms, a system of labels defined on the edges of the primary graph is transformed into a system of labels on the vertices of the line graph. The contraction of adjacent edges with the same label allows to build a more general graph than those generated with the methods of the space syntax. By means of the functions implemented in Mathematica is therefore possible to redefine the space syntax on any system of urban quantities (labels) and reproduce the results of the axial lines as a special case. As an example is discussed a possible application of the method to the urban noise analysis.

D'Autilia, Roberto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

184

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

189

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

Sohoni, Milind

191

CONTINUOUSTIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUOUS­TIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen­water system in groundwater hydrology is given. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation, i for an air­water system in groundwater hydrology, ff = a; w [1], [11], [26]: @(OEae ff s ff ) @t +r \\Delta

192

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

THE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ancillary data is fundamental to the process of modelling a groundwater system. In an unconfined aquifer of the unconfined groundwater parameters as the unique minimum of a convex functional. 1. Introduction It is commonTHE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN UNCONFINED AQUIFER IAN KNOWLES

Knowles, Ian W.

194

Regionally compartmented groundwater flow on Mars Keith P. Harrison1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the basis for such a test. Specifically, we use groundwater models to predict regions of cryosphere that groundwater flow was likely regionally compartmented. Furthermore, the consistent occurrence of modeled. Geophys. Res., 114, E04004, doi:10.1029/2008JE003300. 1. Introduction [2] Groundwater is thought to have

Harrison, Keith

195

New approximation for free surface flow of groundwater: capillarity correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capillarity correction for free surface groundwater flow as modelled by the Boussinesq equation is re; Shallow flow expansion; Simplified approximation 1. Introduction Groundwater heads in coastal aquifersNew approximation for free surface flow of groundwater: capillarity correction D.-S. Jeng a,*, B

Walter, M.Todd

196

Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and presentation of GMRES performance benchmarking results. Introduction As the groundwater model infrastructureError Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models by Matthew F. Dixon1 for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models

Bai, Zhaojun

197

Visualization of groundwater flow using line integral convolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the simulation of groundwater flow and transport models. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, 3D numerical simulationsVisualization of groundwater flow using line integral convolution JĂ?RG GOTTHARDT & CAROLA BLĂ?MER of groundwater flow and transport problems become more and more common. At the same time the need for adequate

Andrzejak, Artur

198

Groundwater Protection 7 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to implement best management practices designed to protect groundwater. Examples include upgrading unGroundwater Protection 7 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 7.1 THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION's program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in U.S. Department of Energy

Homes, Christopher C.

199

Data-flow graphs as a model of parallel complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new model of parallel computation based on data-flow graphs is introduced, which is specifically oriented towards complexity theory. Data-flow graphs are capable of illustrating properties of synchronous, asynchronous, and nondeterministic computations. Sufficient conditions are derived for asynchronous data-flow graphs to be determinate, i.e., all possible computations are finite and yield the same result. For determinate graphs, it is shown that the synchronous computation is as fast as any asynchronous computation. An algorithm is presented that transforms a nondeterminate data-flow graphs into a synchronous determinate one. The basic data-flow graph idea is extended into a model with greater potential parallelism, called the Uniform Data Flow Graph Family (UDFGF) Model. It is proved that time and space for the UDFGF model are polynomially related to reversal and space for the Turing Machine model, in both the deterministic and nondeterministic cases. In addition to forming an abstract computational model, data-flow graphs are parallel programs for real multiprocessors. Given a data flow graph program and a multiprocessor, each node of the graph must be assigned to one of the processors. It is proved that this problem is intractable, and a practical algorithm to find approximate solutions for it is presented.

Campbell, M.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Statistical Properties of Quantum Graph Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general analytical approach to the statistical description of quantum graph spectra based on the exact periodic orbit expansions of quantum levels is discussed. The exact and approximate expressions obtained in \\cite{Anima} for the probability distribution functions using the spectral hierarchy method are analyzed. In addition, the mechanism of appearance of the universal statistical properties of spectral fluctuations of quantum-chaotic systems is considered in terms of the semiclassical theory of periodic orbits.

Yu. Dabaghian

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analysis of beacon triangulation in random graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 viii LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Beacons needed for different n to avoid conflicts . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 II Beacons needed for different n to make pu(n) equal to one for lambda = 10 from our model and simulation... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 III Beacons needed for different n to make pu(n) equal to one for lambda = 10 from our simulation data for G(n,p) graph and uniform distribution case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 IV Beacons needed for different n...

Kakarlapudi, Geetha

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Understanding the Effects of Groundwater Pumping on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the Effects of Groundwater Pumping on Streamflow Depletion through USGS Capture Maps (Vertical and Horizontal Distance from Streams) Pumping rates and pumping schedules The timing source of water to the wells in years to decades. 0 10 mi #12;Pumping Can Affect Other Hydrologic

204

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

Ewing, Richard E.

206

Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

k-Boson Quantum Walks Do Not Distinguish Arbitrary Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we define k-equivalence, a relation on graphs that relies on their associated cellular algebras. We show that a k-Boson quantum walk cannot distinguish pairs of graphs that are k- equivalent. The existence of pairs of k-equivalent graphs has been shown by Ponomarenko et al. [2, 6]. This gives a negative answer to a question posed by Gamble et al. [7].

Jamie Smith

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Dynamics of entanglement of bosonic modes on symmetric graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the dynamics of an initially disentangled Gaussian state on a general finite symmetric graph. As concrete examples we obtain properties of this dynamics on mean field graphs of arbitrary sizes. In the same way that chains can be used for transmitting entanglement by their natural dynamics, these graphs can be used to store entanglement. We also consider two kinds of regular polyhedron which show interesting features of entanglement sharing.

F. Ghahhari; V. Karimipour; R. Shahrokhshahi

2006-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Independent set problems and odd-hole-preserving graph reductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to provide a polynomial-time reduction in the size of the input required to decide the perfection or imperfection of a graph....

Warren, Jeffrey Scott

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Computing the stability number of a graph via linear and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout the paper A(G) ? Sn will denote the adjacency matrix of the graph G, that is, the (i, ..... Some matlab code that constructs the relevant semidefi-.

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

Generating Random Graphs with Large Girth Mohsen Bayati  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Random Graphs with Large Girth Mohsen Bayati Andrea Montanari Amin Saberi Abstract We for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford University; saberi@stanford.edu. knowledge

Montanari, Annamaria

214

A notable family of entire intrinsic minimal graph...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to C1(O). This notion of C2 surface obviously includes the entire intrinsic graphs ...... F. Serra Cassano, Surface measures in Carnot-Carathéodory spaces, Calc.

2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

Graphs are among the most important abstract data structures in computer sci-ence, and the algorithms that operate on them are critical to modern life. Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

description that assumes a sparse matrix representation of the graph, and operates on that matrix with linear environments (e.g., Matlab ). (2) Ease of implementation. Parallel graph algorithms are notoriously difficult computation of graph algorithms. (3) Performance. Graph algorithms expressed by a series of sparse matrix

Kepner, Jeremy

216

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has monitored groundwater on the Hanford Site since the 1940s to help determine what chemical and radiological contaminants have made their way into the groundwater. As regulatory requirements for monitoring increased in the 1980s, there began to be some overlap between various programs. DOE established the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project (groundwater project) in 1996 to ensure protection of the public and the environment while improving the efficiency of monitoring activities. The groundwater project is designed to support all groundwater monitoring needs at the site, eliminate redundant sampling and analysis, and establish a cost-effective hierarchy for groundwater monitoring activities. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project. This QA Plan is based on the QA requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--General Provisions/Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the groundwater project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The groundwater project has determined that the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Luttrell, Stuart P.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

Visualization Graph | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster,Winside, Nebraska (UtilityVirginiaNoGraph Home

218

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

Nichols, Ralph L. (812 Plantation Point Dr., N. Augusta, SC 29841); Widdowson, Mark A. (4204 Havana Ct., Columbia, SC 29206); Mullinex, Harry (10 Cardross La., Columbia, SC 29209); Orne, William H. (12 Martha Ct., Sumter, SC 29150); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

Not Available

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Algorithms to Compute Minimum Cycle Basis in Directed Graphs #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, . . . ,C d whose incidence vectors permit a unique linear combination of the incidence vector of any cycleAlgorithms to Compute Minimum Cycle Basis in Directed Graphs # Telikepalli Kavitha + Kurt Mehlhorn # Abstract We consider the problem of computing a minimum cycle basis in a di­ rected graph G with m arcs

Mehlhorn, Kurt

222

Deciding Timed Bisimulation for Timed Automata Using Zone Valuation Graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deciding Timed Bisimulation for Timed Automata Using Zone Valuation Graph Shibashis Guha, Chinmay was first proved to be decidable for timed automata by Cerans using a product construction method on region graph. Several other methods have been proposed in the literature since then for decid- ing timed

Prasad, Sanjiva

223

Rank Synopses for Efficient Time Travel on the Web Graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank Synopses for Efficient Time Travel on the Web Graph Klaus Berberich, Srikanta Bedathur}@mpi-inf.mpg.de ProblemProblem SolutionSolution ExperimentsExperiments Step 1: PageRank Normalization We normalize PageRank scores computed on Gt ( Vt, Et ) (i.e., the graph at time t ) dividing by the lower bound PageRank score

224

Semidefinite programming and eigenvalue bounds for the graph ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The graph partition problem is the problem of partitioning the vertex set of a graph ... In this paper we simplify a known matrix-lifting semidefinite ...... [44] Sturm, J.F.: Using SeDuMi 1.02, a MATLAB toolbox for optimization over symmetric cones.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

ADAGE: A software package for analyzing graph evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graph evolution. 2.2 Using ADAGE 2.2.1 Installation ADAGE was built for use on MATLAB 2007 version. In this case input is a string. If the MATLAB matrix has already been saved, simply run > input = loadADAGE: A software package for analyzing graph evolution Mary McGlohon, Christos Faloutsos May 2007

226

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming Nicholas R. Kirchner UI 2 Calculations with MATLAB Standard Calculations and Variables Matrices and Vectors 3 Graphing NRK;Matrices and Vectors, Definitions MATLAB is short for MATrix LABoratory. It was built for high-speed matrix

Weinberger, Hans

227

Understanding Complex Network Attack Graphs through Clustered Adjacency Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding Complex Network Attack Graphs through Clustered Adjacency Matrices Steven Noel}@gmu.edu Abstract We apply adjacency matrix clustering to network attack graphs for attack correlation, prediction, and hypothesizing. We self-multiply the clustered adjacency matrices to show attacker reachability across

Noel, Steven

228

Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Scaling Semantic Graph Databases in Size and Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present SGEM, a full software system for accelerating large-scale semantic graph databases on commodity clusters. Unlike current approaches, SGEM addresses semantic graph databases by only employing graph methods at all the levels of the stack. On one hand, this allows exploiting the space efficiency of graph data structures and the inherent parallelism of graph algorithms. These features adapt well to the increasing system memory and core counts of modern commodity clusters. On the other hand, however, these systems are optimized for regular computation and batched data transfers, while graph methods usually are irregular and generate fine-grained data accesses with poor spatial and temporal locality. Our framework comprises a SPARQL to data parallel C compiler, a library of parallel graph methods and a custom, multithreaded runtime system. We introduce our stack, motivate its advantages with respect to other solutions and show how we solved the challenges posed by irregular behaviors. We present the result of our software stack on the Berlin SPARQL benchmarks with datasets up to 10 billion triples (a triple corresponds to a graph edge), demonstrating scaling in dataset size and in performance as more nodes are added to the cluster.

Morari, Alessandro; Castellana, Vito G.; Villa, Oreste; Tumeo, Antonino; Weaver, Jesse R.; Haglin, David J.; Choudhury, Sutanay; Feo, John T.

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Surface Reconstruction Method Using Global Graph Cut Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAR (China) 1 sparis@csail.mit.edu -- Sylvain Paris has worked on this project during his PhD at ARTIS calibrated images mainly has been approached using local methods, either as a continuous optimization problem of a pixel. Index Terms Graph flow, graph cut, 3D reconstruction from calibrated cameras, discontinuities

Paris, Sylvain

231

A Surface Reconstruction Method Using Global Graph Cut Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAR (China) 1sparis@csail.mit.edu ­ Sylvain Paris has worked on this project during his PhD at ARTIS calibrated images mainly has been approached using local methods, either as a continuous optimization problem of a pixel. Index Terms Graph flow, graph cut, 3D reconstruction from calibrated cameras, discontinuities

Paris, Sylvain

232

A Surface Reconstruction Method Using Global Graph Cut Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAR (China) 1sparis@csail.mit.edu ­ Sylvain Paris has worked on this project during his PhD at ARTIS reconstruction from multiple calibrated images mainly has been approached using local methods, either to 1/10th of a pixel. Index Terms Graph flow, graph cut, 3D reconstruction from calibrated cameras

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

Resource Minimized Static Mapping and Dynamic Scheduling of SDF Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resource Minimized Static Mapping and Dynamic Scheduling of SDF Graphs Jinwoo Kim, Tae-ho Shin than the previous approaches. Keywords-Mapping, buffer size minimization, SDF graph, dynamic scheduling a model-based approach based on SDF (synchronous data flow) model. Since the parallelism of an application

Ha, Soonhoi

234

Synthesis of Parallel Hardware Implementations from Synchronous Dataflow Graph Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of automated register­transfer level (RTL) VHDL code generation from synchronous dataflow (SDF) graph for mapping applications specified in SDF to parallel digital hardware implementations. Two styles synthesis from SDF graphs is presented. In order to minimize cost while meeting performance require­ ments

235

Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

Young, R. Michael

236

Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs Mahmoud Ghoniem, Youssef algorithms for video de- noising and simplification based on discrete regularization on graphs. The main difference between video and image denoising is the temporal redundancy in video sequences. Recent works

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY VIDEO STRUCTURE ANALYSIS AND GRAPH OPTIMIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY VIDEO STRUCTURE ANALYSIS AND GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Irwin King video summarization method that combines video structure analysis and graph optimiza- tion. First, we analyze the structure of the video, find the boundaries of video scenes, then we calculate each scene

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

238

Groups generated by bounded automata and their schreier graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the Schreier graphs on levels of automaton groups can be constructed by an iterative procedure of inflation of graphs. This was used to associate a piecewise linear map of the form fK(v) = minA?KAv, where K is a finite set of nonnegative matrices, with every...

Bondarenko, Ievgen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Bicyclic graphs with exactly two main signless Laplacian eigenvalues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A signless Laplacian eigenvalue of a graph $G$ is called a main signless Laplacian eigenvalue if it has an eigenvector the sum of whose entries is not equal to zero. In this paper, all connected bicyclic graphs with exactly two main eigenvalues are determined.

Huang, He

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Motorcycle Graphs and Straight Skeletons Siu-Wing Cheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motorcycle Graphs and Straight Skeletons Siu-Wing Cheng Antoine Vigneron March 17, 2005 Abstract We present a new algorithm to compute motorcycle graphs. It runs in O(n n log n) time when n is the number of motorcycles. We give a new characterization of the straight skeleton of a non

Vigneron, Antoine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

On bounding the bandwidth of graphs with symmetry - Optimization ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamming graph H(2,q) (also known as the lattice graph) has bandwidth equal to. (q+1)q. 2. ?1 .... 59. 10 3 120. 72. 75. 76. 90. Table 9: Bounds on the bandwidth of K(v,2) and K(v,3). v d meig .... Freeman, San Francisco, 1979. [19] Graham, A.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in support of DOE`s environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE`s General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in support of DOE's environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE's General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

M&Ms4Graphs: Multi-scale, Multi-dimensional Graph Analytics Tools for Cyber-Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ranging from micro- (host level) to macro-scale (enterprise level). Achievements · Major release of Graph Library - Exhibit at GraphLab Conference, July 2014 · Selected publications 1. "Towards A Networks-of-Networks of Machine Learning Research, 2014. Rendering of Network Traffic Data Showing Communication between IP

246

Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the...

247

LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood What does this project...

248

alpine karst groundwater: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Hydrochemistry, a tool for understanding karst groundwater flows Jacques MUDRY, Chrono-Environment laboratory Physics Websites Summary: Hydrochemistry, a tool for understanding...

249

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of...

250

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

251

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD2 and the ERDF Amended ROD (EPA 1999). The overall objective of the groundwater monitoring program is to determine whether ERDF has impacted the groundwater. This objective is complicated by the fact that the ERDF is situated downgradient of the numerous groundwater contamination plumes originating from the 200 West Area.

Weiss, R. L.; Lawrence, B. L.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

per year. To learn more about groundwater treatment at the Hanford Site, including videos and photos, click here and here. Addthis Related Articles A team of drillers installs...

253

Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite. Abstract: The long-term success of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium (U) depends on the stability of...

254

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater. In early April, five peer...

255

The impacts of climate change on the groundwater system of the upper Danube catchment derived from piezometric head and groundwater quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Groundwater levels, groundwater quality, time series analysis 1. Introduction Understanding results, a concept for modeling changes in groundwater and chemistry coupled with regional climate change1 The impacts of climate change on the groundwater system of the upper Danube catchment derived

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

256

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

none,

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing groundwater model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surveys, groundwater chemistry data, and groundwater level data were... Effects of rainwater-harvesting-induced artificial ... Source: McClain, Michael - Department of...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer groundwater brazil Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of rainfall. The karst aquifers on Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico have similar rainwater and groundwater... by groundwater residence times of years to tens of years....

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - automating groundwater sampling Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT... summary of selected case studies is presented below. BACKGROUND A typical groundwater sampling event... . Automation through the use of sensors...

260

Probabilistic estimation and prediction of groundwater recharge in a semi-arid environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying and characterizing groundwater recharge are critical for water resources management. Unfortunately, low recharge rates are difficult to resolve in dry environments, where groundwater is often most important. ...

Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered groundwater chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altered groundwater chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Seawater intrusion...

262

Well performance graph simplifies field calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphic Methods are widely employed in order to understand overall well behavior using only surface parameters. The authors propose a new graphic method, used successfully by Agip for oil and gas wells in Italy, Libya, Nigeria and Tunisia. The well performance graph helps solve many production problems, including estimation of: inflow performance relationship; causes of rate decline throughout well life; and production rate and bottomhole flowing pressure for various pressures upstream of the surface choke, and vice-versa. This method differs from others by using flow behavior through the choke for both critical and subcritical conditions. Equations describing flow through the formation, string and surface choke are also used. Results are quite reliable when these theoretical equations are calibrated with field data, either from the well concerned or from nearby wells producing the same fluid. This article describes the technique as it applies to oil wells. The methodology for gas wells is similar.

De Ghetto, G.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Community detection in directed acyclic graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some temporal networks, most notably citation networks, are naturally represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). To detect communities in DAGs, we propose a modularity for DAGs by defining an appropriate null model (i.e., randomized network) respecting the order of nodes. We implement a spectral method to approximately maximize the proposed modularity measure and test the method on citation networks and other DAGs. We find that the attained values of the modularity for DAGs are similar for partitions that we obtain by maximizing the proposed modularity (designed for DAGs), the modularity for undirected networks and that for general directed networks. In other words, if we neglect the order imposed on nodes (and the direction of links) in a given DAG and maximize the conventional modularity measure, the obtained partition is close to the optimal one in the sense of the modularity for DAGs.

Speidel, Leo; Masuda, Naoki

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Efficient broadcast on random geometric graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Randon Geometric Graph (RGG) is constructed by distributing n nodes uniformly at random in the unit square and connecting two nodes if their Euclidean distance is at most r, for some prescribed r. They analyze the following randomized broadcast algorithm on RGGs. At the beginning, there is only one informed node. Then in each round, each informed node chooses a neighbor uniformly at random and informs it. They prove that this algorithm informs every node in the largest component of a RGG in {Omicron}({radical}n/r) rounds with high probability. This holds for any value of r larger than the critical value for the emergence of a giant component. In particular, the result implies that the diameter of the giant component is {Theta}({radical}n/r).

Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elsasser, Robert [UNIV OF PADERBORN; Friedrich, Tobias [INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SCI.; Sauerwald, Thomas [INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SCI.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bicyclic graphs with maximal revised Szeged index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The revised Szeged index $Sz^*(G)$ is defined as $Sz^*(G)=\\sum_{e=uv \\in E}(n_u(e)+ n_0(e)/2)(n_v(e)+ n_0(e)/2),$ where $n_u(e)$ and $n_v(e)$ are, respectively, the number of vertices of $G$ lying closer to vertex $u$ than to vertex $v$ and the number of vertices of $G$ lying closer to vertex $v$ than to vertex $u$, and $n_0(e)$ is the number of vertices equidistant to $u$ and $v$. Hansen used the AutoGraphiX and made the following conjecture about the revised Szeged index for a connected bicyclic graph $G$ of order $n \\geq 6$:

Li, Xueliang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

THE MATCHING ENERGY OF A GRAPH IVAN GUTMAN AND STEPHAN WAGNER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(3) implies that the energy of a tree is a monotonically increasing function of any m(T, k) for the study of the energy of trees, we may consider it also for cycle­containing graphs. For such graphsTHE MATCHING ENERGY OF A GRAPH IVAN GUTMAN AND STEPHAN WAGNER Abstract. The energy of a graph G

Wagner, Stephan

267

Embeddings of Cubic Halin Graphs A Surface-by-Surface Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embeddings of Cubic Halin Graphs A Surface-by-Surface Inventory Jonathan L. Gross Columbia@cs.columbia.edu; http://www.cs.columbia.edu/gross/. 1 #12;Embeddings of Cubic Halin Graphs: An Inventory 2 1 graph for a 14-vertex tree with 8 leaves. #12;Embeddings of Cubic Halin Graphs: An Inventory 3

Gross, Jonathan L.

268

ASYMPTOTIC STUDY OF SUBCRITICAL GRAPH CLASSES MICHAEL DRMOTA, ERIC FUSY, MIHYUN KANG, VERONIKA KRAUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASYMPTOTIC STUDY OF SUBCRITICAL GRAPH CLASSES MICHAEL DRMOTA, ´ERIC FUSY, MIHYUN KANG, VERONIKA from the so-called "subcritical" graph classes, which include the classes of cacti graphs, outerplanar graphs chosen from subcritical classes. We show that the number gn/n! (resp. gn) of labelled (resp

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Groundwater migration of radionuclides at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simple Single Resident Well (SRW) Model has been used to calculate groundwater movement since Fermilab`s inception. A new Concentration Model is proposed which is more realistic and takes advantage of computer modeling that has been developed for the siting of landfills. Site geologic and hydrologic data were given to a consultant who made the migration calculations from an initial concentration that was based upon the existing knowledge of the radioactivity leached out of the soil. The various components of the new Model are discussed, and numerical examples are given and compared with DOE/EPA limits.

Malensek, A.J.; Wehmann, A.A.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geodesic Distance in Planar Graphs: An Integrable Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the enumeration of planar graphs using bijections with suitably decorated trees, which allow for keeping track of the geodesic distances between faces of the graph. The corresponding generating functions obey non-linear recursion relations on the geodesic distance. These are solved by use of stationary multi-soliton tau-functions of suitable reductions of the KP hierarchy. We obtain a unified formulation of the (multi-) critical continuum limit describing large graphs with marked points at large geodesic distances, and obtain integrable differential equations for the corresponding scaling functions. This provides a continuum formulation of two-dimensional quantum gravity, in terms of the geodesic distance.

P. Di Francesco

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Graph Laplacian and the Dynamics of Complex Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this talk, we explore the structure of networks from a spectral graph-theoretic perspective by analyzing the properties of the Laplacian matrix associated with the graph induced by a network. We will see how the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian relate to the underlying network structure and dynamics and provides insight into a phenomenon frequently observed in real world networks - the emergence of collective behavior from purely local interactions seen in the coordinated motion of animals and phase transitions in biological networks, to name a few.

Thulasidasan, Sunil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Textbooks : Hudak P., Principles of Hydrogeology (Third Edition), CRC Press. Properties of aquifers ---porosity and specific yield, hydraulic conductivity, water table and potentiometric of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head, Darcy's law, equations of groundwater flow in confined and unconfined

Pan, Feifei

274

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in rural areas. Therefore, quality and quantity aspects of groundwater management constitute acute issues the villages, and pollution plumes downgradient of the main inhabited areas. The absence of sewage or solid waste collection and treatment facilities threatens groundwater quality by increasing its chloride

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report from the Savannah River Plant for first quarter 1992 includes discussion on the following topics: description of facilities; hydrostratigraphic units; monitoring well nomenclature; integrity of the monitoring well network; groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; tritium, nitrate, and pH time-trend data; water levels; groundwater flow rates and directions; upgradient versus downgradient results.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the findings of the groundwater and leachate monitoring and sampling at the Environmental restoration Disposal Facility for calendar year 2009. The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R.L. Weiss, B.L. Lawrence, D.W. Woolery

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

MODELING OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS TRANSPORT AND NATURAL ATTENUATION IN GROUNDWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.quiot@ineris.fr 2. ENVIROS, Spain S.L., Passeig de Rubí 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix ­ Spain, sjordana@enviros.biz 3 performed by 4 teams (ANTEA, ENSMP, ENVIROS and INERIS) to simulate a contamination of groundwater is the evaluation of the fate of pollutants in groundwaters and soils. This knowledge is based on the result

Boyer, Edmond

279

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recently, an independent peer review team was invited to assess the groundwater characterization program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This nationally recognized group of experts, from various external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater.

280

Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis Submitted of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Environmental Engineering Section May 2011 #12;ii Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis

Hansen, René Rydhof

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA Abstract Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley products sold (U.S. Department of 1Corresponding author: U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science

282

An Efficient Probabilistic Finite Element Method for Stochastic Groundwater Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater flow and transport from mathematical models involves considerable uncertainty due to the presenceAn Efficient Probabilistic Finite Element Method for Stochastic Groundwater Flow Harald Osnes Hans by nonlinear effects as oe Y approaches unity in more general domains. 1 #12; 1 Introduction The prediction

Osnes, Harald

283

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING IAN KNOWLES AND AIMIN YAN. Introduction Saturated flow and single phase solute transport in confined ground- water systems are modelled one has to resort to indirect, or inverse, techniques to populate the model. In a groundwater system

Knowles, Ian W.

284

Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation on groundwater and classified the years into good year if water levels are above the seasonal model in that year such as land-use, local hydrogeology. #12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Spatial Models

Sohoni, Milind

285

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING IAN KNOWLES AND AIMIN YAN. Introduction Saturated flow and single phase solute transport in confined ground­ water systems are modelled to resort to indirect, or inverse, techniques to populate the model. In a groundwater system one

Knowles, Ian W.

286

155: Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

155: Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport EKKEHARD HOLZBECHER1 AND SHAUL SOREK2 1. #12;2402 GROUNDWATER Calibration as a task cannot be separated from the other tasks. Inverse modeling of the Negev, J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Sede Boker, Israel The article gives an introduction

Sorek, Shaul

287

Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and uses a finite element method for the simulation of groundwater flow in the lateral (2D) direction (third dimension) a finite difference method is used in the simula- tions. Numerical experiments are done of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

Vuik, Kees

288

Groundwater Protection 7 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or main- tain compliance with regulatory requirements and to implement best management practices designedGroundwater Protection 7 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 DRAFT 7.1 THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION regulations. BNL's program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in DOE Order

289

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring: Setting, sources and methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is conducted on the Hanford Site to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders; and the Washington Administrative Code. Results of monitoring are published annually (e.g., PNNL-11989). To reduce the redundancy of these annual reports, background information that does not change significantly from year to year has been extracted from the annual report and published in this companion volume. This report includes a description of groundwater monitoring requirements, site hydrogeology, and waste sites that have affected groundwater quality or that require groundwater monitoring. Monitoring networks and methods for sampling, analysis, and interpretation are summarized. Vadose zone monitoring methods and statistical methods also are described. Whenever necessary, updates to information contained in this document will be published in future groundwater annual reports.

M.J. Hartman

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations. 3 figures.

Nichols, R.L.; Widdowson, M.A.; Mullinex, H.; Orne, W.H.; Looney, B.B.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Characterization of shallow groundwater at TNX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located on 300 square miles along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, is owned by the Department of Energy and operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company. The site`s mission is to support the national security through the production of nuclear weapons material. With the recent reduction of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and the stronger focus on the cleanup of sites where nuclear operations activities have left behind soil and groundwater contamination, identifying and remediating all inactive wastes has become a primary goal.The TNX Area is located adjacent to the Savannah River in the western portion of SRS (Figure 1). The area is a pilot-scale test facility for the Savannah River Technology Center. Pilot-scale testing and evaluation of chemical processes at TNX have included support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Separations Area, and fuel and target manufacturing areas. Wastewater generated during tests was discharged to unlined basins through a network of underground process sewers.A discussion of waste disposal activities for the TNX Area is included in this report to identify the major sources of contaminants that have impacted the groundwater.

Nichols, R.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Diamond graphs and super-reflexivity William B. Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diamond graphs and super-reflexivity William B. Johnson and Gideon Schechtman Abstract The main results is that dimension reduction a-la Johnson­Lindenstrauss fails in any non super reflexive space

Johnson, William B.

293

Kron Reduction of Graphs with Applications to Electrical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consider a weighted and undirected graph, possibly with self-loops, and its corresponding Laplacian matrix, possibly augmented with additional diagonal elements corresponding to the self-loops. The Kron reduction of this graph is again a graph whose Laplacian matrix is obtained by the Schur complement of the original Laplacian matrix with respect to a subset of nodes. The Kron reduction process is ubiquitous in classic circuit theory and in related disciplines such as electrical impedance tomography, smart grid monitoring, transient stability assessment in power networks, or analysis and simulation of induction motors and power electronics. More general applications of Kron reduction occur in sparse matrix algorithms, multi-grid solvers, finite--element analysis, and Markov chains. The Schur complement of a Laplacian matrix and related concepts have also been studied under different names and as purely theoretic problems in the literature on linear algebra. In this paper we propose a general graph-theoretic f...

Dorfler, Florian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood #3; Departament de Matem#18;atica Aplicada II Universitat Polit#18;ecnica de Catalunya Barcelona, Spain david.wood@upc.edu Submitted: Nov 16, 2004; Accepted

Wood, David R.

295

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood Departament de Matem`atica Aplicada II Universitat Polit`ecnica de Catalunya Barcelona, Spain david.wood@upc.edu Submitted: Nov 16, 2004; Accepted: Aug 11

Wood, David R.

296

Exact Solution of Graph Coloring Problems via Constraint ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coloring the vertices of a graph so that adjacent vertices have different ..... in a vector y having always the same order corresponding to that of matrix A rows.

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

New Lower Bounds on the Stability Number of a Graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 27, 2007 ... adjacency matrix of G. The complete graph on n vertices is denoted by Kn. ..... We used MATLAB to compute each of the five bounds on each of ...

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem on Graphs with Bounded Genus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saberi Abstract We give a constant factor approximation algorithm for the asymmetric traveling salesman:{shayan, saberi}@stanford.edu. 1 #12;Thin trees were first defined in the graph embedding literature in an attempt

Saberi, Amin

299

Random Walks with Lookahead in Power Law Random Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Random Walks with Lookahead in Power Law Random Graphs Milena Mihail Amin Saberi Prasad Tetali Georgia Institute of Technology Email: mihail, saberiˇ @cc.gatech.edu tetali@math.cc.gatech.edu Abstract

Mihail, Milena

300

Confluence in Data Reduction: Bridging Graph Transformation and Kernelization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ermel Falk H¨uffner Rolf Niedermeier Olga Runge Institut f¨ur Softwaretechnik und Theoretische of critical pair analysis from graph transformation theory, supported by the AGG software tool. These results

Wichmann, Felix

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Vulnerability Analysis and Intrusion Detection Through Predictive Attack Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Vulnerability Analysis and Intrusion Detection Through Predictive Attack Graphs Steven, without considering how they contribute to overall attack risk. Similarly, intrusion alarms are logged threats, complexity of security data, and network growth. Our approach to network defense applies attack

Noel, Steven

302

Modeling modern network attacks and countermeasures using attack graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By accurately measuring risk for enterprise networks, attack graphs allow network defenders to understand the most critical threats and select the most effective countermeasures. This paper describes substantial enhancements ...

Ingols, Kyle W.

303

Fracture and Fragmentation of Simplicial Finite Elements Meshes using Graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach for the topological representation of simplicial finite element meshes as graphs is presented. It is shown that by using a graph, the topological changes induced by fracture reduce to a few, local kernel operations. The performance of the graph representation is demonstrated and analyzed, using as reference the 3D fracture algorithm by Pandolfi and Ortiz [22]. It is shown that the graph representation initializes in O(N{sub E}{sup 1.1}) time and fractures in O(N{sub I}{sup 1.0}) time, while the reference implementation requires O(N{sub E}{sup 2.1}) time to initialize and O(N{sub I}{sup 1.9}) time to fracture, where NE is the number of elements in the mesh and N{sub I} is the number of interfaces to fracture.

Mota, A; Knap, J; Ortiz, M

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Local computation algorithms for graphs of non-constant degrees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the model of local computation algorithms (LCAs), we aim to compute the queried part of the output by examining only a small (sublinear) portion of the input. Many recently developed LCAs on graph problems achieve time ...

Yodpinyanee, Anak

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although many $\\cal{NP}$-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of the necessary dynamic programming tables and excessive runtimes of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree decomposition-based approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Weerapurage, Dinesh P [ORNL; Groer, Christopher S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Min-Max Theorems Related to Geometric Representationsof Graphs ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 27, 2010 ... 1. Introduction. Geometric representations of graphs is a beautiful area where combina- ..... We shall use the following construction to get hypersphere ...... This is not surprising, as SDP duality theory is more complex than LP.

Marcel K. de Carli Silva and Levent Tuncel

2011-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Technology Portfolio Planning by Weighted Graph Analysis of System Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Portfolio Planning by Weighted Graph Analysis of System Architectures Peter Davison and Bruce Cameron Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Edward F. Crawley Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Skolkovo 143025, Russia Abstract5 Many systems undergo significant

de Weck, Olivier L.

308

Ranking Outlier Nodes in Subspaces of Attributed Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our graph outlier ranking (GOutRank) introduces scoring functions based on these selected subgraphs by looking at the most promising objects first. They 1http://www.ipd.kit.edu/~muellere/GOutRank/ allow users

Antwerpen, Universiteit

309

How are Feynman graphs resumed by the Loop Vertex Expansion?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this short letter is to clarify which set of pieces of Feynman graphs are resummed in a Loop Vertex Expansion, and to formulate a conjecture on the $\\phi^4$ theory in non-integer dimension.

Vincent Rivasseau; Zhituo Wang

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

Decoding linear codes via optimization and graph-based techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.2.1 Linear Codes on1.1.2 Graph-Based Codes 1.2 Dissertation Overview . . .versus the length of the code for (3,6)-regular LDPC codes (

Taghavi, Mohammad H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

MacWilliams identities for codes on graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MacWilliams identity for linear time-invariant convolutional codes that has recently been found by Gluesing-Luerssen and Schneider is proved concisely, and generalized to arbitrary group codes on graphs. A similar ...

Forney, G. David, Jr.

312

On the limiting absorption principle and spectra of quantum graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main result of the article is validity of the limiting absorption principle and thus absence of the singular continuous spectrum for compact quantum graphs with several infinite leads attached. The technique used involves Dirichlet-to-Neumann operators.

Beng-Seong Ong

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Branching of Graphs in 2-d Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The branching ratio is calculated for three different models of 2d gravity, using dynamical planar phi-cubed graphs. These models are pure gravity, the D=-2 Gaussian model coupled to gravity and the single spin Ising model coupled to gravity. The ratio gives a measure of how branched the graphs dominating the partition function are. Hence it can be used to estimate the location of the branched polymer phase for the multiple Ising model coupled to 2d gravity.

M. G. Harris

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science DMTCS vol. 11:2, 2009, 149160 Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs Romain Boulet Institut de Math´ematiques de Toulouse by their spectrum by considering some unicyclic graphs. An odd (resp. even) sun is a graph obtained by appending a pendant vertex to each vertex of an odd (resp. even) cycle. A broken sun is a graph obtained by deleting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Quantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins, using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-solute, deep groundwater and a low-solute, soil-water. The mixing model indicated 69% ± 10% deep groundwater-member mixing, hydrological pathway, interbasin groundwater flow INTRODUCTION Knowledge of hydrological pathwaysQuantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins

Chappell, Nick A

317

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Multicoloured Random Graphs: The Random Dynamics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Random Dynamics program is a proposal to explain the origin of all symmetries, including Lorentz and gauge invariance without appeal to any fundamental invariance of the laws of nature, and to derive the known physical laws in such a way as to be almost unavoidable. C. D. Froggatt and H. B. Nielsen proposed in their book Origin of Symmetries, that symmetries and physical laws should arise naturally from some essentially random dynamics rather than being postulated to be exact. The most useful assumption of the program that can be made about the fundamental laws is taken to be that they are random and then to see how known physics like mechanics and relativity follow from them. It is believed that almost any model of these regularities would appear in some limit for example as energies become small. Almost all theories or models at the fundamental level could then explain known physics. We suggest how using the formalism and properties of random graphs might be useful in developing the theory, and point towards directions in which it can be more fully extended in future work.

Sam Tarzi

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Understanding what lies beneath: Groundwater critical to Texas water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organizations and programs associated with groundwater in Texas: Aquifers: Geological formations that can store, transmit, and yield groundwater to a well or spring. Groundwater comes from nine major and 21 minor aquifers in Texas. Confined aquifer: Layer... of water that is held between two layers of clay. The recharge area is limited to land surface where the aquifer?s geologic material is exposed to the land surface. Unconfined aquifer: Layer of water that has a confining layer on bottom and a layer...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Management Plan is to define the function, organizational structure (including associated matrix organizations), interfaces, roles and responsibilities, authority, and relationship to the Department of Energy for the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO). GWPO is charged with the responsibility of coordinating all components of the groundwater program for Energy Systems. This mandate includes activities at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

Early, T.O.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

MARTINEZ, C.R.

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

none,

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Priority Groundwater Management Areas: Overview and Frequently Asked Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water shortages and water quality problems in Texas are prompting the state to address the security of its water supplies. One approach being taken is to create priority groundwater management areas (PGMAs) in critical regions. This publication...

Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Persyn, Russell A.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE has mandated in DOE Order 5400.1 that its operations will be conducted in an environmentally safe manner. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will comply with DOE Order 5400.1 and will conduct its operations in a manner that ensures the safety of the environment and the public. This document outlines how the WIPP will protect and preserve groundwater within and surrounding the WIPP facility. Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. The WIPP groundwater surveillance program is designed to determine statistically if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will be determined and appropriate corrective action initiated.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for additional arsenic removal. Several bench-scale experiments revealed that the resultant IOCS could treat arsenic-laden groundwater for extended periods of time before approaching its effective life cycle. The adsorption capacity for As(III) and As...

Abia, Thomas Sunday

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Institutional Arrangements for Effective Groundwater Management to Halt Land Subsidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater use and development but political entities with adequate scope to deal with the problem were either unwilling or unable to engage in regional water management. Indeed, these political organizations and other institutions may have actually...

Brah, W. L.; Jones, L. L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF, to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R. L. Weiss; D. W. Woolery

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

330

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD.

R. L. Weiss

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD.

R. L. Weiss

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Chloride-Magnesium Ratio of Shallow Groundwaters as a Regional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chloride-Magnesium Ratio of Shallow Groundwaters as a Regional Geothermal Indicator in Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

333

Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Surface and Groundwater Use and Protection is to ensure that Mississippi's public resource of water is safe and used properly. It requires that any person must obtain a permit...

334

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Groundwater Protection Rules Coal Mining Operations (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules establish a series of practices for the protection of groundwater which are to be followed by any person who conducts coal mining operations subject to the provisions of West Virginia...

336

Pauli graph and finite projective lines/geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The commutation relations between the generalized Pauli operators of N-qudits (i. e., N p-level quantum systems), and the structure of their maximal sets of commuting bases, follow a nice graph theoretical/geometrical pattern. One may identify vertices/points with the operators so that edges/lines join commuting pairs of them to form the so-called Pauli graph P_{p^N} . As per two-qubits (p = 2, N = 2) all basic properties and partitionings of this graph are embodied in the geometry of the symplectic generalized quadrangle of order two, W(2). The structure of the two-qutrit (p = 3, N = 2) graph is more involved; here it turns out more convenient to deal with its dual in order to see all the parallels with the two-qubit case and its surmised relation with the geometry of generalized quadrangle Q(4, 3), the dual of W(3). Finally, the generalized adjacency graph for multiple (N > 3) qubits/qutrits is shown to follow from symplectic polar spaces of order two/three. The relevance of these mathematical concepts to mutually unbiased bases and to quantum entanglement is also highlighted in some detail.

Michel R. P. Planat; Metod Saniga

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Kron Reduction of Graphs with Applications to Electrical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consider a weighted and undirected graph, possibly with self-loops, and its corresponding Laplacian matrix, possibly augmented with additional diagonal elements corresponding to the self-loops. The Kron reduction of this graph is again a graph whose Laplacian matrix is obtained by the Schur complement of the original Laplacian matrix with respect to a subset of nodes. The Kron reduction process is ubiquitous in classic circuit theory and in related disciplines such as electrical impedance tomography, smart grid monitoring, transient stability assessment in power networks, or analysis and simulation of induction motors and power electronics. More general applications of Kron reduction occur in sparse matrix algorithms, multi-grid solvers, finite--element analysis, and Markov chains. The Schur complement of a Laplacian matrix and related concepts have also been studied under different names and as purely theoretic problems in the literature on linear algebra. In this paper we propose a general graph-theoretic framework for Kron reduction that leads to novel and deep insights both on the mathematical and the physical side. We show the applicability of our framework to various practical problem setups arising in engineering applications and computation. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive and detailed graph-theoretic analysis of the Kron reduction process encompassing topological, algebraic, spectral, resistive, and sensitivity analyses. Throughout our theoretic elaborations we especially emphasize the practical applicability of our results.

Florian Dorfler; Francesco Bullo

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

A graph-based system for network-vulnerability analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a graph-based approach to network vulnerability analysis. The method is flexible, allowing analysis of attacks from both outside and inside the network. It can analyze risks to a specific network asset, or examine the universe of possible consequences following a successful attack. The graph-based tool can identify the set of attack paths that have a high probability of success (or a low effort cost) for the attacker. The system could be used to test the effectiveness of making configuration changes, implementing an intrusion detection system, etc. The analysis system requires as input a database of common attacks, broken into atomic steps, specific network configuration and topology information, and an attacker profile. The attack information is matched with the network configuration information and an attacker profile to create a superset attack graph. Nodes identify a stage of attack, for example the class of machines the attacker has accessed and the user privilege level he or she has compromised. The arcs in the attack graph represent attacks or stages of attacks. By assigning probabilities of success on the arcs or costs representing level-of-effort for the attacker, various graph algorithms such as shortest-path algorithms can identify the attack paths with the highest probability of success.

Swiler, L.P.; Phillips, C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Quantum ergodicity for graphs related to interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove quantum ergodicity for a family of graphs that are obtained from ergodic one-dimensional maps of an interval using a procedure introduced by Pakonski et al (J. Phys. A, v. 34, 9303-9317 (2001)). As observables we take the L^2 functions on the interval. The proof is based on the periodic orbit expansion of a majorant of the quantum variance. Specifically, given a one-dimensional, Lebesgue-measure-preserving map of an interval, we consider an increasingly refined sequence of partitions of the interval. To this sequence we associate a sequence of graphs, whose directed edges correspond to elements of the partitions and on which the classical dynamics approximates the Perron-Frobenius operator corresponding to the map. We show that, except possibly for subsequences of density 0, the eigenstates of the quantum graphs equidistribute in the limit of large graphs. For a smaller class of observables we also show that the Egorov property, a correspondence between classical and quantum evolution in the semiclassical limit, holds for the quantum graphs in question.

G. Berkolaiko; J. P. Keating; U. Smilansky

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979... ABSTRACT Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Groundwater Aquifers. (December 1979) David Bryan Reed, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald L. Reddell Solar energy is a promising alternate energy source for space heat...

Reed, David Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

Forstrom, J.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (W.M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Radioiodine Biogeochemistry and Prevalence in Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

129I is commonly either the top or among the top risk drivers, along with 99Tc, at radiological waste disposal sites and contaminated groundwater sites where nuclear material fabrication or reprocessing has occurred. The risk stems largely from 129I having a high toxicity, a high bioaccumulation factor (90% of all the body’s iodine concentrates in the thyroid), a high inventory at source terms (due to its high fission yield), an extremely long half-life (16M yr), and rapid mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that 129I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define 129I mass balance and flux at sites, but cannot predict accurately its response to changes in the environment. As a consequence of some of these characteristics, 129I has a very low Drinking Water Standard, DWS, which is set at 1 pCi/L, the lowest of all radionuclides in the Federal Register. Recently, significant advancements have been made in detecting iodine species at ambient groundwater concentrations, defining the nature of the organic matter and iodine bond, and quantifying the role of naturally occurring sediment microbes to promote iodine oxidation and reduction. These recent studies have led to a more mechanistic understanding of radioiodine biogeochemistry. The objective of this review is to describe these advances and to provide a state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport in the terrestrial environment and provide information useful for making decisions regarding the stewardship and remediation of 129I contaminated sites. As part of this review, knowledge gaps were identified that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating 129I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of 129I waste. Together the information gained from addressing these knowledge gaps will not alter the observation that 129I is primarily mobile, but it will likely permit demonstration that the entire 129I pool in the source term is not moving at the same rate and some may be tightly bound to the sediment, thereby “smearing” the modeled 129I peak and reducing maximum calculated risk.

Kaplan, Daniel I.; Denham, Miles E.; Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Xu, Chen; Schwehr, Kathy; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mining Large Heterogeneous Graphs using Cray s Urika  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pattern discovery and predictive modeling from seemingly related Big Data represented as massive, ad-hoc, heterogeneous networks (e.g., extremely large graphs with complex, possibly unknown structure) is an outstanding problem in many application domains. To address this problem, we are designing graph-mining algorithms capable of discovering relationship-patterns from such data and using those discovered patterns as features for classification and predictive modeling. Specifically, we are: (i) exploring statistical properties, mechanics and generative models of behavior patterns in heterogeneous information networks, (ii) developing novel, automated and scalable graph-pattern discovery algorithms and (iii) applying our relationship-analytics (data science + network science) expertise to domains spanning healthcare to homeland security.

Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL; Bond, Nathaniel A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Semi-classical measures on Quantum graphs and the Gau map of the determinant manifold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

believed that QE does not hold in general for a FIXED quantum graph. This is proved for star graphs in [BKW to what people do in several papers like [BG00, BKW04, BW08, Ba12, BB13]. Let

Recanati, Catherine

346

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing, 2013 Mousavi: Path Testing #12;Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Outline Structural

Mousavi, Mohammad

347

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing, 2012 Mousavi: Path Testing #12;Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Outline Structural

Mousavi, Mohammad

348

Random intersection graphs and their applications in security, wireless communication, and social networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Random intersection graphs have received much interest and been used in diverse applications. They are naturally induced in modeling secure sensor networks under random key predistribution schemes, as well as in modeling the topologies of social networks including common-interest networks, collaboration networks, and actor networks. Simply put, a random intersection graph is constructed by assigning each node a set of items in some random manner and then putting an edge between any two nodes that share a certain number of items. Broadly speaking, our work is about analyzing random intersection graphs, and models generated by composing it with other random graph models including random geometric graphs and Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi graphs. These compositional models are introduced to capture the characteristics of various complex natural or man-made networks more accurately than the existing models in the literature. For random intersection graphs and their compositions with other random graphs, we study properties su...

Zhao, Jun; Gligor, Virgil

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Math 497E/564 Graph Theory Winter 2012 Instructor Amites Sarkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 497E/564 Graph Theory Winter 2012 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Modern Graph Theory B, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar@wwu.edu #12;

Sarkar, Amites

350

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Vacuum energy, spectral determinant and heat kernel asymptotics of graph Laplacians with general vertex matching conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider Laplace operators on metric graphs, networks of one-dimensional line segments (bonds), with matching conditions at the vertices that make the operator self-adjoint. Such quantum graphs provide a simple model of quantum mechanics in a classically chaotic system with multiple scales corresponding to the lengths of the bonds. For graph Laplacians we briefly report results for the spectral determinant, vacuum energy and heat kernel asymptotics of general graphs in terms of the vertex matching conditions.

J. M. Harrison; K. Kirsten

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Highly Connected Random Geometric Graphs Paul Balister #+ Bela Bollobas +# Amites Sarkar + Mark Walters #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly Connected Random Geometric Graphs Paul Balister #+ Bâ??ela Bollobâ??as +#§ Amites Sarkar +¶ Mark

Banaji,. Murad

353

Bounds for mixing time of quantum walks on finite graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several inequalities are proved for the mixing time of discrete-time quantum walks on finite graphs. The mixing time is defined differently than in Aharonov, Ambainis, Kempe and Vazirani (2001) and it is found that for particular examples of walks on a cycle, a hypercube and a complete graph, quantum walks provide no speed-up in mixing over the classical counterparts. In addition, non-unitary quantum walks (i.e., walks with decoherence) are considered and a criterion for their convergence to the unique stationary distribution is derived.

Vladislav Kargin

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Bifurcations of mutually coupled equations in random graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the behavior of solutions of mutually coupled equations in heterogeneous random graphs. Heterogeneity means that some equations receive many inputs whereas most of the equations are given only with a few connections. Starting from a situation where the isolated equations are unstable, we prove that a heterogeneous interaction structure leads to the appearance of stable subspaces of solutions. Moreover, we show that, for certain classes of heterogeneous networks, increasing the strength of interaction leads to a cascade of bifurcations in which the dimension of the stable subspace of solutions increases. We explicitly determine the bifurcation scenario in terms of the graph structure.

Eduardo Garibaldi; Tiago Pereira

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Groups generated by bounded automata and their schreier graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on levels of automaton groups can be constructed by an iterative procedure of inflation of graphs. This was used to associate a piecewise linear map of the form fK(v) = minA?KAv, where K is a finite set of nonnegative matrices, with every bounded automaton... and minimal growth of the components of f(n)K (v). We prove that the growth exponent of diameters of the Schreier graphs is equal to ?max and the orbital contracting coefficient of the group is equal to 1? min . We prove that the simple random walks on orbital...

Bondarenko, Ievgen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

Some Remarks on Cycles in Graphs and Digraphs \\Lambda Martin Loebl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some Remarks on Cycles in Graphs and Digraphs \\Lambda Martin Loebl Department of Applied, Chile mmatamal@dim.uchile.cl Abstract We survey several recent results on cycles of graphs and directed graphs of the following form: 'Does there exist a set of cycles with a property P that generates all

Loebl, Martin

357

EVEN CYCLE DECOMPOSITIONS OF GRAPHS WITH NO ODD-K4-MINOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVEN CYCLE DECOMPOSITIONS OF GRAPHS WITH NO ODD-K4-MINOR TONY HUYNH, SANG-IL OUM, AND MARYAM VERDIAN-RIZI Abstract. An even cycle decomposition of a graph G is a partition of E(G) into cycles of even length. Evidently, every Eulerian bipartite graph has an even cycle decomposition. Seymour [circuits

Kim, Yong Jung

358

Improved bounds and algorithms for graph cuts and network reliability David G. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved bounds and algorithms for graph cuts and network reliability David G. Harris Aravind, the graphs we deal with will be multi-graphs with no self-loops. We define R(p), the reliability polyno- mial there is no currently known algorithm for estimating R(p), the complementary probability U(p) = 1 - R(p), which we

Srinivasan, Aravind

359

Multiple Coordinated Views for Network Attack Graphs Steven Noel Michael Jacobs Pramod Kalapa Sushil Jajodia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple Coordinated Views for Network Attack Graphs Steven Noel Michael Jacobs Pramod Kalapa graph-based representations have been developed for modeling combinations of low-level network attacks, relatively little attention has been paid to effective techniques for visualizing such attack graphs

Noel, Steven

360

CLAW-FREE 3-CONNECTED P11-FREE GRAPHS ARE HAMILTONIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLAW-FREE 3-CONNECTED P11-FREE GRAPHS ARE HAMILTONIAN TOMASZ LUCZAK AND FLORIAN PFENDER Abstract. We show that every 3-connected claw-free graph which contains no induced copy of P11 is hamiltonian. Since there ex- ist non-hamiltonian 3-connected claw-free graphs without induced copies of P12

Pfender, Florian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The evolution of helping and harming on graphs: the return of the inclusive fitness effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of helping and harming on graphs: the return of the inclusive fitness effect L relatedness between individuals promotes helping behaviour, evolu- tionary graph theory emphasizes., 2006; Ohtsuki & Nowak, 2006). Evolutionary graph theory models allow the effect of space on helping

Alvarez, Nadir

362

Between automation and exploration: SAS graphing techniques for visualization of survey data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Between automation and exploration: SAS graphing techniques for visualization of survey data Chong of survey data. There is always a tension between automation and exploration. Automation is a common to automate the graphing processes via SAS/Macros and SAS/Graph. However, hidden patterns of the data may

Yu, Alex

363

Protection of a Graph EJ Cockayne y , PJP Grobler z , WR Grundlingh z ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

four strategies, i.e. properties of such functions under which the entire graph may be deemed protected of guards required to protect the graph under the various strategies, are stud- ied. Exact values or boundsProtection of a Graph #3; EJ Cockayne y , PJP Grobler z , WR Grundlingh z , J Munganga Ă? & JH van

van Vuuren, Jan H.

364

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Classification of groundwater at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater occurring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been classified according to the ``Guidelines for Ground-Water Classification Under the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ground-Water Protection Strategy`` (June 1988). All of the groundwater units at the NTS are Class II, groundwater currently (IIA) or potentially (IIB) a source of drinking water. The Classification Review Area (CRA) for the NTS is defined as the standard two-mile distance from the facility boundary recommended by EPA. The possibility of expanding the CRA was evaluated, but the two-mile distance encompasses the area expected to be impacted by contaminant transport during a 10-year period (EPA,s suggested limit), should a release occur. The CRA is very large as a consequence of the large size of the NTS and the decision to classify the entire site, not individual areas of activity. Because most activities are located many miles hydraulically upgradient of the NTS boundary, the CRA generally provides much more than the usual two-mile buffer required by EPA. The CRA is considered sufficiently large to allow confident determination of the use and value of groundwater and identification of potentially affected users. The size and complex hydrogeology of the NTS are inconsistent with the EPA guideline assumption of a high degree of hydrologic interconnection throughout the review area. To more realistically depict the site hydrogeology, the CRA is subdivided into eight groundwater units. Two main aquifer systems are recognized: the lower carbonate aquifer system and the Cenozoic aquifer system (consisting of aquifers in Quaternary valley fill and Tertiary volcanics). These aquifer systems are further divided geographically based on the location of low permeability boundaries.

Chapman, J.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming Nicholas R. Kirchner University of Minnesota Thursday, August 30, 2012 #12;Outline 1 MATLAB installation NRK (University of Minnesota) MATLAB 2012.08.30 2 / 28 #12;Outline 1 MATLAB installation 2 The MATLAB UI NRK (University

Weinberger, Hans

368

Analyzing Gene Relationships for Down Syndrome with Labeled Transition Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyzing Gene Relationships for Down Syndrome with Labeled Transition Graphs Neha Rungta, Hyrum changes in gene expres- sion and physical characteristics associated with Down syndrome is not well understood. Chromosome 21 genes interact with non- chromosome 21 genes to produce Down syndrome

Brigham Young University

369

Structured Region Graphs: Morphing EP into GBP Max Welling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Region Graphs: Morphing EP into GBP Max Welling Dept. of Computer Science UC Irvine@eecs.berkeley.edu Abstract GBP and EP are two successful algo­ rithms for approximate probabilistic infer­ ence, which on these structures allow conversion between EP and GBP free ener­ gies. Thus it is revealed that all EP ap

Welling, Max

370

Structured Region Graphs: Morphing EP into GBP Max Welling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Region Graphs: Morphing EP into GBP Max Welling Dept. of Computer Science UC Irvine@eecs.berkeley.edu Abstract GBP and EP are two successful algo- rithms for approximate probabilistic infer- ence, which on these structures allow conversion between EP and GBP free ener- gies. Thus it is revealed that all EP ap

Welling, Max

371

Kron Reduction of Graphs with Applications to Electrical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Kron Reduction of Graphs with Applications to Electrical Networks Florian D¨orfler Francesco work supported by NSF grants IIS- 0904501 and CPS-1135819. Florian D¨orfler and Francesco Bullo Barbara, CA 93106, {dorfler, bullo}@engineering.ucsb.edu we consider the circuit naturally associated

Bullo, Francesco

372

Brain Mapping Using Topology Graphs Obtained by Surface Segmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain Mapping Using Topology Graphs Obtained by Surface Segmentation Fabien Vivodtzev1 , Lars@ucdavis.edu Summary. Brain mapping is a technique used to alleviate the tedious and time- consuming process of annotating brains by mapping existing annotations from brain atlases to individual brains. We introduce

Linsen, Lars

373

Spectral Decision Diagrams Using Graph Transformations Mitchell Thornton Rolf Drechsler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral Decision Diagrams Using Graph Transformations #3; Mitchell Thornton Rolf Drechsler Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Siemens AG Mississippi State University Corporate Technology Mississippi State, MS 39762 81730 Munich, Germany mitch@ece.msstate.edu rolf.drechsler@mchp.siemens

Thornton, Mitchell

374

Mining Large Graphs And Streams Using Matrix And Tensor Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESULTS The graphs at right show overall variability distribution estimated for the Pentium D 800 where a core no longer works properly. In the Sun T1 Niagara cores this is done with a built-in- self processors we record the temperature at which the failure occurred and adjust to the frequencies

Kolda, Tamara G.

375

Optimizing Path Query Performance: Graph Clustering Strategies \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.J. Watson Labs ywh@us.ibm.com Ning Jing z Changsha Institute of Technology jning@eecs.umich.edu Elke A because it does not incur any run­time cost, requires no auxiliary data structures, and is complimentary evaluation of the performance of these graph clustering techniques using an actual city road network as well

376

An Interchange File Format for Graphs Michael Himsolt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphical information. It is designed as an extendible format and provides facilities such that other be as flexible and extensible as possible. Other programs should be able to write graph files with low overhead Ascii). Since end of line is encoded differ­ ently on different platform, we choose not to use end­of­line

Pentus, Mati

377

Hamilton cycles in graphs and hypergraphs: an extremal perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamilton cycles in graphs and hypergraphs: an extremal perspective Abstract. As one of the most fundamental and well-known NP-complete problems, the Hamilton cycle problem has been the subject of intensive and the study of Hamilton cycles in hypergraphs. We survey these developments and highlight open problems

Osthus, Deryk

378

HAMILTON CYCLES IN GRAPHS AND HYPERGRAPHS: AN EXTREMAL PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAMILTON CYCLES IN GRAPHS AND HYPERGRAPHS: AN EXTREMAL PERSPECTIVE DANIELA K¨UHN AND DERYK OSTHUS Abstract. As one of the most fundamental and well-known NP-complete problems, the Hamilton cycle problem emerged, such as resilience, robustness and the study of Hamilton cycles in hypergraphs. We survey

Osthus, Deryk

379

HAMILTON CYCLES IN GRAPHS AND HYPERGRAPHS: AN EXTREMAL PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAMILTON CYCLES IN GRAPHS AND HYPERGRAPHS: AN EXTREMAL PERSPECTIVE DANIELA K¨UHN AND DERYK OSTHUS Abstract. As one of the most fundamental and well-known NP-complete prob- lems, the Hamilton cycle problem emerged, such as resilience, robustness and the study of Hamilton cycles in hypergraphs. We survey

Osthus, Deryk

380

Compatible Hamilton cycles in random graphs Michael Krivelevich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compatible Hamilton cycles in random graphs Michael Krivelevich Choongbum Lee Benny Sudakov, there exists a properly colored Hamilton cycle. Furthermore, our proof can be easily modified to show, there exists a Hamilton cycle in which all edges have distinct colors (i.e., a rainbow Hamilton cycle). 1

Sudakov, Benjamin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

382

Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph Dorit Ron and Adi Shamir Department.ron,adi.shamir}@weizmann.ac.il Abstract. The Bitcoin scheme is a rare example of a large scale global payment system in which all and how they spend their bitcoins, the balance of bitcoins they keep in their accounts, and how they move

383

SMITH INVARIANTS AND DUAL GRADED GRAPHS ALEXANDER MILLER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMITH INVARIANTS AND DUAL GRADED GRAPHS ALEXANDER MILLER Abstract. The aim of this paper the Smith invariants immediately, as the eigenvalues are completely understood [3, 15]. Furthermore, we. Background 1 1.1. Differential posets 1 1.2. Eigenvalues 3 1.3. Smith invariants 3 2. Conjecture for r

Weinberger, Hans

384

Evaluation of Multimodal Graphs for Blind People , STEPHEN BREWSTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sense on people's fingers. Tactile diagrams exist in many forms and they mainly differEvaluation of Multimodal Graphs for Blind People WAI YU 1 , STEPHEN BREWSTER 2 1 Virtual visualisation system and its evaluations. This system is designed to improve blind and visually impaired people

Williamson, John

385

Synchronous Black Hole Search in Directed Graphs Adrian Kosowski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchronous Black Hole Search in Directed Graphs Adrian Kosowski Alfredo Navarra Cristina M called black hole nodes, and once a robot enters in one of them, it is destroyed. The goal is to find supported by the Italian CNR Short-Term Mobility Program. A. Kosowski was supported Polish Ministry Grant N

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA SVANTE JANSON Abstract - 1) = n n-2 for every n # 1. Wright [19] proved that for any fixed k # -1, we have the analoguous) Note the equivalent recursion formula # k+1 = 3k + 2 2 # k + k # j=0 # j # k-j , k # -1. (4) Wright

Janson, Svante

387

WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA SVANTE JANSON Abstract n 1. Wright [19] proved that for any fixed k -1, we have the analoguous asymptotic formula C(n, n-j, k -1. (4) Wright gives in the later paper [20] the same result in the form k = 2(1-5k)/23k1/2(k - 1

Janson, Svante

388

A graph-based network-vulnerability analysis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a graph based approach to network vulnerability analysis. The method is flexible, allowing analysis of attacks from both outside and inside the network. It can analyze risks to a specific network asset, or examine the universe of possible consequences following a successful attack. The analysis system requires as input a database of common attacks, broken into atomic steps, specific network configuration and topology information, and an attacker profile. The attack information is matched with the network configuration information and an attacker profile to create a superset attack graph. Nodes identify a stage of attack, for example the class of machines the attacker has accessed and the user privilege level he or she has compromised. The arcs in the attack graph represent attacks or stages of attacks. By assigning probabilities of success on the arcs or costs representing level of effort for the attacker, various graph algorithms such as shortest path algorithms can identify the attack paths with the highest probability of success.

Swiler, L.P.; Phillips, C.; Gaylor, T.

1998-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

389

A graph-based network-vulnerability analysis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a graph-based approach to network vulnerability analysis. The method is flexible, allowing analysis of attacks from both outside and inside the network. It can analyze risks to a specific network asset, or examine the universe of possible consequences following a successful attack. The analysis system requires as input a database of common attacks, broken into atomic steps, specific network configuration and topology information, and an attacker profile. The attack information is matched with the network configuration information and an attacker profile to create a superset attack graph. Nodes identify a stage of attack, for example the class of machines the attacker has accessed and the user privilege level he or she has compromised. The arcs in the attack graph represent attacks or stages of attacks. By assigning probabilities of success on the arcs or costs representing level-of-effort for the attacker, various graph algorithms such as shortest-path algorithms can identify the attack paths with the highest probability of success.

Swiler, L.P.; Phillips, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaylor, T. [3M, Austin, TX (United States). Visual Systems Div.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Using Visualization Process Graphs to Improve Visualization Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Visualization Process Graphs to Improve Visualization Exploration T. J. Jankun-Kelly1 University, MS 39762, USA. Email: tjk@acm.org Abstract. Visualization exploration is an iterative process, redundant exploration was quickly identified and eliminated. 1 Introduction During the visualization process

Jankun-Kelly, T. J.

391

Graphs, Rewriting and Pathway Reconstruction for Rule-Based Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of systems represented by rule- based models. This is founded on a new, clean, graph on Foundations of Software Technology and Theoretical Computer Science (FSTTCS 2012). Editors: D. D'Souza, J ­ Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik, Dagstuhl Publishing, Germany #12;Danos et al. 277 illuminates choices made

Fontana, Walter

392

Approximating the Diameter of Planar Graphs in Near Linear Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

common starting vertex. Let Gin (resp. Gout) be the subgraph of G induced by C and all interior (resp. exterior) vertices to C. Let d(Gin, Gout, G) denote the largest distance in the graph G between a marked vertex in V (Gin) and a marked vertex in V (Gout). In the beginning, all vertices of G are marked and we

Yuster, Raphael

393

A Simple Approach to Abductive Inference using Conceptual Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simple Approach to Abductive Inference using Conceptual Graphs Maurice Pagnucco Knowledge Systems, Australia. email: morri@cs.su.oz.au fax : +61­2­692­3838 Abstract Abductive reasoning (or simply abduction) is a form of logical in­ ference that aims to derive plausible explanations for data. The term ``abduction

Pagnucco, Maurice

394

Concept generation of dynamic systems using bond graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPRESENTATIONS OF IMMITTANCES . . . Immittance synthesis in design Conventional immit tance synthesis techniques by Foster and Cauer Immittance synthesis with bond graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example - Synthesis of two frequency absorber... . . . . . . . . . 35 . 35 . 38 . . . . . . 40 . . . . . . 49 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page V PHYSICAL REPRESENTATIONS OF TRANSFER FUNCTIONS Transfer function synthesis in design . . . . . . . . . . . General procedure Conditions for passive...

Krishnan, S

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The average number of distinct sites visited by a random walker on random graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the linear large $n$ behavior of the average number of distinct sites $S(n)$ visited by a random walker after $n$ steps on a large random graph. An expression for the graph topology dependent prefactor $B$ in $S(n) = Bn$ is proposed. We use generating function techniques to relate this prefactor to the graph adjacency matrix and then devise message-passing equations to calculate its value. Numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the agreement between the message passing predictions and random walk simulations on random graphs. Scaling with system size and average graph connectivity are also analysed.

De Bacco, Caterina; Sollich, Peter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

MODELING SHALLOW GROUNDWATER TABLE CONTRIBUTION TO SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF A CALCAREOUS SOIL OF SOUTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MODELING SHALLOW GROUNDWATER TABLE CONTRIBUTION TO SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE...................................................................................................................................13 CHAPTER 1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................15 Shallow Groundwater Capillarity

Migliaccio, Kati White

399

Designing A New Elitist Nondominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm For A Multiobjective Long Term Groundwater Monitoring Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

historical data for the migration of a plume of perchloroethylene (PCE) in groundwater. PCE is a commonly groundwater samples are used to assess the effectiveness of clean up efforts in reducing the amount of PCE

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic groundwater sediment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anoxic groundwater sediment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Use of Dissolved H2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of hydrological flow pattern on groundwater arsenic concentration in Bangladesh by Khandaker Ashfaque.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Widespread arsenic contamination of groundwater has become a major concern in Bangladesh since the water supply, particularly in rural areas, is heavily dependent on groundwater. However, relative to the extent of research ...

Ashfaque, Khandaker

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Application of Stable Isotope Probing to Identify RDX-degrading Bacteria in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carcinogen; therefore, occurrence of RDX in groundwater has raised a public health concern. As RDX is biodegradable; bioremediation of RDX-contaminated groundwater has been recognized as a feasible cleanup technology. Several RDX-degrading isolates...

Cho, Kun-Ching

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - area groundwater biodenitrification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vol. 8, 03933, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962graEGU06-A-03933 Summary: groundwater extraction potential are present in the whole basin area. The groundwater quality is fairly...

404

Probabilistic analysis of the effects of climate change on groundwater recharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] Groundwater recharge is likely to be affected by climate change. In semiarid regions where groundwater resources are often critical, annual recharge rates are typically small and most recharge occurs episodically. Such ...

Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal

405

Water balance investigations of groundwater depletion in Asia : information needs and uncertainty analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigated agriculture is an essential component of global food production. In many regions of the world, and Asia in particular, groundwater is a major source of irrigation water. Over-pumping of groundwater aquifers has ...

Kiang, Julie E. (Julie Ega), 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

1 Introduction In Southeast Michigan the source of groundwater is almost guaranteed by its climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater extractors in the countyöstone quarries, golf courses, farms, and house- holds. The groundwater, while eliminating quarry dewatering did not entirely solve the problem. Both low-density and high

Illinois at Chicago, University of

407

Seasonal dynamics in costal aquifers : investigation of submarine groundwater discharge through field measurements and numerical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fresh and saline groundwater flowing from coastal aquifers into the ocean comprise submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This outflow is an important pathway for the transport of nutrients and contaminants, and has ...

Michael, Holly Anne, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling

Fay, Noah

409

MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R. Lund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R University of California, Davis April 2003 #12;MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme;TABLE OF CONTENTS i INTRODUCTION

Pasternack, Gregory B.

410

LDRD final report : first application of geospatial semantic graphs to SAR image data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mixed waste landfill annual groundwater monitoring report April 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual groundwater sampling was conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories' Mixed Waste Landfill (MWL) in April 2005. Seven monitoring wells were sampled using a Bennett{trademark} pump in accordance with the April 2005 Mini-Sampling and Analysis Plan for the MWL (SNL/NM 2005). The samples were analyzed off site at General Engineering Laboratories, Inc. for a broad suite of radiochemical and chemical parameters, and the results are presented in this report. Sample splits were also collected from several of the wells by the New Mexico Environment Department U.S. Department of Energy Oversight Bureau; however, the split sample results are not included in this report. The results of the April 2005 annual groundwater monitoring conducted at the MWL showed constituent concentrations within the historical ranges for the site and indicated no evidence of groundwater contamination from the landfill.

Lyon, Mark L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 447, as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the State of Nevada, includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the PSA.

None

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

Connell, Carl W. Jr. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Carr, Jennifer S. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Conley, S. F. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Brown, W. L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic groundwater system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Arsenic Occurrence in Groundwater...

416

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

417

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative to the use of hydraulic measurements alone. Anthropogenic tracers and their decay products, such as CFC11, 3H, and 3He, provide significant constraint oninput permeability values in the model. Tracer data for 39Ar provide even more complete information on the heterogeneity of permeability and variability in the flow system than the anthropogenic tracers, leading to greater parameter uncertainty reduction.

Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Majority of Livestock Waste Lagoons Pose No Risk to Groundwater Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Majority of Livestock Waste Lagoons Pose No Risk to Groundwater Pollution by Steve Ress UNL Water livestock waste lagoons may not be significant contributors to groundwater pollution. "This is particularly of groundwater pollution from livestock waste lagoons, Spalding said. Samples also were analyzed for nitrogen

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

Hartman, Mary J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada and their application to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada.sader@mmg.com) ABSTRACT: Peat groundwater compositions at depths of 0.4 and 1.1 m below ground surface in the Attawapiskat on hydrogeological measurements and variations in peat groundwater geochemical parameters (pH and EC are high

423

Remediation of MTBE in groundwater: A case where pump-and-treat works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two case studies are discussed in which groundwater pumping reduced levels of dissolved methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater by more than two orders of magnitude, in some cases to below detection limits. MTBE contamination in groundwater is becoming an important issue due to the increasing prevalence and regulation of this gasoline additive. In addition, MTBE is more mobile in groundwater than most hydrocarbons, so it is usually the first gasoline constituent to reach sensitive receptors. Since its Henry`s constant is low, in situ removal of MTBE from groundwater by air sparging is slow, and MTBE does not rapidly degrade, either biologically or abiotically. Therefore, groundwater pumping is usually employed to contain and collect MTBE-contaminated groundwater. Pumping groundwater can reduce MME levels to below detection limits within a few years, because MTBE in the subsurface is found mostly dissolved in groundwater. In contrast, the more hydrophobic gasoline hydrocarbons exist mostly in pockets of separate phase material and adsorbed to soil particles and dissolve slowly in groundwater. Hydrocarbon concentrations are rarely reduced to closure levels within a reasonable time frame by pumping. Sites in eastern Massachusetts and southern New Jersey, where groundwater was contaminated with MTBE due to releases of unleaded gasoline from underground storage tanks, are discussed. At these sites, average MTBE levels were reduced by two to three orders of magnitude, from several ppm or more to less than 10 ppb within three years by pumping groundwater at 10 to 30 gpm.

Bass, D.H.; Riley, B. [Groundwater Technology, Inc., Norwood, MA (United States); Farrell, T. [Groundwater Technology, Inc., Trenton, NJ (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Growth and metal uptake of microalgae produced using salt groundwaters from the Bay of Bourgneuf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth and metal uptake of microalgae produced using salt groundwaters from the Bay of Bourgneuf production of microalgae. Salt groundwaters, available in this region, support a large part of four microalgae grown in two salt groundwaters or in enriched coastal seawater. Cultures of microalgae

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4 + in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3 Ă? and excess N2 gas, which were related

426

Assessment groundwater monitoring plan for single shell tank waste management area B-BX-BY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY has been placed into groundwater quality assessment monitoring under interim-status regulations. This document presents background and an assessment groundwater monitoring plan to evaluate any impacts of risks/spills from these Single Shell Tanks in WMA B-BX-BY on groundwater quality.

Caggiano, J.A.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling Groundwater flow Solute transport INTRODUCTION Predicting any natural process is a very difficultHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE MODELLING Scales of heterogeneity, REV, dispersion and measurement scale groundwater flow and convection

428

Parameter Estimation in Groundwater Flow Models with Distributed and Pointwise Observations*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameter Estimation in Groundwater Flow Models with Distributed and Pointwise Observations* Ben G concerning the least sqaures estimation of parameters in a groundwater flow model. As is typically the case­93­1­0153. #12; 1 Introduction Understanding the flow of groundwater is an important scientific and engineering

429

Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds; Groundwater management; Drinking water. Introduction Approximately one-half of the U and Hitt 2006 , or more complex process-based analyses utilizing groundwater models Eberts et al. 2005Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater: Use in Vulnerability

430

COMSOL Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Two-Dimensional Geometries With Heterogeneities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMSOL Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Two-Dimensional Geometries, Environmental Sys- tems. 1 Introduction Groundwater contributes an large portion of stream flow and subsequently% of a streams nitrogen load has been discharged from groundwater. The surficial aquifer geometry in this area

Gobbert, Matthias K.

431

Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the ECHAM4.5 general circulation model indicate that it is possible to quantify groundwater variability; Groundwater-surface water interaction; Hydroclimatology; Forecasting. Introduction ClimateRole of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction over

Arumugam, Sankar

432

Spring temperatures in the Sagehen Basin, Sierra Nevada, CA: implications for heat flow and groundwater circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on groundwater flow depths within the basin. An analytical model based on these constraints indicates@berkeley.edu. Tel: +1 510 642 2288. Fax: +1 510 643 9980. Geofluids (2009) 9, 195­207 INTRODUCTION Groundwater and groundwater circulation MARIA BRUMM, CHI-YUEN WANG AND MICHAEL MANGA Earth and Planetary Science, University

Manga, Michael

433

Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts for a physical aquifer experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts, and D. M. Rizzo (2008), Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport. Introduction [2] Eigbe et al. [1998] provide an excellent review of groundwater applications of the linear

Vermont, University of

434

Determining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of freshwater into the bay. A second model using Sr2+ /Ca2+ ratios was developed to discern fresh groundwater. Florida . Submarine groundwater discharge Introduction The timing and sources of freshwater deliveryDetermining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge

Miami, University of

435

Predictive Simulations to Assess Potential Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater April 23, 2010 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................ 6 2.2.2 Modifications to Groundwater Flow Model to Simulate Pond Seepage and Pumping.. 6 2.3 Results ............................................................................................................9 3.1 Changes to the Groundwater Flow Model

Netoff, Theoden

436

Groundwater flow and salt transport in a subterranean estuary2 driven by intensified wave conditions3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater discharge, aquifer-ocean exchange, coastal45 aquifer, numerical modeling.46 #12;1. Introduction47 A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model,26 was conducted1 Groundwater flow and salt transport in a subterranean estuary2 driven by intensified wave

Candea, George

437

7-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to implement best management practices designed to protect groundwater. Examples include upgrading underground7-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT water to the Upper Glacial aquifer. #12;7-22001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER

Homes, Christopher C.

438

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. The monitoring frequency and selection criteria for each sampling location is in Appendix C. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix D. If issued, addenda to this plan will be inserted in Appendix E, and Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix F. Guidance for managing purged groundwater is provided in Appendix G.

N /A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. The Bitcoin scheme is a rare example of a large scale global payment system in which all the transactions are publicly accessible (but in an anonymous way). We downloaded the full history of this scheme, and analyzed many statistical properties of its associated transaction graph. In this paper we answer for the first time a variety of interesting questions about the typical behavior of users, how they acquire and how they spend their bitcoins, the balance of bitcoins they keep in their accounts, and how they move bitcoins between their various accounts in order to better protect their privacy. In addition, we isolated all the large transactions in the system, and discovered that almost all of them are closely related to a single large transaction that took place in November 2010, even though the associated users apparently tried to hide this fact with many strange looking long chains and fork-merge structures in the transaction graph.

Dorit Ron; Adi Shamir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A graph-separation theorem for quantum causal models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A causal model is an abstract representation of a physical system as a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where the statistical dependencies are encoded using a graphical criterion called `d-separation'. Recent work by Wood & Spekkens shows that causal models cannot, in general, provide a faithful representation of quantum systems. Since d-separation encodes a form of Reichenbach's Common Cause Principle (RCCP), whose validity is questionable in quantum mechanics, we propose a generalised graph separation rule that does not assume the RCCP. We prove that the new rule faithfully captures the statistical dependencies between observables in a quantum network, encoded as a DAG, and is consistent with d-separation in a classical limit. We note that the resulting model is still unable to give a faithful representation of correlations stronger than quantum mechanics, such as the Popescu-Rorlich box.

Jacques Pienaar; Caslav Brukner

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Spectral properties of microwave graphs with local absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of absorption on the spectra of microwave graphs has been studied experimentally. The microwave networks were made up of coaxial cables and T junctions. First, absorption was introduced by attaching a 50 Ohm load to an additional vertex for graphs with and without time-reversal symmetry. The resulting level-spacing distributions were compared with a generalization of the Wigner surmise in the presence of open channels proposed recently by Poli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 174101 (2012)]. Good agreement was found using an effective coupling parameter. Second, absorption was introduced along one individual bond via a variable microwave attenuator, and the influence of absorption on the length spectrum was studied. The peak heights in the length spectra corresponding to orbits avoiding the absorber were found to be independent of the attenuation, whereas, the heights of the peaks belonging to orbits passing the absorber once or twice showed the expected decrease with increasing attenuation.

M. Allgaier; S. Gehler; S. Barkhofen; H. -J. Stöckmann; U. Kuhl

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Factors Governing Sustainable Groundwater Pumping near a River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treat- ment technologies include lower capital investments and operating costs due to lower energy of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1 system. Introduction Groundwater pumping near rivers is utilized in water resources management

Hubbard, Susan

446

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Effect of oil pollution on fresh groundwater in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive oil fires in Kuwait were the aftermath of the Gulf War. This resulted in the pollution of air, water, and soil, the magnitude of which is unparalleled in the history of mankind. Oil fires damaged several oil well heads, resulting in the flow of oil, forming large oil lakes. Products of combustion from oil well fires deposited over large areas. Infiltrating rainwater, leaching out contaminants from oil lakes and products of combustion at ground surface, can reach the water table and contaminate the groundwater. Field investigations, supported by laboratory studies and mathematical models, show that infiltration of oil from oil lakes will be limited to a depth of about 2 m from ground surface. Preliminary mathematical models showed that contaminated rainwater can infiltrate and reach the water table within a period of three to four days, particularly at the Raudhatain and Umm Al-Aish regions. These are the only regions in Kuwait where fresh groundwater exists. After reaching the water table, the lateral movement of contaminants is expected to be very slow under prevailing hydraulic gradients. Groundwater monitoring at the above regions during 1992 showed minor levels of vanadium, nickel, and total hydrocarbons at certain wells. Since average annual rainfall in the region is only 120 mm/yr, groundwater contamination due to the infiltration of contaminated rainwater is expected to be a long-term one. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Al-Sulaimi, J.; Viswanathan, M.N.; Szekely, F. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The UMTRA PEIS: A strategy for groundwater remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) was initiated in 1992 for the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) program. The PEIS kicked off the groundwater restoration phase of UMTRA, a project involving remediation of 24 sites in ten states and tribal lands contaminated with tailings from uranium mining and milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed, in early 1992, that a PEIS was an appropriate strategy to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for this second, groundwater phase of the project. This decision recognized that although a parallel effort was being undertaken in preparing a PEIS for DOE's Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) program, characteristics and the maturity of the UMTRA project made it more appropriate to prepare a separate PEIS. The ER/WM PEIS is intended to examine environmental restoration and waste management issues from a very broad perspective. For UMTRA, with surface remediation completed or well under way at 18 of the 24 sites, a more focused programmatic approach for groundwater restoration is more effective than including the UMTRA project within the ER/WM environmental impact statements. A separate document allows a more focused and detailed analysis necessary to efficiently tier site-specific environmental assessments for groundwater restoration at each of the 24 UMTRA former processing sites.

Burt, C.; Ulland, L.; Weston, R.F.; Metzler, D. (DOE, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF AN EXISTING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.9 kilowatt total) 14 #12;ENERGY IMPROVEMENT BENEFITS 15 #12;RETURN ON INVESTMENT: SOLAR PANELS 16 #12 of grid energy with solar panel arrays Long-term operations and maintenance costs were significantly.7 kilowatt total) 13 #12;GROUNDWATER SYSTEM ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS ­ Northern Solar Array: 56 panel system (10

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

450

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky Vitaly A. Zlotnik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky aquifers Vitaly A. Zlotnik Department Maximum Stream Depletion Rate, which is defined as a maximum fraction of the pumping rate supplied focused on hy- draulic connection between a stream and an aquifer for pumping wells in alluvial valleys

Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

451

2005 ASHRAE. 109 Groundwater heat pump systems using standing column  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

©2005 ASHRAE. 109 ABSTRACT Groundwater heat pump systems using standing column wells as their ground heat exchanger can be used as a highly efficient source of heating and cooling in residential the well through the heat pump in an open-loop pipe circuit. Standing column wells have been in use

452

Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda R.E. Ewing, y , M.S. Pilant, y J.G. Wade, z and A.T. Watson x Abstract The petroleum industry has well­established partial differential equation models for multi­phase fluid flow through porous media, but the use of control

Ewing, Richard E.

454

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility and to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF Record of Decision and the ERDF Amended Record of Decision.

R. L. Weiss; T. A. Lee

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

455

Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

excluded, yielding a mixture of predominantly range, pasture, grass, and riparian forest covers on sandy to sandy soils and/or flat topography, such as the Nebraska Sand Hills (Figure 1) or the interfluvial sand-groundwater ecoregions (shaded) in Nebraska. The Wet Meadow and Marsh Plain region within the Sand Hills was dropped from

Szilagyi, Jozsef

456

Treatability studies of groundwater contaminated with bis(2-chloroethyl) ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater aquifer underneath a chemical manufacturing plant in Southeast Texas has been contaminated with the leachate from its landfill. There are 17 major chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants found in the groundwater with concentrations ranging from 1 ppm to 1,200 ppm. An air-stripping unit followed by a thermal catalytic oxidation unit is currently operating on-site to remove all of the chlorinated compounds from the contaminated groundwater. One of the contaminants, bis(2-chloroethyl)ether (DCEE), has a fairly low Henry`s Law constant; therefore, a high air flow rate is employed in the stripping unit to improve the overall stripping efficiency. Nevertheless, the treated groundwater still contains a fair amount of DCEE. An UV-peroxidation reactor is set up to study its feasibility for oxidizing DCEE. The treatability data indicate that DCEE at a concentration of 200 ppm can be oxidized effectively in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the effective UV wavelengths lie between 200 and 280 nm. No noticeable reduction of the oxidation rate is observed at low temperature ({approximately} 11 C). Apparent oxidation rate equations of DCEE are determined and several process design parameters are discussed.

Huang, F.Y.C. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering] [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering; Li, K.Y.; Liu, C.C. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modeling the atmospheric inputs of MTBE to groundwater systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical transport model was used to calculate the movement of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE) and several other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the atmosphere downward through the unsaturated zone and into shallow groundwater. Simulations were carried out for periods as long as 10 years to investigate whether a gaseous atmospheric MTBE source at typical ambient concentrations could account for the presence of MTBE in shallow groundwater at the types of low ug/L levels that have been found during the National Water Quality Assessment Program currently being conducted by the US Geological Survey. The simulations indicate that downward movement of MTBE to shallow groundwater will be very slow when there is no net downward movement of water through the vadose zone. For example, for a vadose zone composed of fine sand, and assuming tens of cm of infiltration, then only a few years will be required for water at a water table that is 5.0 m below ground surface to attain MTBE levels that correspond to saturation with respect to the atmospheric source gaseous concentration. An on/off atmospheric source, as might occur in the seasonal use of MTBE, will lead to concentrations in shallow groundwater that correspond to saturation with the time-averaging atmospheric source concentration.

Pankow, J.F.; Johnson, R.L. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering; Thomson, N.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1608 Mt. View Road, Rapid City, South Dakota 57702 As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment from this ambient groundwater is uncertain because the quality of the finished drinking water with the largest releases to the environment are VOCs and that the total release for these 10 compounds was almost

459

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Integration of Groundwater Transport Models with Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~nigo Urteaga2 , Qi Han2 , Anura Jayasumana3 , Tissa Illangasekare1 1 Division of Environmental Sciences dynamic hydrological and environmental processes. As the wireless nodes are resource constrained, mass be conceptualized in the WSN context. INTRODUCTION As groundwater contamination is an established problem with many

Han, Qi "Chee"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment in the Salton Sea Basin is the subject of the project described in this report. Much of the project work was done in cooperation with the US Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region Office ('Reclamation'), which manages the Salton Sea Restoration project for the US Department of the Interior, and complements other recent assessment efforts (e.g., Imperial County, 1995). In this context, the notion of groundwater availability is defined by four separate, but interrelated concepts or components: (1) Volume and Capacity--This refers to the volume of groundwater available in storage in (or the related storage capacity of) the sediments and geologic media that comprise a groundwater basin. The volume of groundwater in a basin will vary in time as a function of recharge, well production, and land subsidence. (2) Producibility--This refers to the ease or difficulty of extracting groundwater in a basin from wells. Groundwater producibility will be affected by well depth and the formation permeability surrounding the open intervals in wells. (3) Quality--This refers to the extent that water produced from wells is potable or otherwise suitable for domestic or other uses. It may also refer to the chemical compositions of groundwater that are unrelated to potability or suitability issues. Groundwater quality will be affected by its residence time and flow pathway in the formation and will also be influenced by the quality of its original source before entering the groundwater regime. (4) Renewability and Recharge--This refers to the extent that groundwater is recharged to the basin as part of the natural hydrologic cycle or other artificial means. Groundwater renewability is normally a function of recharge derived from precipitation (and thus a function of regional climate), but may also be affected in local areas by irrigation, leaking canals, aquifer storage and recovery operations, and so forth. Along with the other factors, renewability will strongly affect how much water can be safely produced from a basin from one year to the next. In this report, we specificall

Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Groundwater Management Tools: Analytical Procedure and Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practice Guideline 2 1. The Management Objective 2 2. Concepts of Sustainable Yield 2 2.1. A MisconceptionGroundwater Management Tools: Analytical Procedure and Case Studies MAF Technical Paper No: 2003. Eigenmodels 11 4.1. Assumptions 11 #12;ii 4.1.1.Dynamics of Recharge Processes 11 4.1.2.Land Surface Recharge

Hickman, Mark

465

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 8 -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 12) and five secondary cooling/process water supply wells (Wells 9, 101, 102, 103, and 105); all Concentration Facility (WCF), Supply and Materiel, and several other smaller facilities. Groundwater quality is also routinely monitored at all active potable supply wells and process supply wells. Figures 8

466

On Grid Partitioning for a High Performance Groundwater Simulation Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equations using a finite volume method. The application problems considered are from the Yucca Mountain equations using a finite volume method. The serial version of TOUGH2 (Transport Of Unsaturated Groundwater. #12; 2 Erik Elmroth equations of water and gas flow, heat transfer and radionuclide migration

Elmroth, Erik

467

AN AGGREGATIONBASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the standard finite element framework from [18,24]. The preconditioner also works well in the context of finiteAN AGGREGATION­BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW \\Lambda E. W. JENKINS analysis of a two­level additive Schwarz method in which the coarse mesh basis is constructed

468

Application of the discontinuous spectral Galerkin method to groundwater flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method uses a finite-element discretization of the groundwater flow domain with basis functions with a standard finite-element method and a mixed finite-element method. Numerical sim- ulations show that the discontinuous spectral Galerkin approximation is more efficient than the standard finite-element method (in

Fagherazzi, Sergio

469

AN AGGREGATION-BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our analysis uses the standard finite element framework from [18,24]. The preconditioner also works well in the context of finite differences, however, as some of the examples in £ 3 illustrateAN AGGREGATION-BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW E. W. JENKINS ¡, C

470

Groundwater Protection 7 2005 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or maintain com- pliance with regulatory requirements and to implement best management practices designedGroundwater Protection 7 2005 Site environmental report7- Brookhaven National Laboratory. The program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in DOE Or- der 450

471

Arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh: A geostatistical and epidemiological framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations in deep wells remain relatively low. INDEX TERMS: 1831 Hydrology: Groundwater quality; 6309 Policy Sciences: Decision making under uncertainty; 6304 Policy Sciences: Benefit-cost analysis; 1829 Hydrology al., 1968], northern China [Wang, 1984], Vietnam [Berg et al., 2001], Argentina [Hopenhayn- Rich et

Entekhabi, Dara

472

Judicious partitions of graphs Bela Bollobas and Alexander Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and for any graph G, there is a partition V (G) = k i=1 Vi such that e(G[Vi]) e(G)/ k+1 2 for i = 1 demand 1 #12;that e(G[Vi]) be fairly close to e(G)/k2 , for i = 1, . . . , k, and that e(Vi, Vj) be fairly close to 2e(G)/k2 , for 1 i

Scott, Alexander Alexander

473

A Spatiotemporal Graph Model for Rainfall Event Identification and Representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a storm ? The spread of a wildfire ? Other dynamic geographic phenomena from time series of snapshot datasets 3Research Objectives Identify the whole lifecycle of rainstorms from time series of snapshot datasets; Represent and analyze the rainstorms... based on a spatiotemporal graph model; Analyze the spatiotemporal characteristics of rainstorms. Data ? NEXRAD (Next generation Radar) ? Hourly precipitation estimate ? Cover more than 2/3 of the nation Rainstorms’ Lifecycle Identification Delineate...

Liu, Weibo

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

476

Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

Zhan, Hongbin

477

A comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complete model-based methods. Keywords Groundwater age . Groundwater recharge/ water budget . USA Introduction Well-constrained water budgets are needed to assess groundwater availability and manage aquifersA comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data P. B

478

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for Fiscal Year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1997 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction continued in the 200-West Area to remove carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-vapor monitoring, and analysis and characterization of sediments sampled below a vadose-zone monitoring well. Source-term analyses for strontium-90 in 100-N Area vadose-zone sediments were performed using recent groundwater-monitoring data and knowledge of strontium`s ion-exchange properties. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1996 and June 1997. Water levels near the Columbia River increased during this period because the river stage was unusually high. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

480

Semi-classical measures on Quantum graphs and the Gau map of the determinant manifold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

believed that QE does not hold in general for a FIXED quantum graph. In [BKW04], it is proved that QE does

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time-concentration graphs groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Materials for Math 13900 Bring to class each day: graph paper ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials for Math 13900. Bring to class each day: graph paper isometric dot paper unlined paper cm ruler. We will also be using: compass small scissors.

Roames, Renee S

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

482

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

DADO MA

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 959972 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation 959 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 959972 (2004) © EGU Strontium isotope geochemistry for corresponding author : p.negrel@brgm.fr Abstract This study presents strontium isotope and major ion data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

484

Groundwater Modeling (Geological Sciences 16:460:528:01) Purpose: Learn to build a groundwater flow and transport model using Visual MODFLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Groundwater Modeling, by Nevin Kresic Applied Groundwater Model, by Mary P. Anderson and William W. Woessner://envsci.rutgers.edu/~yreinfelder/GEOL_528/Anderson-Chapters.pdf Material: PC laptop (or Mac running Windows) If using lab computer, a flash Ingredients of Final Report Anderson Chapters 7.7, 7.8, 17, ASTMGuide Catch up on Project Catch

485

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1991-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1994, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), copper, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, mercury, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in one Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) well. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Impacts on groundwater due to land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was designed to demonstrate the potential benefits of utilizing sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and fertilizer on Sassafras sandy loam soil. Aerobically digested, liquid sewage sludge was applied to the soil at rates of 0, 22.4, and 44.8 Mg of dry solids/ha for three consecutive years between 1978 and 1981. Groundwater, soil, and crop contamination levels were monitored to establish the maximum sewage solids loading rate that could be applied without causing environmental deterioration. The results indicate that application of 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha of sludge is the upper limit to ensure protection of the groundwater quality on the site studied. Application rates at or slightly below 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha are sufficient for providing plant nutrients for the dent corn and rye cropping system utilized in the study.

Higgins, A.J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Evaluation of Background Mercury Concentrations in the SRS Groundwater System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury analyses associated with the A-01 Outfall have highlighted the importance of developing an understanding of mercury in the Savannah River Site groundwater system and associated surface water streams. This activity is critical based upon the fact that the EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for this constituent is 0.012mg/L, a level that is well below conventional detection limits of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/L. A first step in this process is obtained by utilizing the existing investment in groundwater mercury concentrations (20,242 records) maintained in the SRS geographical information management system (GIMS) database. Careful use of these data provides a technically defensible initial estimate for total recoverable mercury in background and contaminated SRS wells.

Looney, B.B.

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

491

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-U-14 Ditch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater impact assessments are conducted at liquid effluent receiving sites on the Hanford Site to determine hydrologic and contaminant impacts caused by discharging wastewater to the soil column. The assessments conducted are pursuant to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (Ecology et al. 1992). This report assesses impacts on the groundwater and vadose zone from wastewater discharged to the 216-U-14 Ditch. Contemporary effluent waste streams of interest are 242-S Evaporator Steam Condensate and UO{sub 3}/U Plant wastewater.

Singleton, K.M.; Lindsey, K.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Corrective measures evaluation report for Tijeras Arroyo groundwater.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Measures Evaluation report was prepared as directed by a Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Supporting information includes background concerning the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. The evaluation of remedial alternatives included identifying and describing four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, comparing remedial alternatives to the criteria, and selecting the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, monitored natural attenuation of the contaminants of concern (trichloroethene and nitrate) is the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are also presented.

Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, M. Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Groundwater Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater protection activities and hydrogeologic characterization studies are conducted at LANL annually. A summary of fiscal year 1998 results and findings shows increased understanding of the hydrogeologic environment beneath the Pajarito Plateau and significant refinement to elements of the LANL Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model pertaining to areas and sources of recharge to the regional aquifer. Modeling, drilling, monitoring, and data collection activities are proposed for fiscal year 1999.

A. K. Stoker; A. S. Johnson; B. D. Newman; B. M. Gallaher; C. L. Nylander; D. B. Rogers; D. E. Broxton; D. Katzman; E. H. Keating; G. L. Cole; K. A. Bitner; K. I. Mullen; P. Longmire; S. G. McLin; W. J. Stone

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Study of electrokinetic effects to quantify groundwater flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of electrokinetic effects (streaming potential) in earth materials was undertaken. The objective was to evaluate the measurement of electrokinetic effects as a method of monitoring and predicting the movement of groundwater, contaminant plumes, and other fluids in the subsurface. The laboratory experiments verified that the electrokinetic effects in earth materials are prominent, repeatable, and can be described well to first order by a pair of coupled differential equations.

Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haupt, R.W. [MIT Lincoln Lab., Lexington, MA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Calendar year 1994 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1994 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1994 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y- 12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts: Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference containing the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline (March 1 of the following CY). Part 2 of the annual groundwater report, to be issued mid-year, will contain a regime-wide evaluation of groundwater quality, present the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describe changes in monitoring priorities, and present planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis activities.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water – groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 – 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 – 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z