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Sample records for time zone 5

  1. Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400...

  2. Climate Zone 5C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    C. Climate Zone 5C is defined as Marine with IP Units 5400 < HDD65F 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18C 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5C...

  3. H.R.S. 205-5 - Zoning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    05-5 - Zoning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: H.R.S. 205-5 - ZoningLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  4. "Table HC9.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing

  5. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tanabe, Tada-aki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1991-12-31

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section.

  6. A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiThesisDissertation Author Catherine King Skokan Organization Colorado School of Mines Published Publisher Not Provided, 1974 DOI...

  7. Fault zone structure determined through the analysis of earthquake arrival times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelini, A.

    1991-10-01

    This thesis develops and applies a technique for the simultaneous determination of P and S wave velocity models and hypocenters from a set of arrival times. The velocity models are parameterized in terms of cubic B-splines basis functions which permit the retrieval of smooth models that can be used directly for generation of synthetic seismograms using the ray method. In addition, this type of smoothing limits the rise of instabilities related to the poor resolving power of the data. V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratios calculated from P and S models display generally instabilities related to the different ray-coverages of compressional and shear waves. However, V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratios are important for correct identification of rock types and this study introduces a new methodology based on adding some coupling (i.e., proportionality) between P and S models which stabilizes the V{sub P}/V{sub S} models around some average preset value determined from the data. Tests of the technique with synthetic data show that this additional coupling regularizes effectively the resulting models.

  8. Gasoline prices increase for first time in 5 weeks (short version...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices increase for first time in 5 weeks (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose for the first time in 5 weeks to 3.31 a gallon on Monday. ...

  9. Gasoline prices increase for first time in 5 weeks (long version...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices increase for first time in 5 weeks (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose for the first time in 5 weeks to 3.31 a gallon on Monday. ...

  10. DOE 1.5 Installation Time Lapse Video (Text Version) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE 1.5 Installation Time Lapse Video (Text Version) DOE 1.5 Installation Time Lapse Video (Text Version) Below is the text version for the DOE 1.5 Installation Time Lapse Video. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory installs a 1.5-MW wind turbine for the U.S. Department of Energy at its National Wind Technology Center located just south of Boulder, Colorado. The construction site is a grassy field that overlooks the eastern plains of Colorado. Two blue construction cranes work together to

  11. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Workers with Paducah site infrastructure contractor Swift & Staley, Inc. recently exceeded 1.5 million hours without lost time away from work due to injury or illness, representing nine years of safe performance.

  12. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness November 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Debris from the former mill buildings at the Moab site is excavated ...

  13. Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Time with respect to the BNB Trigger Time [µs] 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Fractional Flash Count per 0.15 µs with respect to Cosmic Background Measured Cosmic Rate (Beam-Off) BNB Trigger Data (Beam-On) [4.51E18 POT]

  14. Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 15 20 Time with respect to the NuMI Trigger Time [µs] 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Fractional Flash Count per 0.5 µs with respect to Cosmic Background Measured Cosmic Rate (Beam-Off) NuMI Trigger Data (Beam-On) [4.83E18 POT]

  15. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  16. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE TIME STEPPING ALGORITHM OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumberland, R.; Mesina, G.

    2009-01-01

    The RELAP5-3D time step method is used to perform thermo-hydraulic and neutronic simulations of nuclear reactors and other devices. It discretizes time and space by numerically solving several differential equations. Previously, time step size was controlled by halving or doubling the size of a previous time step. This process caused the code to run slower than it potentially could. In this research project, the RELAP5-3D time step method was modifi ed to allow a new method of changing time steps to improve execution speed and to control error. The new RELAP5-3D time step method being studied involves making the time step proportional to the material courant limit (MCL), while insuring that the time step does not increase by more than a factor of two between advancements. As before, if a step fails or mass error is excessive, the time step is cut in half. To examine performance of the new method, a measure of run time and a measure of error were plotted against a changing MCL proportionality constant (m) in seven test cases. The removal of the upper time step limit produced a small increase in error, but a large decrease in execution time. The best value of m was found to be 0.9. The new algorithm is capable of producing a signifi cant increase in execution speed, with a relatively small increase in mass error. The improvements made are now under consideration for inclusion as a special option in the RELAP5-3D production code.

  17. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adams County,...

  18. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated timing system SSDR 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedwald, J.; Van Aersau, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-08-26

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Timing System, WBS 1.5.3 which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The Integrated Timing System provides all temporally-critical hardware triggers to components and equipment in other NIF systems.

  19. Database of Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones (Task ET-WIN-PNNL-FY13-01_5.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Culp, Thomas D.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced in support of the Emerging Technologies Low-e Storm Windows Task 5.3: Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone. Both sets of calculation results will be made publicly available through the Building America Solution Center.

  20. 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Records Required) ... 5 5.6 TEMPERATURE LIMITATIONS - CRANE HOOKS, HOIST HOOKS, AND MISCELLANEOUS HOOKS ......

  1. 5

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    04 Site Management Plan Page 5-1 5.0 Project Schedules and Milestones (FY 2005) 5.1 Establishing Project Schedules and Milestones The SMP establishes the overall plan for remedial actions at the MMTS and milestones against which progress can be measured. The SMP also documents the overall plan for remedial actions at the MVP Site, which has been deleted. The SMP was first prepared in 1995 and was revised in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003. As stated in the 2003 SMP, Section 5.0,

  2. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  3. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – It has been more than five years since workers on the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah had a lost-time injury or illness. This represents roughly 2.2 million hours of safe work.

  4. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  5. Zoning and Permitting Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Zoning and permitting is commonly controlled by local governments and may be applicable to both residential and commercial properties.

  6. Climate Zone 5A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania Jersey County, Illinois Jewell County, Kansas Jo Daviess County, Illinois Johnson County, Indiana Johnson County, Iowa Johnson County, Nebraska Jones County, Iowa...

  7. Climate Zone 5B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Nevada Larimer County, Colorado Lassen County, California Latah County, Idaho Lewis County, Idaho Lincoln County, Colorado Lincoln County, Idaho Lincoln County, Nevada...

  8. Local Option- Rural Renewable Energy Development Zones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial renewable energy property in these zones are eligible for a 3 to 5 year local property tax exemption. Eligible property includes either wind, geothermal, solar, biomass, or other uncon...

  9. ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Subtype A Subtype B Subtype C Climate Zone Number 1 Zone 1A Zone 1B NA Climate Zone Number 2 Zone 2A Zone 2B NA Climate Zone Number 3 Zone 3A Zone 3B Zone...

  10. Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For the purposes of renaissance zone designation, “renewable energy facility” means a facility that creates energy, fuels, or chemicals directly from the wind, the sun, trees, grasses, bio-solids,...

  11. Daylight Savings Time Starts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daylight Savings Time Starts Daylight Savings Time Starts WHEN: Mar 08, 2015 3:00 AM - 11:59 PM WHERE: World Time Zones CATEGORY: Holiday INTERNAL: Calendar Login Daylight Savings...

  12. Time dependent effects and transport evidence for phase separation in La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, M.; Mitchell, J. F.; Schiffer, P.

    2000-02-17

    The ground state of La{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} changes from a ferromagnetic metallic to an antiferromagnetic charge-ordered state as a function of Ca concentration at x {approximately} 0.50. The authors present evidence from transport measurements on a sample with x = 0.50 that the two phases can coexist, in agreement with other observations of phase separation in these materials. They also observe that, by applying and then removing a magnetic field to the mainly charge-ordered state at some temperatures, they can ``magnetically anneal'' the charge order, resulting in a higher zero-field resistivity. They also observe logarithmic time dependence in both resistivity and magnetization after a field sweep at low temperatures.

  13. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  14. Real-time PCR Detection of Brucella Abortus: A Comparative Study of SYBR Green I, 5'-exonuclease, and Hybridization Probe Assays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, Deborah Trishelle; Hadfield, Ted; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    2003-08-01

    Real-time PCR provides a means of detecting and quantifying DNA targets by monitoring PCR product accumulation during cycling as indicated by increased fluorescence. A number of different approaches can be used to generate the fluorescence signal. Three approachesSYBR Green I (a double-stranded DNA intercalating dye), 5'-exonuclease (enzymatically released fluors), and hybridization probes (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)were evaluated for use in a real-time PCR assay to detect Brucella abortus. The three assays utilized the same amplification primers to produce an identical amplicon. This amplicon spans a region of the B. abortus genome that includes portions of the alkB gene and the IS711 insertion element. All three assays were of comparable sensitivity, providing a linear assay over 7 orders of magnitude (from 7.5 ng down to 7.5 fg). However, the greatest specificity was achieved with the hybridization probe assay.

  15. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deep Vadose Zone – Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue.

  16. Enterprise Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnterpriseZone&oldid542697"...

  17. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  18. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  19. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Final report, September 1986--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, R.B.; Nguyen, B.

    1993-08-01

    Earthquake activity in the New Madrid Seismic Zone had been monitored by regional seismic networks since 1975. During this time period, over 3,700 earthquakes have been located within the region bounded by latitudes 35{degrees}--39{degrees}N and longitudes 87{degrees}--92{degrees}W. Most of these earthquakes occur within a 1.5{degrees} x 2{degrees} zone centered on the Missouri Bootheel. Source parameters of larger earthquakes in the zone and in eastern North America are determined using surface-wave spectral amplitudes and broadband waveforms for the purpose of determining the focal mechanism, source depth and seismic moment. Waveform modeling of broadband data is shown to be a powerful tool in defining these source parameters when used complementary with regional seismic network data, and in addition, in verifying the correctness of previously published focal mechanism solutions.

  20. Santa Clara County- Zoning Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Santa Clara County's Zoning Ordinance includes standards for wind and solar structures for residential, agricultural, and commercial uses.

  1. Milling time and temperature dependence on Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} nanoparticles synthesized by mechanical alloying method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajarin, R. Purwaningsih, H. Widyastuti, Susanti, D. Helmy, R. Kurnia

    2014-09-25

    Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} is one type of titanate oxides which has M{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} crystal structure. It has various kinds of applications due to its electric and magnetic properties such as spintronics, electromagnetic devices, and gas sensor. In this study, Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} nanoparticles were synthesized by simple mechanical alloying using planetary ball milling machine with various milling times and sintering temperatures. TiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders obtained from coprecipitation process were used as starting materials. The resulted Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} powders were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Vibration Sample Magnetometer (VSM) in order to observe crystal quality, particles morphology, and magnetic properties respectively. As the milling time increases and the sintering temperature decreases, the crystal size of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} phase decreases. The smallest crystal size of the synthesized Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} nanoparticles was ∼ 51 nm obtained by the milling time of 25 hours and sintering at 1100°C. The distribution of the resulted Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} nanoparticles was not so homogeneous due to the appearance of small amount impurities. The VSM measurements show that a paramagnetic property was observed which should be analyzed more details on the low external magnetic fields.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Central_Plateau_Inner_Zone.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Plutonium Finishing Plant -- 317M Central Plateau Inner Zone (10 sq. mi.) ( q ) * U Plant Canyon - Demolish 5 remaining - Demolish 5 remaining ancillary facilities -...

  3. Liquid zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  4. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmore » with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 μg kg−1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 μg kg−1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 μg kg−1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 μg kg−1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.« less

  5. Two-zone countercurrent smelter system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, J.H.; Fruehan, R.J.; Elliott, J.F.

    1995-01-03

    A process for continuously smelting iron ore by use of coal to yield molten iron or semi-steel is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of establishing a melt covered by slag; inducing the slag and the molten iron to flow countercurrently to one another, toward opposite ends of the smelter; maintaining iron oxide-reducing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the slag flows; maintaining carbon-oxidizing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the molten iron flows; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the slag from the reducing zone end of the smelter; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the molten iron from the oxidizing zone end of the smelter; and adding to both zones iron ore, coal, oxygen, and flux at addition rates sufficient to keep the molten iron in the reducing zone substantially saturated with carbon, maintain in the slag being tapped an FeO content of about 5 weight percent or less, and maintain in the molten iron being tapped a carbon content of about 0.5 to 5 weight percent. A slag dam preferably is included in the smelter, to impede the backflow of the slag from the reducing zone to the oxidizing zone. A metal bath dam with one or more flow-through portals also is preferably used, submerged below the slag dam, to impede the backflow of the hot metal. 8 figures.

  6. Two-zone countercurrent smelter system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, James H. (Toronto, CA); Fruehan, Richard J. (Murrysville, PA); Elliott, deceased, John F. (late of Winchester, MA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for continuously smelting iron ore by use of coal to yield molten iron or semi-steel is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of establishing a melt covered by slag; inducing the slag and the molten iron to flow countercurrently to one another, toward opposite ends of the smelter; maintaining iron oxide-reducing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the slag flows; maintaining carbon-oxidizing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the molten iron flows; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the slag from the reducing zone end of the smelter; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the molten iron from the oxidizing zone end of the smelter; and adding to both zones iron ore, coal, oxygen, and flux at addition rates sufficient to keep the molten iron in the reducing zone substantially saturated with carbon, maintain in the slag being tapped an FeO content of about 5 weight percent or less, and maintain in the molten iron being tapped a carbon content of about 0.5 to 5 weight percent. A slag dam preferably is included in the smelter, to impede the backflow of the slag from the reducing zone to the oxidizing zone. A metal bath dam with one or more flow-through portals also is preferably used, submerged below the slag dam, to impede the backflow of the hot metal.

  7. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  8. Deep Vadose Zone - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Deep Vadose Zone Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Deep Vadose Zone Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size

  9. City of Austin- Zoning Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Zoning Code also allows for preservation plans in historic districts to incorporate sustainability measures such as solar technologies and other energy generation and efficiency measures.

  10. Sandia defines solar variability zones

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    defines solar variability zones - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ...

  11. Western Renewable Energy Zones (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, J.

    2011-06-01

    This presentation summarizes recent developments and trends pertaining to competitive renewable energy zones, transmission planning and the integration of renewable generation resources.

  12. Excimer laser photolysis of V(CO)/sub 6/: time-resolved infrared studies of gas-phase V(CO)/sub x/ (x = 5-2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, Y.; Hackett, P.A.; Rayner, D.M.

    1987-10-28

    The photolysis of gas-phase vanadium hexacarbonyl V(CO)/sub 6/, has been studied at excimer laser wavelengths (351, 308, 248, and 193 nm) by observing the coordinatively unsaturated transient products, V(CO)/sub x/ (x = 5-3 and possibly 2), via time-resolved infrared kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The dependence of the initial fragment distribution on photolysis wavelength is consistent with the model of sequential CO elimination established by similar studies on Fe(CO)/sub 5/, Cr(CO)/sub 6/, and Co(CO)/sub 3/NO. The high reactivity of unsaturated metal carbonyl species with saturated carbonyls to form binuclear complexes is again observed, with rate constants for the reaction of V(CO)/sub 3/ and V(CO)/sub 4/ with V(CO)/sub 6/ found to be of the order 3 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Infrared assignments for V(CO)/sub x/ are supported by kinetic measurements in the presence of added CO. Rate constants for the reaction of CO with V(CO)/sub 3/, V(CO)/sub 4/, and V(CO)/sub 5/ are found as (0.4 +/- 0.1) x 10/sup -10/, (0.5 +/- 0.1) x 10/sup -10/, and (0.5 +/- 0.1) x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, respectively, leading to the expectation that ground-state V(CO)/sub 3-5/ share the doublet character of V(CO)/sub 6/. The infrared assignments are in disagreement with infrared absorption and some ESR studies of V(CO)/sub x/ fragments in low-temperature matrices.

  13. Processing optimization and sintering time dependent magnetic and optical behaviors of Aurivillius Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Guang; Sun Lin; Ren Qing; Xu Wenfei; Yang Jing; Tang Xiaodong; Bai Wei; Duan Chungang; Chu Junhao; Wu Jing; Meng Xiangjian

    2013-01-21

    Aurivillius Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} (BTF) ceramics were synthesized using the conventional solid state reaction method by optimizing excess of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and sintering time. Their structures, magnetic, and optical properties were investigated in detail. The optimum process to sinter pure Aurivillius BTF ceramics was confirmed to be 3 wt. % excess Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} to compensate the Bi volatilization at 1050 Degree-Sign C for 240 min (BTF-240M). The microstructure and crystalline structure of the BTF ceramics had little dependence on the sintering time from the x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopic data. Nevertheless, the magnetic and optical properties were closely related with the sintering time. The overall magnetic behavior of these BTF ceramics was superparamagnetic (SPM), whereas there were unambiguous clues for the existence of antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions. However, whether the SPM behavior was intrinsic or arised from a tiny amount of spinel Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} impurity phase cannot be thoroughly ruled out in the XRD detection limit in the present stage. The AFM interactions were weakened upon extending the sintering time. The effective magnetic moment ({mu}{sub eff}), however, demonstrated different dependency on the sintering time. It increased with the sintering time from 80 min to 240 min, and then dropped with further extending the sintering time. Compared with other BTF ceramics, the BTF-240M ceramic showed the highest values of the refractive index n and real part {epsilon}{sub 1}, as well as the lowest ones of the extinction coefficient k and imagine part {epsilon}{sub 2} in whole photon energy range. Finally, a direct inter-band transition was confirmed for these BTF ceramics and optical energy band gaps were determined to be about 3.08, 3.18, and 3.39 eV for 80 min, 150 min, and 240 min sintered BTF ceramics, respectively, yet abnormal optical behavior was observed in BTF-360M ceramic.

  14. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore » nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  15. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore »nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  16. Climate Zones | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America » Climate Zones Climate Zones Building America determines building practices based on climate zones to achieve the most energy savings in a home. This page offers some general guidelines on the definitions of the various climate regions based on heating degree-days, average temperatures, and precipitation. You can also view the Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County. Hot-Humid A hot-humid climate is generally defined as a region that receives more than 20 in. (50 cm) of

  17. A Low-Velocity Zone in the Basement Beneath the Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone in the Basement Beneath the Valles Caldera, New Mexico Abstract We present quantitative results of forward modeling applied to a suite of travel time delays observed...

  18. Climate Zone 1B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 1B is defined as Dry with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C . The following places are categorized as class 1B climate zones:...

  19. Cohesive Zone Model User Element

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-17

    Cohesive Zone Model User Element (CZM UEL) is an implementation of a Cohesive Zone Model as an element for use in finite element simulations. CZM UEL computes a nodal force vector and stiffness matrix from a vector of nodal displacements. It is designed for structural analysts using finite element software to predict crack initiation, crack propagation, and the effect of a crack on the rest of a structure.

  20. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  1. Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Planned Capacity 1 Geothermal Areas within the Transition Zone Geothermal Region Energy Generation Facilities within the Transition Zone Geothermal Region Geothermal Power...

  2. GridZone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: GridZone Sector: Efficiency, Services, Transmission Technology: Smart Grid, Energy Storage, Energy Security ParentHolding Organization: GridZone Limited Company...

  3. Wetlands and Riparian Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wetlands and Riparian Zones Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWetlandsandRiparianZones&oldid612217...

  4. Adams County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Washington ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

  5. A simulation of the transport and fate of radon-222 derived from thorium-230 low-level waste in the near-surface zone of the Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-12-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE, 1988) requires performance assessments on all new and existing low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites. An integral part of performance assessment is estimating the fluxes of radioactive gases such as radon-220 and radon-222. Data needs pointed out by mathematical models drive site characterization. They provide a logical means of performing the required flux estimations. Thorium-230 waste, consisting largely of thorium hydroxide and thorium oxides, has been approved for disposal in shallow trenches and pits at the LLW Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site. A sophisticated gas transport model, CASCADR8 (Lindstrom et al., 1992b), was used to simulate the transport and fate of radon-222 from its source of origin, nine feet below a closure cap of native soil, through the dry alluvial earth, to its point of release into the atmosphere. CASCADR8 is an M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. It has been tailored to the site-specific needs of the dry desert environment of southern Nevada. It is based on the mass balance principle for each radionuclide and uses gas-phase diffusion as well as barometric pressure-induced advection as its main modes of transport. CASCADR8 uses both reversible and irreversible sorption kinetic rules as well as the usual classical Bateman (1910) M-chain decay rules for its kinetic processes. Worst case radon-222 gas-phase concentrations, as well as surface fluxes, were estimated over 40 days. The maximum flux was then used in an exposure assessment model to estimate the total annual dose equivalent received by a person residing in a standard 2500-square-foot house with 10-foot walls. Results are described.

  6. Baroclinic instability in stellar radiation zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2014-03-20

    Surfaces of constant pressure and constant density do not coincide in differentially rotating stars. Stellar radiation zones with baroclinic stratification can be unstable. Instabilities in radiation zones are of crucial importance for angular momentum transport, mixing of chemical species, and, possibly, for magnetic field generation. This paper performs linear analysis of baroclinic instability in differentially rotating stars. Linear stability equations are formulated for differential rotation of arbitrary shape and then solved numerically for rotation nonuniform in radius. As the differential rotation increases, r- and g-modes of initially stable global oscillations transform smoothly into growing modes of baroclinic instability. The instability can therefore be interpreted as stability loss to r- and g-modes excitation. Regions of stellar parameters where r- or g-modes are preferentially excited are defined. Baroclinic instability onsets at a very small differential rotation of below 1%. The characteristic time of instability growth is about 1000 rotation periods. Growing disturbances possess kinetic helicity. Magnetic field generation by the turbulence resulting from baroclinic instability in differentially rotating radiation zones is therefore possible.

  7. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanfords vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNLs Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  8. Deep Vadose Zone | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Deep Vadose Zone Deep Vadose Zone The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOE's most challenging deep vadose zone characterization, remediation, monitoring, and prediction challenges. PDF icon Deep Vadose Zone More Documents & Publications Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Advanced Simulation Capability of Environmental Management

  9. Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Gas use predictions (thermsheating degree day) are scattered both above and below the line of perfect fit. How- ever, the model tends to underpredict pre- and post-retrofit total ...

  10. SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.W. REIMUS

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvial Testing Complex (ATC) located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and colloid transport parameters. (4) Comparisons of sorption parameter estimates for a reactive solute tracer (lithium ion) derived from the C-wells field tracer tests and laboratory tests using C-wells core samples. (5) Sorption parameter estimates for lithium ion derived from laboratory tests using alluvium samples from ATC well NC-EWDP-19D. These estimates will allow a comparison of laboratory- and field-derived sorption parameters to be made in saturated alluvium if cross-hole tracer tests are conducted at the ATC.

  11. Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammon Williams

    2012-05-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent speciessurrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurationslid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the temperature differences between the high and low furnace zones200 and 300 ?C. During each experiment, the temperatures at selected locations around the crucible were measured and recorded to provide temperature profiles. Following each experiment, samples were collected and elemental analysis was done to determine the composition of iii the salt. Several modelsnon-mixed, well-mixed, Favier, and hybridwere explored to describe the zone freezing process. For CsCl-LiCl-KCl system, experimental results indicate that through this process up to 90% of the used salt can be recycled, effectively reducing waste volume by a factor of ten. The optimal configuration was found to be a 5.0 mm/hr rate with a lid configuration and a ?T of 200C. The larger 400 g mixtures had recycle percentages similar to the 50 g mixtures; however, the throughput per time was greater for the 400 g case. As a result, the 400 g case is recommended. For the CeCl3-LiCl-KCl system, the result implies that it is possible to use this process to separate the rare-earth and transuranics chlorides. Different models were applied to only CsCl ternary system. The best fit model was the hybrid model as a result of a solute transport transition from non- mixed to well-mixed throughout the growing process.

  12. Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "BuildingsModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise...

  13. Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

    2011-07-19

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  14. Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Conca

    2000-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

  15. Prediction of subsurface fracture in mining zone of Papua using passive seismic tomography based on Fresnel zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setiadi, Herlan; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Wely, Woen; Riyanto, Erwin

    2015-04-16

    Fracture prediction in a block cave of underground mine is very important to monitor the structure of the fracture that can be harmful to the mining activities. Many methods can be used to obtain such information, such as TDR (Time Domain Relectometry) and open hole. Both of them have limitations in range measurement. Passive seismic tomography is one of the subsurface imaging method. It has advantage in terms of measurements, cost, and rich of rock physical information. This passive seismic tomography studies using Fresnel zone to model the wavepath by using frequency parameter. Fresnel zone was developed by Nurhandoko in 2000. The result of this study is tomography of P and S wave velocity which can predict position of fracture. The study also attempted to use sum of the wavefronts to obtain position and time of seismic event occurence. Fresnel zone tomography and the summation wavefront can predict location of geological structure of mine area as well.

  16. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  17. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual results on the pilot plant gasifier and demonstration plant design recommendations, based on cold flow simulation results.

  18. Controlled short residence time coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-04

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -455.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same conditions except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent.

  19. Climate Zone 8B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype B. Climate Zone 8B is defined as Subarctic with IP Units 12600 < HDD65F and SI Units 7000 < HDD18C . The following places are categorized as class 8B climate zones:...

  20. Climate Zone 8A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Climate Zone Number 8A is defined as Subarctic with IP Units 12600 < HDD65F and SI Units 7000 < HDD18C . The following places are categorized as class 8A climate zones:...

  1. Climate Zone 1A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Climate Zone 1A is defined as Very Hot - Humid with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C . The following places are categorized as class 1A climate zones:...

  2. Farmland Security Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Security Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Farmland Security ZoneLegal Abstract California Department of...

  3. Pellet Zone Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pellet Zone Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pellet Zone Ltd Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: NR19 1AE Sector: Biomass Product: UK based biomass pellet trading firm....

  4. Zero Zone Comment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zero Zone Comment Zero Zone Comment These comments are submitted by Zero Zone Inc., a manufacturer of CRE equipment, in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) notice in the July 3, 2014 Federal Register requesting information to assist DOE in reviewing existing regulations and in making its regulatory program more effective and less burdensome. PDF icon Zero Zone comments More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI Executive Order 13563 certification, compliance and

  5. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  6. Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  7. Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  8. Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  9. Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  10. Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  11. Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  12. Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Central Nevada Seismic Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

  13. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 3. High-energy spectrum (time-of-flight method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the experiments performed to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons released in certain atomic-weapons tests in Operation Greenhouse. The measurements were made of two types: (1) the time-of-flight measurements designed to establish the fission neutron spectrum down to about 3 MeV energy, and (2) the so-called Tenex (Temperature-Neutron Experiment) measurements designed to obtain the velocity distribution of neutrons produced by the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions.

  14. Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

    2005-09-06

    Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

  15. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype B + Adams County,...

  16. U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Climate Zone U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: climate zones map Note:Map updated with corrections, February 2012 Further Explanation on How Climate Zones are Defined...

  17. U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Past Climate Zones U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: climate zone map Return to Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS Return to CBECS Home Page Note:Map updated with corrections,...

  18. Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied

  19. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  20. Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory Handbook | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Author Washington...

  1. Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    temperature anomaly has been mapped. A group of subtle temperature anomalies along Simpson Pass, south of the current production area, are interpreted as an upwelling zone with...

  2. Coastal Zone Management Act and Regulations (NOAA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) of 1972 provides for the management of the nation’s coastal resources, including the Great Lakes.

  3. Climate Zone 2B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are categorized as class 2B climate zones: Bandera County, Texas Dimmit County, Texas Edwards County, Texas Frio County, Texas Imperial County, California Kinney County, Texas La...

  4. Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the National Estuarine Research Reserve System. The 34 coastal programs aim to balance competing land and water issues in the coastal zone, while estuarine reserves serve...

  5. Coastal Zone Management Act and Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) of 1972 provides for the management of the nation’s coastal resources, including the Great Lakes.

  6. Vadose Zone Microbiology: Science and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, Fred J.; Bradley, Stephen D.; Kieft, Thomas L.

    2002-03-12

    Brockman FJ, SN Bradley and TL Kieft. 2002. Vadose zone microbiology. In Encyclopedia of Environmental Microbiology, volume 6, pp. 3236-3246. John Wiley and Sons, New York.

  7. Maricopa County- Renewable Energy Systems Zoning Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance contains provisions for siting renewable energy systems. The ordinance defines renewable energy as "energy derived primarily from sources other than fossil...

  8. HYDROGEN GREENHOUSE PLANETS BEYOND THE HABITABLE ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond; Gaidos, Eric E-mail: gaidos@hawaii.edu

    2011-06-10

    We show that collision-induced absorption allows molecular hydrogen to act as an incondensible greenhouse gas and that bars or tens of bars of primordial H{sub 2}-He mixtures can maintain surface temperatures above the freezing point of water well beyond the 'classical' habitable zone defined for CO{sub 2} greenhouse atmospheres. Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we find that 40 bars of pure H{sub 2} on a three Earth-mass planet can maintain a surface temperature of 280 K out to 1.5 AU from an early-type M dwarf star and 10 AU from a G-type star. Neglecting the effects of clouds and of gaseous absorbers besides H{sub 2}, the flux at the surface would be sufficient for photosynthesis by cyanobacteria (in the G star case) or anoxygenic phototrophs (in the M star case). We argue that primordial atmospheres of one to several hundred bars of H{sub 2}-He are possible and use a model of hydrogen escape to show that such atmospheres are likely to persist further than 1.5 AU from M stars, and 2 AU from G stars, assuming these planets have protecting magnetic fields. We predict that the microlensing planet OGLE-05-390Lb could have retained an H{sub 2}-He atmosphere and be habitable at {approx}2.6 AU from its host M star.

  9. FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

    2011-07-05

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 5% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory- / intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

  10. SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. KELLER

    2004-11-03

    This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086-2.20-00) (LANL 2003 [DIRS 161725]) and is described in Section 6.4 of this report. FEHM is a three-dimensional (3-D), finite-volume, finite-element, heat and mass flow-and-transport code. This report documents the features and capabilities of the site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the SZ at Yucca Mountain in support of the TSPA-LA. Correlative flow-model calculations using FEHM are carried out and documented in the model report ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model independent of the transport processes and supplied as a part of the output package from the flow model, which is then used as inputs to the transport model. Several SZ analysis model reports provide information and data needed as feed-ins for this report, and this report in turn provides technical product outputs that feed into other SZ reports. The details of inputs to the site-scale transport model are provided in Section 4.

  11. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF/AZ performance. The selection and presentation of contributions are intended to show the iterative development of understand

  12. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. HDF5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HDF5 HDF5 HDF5 Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:47

  14. Subduction Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25,000,000 W 25,000,000,000 mW 0.025 GW 2.5e-5 TW 513.15 K240 C 464 F 923.67 R Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Philippine Island Arc Fault Intersection Volcanic 150 MW150,000...

  15. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; Percival, Carl; Coe, H.; Jones, Roderic L.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlations with measurements of 0.70.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.50.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.01.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases one with low relative humidity (RH) (6070%), the other with high RH (8090%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles.

    The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes ( 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.

  16. 230 s room-temperature storage time and 1.14 eV hole localization energy in In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots on a GaAs interlayer in GaP with an AlP barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonato, Leo Sala, Elisa M.; Stracke, Gernot; Nowozin, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Ajour, Mohammed Nasser; Daqrouq, Khaled; Bimberg, Dieter

    2015-01-26

    A GaP n{sup +}p-diode containing In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots (QDs) and an AlP barrier is characterized electrically, together with two reference samples: a simple n{sup +}p-diode and an n{sup +}p-diode with AlP barrier. Localization energy, capture cross-section, and storage time for holes in the QDs are determined using deep-level transient spectroscopy. The localization energy is 1.14(±0.04) eV, yielding a storage time at room temperature of 230(±60) s, which marks an improvement of 2 orders of magnitude compared to the former record value in QDs. Alternative material systems are proposed for still higher localization energies and longer storage times.

  17. CANDIDATE PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONES OF KEPLER STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaidos, Eric

    2013-06-20

    A key goal of the Kepler mission is the discovery of Earth-size transiting planets in ''habitable zones'' where stellar irradiance maintains a temperate climate on an Earth-like planet. Robust estimates of planet radius and irradiance require accurate stellar parameters, but most Kepler systems are faint, making spectroscopy difficult and prioritization of targets desirable. The parameters of 2035 host stars were estimated by Bayesian analysis and the probabilities p{sub HZ} that 2738 candidate or confirmed planets orbit in the habitable zone were calculated. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program models were compared to photometry from the Kepler Input Catalog, priors for stellar mass, age, metallicity and distance, and planet transit duration. The analysis yielded probability density functions for calculating confidence intervals of planet radius and stellar irradiance, as well as p{sub HZ}. Sixty-two planets have p{sub HZ} > 0.5 and a most probable stellar irradiance within habitable zone limits. Fourteen of these have radii less than twice the Earth; the objects most resembling Earth in terms of radius and irradiance are KOIs 2626.01 and 3010.01, which orbit late K/M-type dwarf stars. The fraction of Kepler dwarf stars with Earth-size planets in the habitable zone ({eta}{sub Circled-Plus }) is 0.46, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.31-0.64. Parallaxes from the Gaia mission will reduce uncertainties by more than a factor of five and permit definitive assignments of transiting planets to the habitable zones of Kepler stars.

  18. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-27

    The confined zone dispersion (CZD) process involves flue gas post-treatment, physically located between a boiler's outlet and its particulate collector, which in the majority of cases is an electrostatic precipitator. The features that distinguish this process from other similar injection processes are: Injection of an alkaline slurry directly into the duct, instead of injection of dry solids into the duct ahead of a fabric filter. Use of an ultrafine calcium/magnesium hydroxide, type S pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime. This commercial product is made from plentiful, naturally occurring dolomite. Low residence time, made possible by the high effective surface area of the Type S lime. Localized dispersion of the reagent. Slurry droplets contact only part of the gas while the droplets are drying, to remove up to 50 percent of the S0{sub 2} and significant amounts of NO{sub x}. The process uses dual fluid rather than rotary atomizers. Improved electrostatic precipitator performance via gas conditioning from the increased water vapor content, and lower temperatures. Supplemental conditioning with S0{sub 3} is not believed necessary for satisfactory removal of particulate matter.

  19. A SUPER-EARTH-SIZED PLANET ORBITING IN OR NEAR THE HABITABLE ZONE AROUND A SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Howell, Steve B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Ciardi, David; Fischer, Debra A.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We present the discovery of a super-Earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the 3-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.3%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24{sup +0.44}{sub -0.29} R{sub Circled-Plus} and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-sized object with a radius of 1.7{sup +0.34}{sub -0.23} R{sub Circled-Plus} and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 {+-} 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth analog.

  20. Accelerators (5/5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-09

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  1. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  2. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  3. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, William H.; Ganoe, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  4. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Kids Zone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZONE NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Cartoon drawing of science girl Kids Zone Welcome K-12 students and teachers! The NNSA/NFO Kids Zone contains information regarding the Nevada Regional Science Bowl, the Environmental Management Kids Display/Activity Book, Student Forum, and lots of photos. Teachers - You can also request a speaker for your classroom or school by filling out the Speakers Bureau Request Form. Feel free to browse the site and come back often as we

  5. Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants inthe Hanford Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee,Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2007-04-10

    Water and chemical transport from a point source withinvadose zone sediments at Hanford were examined with a leak testconsisting of five 3800-liter aliquots of water released at 4.5 m depthevery week over a 4-week period. The third aliquot contained bromide, D2Oand 87Sr. Movement of the tracers was monitored for 9 months by measuringpore water compositions of samples from boreholes drilled 2-8 m from theinjection point. Graded sedimentary layers acting as natural capillarybarriers caused significant lateral spreading of the leak water. D2Oconcentrations>50 percent of the concentration in the tracer aliquotwere detected at 9-11 m depth. However, increased water contents, lowerd18O values, and geophysical monitoring of moisture changes at otherdepths signified high concentrations of leak fluids were added where D2Oconcentrations were<3 percent above background, suggesting limitedmixing between different aliquots of the leak fluids. Initially highbromide concentrations decreased more rapidly over time than D2O,suggesting enhanced transport of bromide due to anion exclusion. Nosignificant increase in 87Sr was detected in the sampled pore water,indicating strong retardation of Sr by the sediments. These resultshighlight some of the processes strongly affecting chemical transport inthe vadose zone and demonstrate the significant separation of contaminantplumes that can occur.

  6. Coiled tubing isolates zones, fractures wells with single trip service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, S.A.

    1999-04-01

    A system has been devised that combines high pressure coiled tubing (CT) and a selective isolation technique to frac multiple zones in a single operation. Multiple zones in one well can be individually isolated, fractured and flowed back simultaneously which results in reduced exposure to kill fluids and therefore higher retained conductivity for newly created fractures. The technique has been named CoilFRAC{trademark} by Dowell. The key benefits to the entire operation are reduced rig and operations time compared to conventional fracturing processes. Time savings, increased production, and environmental benefits are the economic drivers that result in rapid return on investment for production operators. The single trip concept for perforating and stimulation crews also brings additional benefits over multiple mobilizations. Wells which previously had only major zones perforated and stimulated and which are currently depleted can be revived economically using this system, giving the well a second life. The paper describes the equipment and its safety and contingency features, optimized shallow gas production in Alberta, and results from a South Texas oil well fracturing.

  7. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  8. As you prepare for your upcoming beam time, please be aware that construction is planned to update SLAC Gate 17 with RFID proximity card access hardware and to change the stairs next to the Security hut to an ADA compliant ramp. Please forward this to your proposal collaborators (and ensure that all users have registered and completed training before they arrive). This construction is scheduled to begin Tuesday 5/28 and be completed by 6/28. During this construction, access to the LCLS and SSRL buildings and experimental facilities will be provided as follows: VEHICLES ONLY THROUGH GATE 17 5/28-6/28 0600-1530 (6 am-3:30 pm) Construction Zone. Only VEHICLE traffic will be allowed access through Gate 17 and flagman will provide traffic control. 1530-1800 (3:30-6:00 pm) Assumes construction will have stopped for the day; both traffic lanes will be open for vehicles. 1800-0600 (6 pm-6 am) As now, Gate 17 will be closed or barricaded overnight. PEDESTRIANS ONLY THROUGH GATE 16 5/28-6/28 The pedestrian turnstile at Gate 16A will not change. The turnstile is available for pedestrian use 24/7 as long as the individual has a valid SLAC ID badge (and there is a guard at Gate 30 to 'buzz' them through). 0700-1600 (6 am-4 pm) Pedestrians who would normally walk through Gate 17 will instead follow the detour to Gate 16 swing gate which will be unlocked and staffed by Security. A valid SLAC ID badge is needed to enter; new users without IDs will be allowed to proceed for check-in and badging after confirmation with the User Research Administration Office (see detour map attached). FYI - After the construction is completed and proximity card readers are fully functional, users and staff will enter Gates 17 and 30 using an activated RFID proximity card. More details to follow.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automated Proximity Access at Gate 17 and Sector 30 New SLAC ID badges with embedded RFID are used to activate these gates and for off-hours access at the main entrance off Sand Hill Road as well as Alpine Road (gates will be accessible 24/7) . New user badges include this proximity gate activation feature, but older photo IDs need to be updated. Users are advised to register, complete training and contact the User Research Administration (URA) office before arrival for beam time to help

  9. China-Low Carbon Development Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China-Low Carbon Development Zones (Redirected from E3G-China-Low Carbon Development Zones) Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Low Carbon Development Zones AgencyCompany...

  10. Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Category Edit History Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Climate Zones defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standards. Pages in category "ASHRAE Climate Zones" The...

  11. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  12. Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    46 Investigations of Spatial and Temporal Variability of Ocean and Ice Conditions in and Near the Marginal Ice Zone: The "Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment" (MIZOPEX) Final Campaign Summary JA Maslanik February 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any

  13. Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.

    2010-03-30

    An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

  14. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  15. Haleakala SW Rift Zone Exploration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SW Rift Zone Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Haleakala SW Rift Zone Exploration Project Location Information...

  16. Bernalillo County, New Mexico ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bernalillo County, New Mexico ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bernalillo County, New Mexico ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  17. Turkey Near-Zero Zone | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corporation and the State Department, developed the Near-Zero Zone (NZZ) - an industrial energy efficiency project at the Ataturk Organized Industrial Zone in Izmir, Turkey. ...

  18. Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  19. An Updated Site Scale Saturated Zone Ground Water Transport Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An Updated Site Scale Saturated Zone Ground Water Transport Model for Yucca Mountain. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Updated Site Scale Saturated Zone Ground Water ...

  20. Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place...

  1. Future Energy Zone Private Ltd FEZ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Private Ltd FEZ Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Zone Private Ltd (FEZ) Place: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Focused on building...

  2. LADOL Integrated Logistics Free Zone Enterprise LILE | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LADOL Integrated Logistics Free Zone Enterprise LILE Jump to: navigation, search Name: LADOL Integrated Logistics Free Zone Enterprise (LILE) Place: Lagos, Nigeria Product:...

  3. Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alameda County, California ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  4. Anderson County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Tennessee ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  5. Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  6. Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  7. Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  8. Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  9. Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  10. Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  11. Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3A Atlanta, Georgia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3B Los Angeles, California Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Archive ...

  12. Longyang Zone Hongqiang Hydroelectric Power Development Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Longyang Zone Hongqiang Hydroelectric Power Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Longyang Zone Hongqiang Hydroelectric Power Development Co., Ltd. Place: Baoshan...

  13. DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid...

  14. Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date...

  15. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  16. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

  18. Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date...

  19. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity...

  20. Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity...

  1. Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness...

  2. Montana Streamside Management Zone Law Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Law Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Streamside Management Zone Law Webpage Abstract Provides information on...

  3. Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett,...

  4. Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (3) Power...

  5. Innovation and Success in Planning and Zoning | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation and Success in Planning and Zoning This document summarizes several successful initiatives to implement solar-friendly planes and zoning codes. PDF icon ...

  6. Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control Title: Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control A system includes a particulate ...

  7. Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone...

  8. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  9. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  10. Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

  11. Baxter County, Arkansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baxter County, Arkansas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

  12. 1999 vadose zone monitoring plan and guidance for subsequent years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, D.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Last, G.V.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive waste in the US. The majority of the liquid waste was disposed to the soil column where much of it remains today. This document provides the rationale and general framework for vadose zone monitoring at cribs, ditches, trenches and other disposal facilities to detect new sources of contamination and track the movement of existing contamination in the vadose zone for the protection of groundwater. The document provides guidance for subsequent site-specific vadose zone monitoring plans and includes a brief description of past vadose monitoring activities (Chapter 3); the results of the Data Quality Objective process used for this plan (Chapter 4); a prioritization of liquid waste disposal sites for vadose monitoring (Chapter 5 and Appendix B); a general Monitoring and Analysis Plan (Chapter 6); a general Quality Assurance Project Plan (Appendix A), and a description of vadose monitoring activities planned for FY 1999 (Appendix C).

  13. The role of the Ganges-Brahmaputra mixing zone in supplying barium and [sup 226]Ra to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, J. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks ); Falkner, K.K. CNES, Toulouse ); Brown, E.T. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1993-07-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra river system is ranked fourth among world rivers as a source of freshwater to the oceans and is believed to supply more sediment to the ocean than any other; 1.5 [times] 10[sup 12] kg/yr (Milliman and Meade, 1983). Barium and [sup 226]Ra are typically enriched in waters where sediment-laden rivers enter the ocean. As such, the Ganges-Brahmaputra is likely to produce globally significant barium and [sup 226]Ra fluxes to the ocean. Water samples for barium and [sup 226]Ra were collected within four major channels of the Ganges-Brahmaputra mixing zone during a period of low sediment and freshwater discharge. The data suggest that in addition to suspended sediments supplied directly from rivers, river sediments deposited during high discharge in mangroves and on islands are desorbing barium and [sup 226]Ra to seawater. The release of barium and [sup 226]Ra from these sediment deposits is out-of-phase with the direct supply of sediments from the rivers. Estimates of the annual fluxes of barium and [sup 226]Ra from the Ganges-Brahmaputra mixing zone were also derived. The fluxes of barium and [sup 226]Ra are 5.3 [times] 10[sup 8] mol barium/yr and 9.5 [times] 10[sub 14] dpm radium/yr. The first silicate and phosphate mixing profiles for this system are reported. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Zoned electrical heater arranged in spaced relationship from particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-11-15

    A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  15. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

  16. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montazer, P.; Wilson, W.E.

    1985-12-31

    The unsaturated volcanic tuff beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy as a host rock for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Assessment of site suitability needs an efficient and focused investigative program. A conceptual hydrogeologic model that simulates the flow of fluids through the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain was developed to guide the program and to provide a basis for preliminary assessment of site suitability. The study was made as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project of the US Department of Energy. Thickness of the unsaturated zone is about 1640 to 2460 feet (500 to 750 meters). Based on physical properties, the rocks in the unsaturated zone are grouped for the purpose of this paper into five informal hydrogeologic units. From top to bottom these units are: Tiva Canyon welded unit, Paintbrush nonwelded unit. Topopah Spring welded unit, Calico Hills nonwelded unit, and Crater Flat unit. Welded units have a mean fracture density of 8 to 40 fractures per unit cubic meter, mean matrix porosities of 12 to 23%, matrix hydraulic conductivities with geometric means ranging from 6.5 x 10{sup -6} to 9.8 x 10{sup -6} foot per day (2 x 10{sup -6} to 3 x 10{sup -6} meter per day), and bulk hydraulic conductivities of 0.33 to 33 feet per day (0.1 to 10 meters per day). The nonwelded units have a mean fracture density of 1 to 3 fractures per unit cubic meter, mean matrix porosities of 31 to 46%, and saturated hydraulic conductivities with geometric means ranging from 2.6 x 10{sup -5} to 2.9 x 10{sup -2} foot per day (8 x 10{sup -6} to 9 x 10{sup -3} meter per day). 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  18. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  19. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  20. Webinar: EISPC Energy Zones Mapping Tool Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne National Laboratory has organized a webinar demonstration of the Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free online mapping tool for identifying areas in all 39 EISPC states that may be suitable for new clean power generation. The tool is maintained by Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

  2. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  3. Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C...

  4. Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

  5. Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. W. Reimus; M. J. Umari

    2003-12-23

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that have been conducted to test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters that are used in the development of parameter distributions for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in the revisions to the SZ flow model report (BSC 2003 [ 162649]), the SZ transport model report (BSC 2003 [ 162419]), the SZ colloid transport report (BSC 2003 [162729]), and the SZ transport model abstraction report (BSC 2003 [1648701]). Specifically, this scientific analysis report provides the following information that contributes to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as a barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvium Testing Complex (ATC), which is located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and colloid transport parameters. (4) Comparisons of sorption parameter estimates for a reactive solute tracer (lithium ion) derived from both the C-wells field tracer tests and laboratory tests using C-wells core samples. (5) Sorption parameter estimates for lithium ion derived from laboratory tests using alluvium samples from NC-EWDP-19D1 (one of the wells at the ATC) so that a comparison of laboratory- and field-derived sorption parameters can be made in saturated alluvium if cross-hole tracer tests are conducted at the ATC.

  6. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being carried out in the model report, ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model, described herein, independent of the transport processes, and are then used as inputs to the transport model. Justification for this abstraction is presented in the model report, ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021 (BSC 2003 [164870]).

  7. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  8. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  9. ARM - Time in ARM NetCDF Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govDataTime in ARM NetCDF Files Page Contents Introduction Time Zones Epoch Time Time Variables Conversion Examples and Hints Perl Example C Example Fortran Example IDL Example Notes on Generating Epoch Times Contact Information Time in ARM NetCDF Files Introduction This document explains most of the issues related to the use of time in ARM netCDF data files. Time Zones All ARM netCDF files are in UTC. Note that this has some implications for solar-based data; we tend to split our files at

  10. GLORIA mosaic of the U. S. Hawaiian exclusive economic zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torresan, M.E. )

    1990-06-01

    Digital long-range side-scan sonar reconnaissance surveys using GLORIA have imaged about 65% of the nearly 2.4 million km{sup 2} of the Hawaiian EEZ. The images have been processed and compiled into one mosaic that comprises the EEZ area surrounding the principal Hawaiian islands (from Hawaii to Kauai); extending on the south side of the ridge west to Kure Island, and on the north side to St. Rogatien Bank. The GLORIA images depict a variety of features that include enormous slumps and debris avalanches, lava flows, seafloor spreading fabric, fracture zones, seamounts, and unusual sedimentation patterns with more detail than previously had been possible with typical seismic reflection techniques. Some of these features were unknown before the GLORIA surveys. In particular, the GLORIA images show that the major degradational processes that affect the island and ridge areas are massive, likely tsunamogenic, blocky debris avalanches and slumps. These failures mantle the flanks of the ridge; some extending across the trough and up on to the Hawaiian Arch (up to 230 km from their sources). Over 30 failures are identified, ranging in area from 250 to > 6,000 km{sup 2} and having volumes from 500 to > 5,000 km{sup 3}. Such deposits cover > 125,000 km{sup 3} of the Ridge and adjacent seafloor. Also imaged are large Cenozoic submarine volcanic flow fields situated on the Hawaiian Arch. One such field, the North Arch field, is located north of Oahu between the Molokai and Murray fracture zones, and covers about 200,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to the GLORIA imagery only a small portion of this flow field was mapped. In addition, the imagery depicts the finer details of the Molokai and Murray fracture zones, the Cretaceous seafloor spreading fabric, and tensional faults on the Hawaiian Arch.

  11. 5-Hydroxyfurochromones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gammill, Ronald B.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention provides novel 5-hydroxyfurochromones, which are useful as antiatherosclerotic agents.

  12. 5Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 5Li Adopted value: 1.23 MeV (2002TI10) Measured Mass Excess for 5Li Adopted value: 11680 ± 50 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1960BA45: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960BR10: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960BR19: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960HA14: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960PE14: 5Li; measured not

  13. Analysis of offsite emergency planning zones project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Armstrong, C.E. . Rocky Flats Plant); McKinney, J.M.; Verholek, M.G.; Fraser, P.J.; Dalfonso, P.H. )

    1991-07-18

    The Rocky Flats Plant maintains and uses significant nonradioactive chemically hazardous material (HAZMAT) inventories. Some of these materials are used in sufficient quantities to represent a credible risk to the offsite public in the event of an emergency at the facility. In Phase 2 of this project, the EG G Rocky Flats, Inc. and TENERA, L.P. Task Team (Task Team) produced an initial screening-level modeling analysis study and an Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) encompassing the Vulnerable Zones (VZs) for hazardous materials stored at the facility. The screening-level analysis will be supplemented with more refined evaluations during subsequent phases of the project. The existence of these chemicals in the Rocky Flats Plant Occupational Health Information System (OHIS) chemical inventory database was verified. All liquid and gaseous chemicals were considered as potential hazardous material source terms for further screening analysis. Hazards associated with solid substances were not considered in this phase of the project. 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-03-08

    A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  17. Western Renewable Energy Zones-Phase 1 Report | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Energy Zones-Phase 1 Report Western Renewable Energy Zones-Phase 1 Report In June 2006, the Western Governors'Association published "Clean Energy, a Strong Economy and a ...

  18. Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: Name The Gulf of California rift zone is a complex transition zone between the dextral (right-lateral) motion of the San Andreas transform...

  19. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steltenpohl, M.G. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Goldberg, S.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Hanley, T.B. (Columbus College, GA (United States)); Kunk, M.J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  20. DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2010 | Department of Energy New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utilities Workshop, held in Memphis, TN, in July 2010 for the electric utilities in the seismic zone was a chance to bring together a diverse set of industry partners to discuss the potential effects of an earthquake in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

  2. Electroactive-Zone Extension in Flow-Battery Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, KC; Brunini, VE; Dong, YJ; Chiang, YM; Carter, WC

    2014-11-20

    Flowable suspensions that conduct both electrons and ions can enable the use of energy-dense electroactive species in flow batteries [M. Duduta et al., Adv. Energy Mater., 1, 511 (2011); Z. Li et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 15, 15,833 (2013); F. Fan et al., Nano Lett., 14, 2210 (2014)]. In comparison with conventional flow batteries where electrochemical reactions are confined to a fixed current-collector region, electronically conductive flow electrodes permit electrochemical reactions to extend outside of the physical confines of the stack. We have measured and modeled how mixed-conduction enables an electroactive zone (EAZ, in which electrochemical reactions occur) that is of greater spatial extent than current collectors, the extension being termed side zone, SZ. Electrochemical reactions in SZs can reduce coulombic and energetic efficiency. Here we show that for realistic suspension properties and operating conditions, the added inefficiency is small in practice, and can be further mitigated by using appropriate operating conditions and/or materials choices. For the specific example of a non-aqueous Li4Ti5O12 suspension, we show that EAZ extension contributes less than 1% additional efficiency loss at C/10 rates for current collectors greater than 20 mm long. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vadose Zone Characterization Techniques Developed by EMSP Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillen, Donna P.

    2003-02-24

    This paper discusses research contributions made by Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research in the area of geophysical characterization of the subsurface. The goal of these EMSP research projects is to develop combined high-resolution measurement and interpretation packages that provide accurate, timely information needed to characterize the vadose zone. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques can be used to characterize the shallow subsurface. Since individual geophysical characterization tools all have specific limitations, many different techniques are being explored to provide more widespread applicability over a range of hydrogeologic settings. A combination of laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of how contaminants move through the vadose zone. This entails field tests with field-hardened systems, packaging and calibration of instrumentation, data processing and analysis algorithms, forward and inverse modeling, and so forth. DOE sites are seeking to team with EMSP researchers to leverage the basic science research investment and apply these advances to address subsurface contamination issues that plague many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.

  4. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  5. X Time Series

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    11 Figure 5-11: 1-Hour Ozone Time Series Observed (C506) v. Predicted (CAMx) for WRF AACOG Base Case Run 3, 2006 5-12 5.3.2 Hourly NO X Time Series Time series plots of modeled and predicted hourly NO X for each monitor located in the San Antonio MSA were constructed. The model over predicted NO X emissions at the C58 monitor on almost every day during the June 2006 episode. The average predicted hourly NO X was 7.3 ppb, while the average observed hourly NO X was only 3.9 ppb. Likewise, the

  6. NELHA Creates the 'Green Energy Zone.' | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NELHA Creates the 'Green Energy Zone.' NELHA Creates the 'Green Energy Zone.' Ron Baird and Will Rolston's presentation at the February 13, 2008 Technical Assistance Project for State and Local Officials (TAP) Webcast. PDF icon NELHA Creates the 'Green Energy Zone' More Documents & Publications EA-1336: Final Environmental Assessment Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH

  7. Zoning for Distributed Wind Power - Breaking Down Barriers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.; Sagrillo, M.

    2005-08-01

    Zoning regulations for the use of small wind turbines vary from state to state and from one local jurisdiction to the next. This paper examines the zoning experiences of small wind turbine owners, options for local actions, and examples of state and federal limited preemption of local zoning authority as a means of promoting the implementation of new technologies.

  8. HDF5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Optional. PrgEnv-pgi is not installed on Cori) % module load cray-hdf5 % ftn ... (for Fortran code) % cc ... (for C code) % CC ... (for C++ code) Cray parallel HDF5 on Edison and...

  9. July 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 July 5 Attending: Eric Jay Andrei Utilization: Cluster has been relatively full and stable. OutagesIncidents: Minor NGF issues over the weekend might have affected STAR users....

  10. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 5.0 E E nvir nvir onmental onmental Consequences Consequences 5-1 DOE/EIS-0287 5.1 Introduction Chapter 5 describes the potential environ- mental consequences of implementing each of the alternatives described in Chapter 3. This Final EIS analyzes the alternatives in the Draft EIS and provides corrections and updates as needed. In addition, it analyzes the State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative, Direct Vitrification, and a new option of the Non-Separations Alternative, the Steam Reforming

  11. DEAD, UNDEAD, AND ZOMBIE ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: ercolano@usm.lmu.de

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M {sub *} = 0.7 M {sub Sun} and 0.1 M {sub Sun }. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M {sub disk}/M {sub *} = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as L{sub X} /L {sub *} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3.5}, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 {mu}m grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only {approx}5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate ( M-dot ) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10{sup -2}; and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field-aligned grains in the outer disk regions is consistent with active MRI at those radii.

  12. Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  13. Anderson County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kansas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  14. When did movement begin on the Furnace Creek fault zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reheis, M. )

    1993-04-01

    About 50 km of post-Jurassic right-lateral slip has occurred on the northern part of the Furnace Creek fault zone (FCFZ). The sedimentology, stratigraphy, and structure of Tertiary rocks suggest that movement on the fault began no earlier than 12--8 Ma and possibly as late as 5--4 Ma. Large remnants of erosion surfaces occur on both sides of the FCFZ in the southern White Mountains and Fish Lake Valley and are buried by rhyolite and basalt, mostly 12--10 Ma; the ash flows and welded tuffs were likely erupted from sources at least 40 km to the east. Thus, the area probably had gentle topography, suggesting a lengthy period of pre-late Miocene tectonic stability. On the west side of the FCFZ, Cambrian sedimentary rocks are buried by a fanglomerate with an [sup [minus

  15. BLCC5 Registration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for taking the time to register for the BLCC5 software. Fields marked with a * indicate a required field. Once you complete the form, you will be forwarded to a page to download the...

  16. TIMING APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

    1956-04-17

    The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

  17. Part 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    May 8, 2012 PERMIT PART 5 Page 5-1 of 11 PART 5 - GROUNDWATER DETECTION MONITORING 5.1. DETECTION MONITORING PROGRAM This Part specifies the requirements of the Detection Monitoring Program (DMP). The DMP shall establish background groundwater quality and monitor indicator parameters and waste constituents that provide a reliable indication of the presence of hazardous constituents in the groundwater, as required by 20.4.1.500 NMAC (incorporating 40 CFR §§264.97 and 264.98). The DMP consists

  18. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  19. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

  20. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy A hallmark in the cuprate family of

  1. 5He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1974MAYI: 7Li(polarized p, t), E 43.8 MeV. 5He deduced levels. 1973TR04: 2H(, pd), (, dt), E 70 MeV. Deduced level-width. 5He deduced levels. 1974HO11: 2H(,...

  2. Anderson County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Texas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number...

  3. Double patterning HSQ processes of zone plates for 10 nm diffraction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Using the new process, we successfully realized zone plates of 10 nm and 12 nm outermost zones. Fig. 3 shows the SEM micrographs of the zone plates outer regions. The zone plates ...

  4. Table HC9.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................... 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 3.2 8.3 8.9 7.7 7.5 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 7.8 17.8 18.4 16.3 15.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 5.1 12.4 11.9 10.5 10.4

  5. A Markov chain analysis of fish movements to determine entrainment zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    2004-06-01

    The extent of the biological zone of influence (BZI) of a water withdrawal port, such as a cooling water intake or a smolt bypass, directly reflects its local effect on fish. This study produced a new technique to determine the BZI, defined as the region immediately upstream of a portal where the probability of fish movement toward the portal is greater than 90%. We developed and applied the technique at The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, where the ice/trash sluiceway functions as a surface flow smolt bypass. To map the BZI, we applied a Markov-Chain analysis to smolt movement data collected with an active fish tracking sonar system. Probabilities of fish movement from cell to cell in the sample volume, calculated from tracked fish data, formed a Markov transition matrix. Multiplying this matrix by itself many times with absorption at the boundaries produced estimates of probability of passage out each side of the sample volume from the cells within. The BZI of a sluiceway entrance at The Dalles Dam was approximately 5 m across and extended 6-8 m out from the face of the dam in the surface layer 2-3 m deep. BZI mapping is applicable to many bioengineering efforts to protect fish populations.

  6. Time Off

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Off Time Off A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Time Off Work schedules A variety of work schedules are available that allow flexibility for workers and Laboratory programs. The most popular work schedule is the 9/80-employees work 80 hours over a 9 workday (two week) period, with a Friday off every other week. Holidays The Lab recognizes these 12

  7. 5Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Mass Excess for 5Be Adopted value: 38000 ± 4000 keV † (2003AU02) † value and uncertainty derived not from purely experimental data, but at least partly from systematic trends Measurements 1974COXX: 3He(3He, n), E = 26, 34.5 MeV; measured σ(En). 5Be deduced lower mass limit. Back to Top Back to Ground-State Decays Data Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 29 April 2015

  8. January 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 January 5 PDSF Users Meeting 1/5/10 Attending: Eric and Jay from PDSF and users Andrew, Andrei, Marjorie, Craig, Jeff A. and Jeff P. Cluster status: Utilization has been very light, mostly STAR jobs. There was a question about the status of /eliza1 and whether it was truly gone and it is. Apparently some users didn't have their data backed up and lost it (despite announcements). Outages: None. Upcoming downtimes: System-wide outage has been rescheduled for 1/11/10. STAR and ATLAS work

  9. Tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer demonstration sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) is the primary document describing field and laboratory activities and requirements for the tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer (CP) demonstration. It is written in accordance with Hanford Tank Initiative Tank 241-AX-104 Upper Vadose Zone Demonstration Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999). This technology demonstration, to be conducted at tank 241-AX-104, is being performed by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) Project as a part of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Program (EM-30) and the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) Tanks Focus Area. Sample results obtained as part of this demonstration will provide additional information for subsequent revisions to the Retrieval Performance Evaluation (RPE) report (Jacobs 1998). The RPE Report is the result of an evaluation of a single tank farm (AX Tank Farm) used as the basis for demonstrating a methodology for developing the data and analyses necessary to support making tank waste retrieval decisions within the context of tank farm closure requirements. The RPE includes a study of vadose zone contaminant transport mechanisms, including analysis of projected tank leak characteristics, hydrogeologic characteristics of tank farm soils, and the observed distribution of contaminants in the vadose zone in the tank farms. With limited characterization information available, large uncertainties exist as to the nature and extent of contaminants that may exist in the upper vadose zone in the AX Tank Farm. Traditionally, data has been collected from soils in the vadose zone through the installation of boreholes and wells. Soil samples are collected as the bore hole is advanced and samples are screened on site and/or sent to a laboratory for analysis. Some in-situ geophysical methods of contaminant analysis can be used to evaluate radionuclide levels in the soils adjacent to an existing borehole. However, geophysical methods require compensation for well casing interference and soil moisture content and may not be successful in some conditions. In some cases the level of interference must be estimated due to uncertainties regarding the materials used in well construction and soil conditions, Well casing deployment used for many in-situ geophysical methods is relatively expensive and geophysical methods do not generally provide real time values for contaminants. In addition, some of these methods are not practical within the boundaries of the tank farm due to physical constraints, such as underground piping and other hardware. The CP technologies could facilitate future characterization of vadose zone soils by providing vadose zone data in near real-time, reducing the number of soil samples and boreholes required, and reducing characterization costs.

  10. HDF5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amounts of numerical data, and easily manipulate that data from NumPy. H5py uses straightforward NumPy and Python metaphors, like dictionary and NumPy array syntax. For example,...

  11. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    44 Environmental Consequences 5.2.7 WATER RESOURCES This section presents potential water resource impacts from implement- ing the proposed waste processing alternatives described in Chapter 3. Section 5.2.14 dis- cusses potential impacts to INEEL water resources from accidents or unusual natural phe- nomena such as earth- quakes. Appendix C.9 discusses potential long- term impacts to INEEL water resources from facility closure. Because the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative would involve

  12. EVALUATION OF VADOSE ZONE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES TO IMMOBILIZE TECHNETIUM-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-03-15

    The Hanford Site End State Vision document (DOE/RL-2003-59) states: ''There should be an aggressive plan to develop technology for remediation of the contamination that could get to the groundwater (particularly the technetium [{sup 99}Tc])''. In addition, there is strong support from the public and regulatory agencies for the above statement, with emphasis on investigation of treatment alternatives. In July 2004, PNNL completed a preliminary evaluation of remediation technologies with respect to their effectiveness and implementability for immobilization of {sup 99}Tc beneath the BC Cribs in the 200 West Area (Truex, 2004). As a result of this evaluation, PNNL recommended treatability testing of in situ soil desiccation, because it has the least uncertainty of those technologies evaluated in July 2004 (Treatability Test Outline, September 30, 2004). In 2005, DOE-RL and Fluor Hanford convened an independent technical panel to review alternative remediation technologies, including desiccation, at a three-day workshop in Richland, Washington. The panel was composed of experts in vadose-zone transport, infiltration control, hydrology, geochemistry, environmental engineering, and geology. Their backgrounds include employment in academia, government laboratories, industry, and consulting. Their review, presented in this document, is based upon written reports from Hanford, oral presentations from Hanford staff, and each panel members' years of experience in their particular field of expertise. The purpose of this report is to document the panel's evaluation of various treatment alternatives with potential for minimizing contaminant migration in the deep vadose zone at the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The panel was tasked with assessing the most viable and practical approach and making recommendations for testing. The evaluation of vadose-zone treatment alternatives was conducted to be broadly applicable at a variety of locations at Hanford. However, because of limitations of time, the panel was asked to focus on one example, {sup 99}Tc contamination below the BC Cribs and Trenches. It is well recognized that conditions at BC Cribs and Trenches are not the same as those at other Hanford locations, but it was selected so that the panel could develop an understanding of site conditions at one location. The recommendations in this report are not intended to address the regulatory decision process for this site.

  13. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, V L. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Adams, Nicolaus G. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Bill, Brian D. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Stehr, Carla M. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Wekell, John C. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Moeller, Peter (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Busman, Mark (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Woodruff, Dana L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  14. Central Plateau Groundwater and Deep Vadose Zone Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vadose Zone Executive Council Hanford Advisory Board River and Plateau Committee Briant L. Charboneau DOE-RL, Soil and Groundwater Federal Project Director October 9, 2012 1 Discussion Topics * Purpose of the Executive Council - Why was this established? * Who participates? * What are the integration topics of interest to the Council? * Examples of groundwater and vadose zone integration - Deep Vadose Zone treatability testing leading to evaluation of measures to protect groundwater - B complex

  15. Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  16. East Tennessee Technology Park Zones 1 and 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document explains the cleanup activities and any use limitations for the land surrounding the East Tennessee Technology Park’s Zones 1 and 2.

  17. Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County...

  18. Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search...

  19. Tectonic analysis of the Rio Grande Rift Zone, central Colorado...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rift Zone, central ColoradoThesisDissertation Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author D.H. Knepper Organization Colorado School of Mines Published Publisher Not Provided, 1974...

  20. Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Baoding High-Tech Industry Development Zone Place: China Product: Government & NGO ( State-owned commercial entity ) References: Baoding High-Tech Industry Development...

  1. Variation in sericite composition from fracture zones within...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    found in drillhole samples within the geothermal system at Coso Hot Springs. Low-permeability zones of the crystalline basement contain coarse-grained relict muscovite, whereas...

  2. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effective solutions to solve DOE's most challenging deep vadose zone characterization, remediation, monitoring, and prediction challenges. Please click here to read more... ...

  3. Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area Wilson Hot Spring Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Energy Generation Facilities within the Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region...

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  5. Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes...

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity...

  7. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  8. Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness...

  9. Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date...

  10. High pressure floating zone growth and structural properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    quantum paraelectric BaFe12O19 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High pressure floating zone growth and structural properties of ferrimagnetic quantum ...

  11. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005...

  12. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Permitting & Zoning | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting & Zoning < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  13. Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  14. Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  19. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other ...

  20. Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Search Results Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter ... An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system ...

  1. Washington Coastal Zone Management Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Coastal Zone Management Webpage Abstract Provides overview of Washington's coastal...

  2. Drone Zone at Los Alamos ScienceFest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drone Zone at Los Alamos ScienceFest Drone Zone at Los Alamos ScienceFest WHEN: Jul 18, 2015 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM WHERE: Ashley Pond Downtown Los Alamos, New Mexico CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Drone Zone at Los Alamos ScienceFest Event Description An interactive event offering learning and competition as part of the Los Alamos ScienceFest. Join us at the Drone Zone at Los Alamos ScienceFest where you can bring your own drone or try flying a

  3. Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  4. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  5. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  6. Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  7. Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry...

  8. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  9. Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  10. Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  11. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 6217 Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section 6217 Webpage...

  12. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3 Facility Disposition Impacts Section 5.3 presents a discussion of potential impacts associated with the disposition of exist- ing HLW management facilities at INEEL and disposition of new facilities that would be built in support of the proposed waste processing alternatives. The discussion includes (1) the potential impacts of short-term actions in dispo- sitioning new and existing HLW management facilities, (2) the potential long-term impacts from the

  13. July 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 July 5 Attending: Eric Jay Andrei Utilization: Cluster has been relatively full and stable. Outages/Incidents: Minor NGF issues over the weekend might have affected STAR users. Upcoming Downtimes: 7/13 PDSF will be down all day for maintenance including power upgrades, /common migration, and GPFS and kernal upgrades. Announcement to go out later today. Procurements/New Hardware: Last procurement of this FY to go out later this month. Jay will send an email to PI's with the details. Group

  14. June 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 June 5 Attending Iwona Larry, Mike, Craig, Yushu, Katie, Jeff Outages/Downtimes BestMAN on pdsfgrid1 had repeating problems, Iwona and Larry are working on this. Upcoming Downtimes Full day outage on June 10 for network reconfiguration. Grid Issues ATLAS DDM Delete file issue, Iwona is working on it. Other Issues Mike (ATLAS) suggested to name one contact person per group, when one user in that group is blocked, an email will go to that contact person as well. Jeff suggested to remove .chos

  15. Amendment 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Date: March 5, 2008 ISSUED BY: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 PROJECT NAME & LOCATION Design/Build Subcontract for the Research Support Facility Golden, CO The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth below. The hour and date specified for receipt of offers [X] is not extended and remains 4 p.m. MDT, 3/27/08. [] is hereby FAILURE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, ALL TERMS

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  17. Effects of ion-neutral collisions on Alfven waves: The presence of forbidden zone and heavy damping zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, C. J.; Lee, L. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Wang, C. B.

    2013-03-15

    Alfven waves are low-frequency transverse waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. We define the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0} as {omega}{sub 0}=kV{sub A}cos{theta}, where k is the wave number, V{sub A} is the Alfven speed, and {theta} is the angle between the wave vector and the ambient magnetic field. There are partially ionized plasmas in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasma systems, such as in the solar chromosphere, interstellar clouds, and the earth ionosphere. The presence of neutral particles may modify the wave frequency and cause damping of Alfven waves. The effects on Alfven waves depend on two parameters: (1) {alpha}=n{sub n}/n{sub i}, the ratio of neutral density (n{sub n}), and ion density (n{sub i}); (2) {beta}={nu}{sub ni}/{omega}{sub 0}, the ratio of neutral collisional frequency by ions {nu}{sub ni} to the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0}. Most of the previous studies examined only the limiting case with a relatively large neutral collisional frequency or {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1. In the present paper, the dispersion relation for Alfven waves is solved for all values of {alpha} and {beta}. Approximate solutions in the limit {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1 as well as {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 are obtained. It is found for the first time that there is a 'forbidden zone (FZ)' in the {alpha}-{beta} parameter space, where the real frequency of Alfven waves becomes zero. We also solve the wavenumber k from the dispersion equation for a fixed frequency and find the existence of a 'heavy damping zone (HDZ).' We then examine the presence of FZ and HDZ for Alfven waves in the ionosphere and in the solar chromosphere.

  18. Lecture 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    two-channel elimination chemically activated reaction Stanford University Hai Wang Version 1.2 5-2 C 2 H 3 * C 2 H 2 + H* n-C 3 H 7 * C 2 H 4 + CH 3 * The third...

  19. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

    2010-02-24

    The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

  20. Multi-Zone Modeling of the Pulsar Win Nebula HESS J1825-137

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Etten, Adam; Romani, Roger W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-08

    The pulsar wind nebula associated with PSR J1826-1334, HESS J1825-137, is a bright very high energy source with an angular extent of {approx} 1{sup o} and spatially-resolved spectroscopic TeV measurements. The gamma-ray spectral index is observed to soften with increasing distance from the pulsar, likely the result of cooling losses as electrons traverse the nebula. We describe analysis of X-ray data of the extended nebula, as well as 3-D time-dependent spectral energy distribution modeling, with emphasis on the spatial variations within HESS J1825-137. The multi-wavelength data places significant constraints on electron injection, transport, and cooling within the nebula. The large size and high nebular energy budget imply a relatively rapid initial pulsar spin period of 13 {+-} 7 ms and an age of 40 {+-} 9 kyr. The relative fluxes of each VHE zone can be explained by advective particle transport with a radially decreasing velocity profile with v(r) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.5}. The evolution of the cooling break requires an evolving magnetic field which also decreases radially from the pulsar, B(r, t) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.7} E(t){sup 1/2}. Detection of 10 TeV flux {approx} 80 pc from the pulsar requires rapid diffusion of high energy particles with {tau}{sub esc} {approx} 90 (R/10 pc){sup 2}(E{sub e}/100TeV){sup -1} year, contrary to the common assumption of toroidal magnetic fields with strong magnetic confinement. The model predicts a rather uniform Fermi LAT surface brightness out to {approx} 1{sup o} from the pulsar, in good agreement with the recently discovered LAT source centered 0.5{sup o} southwest of PSR J1826-1334 with extension 0.6 {+-} 0.1{sup o}.

  1. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. . Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. ); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA )

    1992-01-01

    A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

  2. Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast

  3. "Table HC9.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  4. "Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  5. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 5.2.6 AIR RESOURCES Air pollutant emissions associated with construction and operation of facilities to support the waste processing al- ternatives could affect the air resources in the region of the INEEL. DOE characterized air emission rates and calculated maximum consequences at onsite and offsite locations from projects associated with proposed waste processing alternatives. The assessments include emis- sions from stationary sources (facility stacks); fugitive sources from construction

  6. Directly imaging steeply-dipping fault zones in geothermal fields with multicomponent seismic data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ting; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-07-30

    For characterizing geothermal systems, it is important to have clear images of steeply-dipping fault zones because they may confine the boundaries of geothermal reservoirs and influence hydrothermal flow. Elastic reverse-time migration (ERTM) is the most promising tool for subsurface imaging with multicomponent seismic data. However, conventional ERTM usually generates significant artifacts caused by the cross correlation of undesired wavefields and the polarity reversal of shear waves. In addition, it is difficult for conventional ERTM to directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. We develop a new ERTM imaging method in this paper to reduce these artifacts and directly image steeply-dipping fault zones.more » In our new ERTM method, forward-propagated source wavefields and backward-propagated receiver wavefields are decomposed into compressional (P) and shear (S) components. Furthermore, each component of these wavefields is separated into left- and right-going, or downgoing and upgoing waves. The cross correlation imaging condition is applied to the separated wavefields along opposite propagation directions. For converted waves (P-to-S or S-to-P), the polarity correction is applied to the separated wavefields based on the analysis of Poynting vectors. Numerical imaging examples of synthetic seismic data demonstrate that our new ERTM method produces high-resolution images of steeply-dipping fault zones.« less

  7. Modeling CANDU-6 liquid zone controllers for effects of thorium-based fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St-Aubin, E.; Marleau, G.

    2012-07-01

    We use the DRAGON code to model the CANDU-6 liquid zone controllers and evaluate the effects of thorium-based fuels on their incremental cross sections and reactivity worth. We optimize both the numerical quadrature and spatial discretization for 2D cell models in order to provide accurate fuel properties for 3D liquid zone controller supercell models. We propose a low computer cost parameterized pseudo-exact 3D cluster geometries modeling approach that avoids tracking issues on small external surfaces. This methodology provides consistent incremental cross sections and reactivity worths when the thickness of the buffer region is reduced. When compared with an approximate annular geometry representation of the fuel and coolant region, we observe that the cluster description of fuel bundles in the supercell models does not increase considerably the precision of the results while increasing substantially the CPU time. In addition, this comparison shows that it is imperative to finely describe the liquid zone controller geometry since it has a strong impact of the incremental cross sections. This paper also shows that liquid zone controller reactivity worth is greatly decreased in presence of thorium-based fuels compared to the reference natural uranium fuel, since the fission and the fast to thermal scattering incremental cross sections are higher for the new fuels. (authors)

  8. Directly imaging steeply-dipping fault zones in geothermal fields with multicomponent seismic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ting; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-07-30

    For characterizing geothermal systems, it is important to have clear images of steeply-dipping fault zones because they may confine the boundaries of geothermal reservoirs and influence hydrothermal flow. Elastic reverse-time migration (ERTM) is the most promising tool for subsurface imaging with multicomponent seismic data. However, conventional ERTM usually generates significant artifacts caused by the cross correlation of undesired wavefields and the polarity reversal of shear waves. In addition, it is difficult for conventional ERTM to directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. We develop a new ERTM imaging method in this paper to reduce these artifacts and directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. In our new ERTM method, forward-propagated source wavefields and backward-propagated receiver wavefields are decomposed into compressional (P) and shear (S) components. Furthermore, each component of these wavefields is separated into left- and right-going, or downgoing and upgoing waves. The cross correlation imaging condition is applied to the separated wavefields along opposite propagation directions. For converted waves (P-to-S or S-to-P), the polarity correction is applied to the separated wavefields based on the analysis of Poynting vectors. Numerical imaging examples of synthetic seismic data demonstrate that our new ERTM method produces high-resolution images of steeply-dipping fault zones.

  9. Multi-zone methods to predict gas well performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, L.A.; Newhouse, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The contributing elements of a formula developed for accurately predicting the performance of gas wells which include a high permeability zone interbedded with one or more low permeability zones are discussed. The theory assumes the existence of 3 conditions: (1) the well depletes without water encroachment; (2) each zone remains discreet from every other - that is, without cross flow among zones when the well is producing; and (3) each zone has either a hydraulic fracture or some skin effect. As a practical matter in using the model, only one of these reservoir conditions need to be met - freedom from water encroachment. The model developed does not adapt to reservoirs that have limited cross flow between zones. It also adapts to those with a hydraulic fracture in only some of the zones and includes equations which help to calculate matrix permeability whenever a known hydraulic fracture does exist. The functions of the model are illustrated by assuming the existence of a shaley-sand, 6-zone reservoir and by ascribing to it certain characteristics. The use of the model is examined and its results are discussed.

  10. Category:County Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zone information in the United States of America. Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages in category "County Climate Zones" The following...

  11. Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms Abstract: Microalgal biofilm based

  12. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) - Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-02-01

    The Deep Vadoze Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources and to address the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. This factsheet provides an overview of the initiative and the approach to integrate basic science and needs-driven applied research activities with cleanup operations.

  13. Significance of Soft Zone Sediments at the SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aadland, R.K.

    2000-02-03

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on the origin, extent and stability of ''soft zones'' in the carbonate bearing strata at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As part of this study, a comprehensive historical compendium of how soft zones have been addressed during the past 47 years at SRS is reviewed.

  14. High gain photoconductive semiconductor switch having tailored doping profile zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, Albert G.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Mar, Alan; Zutavern, Fred J; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Zipperian, Thomas E.; O'Malley, Martin W.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Denison, Gary J.; Brown, Darwin J.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Hou, Hong Q.

    2001-01-01

    A photoconductive semiconductor switch with tailored doping profile zones beneath and extending laterally from the electrical contacts to the device. The zones are of sufficient depth and lateral extent to isolate the contacts from damage caused by the high current filaments that are created in the device when it is turned on. The zones may be formed by etching depressions into the substrate, then conducting epitaxial regrowth in the depressions with material of the desired doping profile. They may be formed by surface epitaxy. They may also be formed by deep diffusion processes. The zones act to reduce the energy density at the contacts by suppressing collective impact ionization and formation of filaments near the contact and by reducing current intensity at the contact through enhanced current spreading within the zones.

  15. Sub-nanosecond Half-life Measurement of the Yrast I{sup π}=5{sup −} State in the N=78 Nucleus {sup 136}{sub 58}Ce using Fast-timing Coincident Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alharbi, T.; Regan, P.H.; Mărginean, N.; Podolyák, Zs.; Bajoga, A.; Britton, R.; Bucurescu, D.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D.; Ghită, D.; Glodariu, T.; Mihai, C.; Mulholland, K.; Mărginean, R.; Negret, A.; Nita, C.R.; Patel, Z.; Roberts, O.J.; Stroe, L.; Sava, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    We report on the measurement of the half-life of the yrast I{sup π}=5{sup −} state in the transitional nucleus {sup 136}Ce using a combined HPGe-LaBr3(Ce) scintillator gamma-ray detection array. The measured value for the E1 decay is approximately half a nanosecond, which corresponds to an E1 decay strength of approximately 2×10{sup −6} Wu. This value is in line with single-particle type E1 decays in this mass region and suggests no sign of additional K-hindrance associated with axially symmetric quadrupole deformations observed for lighter cerium isotopes.

  16. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HLW & FD EIS 5-73 DOE/EIS-0287 tion dose to the nonin- volved worker and maximally exposed offsite individual and the collective dose to the population residing within 50 miles of INTEC. The radiation dose values for the var- ious alternatives were then multiplied by the dose-to-risk conversion factors, which are based on the 1993 Limitations of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (NCRP 1993). DOE has adopted these risk fac- tors of 0.0005 and 0.0004 latent cancer fatality (LCF) for each

  17. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    45 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3.4.2 Existing Facilities Associated with High-Level Waste Management The facilities in this group are those that have historically been used at the INTEC to generate, treat, and store HLW. Because of the number of facilities involved, DOE has grouped them in functional groups for purposes of analysis (see Table 3-3). DOE analyzed the HLW tanks and bin sets for closure under all five disposition sce- narios; however, facilities that support the Tank Farm

  18. Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas Ronald; Bates, Dona Louise; Bishop, Carolyn Wagoner; Heard, Robert Eugene; Hubbell, Joel Michael; Hull, Laurence Charles; Lehman, Richard Michael; Magnuson, Swen O; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Mccarthy, James Michael; Porro, Indrek; Ritter, Paul David; Roddy, Michael Scott; Singler, Robert Edward; Smith, Richard Paul

    2000-08-01

    Subsurface contamination in the vadose zone, that portion of the subsurface pathway between land surface and an underlying aquifer, poses environmental problems at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in eastern Idaho and across the U.S. Department of Energy complex. Assessing potential adverse impacts from these contaminated sites requires an understanding of the mechanisms controlling contaminant transport. Currently, vadose zone experts at the INEEL cannot with confidence predict the movement of water and contaminants in the complex, heterogeneous, fractured subsurface at the INEEL, especially within the vadose zone. In the draft version (Revision 1) of the Vadose Zone Deficiencies document, deficiencies in scientific understanding of flow and transport processes in the vadose zone at the INEEL were identified and grouped into 13 categories and recommendations were provided to address each of the deficiencies. The draft document provided the basis for an INEEL Vadose Zone Workshop that was conducted October 20 and 21, 1999, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The workshop was conducted to group and rank the previously identified deficiencies and for the subsequent development of science plans to address the deficiencies that limit reliable predictions of water and contaminant movement in the subsurface. The workshop participants, comprising INEEL and scientists and project managers and non-INEEL scientists knowledgeable about the vadose zone, developed science- and technology-based recommendations derived through a series of technical sessions at the workshop. In this document, the final version of the Vadose Zone Deficiencies document, the draft document has been incorporated, largely intact, as well as the results from the workshop. The workshop participants grouped the deficiencies in vadose zone understanding at the INEEL into seven categories. These seven categories will be the focus areas of five science plans that are being developed to address the deficiencies. This document lays the foundation for the INEEL Site-wide vadose zone roadmap.

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  1. Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent an energy retrofit to comply with Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance, a mandate that requires all rental properties to meet certain energy efficiency standards by 2018. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, worked with city planners and building owners to evaluate this program and recently completed a case study evaluating the effectiveness of a collection of retrofit measures.

  2. A new estimate of the chondrule cooling rate deduced from an analysis of compositional zoning of relict olivine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miura, H.; Yamamoto, T.

    2014-03-01

    Compositional zoning in chondrule phenocrysts records the crystallization environments in the early solar nebula. We modeled the growth of olivine phenocrysts from a silicate melt and proposed a new fractional crystallization model that provides a relation between the zoning profile and the cooling rate. In our model, we took elemental partitioning at a growing solid-liquid interface and time-dependent solute diffusion in the liquid into consideration. We assumed a local equilibrium condition, namely, that the compositions at the interface are equal to the equilibrium ones at a given temperature. We carried out numerical simulations of the fractional crystallization in one-dimensional planar geometry. The simulations revealed that under a constant cooling rate the growth velocity increases exponentially with time and a linear zoning profile forms in the solid as a result. We derived analytic formulae of the zoning profile, which reproduced the numerical results for wide ranges of crystallization conditions. The formulae provide a useful tool to estimate the cooling rate from the compositional zoning. Applying the formulae to low-FeO relict olivine grains in type II porphyritic chondrules observed by Wasson and Rubin, we estimate the cooling rate to be ?200-2000 K s{sup 1}, which is greater than that expected from furnace-based experiments by orders of magnitude. Appropriate solar nebula environments for such rapid cooling conditions are discussed.

  3. Genepool Time Heatmaps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genepool Time Heatmaps Heatmap of Time and Slots Requested vs Time Waited (in hours) | Queue: All | Last 7 Days Time Requested Slots <1h 1-2h 2-6h 6-12h 12-24h 24-36h 36-48h 48h-1wk >1wk Job Count Longest Wait 1 23.0 (233) 0.37 (1819) 27.54 (49888) 5.85 (124593) 1.23 (39835) 0.34 (732) 0 0.4 (224) 0.02 (1) 217325 538.96 2 0 0.01 (19) 2.54 (78) 0.2 (140) 0.99 (2683) 0 0 0 0 2920 9.1 4 0.08 (1) 0 2.82 (141) 0.36 (143) 1.07 (12) 0.06 (5) 0.01 (5) 0.06 (1) 1.3 (5) 313 20.48 6 0.01 (2) 0 0.09

  4. table5.5_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE

  5. Trace-element zoning in garnets from sheared mantle xenoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, W.L.; Cousens, D.R.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. ); Smith, D. ); Boyd, F.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Proton-microprobe analyses of garnets from sheared high-temperature ultramafic xenoliths reveal marked zonation of trace elements, paralleling trends in major and minor elements. Garnet rims (600-1,000 {mu}m wide) are enriched in Fe, Ti, Zr, Y and Ga, and either enriched or depleted in Cr, relative to cores. Zoning profiles for Ti and Zr are S-shaped and extend further into the grains than the Cr and Ga gradients. The profiles are consistent with the formation of Ti, Zr, Y-enriched garnet overgrowths, followed by diffusive equilibration between rim and core over years to hundreds of years. This enrichment in Fe, Ca, Al and incompatible elements is ascribed to melt infiltration and consequent melt-crystal exchange and garnet growth, shortly before eruption. Zr/Y is 1 to 2 in garnet cores but 4 to 5 in rims, and so the infiltrating melt may have been relatively alkalic. Major and trace element concentrations in such high-temperature sheared xenoliths are not likely to resemble those of primitive mantle or of residual mantle depleted by melt extraction.

  6. Western Renewable Energy Zones, Phase 1: QRA Identification Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletka, R.; Finn, J.

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the Western Renewable Energy Zones (WREZ) Initiative Phase 1 Qualified Resource Area identification process, including the identification and economic analysis of Qualified Resource Areas (QRAs) and 'non-REZ' resources. These data and analyses will assist the Western US in its renewable energy transmission planning goals. The economic analysis in this report produced the input data for the WREZ Generation and Transmission model, which is a screening-level model to determine the optimal routing for and cost of delivering renewable energy from QRAs to load centers throughout the Western Interconnection. In June 2009, the Western Governors' Association accepted the Western Governors' Association WREZ Phase 1 Report in which the QRAs were mapped and the entire WREZ Phase 1 process was explained in general. That same month the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory released the WREZ Generation and Transmission Model (GTM), which was also developed by Black & Veatch. This report details the assumptions and methodologies that were used to produce the maps and resource analyses in the WGA report as well as the economic data used by the WREZ GTM. This report also provides the results of the non-REZ resource analysis for the first time in the WREZ initiative.

  7. Zoning for earth sheltered buildings. A guide for Minnesota communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Background information on earth sheltered buildings and the zoning issues related to this construction techniques is provided. Ways to develop goals and policies on earth sheltering and integrate them into existing planning documents are outlined. Ways to eliminate prohibitions and barriers to earth-sheltered buildings from zoning language are explained. Subdivision and planned unit development (PUD) regulations designed to facilitate and encourage new developments of earth sheltered homes are considered. Model language on planning, zoning, and subdivisions and planned unit developments and a summary of the various recommendations made throughout the guidebook are included. (MHR)

  8. Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-06-26

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

  9. An Analysis of Dual Zone Loading for Shipping Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, William Christopher; Yim, Man-Sung

    2007-07-01

    The bumps current fuel assembly designs can achieve exceeds the fuel assembly burnups the current fleet of shipping casks can ship. One method of handling this situation which has been proposed is regionalized loading. This concept involves administratively separating the fuel basket of a shipping cask into two or more regions and loading fuel with different burnup, cooling times and enrichments into these regions. To evaluate how regionalized loading patterns might affect shipping spent nuclear fuel in comparison to uniform loading, a test case study was performed using fuel assemblies discharged from an actual nuclear plant and a shipping cask licensed by the NRC. Using the same fuel assemblies and shipping cask, results were obtained assuming a uniform loading pattern and compared to the results obtained assuming a dual zone loading pattern. Source terms for the analysis were generated using SAS2 and the dose levels were calculated using MCNPS. The analysis showed that the dual zone loading reduced the amount of time required to ship the given quantity of fuel by roughly thirty percent compared to the uniform loading. The average dose rate to the transportation workers and the public due to the implementation of dual zone loading increased. Implications of these increases are discussed. (authors)

  10. The Use of Radar Methods to Determine Moisture Content in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosemary Knight

    2003-12-28

    Water content is a critical parameter affecting both liquid-phase and vapor-phase contaminant transport in the vadose zone. This means that accurate estimate of in situ water content must be obtained in order to design for the appropriate handling or remediation of a contaminated region of the vadose zone. Traditional methods of sampling the subsurface by drilling and/or direct sampling are very time consuming, limited in terms of spatial coverage, and have the associated risk of contacting and increasing the size of the contaminated area. One solution is to use geophysical methods which can provide a high-resolution, non-invasive means of sampling or imagin the subsurface.

  11. Baca County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baca County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baca County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  12. Adams County, Indiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Indiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Indiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  13. Adams County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  14. Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  15. Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  16. Adams County, Ohio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Ohio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Ohio ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

  17. Bacon County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bacon County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bacon County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  18. Bates County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bates County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bates County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  19. Ben Hill County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ben Hill County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ben Hill County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  20. Barrow County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Barrow County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barrow County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  1. Apache County, Arizona ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apache County, Arizona ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Apache County, Arizona ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  2. Certification of Consistency with Washington's Coastal Zone Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Management Program for Federally Licensed or Permitted ActivitiesLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not...

  3. Certification of Consistency with Washington's Coastal Zone Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coastal Zone Management Program for Federally Funded ActivitiesLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not...

  4. Montana Guide to the Streamside Management Zone Law & Rules Webpage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guide to the Streamside Management Zone Law & Rules Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Guide to the Streamside Management...

  5. Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zones can be targeted in the future Authors Dilley, L. M.; Norman, D.I.; Moore, J.; McCulloch and J. Published Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2006, 112006 DOI...

  6. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley...

  7. app_c5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Truck Impacts C.5-7 C.5.4.2 Rail Impacts C.5-8 C.5.5 Cargo-Related Accident Impacts C.5-8 C.5.5.1 Accident Types C.5-8 C.5.5.2 Accident Release C.5-9 C.5.5.3 Radiological Waste ...

  8. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  9. Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Data Explorer Search Results Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration Title: Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust; and a grid that includes electrically resistive material that is segmented by non-conductive material

  10. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Xie, Xueying; Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  11. Characterization of microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a blast-resistant naval steel | Energy Frontier Research Centers microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone of a blast-resistant naval steel Home Author: X. Yu, J. Caron, S. S. Babu, J. C. Lippold, D. Isheim, D. N. Seidman Year: 2010 Abstract: The influence of simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycles on the microstructural evolution in a blast-resistant naval steel was investigated by dilatometry, microhardness testing, optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction

  12. WIPP Concludes Zone Recovery Activities for Panel 7 Disposal Pathway

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24, 2015 WIPP Concludes Zone Recovery Activities for Panel 7 Disposal Pathway After months of catch-up rock bolting and contamination mitigation, zone recovery activities along the pathway to Panel 7 have been completed. Panel 7, which consists of seven disposal rooms (see map below), will be the active disposal area when waste emplacement activities resume. Initial closure of Panel 7 Room 7 was completed in May 2015. Although the pathway has been established, a significant number of activities,

  13. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating the impacts of fracture zone on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pressure build-up and ground surface uplift during geological CO₂ sequestration (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Uncertainty quantification for evaluating the impacts of fracture zone on pressure build-up and ground surface uplift during geological CO₂ sequestration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty quantification for evaluating the impacts of fracture zone on pressure build-up and ground surface uplift during geological CO₂ sequestration A series of numerical

  14. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  15. Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place...

  16. Double patterning HSQ processes of zone plates for 10 nm diffraction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    For diffraction-limited zone plates, accuracy better than one-third of the smallest zone ... Sponsoring Org: Materials Sciences Division Country of Publication: United States Language...

  17. InSAR At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness useful...

  18. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-16

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate-scale tests will be used to bridge the gap between the small-scale foam transport studies and the field-scale demonstration. Numerical simulation studies on foam delivery under vadose conditions will be performed to simulate observed foam transport behavior under vadose zone conditions and predict the foam delivery performance at field-scale.

  19. Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

    2011-10-01

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

  20. Hydrogeologic characterization of an arid zone Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginanni, J.M.; O`Neill, L.J. [USDOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hammermeister, D.P.; Blout, D.O.; Dozier, B.L.; Sully, M.J.; Johnejack, K.R.; Emer, D.F. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Tyler, S.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    1994-06-01

    An in-depth subsurface site characterization and monitoring program for the soil water migration pathway has been planned, implemented, and completed to satisfy data requirements for a waiver from groundwater monitoring, for an exemption from liner leachate collections systems, and for different regulatory driven performance assessments. A traditional scientific approach has been taken to focus characterization and monitoring efforts. This involved developing a conceptual model of the hydrogeologic system and defining and testing hypotheses about this model. Specific hypotheses tested included: that the system was hydrologically heterogenous and anisotropic, and that recharge was very low or negligible. Mineralogical, physical, and hydrologic data collected to test hypotheses has shown the hydrologic system to be remarkably homogenous and isotropic rather than heterogenous and anisotropic. Both hydrodynamic and environmental tracer approaches for estimating recharge have led to the conclusion that recharge from the Area 5 RWMS is not occurring in the upper region of the vadose zone, and that recharge at depth is extremely small or negligible. This demonstration of ``no migration of hazardous constituents to the water table satisfies a key requirement for both the groundwater monitoring waiver and the exemption from liner leachate collection systems. Data obtained from testing hypotheses concerning the soil water migration pathway have been used to refine the conceptual model of the hydrogeologic system of the site. These data suggest that the soil gas and atmospheric air pathways may be more important for transporting contaminants to the accessible environment than the soil water pathway. New hypotheses have been developed about these pathways, and characterization and monitoring activities designed to collect data to test these hypotheses.

  1. Fracture initiation by local brittle zones in weldments of quenched and tempered structural alloy steel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, K.L.; Reuter, W.G.; Reemsnyder, H.S.; Matlock, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) embrittlement of an API 2Y Grade 50T quenched and tempered offshore structural steel plate, welded by the submerged-arc process at a heat input of 4.5 kJ/mm, was investigated from the viewpoint of identifying the local brittle zone (LBZ) microstructure and the metallurgical factors associated with its formation. Microstructural and fractographic analysis showed the LBZ microstructure to be dual phase martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent. The formation of M-A constituent was found to be related to microstructural banding of the hot-rolled base plate. When the banded base plate was welded, M-A constituent formed only within the band microstructure which penetrated the intercritically-reheated coarse-grain HAZ (IRCGHAZ). The chemistry of the band microstructure in conjunction with the thermal cycle of the IRCGHAZ provided the critical conditions for the formation of M-A constituent in the API 2Y Grade 50T steel investigated. The influence of local brittle zones (i.e., M-A constituent) on the HAZ fracture toughness was evaluated by means of Crack-Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD) tests. These tests showed the steel to suffer embrittlement when the fatigue precrack sampled an intercritically-reheated coarse-grain HAZ which contained M-A constituent, confirming that M-A constituent is the major microstructural factor controlling the HAZ toughness of this particular steel.

  2. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, North Ramp area of the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousseau, J.P.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Gillies, D.C.

    1999-03-01

    Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being investigated by the US Department of Energy as a potential site for a repository for high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of surface-based geologic, pneumatic, hydrologic, and geochemical studies conducted during 1992 to 1996 by the US Geological Survey in the vicinity of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) that are pertinent to understanding multiphase fluid flow within the deep unsaturated zone. Detailed stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the study area provided the hydrogeologic framework for these investigations. Shallow infiltration is not discussed in detail in this report because the focus in on three major aspects of the deep unsaturated-zone system: geologic framework, the gaseous-phase system, and the aqueous-phase system. However, because the relation between shallow infiltration and deep percolation is important to an overall understanding of the unsaturated-zone flow system, a summary of infiltration studies conducted to date at Yucca Mountain is provided in the section titled Shallow Infiltration. This report describes results of several Site Characterization Plan studies that were ongoing at the time excavation of the ESF North Ramp began and that continued as excavation proceeded.

  3. Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisneros, Roberto R; Huang, Jian; Ostrouchov, George; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2011-01-01

    Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

  4. Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

  5. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe the RAs performed in Zone 2. The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into 7 geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the DQOs of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed, and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was executed and completed in FY 2007 for the 11 EUs addressed in this document. The main body of this report describes both the DVS process and scope of work performed and the RAs completed. The scope and approach for performing DVS activities performed in FY 2007 that lead to action/no further action decisions are presented in Sects. 2 through 4. RAs performed in FY 2007 are presented in Sects. 5 through 10. Future land use is described in Sect. 11, and the status of all Zone 2 EUs as of this PCCR is presented in Sect. 12.

  6. Significance of water fluxes in a deep arid-region vadose zone to waste disposal strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnejack, K.R.; Blout, D.O.; Sully, M.J.; Emer, D.F.; Hammermeister, D.P. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Dever, L.G.; O`Neill, L.J. [DOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Waste Management Div.; Tyler, S.W. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Chapman, J. [Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1994-03-01

    Recently collected subsurface site characterization data have led to the development of a conceptual model of water movement beneath the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that differs significantly from the conceptual model of water movement inherent in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. At the Area 5 RWMS, water fluxes in approximately the upper 75 m (250 ft) of the vadose zone point in the upward direction (rather than downward) which effectively isolates this region from the deep (approximately 250 m (820 ft)) uppermost aquifer. Standard RCRA approaches for detection and containment (groundwater monitoring and double liners/leachate collection/leak detection systems) are not able to fulfill their intended function in this rather unique hydrogeologic environment. In order to better fulfill the waste detection and containment intentions of RCRA for mixed waste disposal at the Area 5 RWMS, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) is preparing a single petition for both a waiver from groundwater monitoring and an exemption from double liners with leachate collection/leak detection. DOE/NV proposes in this petition that the containment function of liners and leachate collection is better accomplished by the natural hydrogeologic processes operating in the upper vadose zone; and the detection function of groundwater monitoring and the leak detection system in liners is better fulfilled by an alternative vadose zone monitoring system. In addition, an alternative point of compliance is proposed that will aid in early detection, as well as limit the extent of potential contamination before detection. Finally, special cell design features and operation practices will be implemented to limit leachate formation, especially while the cell is open to the atmosphere during waste emplacement.

  7. NUG Webinar June 5, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 5 Time: 11:00 PDT Agenda NERSC's move to its new building at Berkeley Lab Dirac, Carver, and Hopper timelines and plans NERSC Exascale Science Applications Program...

  8. Table HC9.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 10.9 25.7 27.1 23.4 22.4 1.............................................................. 103.3 10.2 24.3 25.3 22.2 21.3 2 or More................................................. 6.2 0.6 1.5 1.8 1.2 1.1 Do Not Use

  9. The Rotary Zone Thermal Cycler: A Low-Power System Enabling Rapid Automated PCR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rotary Zone Thermal Cycler: A Low-Power System Enabling Rapid, AufgmND2 0i4-i637iJ Michael S. Bartsch1'^, Harrison J. Edwards1,2'*, Daniel Lee1,3'*, Caroline E. Moseley1'*, Karen E. Tew1'4'*, Ronald F. Renzi1, James L. Van de Vreugde1, Hanyoup Kim1,5, Daniel L. Knight6, Anupama Sinha1, Steven S. Branda1, Kamlesh D. Patel1 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; 2 Currently at Gas Transmission Systems, Walnut Creek, CA; 3 Currently at California State University, Los Angeles, CA; 4

  10. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: FY 2002 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.

    2003-01-02

    This work reported here is part of the U. S. Department of Energys Science and Technology Initiative to develop improved conceptual models of flow and transport in the vadose zone, particularly for the Hanford Site, Washington. The National Academy of Sciences has identified significant knowledge gaps in conceptual model development as one reason for discovery of subsurface contamination in unexpected places. Inadequate conceptualizations limits, not only the understanding of long-term fate and transport, but also the selection and design of remediation technologies. Current conceptual models are limited partly because they do not account for the random heterogeneity that occurs under the extremes of very nonlinear flow behavior typical of the Hanford vadose zone. A major improvement in conceptual modeling of the Hanford vadose zone includes a better understanding and description of soil anisotropy, a property that appears to control much of the subsurface flow and transport in layered sediments at the Hanford Site.

  11. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  12. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results, Fiscal Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2014-09-01

    Over decades of operation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have released nearly 2 trillion L (450 billion gal.) of liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Much of this discharge of liquid waste into the vadose zone occurred in the Central Plateau, a 200 km2 (75 mi2) area that includes approximately 800 waste sites. Some of the inorganic and radionuclide contaminants in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Site are at depths below the limit of direct exposure pathways, but may need to be remediated to protect groundwater. The Tri-Party Agencies (DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology) established Milestone M 015 50, which directed DOE to submit a treatability test plan for remediation of technetium-99 (Tc-99) and uranium in the deep vadose zone. These contaminants are mobile in the subsurface environment and have been detected at high concentrations deep in the vadose zone, and at some locations have reached groundwater. Testing technologies for remediating Tc-99 and uranium will also provide information relevant for remediating other contaminants in the vadose zone. A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the DOE test plan published in March 2008 to meet Milestone M 015 50. The active desiccation portion of the test has been completed. Monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and are reported herein. This is an interim data summary report that includes about 3 years of post-desiccation monitoring data. The DOE field test plan proscribes a total of 5 years of post-desiccation monitoring.

  13. Particle denuded zones in alumina reinforced aluminum matrix composite weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidambaram, A.; Bhole, S.D.

    1996-08-01

    The Welding Institute of Canada (WIC), Ontario, has been studying the weldability of different DURALCAN MMC`s. Research on alumina reinforced (20 vol.%) 6061 Al alloy GTA welds showed satisfactory tensile and yield strengths (0.2% Proof Stress) but the welds failed to pass the bend test requirements with fracture taking place in the relatively brittle heat affected zone (HAZ). Further, the welds were characterized by a region which was devoid of reinforcement particles adjacent to the fusion lines. The present study was undertaken to try and explain the formation of this particle denuded zone (PDZ) at the fusion lines.

  14. Interactive display system having a scaled virtual target zone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2006-06-13

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector and imaging device cooperate with the panel for projecting a video image thereon. An optical detector bridges at least a portion of the waveguides for detecting a location on the outlet face within a target zone of an inbound light spot. A controller is operatively coupled to the imaging device and detector for displaying a cursor on the outlet face corresponding with the detected location of the spot within the target zone.

  15. A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

  16. MCA 77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management Zones Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: MCA...

  17. Colorado - C.R.S. 40-5-101 - New Construction - Extension - Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado - C.R.S. 40-5-101 - New Construction - Extension - Compliance with Local Zoning RulesLegal Abstract...

  18. The Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 July 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Alice Brandon Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Jane Miller Mary Murray Brett Pate Cindy Robinson Sandra Schwartz I N S I D E Page 2 Major milestone celebrated Page 3 Putting 70 cents to good use Pages 4 and 5 The comings and goings during June Page 7 Y-12's new talent Ray Smith Donna

  19. The time it takes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time it takes... 180 days 254 days 280 days 365 days to grow 3 inches of hair to travel to and land on Mars for a human baby to develop to term for one Earth-year 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 39 minutes longer than a day on Earth. A day on Mars lasts This year's high school graduates have never known a world in which there were no robotic vehicles cruising around on Mars. There are presently six active spacecraft orbiting around or driving on Mars. Los Alamos scientists helped to develop the

  20. Aug 2010 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 August 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 ARRA work continues Page 4 Sharing secrets with the public Page 5 Apprentices are a sure bet Page 6 Need a yo-yo? Stop by JA BizTown's Y-12 booth Page 8 Employees drop the pounds B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for

  1. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  2. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3A Atlanta, Georgia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  3. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3A Atlanta, Georgia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  4. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  5. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  6. Vertical Variability in Saturated Zone Hydrochemistry Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Patterson; P. Striffler

    2007-02-17

    The differences in the saturated zone hydrochemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-22PC reflect the addition of recharge along Fortymile Wash. The differences in water chemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-19PB appear to indicate that other processes are involved. Water from the lower part of NC-EWDP-19PB possesses chemical characteristics that clearly indicate that it has undergone cation exchange that resulted in the removal of calcium and magnesium and the addition of sodium. This water is very similar to water from the Western Yucca Mountain facies that has previously been thought to flow west of NC-EWDP-19PB. Water from the lower zone in NC-EWDP-19PB also could represent water from the Eastern Yucca Mountain facies that has moved through clay-bearing or zeolitized aquifer material resulting in the altered chemistry. Water chemistry from the upper part of the saturated zone at NC-EWDP-19PB, both zones at NC-EWDP-22PC, and wells in the Fortymile Wash facies appears to be the result of recharge through the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain and within the Fortymile Wash channel.

  7. Archived Reference Climate Zone: TMY2 Weather Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  8. Archived Reference Climate Zone: TMY2 Weather Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  9. FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS IN A DEAD ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Alexander, Richard D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-10

    Circumbinary planets have been observed at orbital radii where binary perturbations may have significant effects on the gas disk structure, on planetesimal velocity dispersion, and on the coupling between turbulence and planetesimals. Here, we note that the impact of all of these effects on planet formation is qualitatively altered if the circumbinary disk structure is layered, with a non-turbulent midplane layer (dead zone) and strongly turbulent surface layers. For close binaries, we find that the dead zone typically extends from a radius close to the inner disk edge up to a radius of around 10-20 AU from the center of mass of the binary. The peak in the surface density occurs within the dead zone, far from the inner disk edge, close to the snow line, and may act as a trap for aerodynamically coupled solids. We suggest that circumbinary planet formation may be easier near this preferential location than for disks around single stars. However, dead zones around wide binaries are less likely, and hence planet formation may be more difficult there.

  10. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Los Angeles, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  11. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Los Angeles, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  12. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. Zone approaches to international safeguards of a nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the results of safeguards verifications for the individual facilities within it. We have examined safeguards approaches for a state nuclear fuel cycle that take into account the existence of all of the nuclear facilities in the state. We have focussed on the fresh-fuel zone of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. The intention is to develop an approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the zone approach and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches. Technical effectiveness, in these cases, means an estimate of the assurance that all nuclear material has been accounted for.

  15. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  18. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  19. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  20. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  1. Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

    2012-08-10

    Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

  2. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  3. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  4. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  5. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  6. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  7. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  8. Zongo-San Gaban zone: Eocene foreland boundary of the Central Andean orogen, northwest Bolivia and southeast Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, E.; Clark, A.H.; Kontak, D.J.; Archibald, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Discordant muscovite and biotite K-Ar dates of samples taken in six transects through the Cordillera Oriental of southeast Peru and northwest Bolivia, combined with /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectra, reveal a northwest-trending, structurally cryptic, tectonothermal zone of late Eocene age (ca. 38 Ma) that overprints Triassic and older igneous and metamorphic rocks. The zone is at least 450 km long but is less than 25 km wide; temperatures along its northeast boundary are estimated to have reached 350/sup 0/C. No Paleogene magmatism has been recognized that could account for the thermal resetting of the K-Ar isotopic system. Uplift, erosion, and southwest-verging thrusting accompanied the development of this domain, which defined the foreland boundary of the orogen prior to inception of northeast-verging Andean thrusting in Miocene time. It is proposed that this tectonothermal zone, the Zongo-San Gaban zone (ZSGZ), which involves thrusting and basement shortening, is the southerly manifestation of the Incaic compressional deformation, which produced the thin-skinned Maranon thrust and fold belt (MTFB) north of the Abancay deflection of central Peru.

  9. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  10. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau. Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Johnson, Christian D.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2015-09-01

    A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Program. The active desiccation portion of the test has been completed. Monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and are reported herein. This is an interim data summary report that includes about 4 years of post-desiccation monitoring data. The DOE field test plan proscribes a total of 5 years of post-desiccation monitoring.

  11. Narrowing of the coherent population trapping resonance under zone pumping in cells with different characteristics of the wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A N; Matisov, B G [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-28

    It is shown that when coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is excited by a narrow laser beam, the presence of elastic collisions with the cell wall significantly affects the line shape of the CPT-resonance. We have constructed a theoretical model, which is based on averaging over the random Ramsey sequences of the atom dwell time in the beam and dark zones and takes into account the probability of elastic bounce of an atom from the wall.

  12. .beta.-glucosidase 5 (BGL5) compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. Uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF{sub 6} and solid UF{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yato, Yumio; Kishimoto, Yoichiro; Sasao, Nobuyuki; Suto, Osamu; Funasaka, Hideyuki

    1996-08-01

    Based on a collision model, a new rate equation is derived for uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF{sub 6} and solid UF{sub 5} by considering the number of UF{sub 5} molecules on the solid surface to be dependent on time. The reaction parameters included in the equation are determined from the experimental data and compared with the previous ones. A remarkable agreement is found between the particle sizes of UF{sub 5} estimated from the reaction parameter and from the direct observation with an electron microscope. The rate equation given in this work fully satisfies the related mass conservation and furthermore includes explicitly the terms related to the UF{sub 6} density and the mean size of UF{sub 5} particles, both of which are considered to cause an important effect on the reaction. This remarkable feature facilitates the simulation studies on this reaction under various conditions. The long term behavior of a simulated exchange reaction is studied under the condition considered to be close to that in a recovery zone of the MLIS process. The result indicates that the reaction is virtually limited to the solid surface under this conditions and thus the depletion of {sup 235}UF{sub 5} concentration averaged over the whole UF{sub 5} particles is not significant even after 200 h of the exchange reaction.

  14. A saturated zone site-scale flow model for Yucca mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddebbarh, Al Aziz

    2008-01-01

    A saturated zone site-scale flow model (YMSZFM) was developed for licensing requirements for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository to incorporate recent data and analyses including recent stratigraphic and water-level data from Nye County wells, single-and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and recent hydrochemistry data. Analyses include use of data from the 2004 transient Death Valley Regional (ground-water) Flow System (DVRFS) model, the 2003 unsaturated zone flow model, and the latest hydrogeologic framework model (HFM). This model includes: (1) the latest understanding of SZ flow, (2) enhanced model validation and uncertainty analyses, (3) improved locations and definitions of fault zones, (4) refined grid resolution (500-to 250-m grid spacing), and (5) use of new data. The flow model was completed using the three-dimensional, Finite-Element Heat and Mass Transfer computer code (FEHM). The SZ site-scale flow model was calibrated with the commercial parameter estimation code, PEST to achieve a minimum difference between observed water levels and predicted water levels, and also between volumetric/mass flow rates along specific boundary segments as supplied by the DVRFS. A total of 161 water level and head measurements with varied weights were used for calibration. A comparison between measured water-level data and the potentiometric surface yielded an RMSE of 20.7 m (weighted RMSE of 8.8 m). The calibrated model was used to generate flow paths and specific discharge predictions. Model confidence was built by comparing: (l) calculated to observed hydraulic heads, and (2) calibrated to measured permeabilities (and therefore specific discharge). In addition, flowpaths emanating from below the repository footprint are consistent with those inferred both from gradients of measured head and from independent water-chemistry data. Uncertainties in the SZ site-scale flow model were quantified because all uncertainty contributes to inaccuracy in system representation and response. Null space and solution space uncertainties were determined.

  15. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

    2003-04-15

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  16. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

    2001-01-01

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  17. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

    2003-04-08

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  18. Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2012-06-26

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust; and a grid that includes electrically resistive material that is segmented by non-conductive material into a plurality of zones and wherein the grid is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF.

  19. Multi-zone modelling of partially premixed low-temperature combustion in pilot-ignited natural-gas engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, S. R.; Srinivasan, K. K.

    2010-06-29

    Detailed results from a multi-zone phenomenological simulation of partially premixed advanced-injection low-pilot-ignited natural-gas low-temperature combustion are presented with a focus on early injection timings (the beginning of (pilot) injection (BOI)) and very small diesel quantities (2-3 per cent of total fuel energy). Combining several aspects of diesel and spark ignition engine combustion models, the closed-cycle simulation accounted for diesel autoignition, diesel spray combustion, and natural-gas combustion by premixed turbulent flame propagation. The cylinder contents were divided into an unburned zone, several pilot fuel zones (or 'packets') that modelled diesel evaporation and ignition, a flame zone for natural-gas combustion, and a burned zone. The simulation predicted the onset of ignition, cylinder pressures, and heat release rate profiles satisfactorily over a wide range of BOIs (20-60° before top dead centre (before TDC)) but especially well at early BOIs. Strong coupling was observed between pilot spray combustion in the packets and premixed turbulent combustion in the flame zone and, therefore, the number of ignition centres (packets) profoundly affected flame combustion. The highest local peak temperatures (greater than 2000 K) were observed in the packets, while the flame zone was much cooler (about 1650 K), indicating that pilot diesel spray combustion is probably the dominant source of engine-out emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO x). Further, the 60° before TDC BOI yielded the lowest average peak packet temperatures (about 1720 K) compared with the 20° before TDC BOI (about 2480 K) and 40° before TDC BOI (about 2700 K). These trends support experimental NO x trends, which showed the lowest NO x emissions for the 60°, 20°, and 40° before TDC BOIs in that order. Parametric studies showed that increasing the intake charge temperature, pilot quantity, and natural-gas equivalence ratio all led to higher peak heat release rates and hotter packets but the pilot quantity and intake temperature affected the potential for NO x formation to a greater extent.

  20. Adams County, North Dakota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, North Dakota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, North Dakota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  1. Anson County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anson County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anson County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  2. Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  3. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract NA Author Donald Thomas...

  4. Deep Vadose ZoneApplied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2013-03-14

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2012.

  5. Aiken County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aiken County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aiken County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  6. Spin transition zone in Earth;s lower mantle (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spin transition zone in Earth;s lower mantle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin transition zone in Earth;s lower mantle Authors: Lin, J.-F. ; Vanko, G. ; Jacobsen, ...

  7. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-09-01

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30.5 meters in each borehole, and a nearly zero potential gradient throughout the remaining portion of the vadose zone. These hydrologic condition data and hydrologic property data indicate that little net downward liquid flow is occurring (if any) through the thick vadose zone. Conversely, gas flow by diffusion, and possibly by advection, may be an important transport mechanism. Environmental tracer measurements made on water extracted from geologic samples suggest that water vapor in the upper portion of the vadose zone is moving upward in response to evaporative demand of the present arid climate. Preliminary water quality data indicate that the key hazardous and radioactive constituents do not exceed appropriate standards. Monitoring instruments and equipment were installed in each pilot well for making in-situ measurements of key hydrologic and pneumatic parameters and to monitor change in these parameters over time.

  8. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.; Armstrong, C.; Daugherty, N.M.; Foppe, T.L.; Petrocchi, A.J.; Southward, B.

    1990-05-01

    This project plan for Phase II summarizes the design of a project to complete analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Federal, state, and local governments develop emergency plans for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of these plans is to identify EPZs where actions might be necessary to protect public health. Public protective actions include sheltering, evacuation, and relocation. Agencies use EPZs to develop response plans and to determine needed resources. The State of Colorado, with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Rocky Flats contractors, has developed emergency plans and EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant periodically beginning in 1980. In Phase II, Interim Emergency Planning Zones Analysis, Maximum Credible Accident'' we will utilize the current Rocky Flats maximum credible accident (MCA), existing dispersion methodologies, and upgraded dosimetry methodologies to update the radiological EPZs. Additionally, we will develop recommendations for EPZs for nonradiological hazardous materials releases and evaluate potential surface water releases from the facility. This project will allow EG G Rocky Flats to meet current commitments to the state of Colorado and make steady, tangible improvements in our understanding of risk to offsite populations during potential emergencies at the Rocky Flats Plant. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Gj 832c: A super-Earth in the habitable zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Marshall, J. P.; Bailey, J.; Salter, G. S.; Wright, D.; Tuomi, Mikko; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Anglada-Escud, Guillem; Carter, B. D.; O'Toole, S. J.; Crane, J. D.; Schectman, S. A.; Thompson, I.; Minniti, D.; Jenkins, J. S.; Diaz, M.

    2014-08-20

    We report the detection of GJ 832c, a super-Earth orbiting near the inner edge of the habitable zone of GJ 832, an M dwarf previously known to host a Jupiter analog in a nearly circular 9.4 yr orbit. The combination of precise radial-velocity measurements from three telescopes reveals the presence of a planet with a period of 35.68 0.03 days and minimum mass (m sin i) of 5.4 1.0 Earth masses. GJ 832c moves on a low-eccentricity orbit (e = 0.18 0.13) toward the inner edge of the habitable zone. However, given the large mass of the planet, it seems likely that it would possess a massive atmosphere, which may well render the planet inhospitable. Indeed, it is perhaps more likely that GJ 832c is a 'super-Venus', featuring significant greenhouse forcing. With an outer giant planet and an interior, potentially rocky planet, the GJ 832 planetary system can be thought of as a miniature version of our own solar system.

  10. Flow and Transport in the Hanford 300 Area Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-13

    Contaminant migration in the 300 Area unconfined aquifer is strongly coupled to fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. To better understand the interaction between the river, aquifer, and vadose zone, a 2-D saturated-unsaturated flow and transport model was developed for a vertical cross-section aligned west-east across the Hanford Site 300 Area, nearly perpendicular to the river. The model was used to investigate water flow and tracer transport in the vadose zone-aquifer-river flow system, in support of the ongoing study of the 300 Area uranium plume. The STOMP simulator was used to model 1-year from 3/1/92 to 2/28/93, a period when hourly data were available for both groundwater and river levels. Net water flow to the river (per 1-meter width of shoreline) was 182 m3/y in the base case, but the cumulative exchange or total flow back and forth across the riverbed was 30 times greater. The low river case had approximately double the net water and Groundwater tracer flux into the river as compared to the base case.

  11. The effect of planets beyond the ice line on the accretion of volatiles by habitable-zone rocky planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana, Elisa V. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Lissauer, Jack J., E-mail: elisa.quintana@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Models of planet formation have shown that giant planets have a large impact on the number, masses, and orbits of terrestrial planets that form. In addition, they play an important role in delivering volatiles from material that formed exterior to the snow line (the region in the disk beyond which water ice can condense) to the inner region of the disk where terrestrial planets can maintain liquid water on their surfaces. We present simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet formation from a disk of protoplanets around a solar-type star and we include a massive planet (from 1 M {sub ?} to 1 M {sub J}) in Jupiter's orbit at ?5.2 AU in all but one set of simulations. Two initial disk models are examined with the same mass distribution and total initial water content, but with different distributions of water content. We compare the accretion rates and final water mass fraction of the planets that form. Remarkably, all of the planets that formed in our simulations without giant planets were water-rich, showing that giant planet companions are not required to deliver volatiles to terrestrial planets in the habitable zone. In contrast, an outer planet at least several times the mass of Earth may be needed to clear distant regions of debris truncating the epoch of frequent large impacts. Observations of exoplanets from radial velocity surveys suggest that outer Jupiter-like planets may be scarce, therefore, the results presented here suggest that there may be more habitable planets residing in our galaxy than previously thought.

  12. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  13. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, Andr

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - HISTORY AND RESULTS 25 YEARS AFTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes results of the radiation environmental monitoring performed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) during the period following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. This article presents a brief overview of five comprehensive reports generated under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 (Washington Savannah River Company LLC, Subcontract No. AC55559N, SOW No. ON8778) and summarizes characteristics of the ChEZ and its post-accident status and the history of development of the radiation monitoring research in the ChEZ is described. This article addresses characteristics of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ, its major goals and objectives, and changes of these goals and objectives in the course of time, depending on the tasks associated with the phase of mitigation of the ChNPP accident consequences. The results of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ during the last 25 years are also provided.

  15. Influence of compaction on the interfacial transition zone and the permeability of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemann, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch; Muench, Beat; Gasser, Philippe; Holzer, Lorenz

    2006-08-15

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is regarded as a key feature for the transport properties and the durability of concrete. In this study one self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixture and two conventionally vibrated concrete (CVC) mixtures are studied in order to determine the influence of compaction on the porosity of the ITZ. Additionally oxygen permeability and water conductivity were measured in vertical and horizontal direction. The quantitative analysis of images made with an optical microscope and an environmental scanning electron microscope shows a significantly increased porosity and width of the ITZ in CVC compared to SCC. At the same time oxygen permeability and water conductivity of CVC are increased in comparison to SCC. Moreover, considerable differences in the porosity of the lower, lateral and upper ITZ are observed in both types of concrete. The anisotropic distribution of pores in the ITZ does not necessarily cause anisotropy in oxygen permeability and water conductivity though.

  16. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2011-01-24

    The U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (OctoberMarch), and they discharged during the summer period (AprilSeptember). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

  17. Wireless zoned particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA

    2011-10-04

    An assembly includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. An absorbing layer absorbs microwave energy in one of N frequency ranges and is arranged with the upstream end. N is an integer. A frequency selective filter has M frequency selective segments and receives microwave energy in the N frequency ranges. M is an integer. One of the M frequency selective segments permits passage of the microwave energy in one of the N frequency ranges and does not permit passage of microwave energy in the other of the N frequency ranges.

  18. TWRS vadose zone contamination issue expert panel report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, D.S.

    1997-05-01

    When members were first canvassed for participation in the Vadose Zone Expert Panel the stated purpose for convening the Panel was to review a controversial draft report, the SX Tank Farm Report. This report was produced by a DOE Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO) contractor, RUST Geotech, now MACTEC-ERS, for the DOE Richland Office (DOERL). Three meetings were planned for June, July and August, 1995 to review the draft report and to complete a Panel report by mid-September. The Expert Panel has found its efforts confounded by various non-technical issues. The Expert Panel has chosen to address some of the non-technical issues in this Preface rather than to dilute the technical discussion that follows in the body of this independent expert panel status report (Panel Report). Rather than performing a straightforward manuscript review, the Panel was asked to resolve conflicting interpretations of gamma-ray logging measurements performed in vadose zone boreholes (drywells) surrounding the high-level radioactive wastes of the SX tank farm. There are numerous and complex technical issues that must be evaluated before the vertical and radial extent of contaminant migration at the SX tank farm can be accurately assessed. When the Panel first met in early June, 1996, it quickly became apparent that the scientific and technical issues were obscured by policy and institutional affairs which have polarized discussion among various segments of the Hanford organization. This situation reflects the kinds of institutional problems described separately in reports by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS/NRC), The Hanford Tanks Environmental Impacts and Policy Choices and BmTiers to Science: Technical Management of the Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Program. The Vadose Zone Characterization Program, appears to be caught between conflicting pressures and organizational mandates, some imposed from outside DOE-RL and some self-imposed. The institutional problems they encountered include having both Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), the parent organization of the Vadose Zone Characterization Program and Environmental Restoration (ER), each under different regulatory controls and different organizational units, seeking to defend the status quo and discount many of the Panel`s conclusions and recommendations. The results presented in the SX Tank Farm Report, especially the visualizations, have created concern in the public sector, both on a local, personal level and on a national political level.

  19. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bronson, M.C.

    1995-02-14

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing. 6 figs.

  20. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bronson, Mark C. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing.

  1. Development of transfer zones and location of oil and gas fields in frontal part of Bolivian Andean fold-and-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baby, P. ); Specht, M.; Colletta, B.; Letouzey, J. ); Mendez, E. ); Guillier, B. )

    1993-02-01

    The frontal part of the Bolivian Andean thrust belt consists of a thick series of paleozoic to cenozoic sedimentary rocks (5 to 8 km thick) which are folded and thrusted towards the east on a sole thrust at the base of paleozoic series. The front of this tectonic wedge is characterized by transfer zones of various scales and geometries. The main oil and gas fields are located in these transfer zones. A study realized from YPFB (Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos) seismic data shows that in all the cases, the deformation is controlled by the geometry and thickness variations of the paleozoic basin. The most spectacular transfer zone appears at the bolivian orocline scale and corresponds to the famous bending of the andean thrust front close to Santa Cruz. More to the south (19 to 22[degrees] S) the southern foreland fold and thrust belt is characterized by a set of local right lateral offset transfer zones ([open quotes]en echellon[close quotes] folds). The difference of geometry and scale of the transfer zones seems to be related to the variation of the angle value between the shortening direction and the direction of the paleozoic basin borders. In order to test our interpretation, to constrain the boundary conditions and to study the thrust propagation sequence, we performed a set of analog model experiments whose 3D visualization was analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography.

  2. Code System Calculate One-Dimensional Vertical Transport Unsaturated Soil Zone

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-03-01

    SESOIL, as an integrated screening-level soil compartment model, is designed to simultaneously model water transport, sediment transport, and pollutant fate. SESOIL is a one-dimensional vertical transport model for the unsaturated soil zone. Only one compound at a time can be considered. The model is based on mass balance and equilibrium partitioning of the chemical between different phases (dissolved, sorbed, vapor, and pure). The SESOIL model was designed to perform long-term simulations of chemical transport andmore » transformations in the soil and uses theoretically derived equations to represent water transport, sediment transport on the land surface, pollutant transformation, and migration of the pollutant to the atmosphere and groundwater. Climatic data, compartment geometry, and soil and chemical property data are the major components used in the equations. SESOIL was developed as a screening-level model, utilizing less soil, chemical, and meteorological values as input than most other similar models. Output of SESOIL includes time-varying pollutant concentrations at various soil depths and pollutant loss from the unsaturated zone in terms of surface runoff, percolation to the groundwater, volatilization, and degradation. The February 1995 release corrects an error that caused the code to fail when average monthly air temperature was -10C and includes an improved iteration procedure for the mass balance equations in the model. PLEASE NOTE: The RISKPRO information management software (see OTHER PROG/OPER SYS INFO) was used by the developers of the New SESOIL User''s Guide in their study and revisions of SESOIL. Using RISKPRO in conjunction with SESOIL is an option, and it may provide the easiest way to use SESOIL. The other option, use of SESOIL in stand-alone mode, has been tested and used. The stand-alone option is covered in ''Instructions for Running Stand-Alone SESOIL Code'', and in ''A Seasonal Soil Compartment Model''.« less

  3. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time t{sub i} (trajectory positions and velocities x{sub i} = (r{sub i}, v{sub i})) to time t{sub i+1} (x{sub i+1}) by x{sub i+1} = f{sub i}(x{sub i}), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t{sub 0}t{sub M} can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [x{sub i} ? f(x{sub (i?1})]{sub i} {sub =1,M} = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H{sub 2}O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup ((serial execution time)/(parallel execution time) ) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow transmission control protocol/Internet protocol networks. Scripts written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl + 4H{sub 2}O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. Using these algorithms, we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 s/time step to 6.9 s/time step.

  4. ARM - Datastreams - gms5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : GMS5 GMS-5: visible 1.25-km res., IR 5-km resolution Active Dates 1996.10.11 - 2003.02.16 Measurement Categories Radiometric...

  5. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Jobs Dispatched / Hour What is the Scheduler Cycle? The Univa Grid Engine Scheduler cycle performs a number of important tasks, including: Prioritizing Jobs Reserving Resources for jobs requesting more resources (slots / memory) Dispatching jobs or tasks to the compute nodes Evaluating job dependencies The "cycle time" is the length of time it takes the scheduler to complete all

  6. Attachment C5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    C5 QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLAN REQUIREMENTS Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit March 13, 2013 (This page intentionally blank) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit March 13, 2013 PERMIT ATTACHMENT C5 Page C5-i ATTACHMENT C5 QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLAN REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS C5-1 Quality Assurance Project Plans ...................................................................................... 1 C5-2 Document Review, Approval, and Control

  7. Climate Time-Machine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Time-Machine Climate Time-Machine 20th Century Reanalysis Project Explores Earth's Past and Future Climate January 25, 2011 Berkeley Lab Contact: Jon Bashor, ...

  8. AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    153 CLOSURE STRATEGY NEVADA TEST SITE AREA 5 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SITE Revision 0 ... Closure Strategy Nevada Test Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management ...

  9. A = 5 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 General Tables The General Table for 5H is subdivided into the following categories: Cluster Model Hypernuclei Model Calculations Photodisintegration Pions The General Table for...

  10. Vertical zone melt growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.L.; Nordquist, P.E.R.; Gorman, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A Vertical Zone Melt (VZM) technique has been applied to the single crystal growth of GaAs. A pyrolytic boron nitride crucible and a (100) oriented seed were used along with liquid encapsulation by boric oxide. In the case of GaAs, the ampoule was pressurized with either argon or argensic vapor from elemental arsenic at pressures ranging from 1 to 2 atmospheres. A molten zone length of 22 mm gave a growth interface which is nearly flat and resulted in routine single crystal growth. Temperature gradients of 4{degrees}C/cm. and 9{degrees}C/cm. have produced dislocation densities of <1000/cm{sup 2} and 2000-5000/cm{sup 2} respectively for 34 mm diameter crystals of GaAs. Post growth cooling rates for GaAs have been 35, 160 and 500{degrees}C/hr. The cooling rate has been found to affect the number and size of arsenic precipitates and the EL2 concentration in the GaAs crystal. The effects of these and other growth parameters on the crystalline perfection and electrical properties of the crystals will be discussed.

  11. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 41-09-39 in the S-SX Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 5.15. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 41-09-39 installed adjacent to tank SX-109.

  12. Predicting the spatial extent of injection-induced zones of enhanced permeability at the Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, J.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Dobson, P.F.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of coupled thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical (THM) modeling of a proposed stimulation injection associated with an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) demonstration project at the northwest part of The Geysers geothermal field, California. The project aims at creating an EGS by directly and systematically injecting cool water at relatively low pressure into a known High Temperature (about 280 to 350 C) Zone (HTZ) located under the conventional (240 C) steam reservoir at depths below 3 km. Accurate micro-earthquake monitoring from the start of the injection will be used as a tool for tracking the development of the EGS. We first analyzed historic injection and micro-earthquake data from an injection well (Aidlin 11), located about 3 miles to the west of the new EGS demonstration area. Thereafter, we used the same modeling approach to predict the likely extent of the zone of enhanced permeability for a proposed initial injection in two wells (Prati State 31 and Prati 32) at the new EGS demonstration area. Our modeling indicates that the proposed injection scheme will provide additional steam production in the area by creating a zone of permeability enhancement extending about 0.5 km from each injection well which will connect to the overlying conventional steam reservoir.

  13. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2002-02-12

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld and thermodynamic calculations to compare these results with the important phase transformation isotherms. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can be better understood and modeled.

  14. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2001-12-04

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal for the carbon-manganese steel studied in this investigation. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld to investigate transformation kinetics under both positive and negative temperature gradients in the HAZ. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can now be better understood and modeled.

  15. FY 2013 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary

  16. May 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Stuart Hames Sharon McConathy Patrick McCoy I N S I D E Page 3 Fire department members come to the rescue Page 4 Driving green to protect our natural resources Page 5 73s: Best regards from Y-12's hams Page8 What's the secret? Mary Murray Brett Pate

  17. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f , (e.g. Verlet algorithm) is available to propagate the system from time ti (trajectory positions and velocities xi = (ri; vi)) to time ti+1 (xi+1) by xi+1 = fi(xi), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t0 : : : tM can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [xi - f (x(i-1)]i=1;M = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of optimization techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton optimization schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem are tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl+4H2O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow TCP/IP networks. Scripts written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl+4H2O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. By using these algorithms we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 seconds per time step to 6.9 seconds per time step.

  18. "Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  19. "Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  20. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent an energy retrofit to comply with Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance, a mandate that requires all rental properties to meet certain energy efficiency standards by 2018. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, worked with city planners and building owners to evaluate this program and recently completed a case study evaluating the effectiveness of a collection of retrofit measures.

  1. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones for Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inger, J.R. ); Brown-Strattan, M.A. . Rocky Flats Plant)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this quality assurance program was to ensure the quality and technical adequacy of Phase 2 of the Analysis of Offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant project. Quality assurance was accomplished by managing and controlling the processes in the development of the product. The quality assurance task team conducted audits, reviews, and surveillances of project and related activities. This process contributed to identifying areas where the quality assurance plan was not fully implemented, areas needing improvement, and/or corrective actions resulting in a improved product. During the reviews and audits, several key areas were identified where quality assurance plan implementation needed to be improved. These areas included maintaining adequate documentation, reviewing technical results, making inputs traceable to technical results, and understanding that all personnel are responsible for quality.

  2. Variable power distribution for zoned regeneration of an electrically heated particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Garima [Bangalore, IN; Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-04-03

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with multiple zones, an electric heater and a control module. The electrical heater includes heater segments, which each correspond with a respective one of the zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and is proximate with the PM filter. The control module selectively applies a first energy level to a first one of the zones via a first one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the first zone. The control module also selectively applies a second energy level that is less than the first energy level to a second one of the zones via a second one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the second zone.

  3. Technical and Policy Challenges in Deep Vadose Zone Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Freshley, Mark D.; Dresel, P. E.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2012-03-21

    Deep vadose zone contamination is a significant issue facing the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). Contamination in the deep vadose zone is isolated from exposure such that direct contact is not a factor in risk to human health and the environment; rather, movement of contamination from the deep vadose zone to the groundwater creates the potential for exposure and risk to receptors. Transport of deep vadose zone contamination and discharge to the groundwater creates the potential for exposure and risk to receptors, so limiting flux to groundwater is key for protection of groundwater resources. Remediation approaches for the deep vadose zone need to be considered within the regulatory context, targeted at mitigating the source of contamination and reduce contaminant flux to groundwater. This paper reviews the processes for deep vadose zone metal and radionuclide remediation as well as challenges and opportunities for implementation.

  4. Notice of construction for tank waste remediation system vadose zone characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-05-04

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of constriction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 millirem/year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this initial start-up notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with vadose zone characterization within the Single-Shell Tank Farms located in the 200-East and 200-West Areas of the Hanford Site. Vadose zone characterization activities include the drilling and sampling of soil from the surface to the depth of groundwater.

  5. Exploring the blazar zone in high-energy flares of FSRQs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavecchio, F.; Stamerra, A.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Uemura, M.

    2014-07-20

    The gamma-ray emission offers a powerful diagnostic tool to probe jets and their surroundings in flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). In particular, sources emitting at high energies (>10 GeV) give us the strongest constraints. This motivates us to start a systematic study of flares with bright emission above 10 GeV, examining archival data of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray telescope. At the same time, we began to trigger Target of Opportunity observations to the Swift observatory at the occurrence of high-energy flares, obtaining a wide coverage of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for several FSRQs during flares. Among others, we investigate the SED of a peculiar flare of 3C 454.3, showing a remarkably hard gamma-ray spectrum, quite different from the brightest flares of this source, and a bright flare of CTA 102. We modeled the SED in the framework of the one-zone leptonic model, using also archival optical spectroscopic data to derive the luminosity of the broad lines and thus estimate the disk luminosity, from which the structural parameters of the FSRQ nucleus can be inferred. The model allowed us to evaluate the magnetic field intensity in the blazar zone and to locate the emitting region of gamma-rays in the particular case in which gamma-ray spectra show neither absorption from the broad-line region (BLR) nor the Klein-Nishina curvature expected in leptonic models assuming the BLR as the source of seed photons for the External Compton scenario. For FSRQs bright above 10 GeV, we were able to identify short periods lasting less than one day characterized by a high rate of high-energy gamma-rays and hard gamma-ray spectra. We discussed the observed spectra and variability timescales in terms of injection and cooling of energetic particles, arguing that these flares could be triggered by magnetic reconnection events or turbulence in the flow.

  6. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

  7. AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration | Department of Energy AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration January 22, 2013 - 3:41pm Addthis SEATTLE -- AltaRock Energy today announced that it has created multiple stimulated zones from a single wellbore at the

  8. PAC_5Oct01_App

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 5, 2001 meeting of the ATLAS PAC Due to the current fiscal situation, it was assumed that ATLAS will operate on a five day per week basis. Because of this unfortunate situation, a somewhat complex approval process was instituted. The PAC first identified those experiments that should be run at all cost. It also identified other experiments that should be granted beam time if at all possible. It is hoped that sufficient flexibility for efficient scheduling and operation has been achieved

  9. DOE F 1600.5

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    DOE F 1600.5 (06-94) All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Control No. 1910-0400 U.S. Department of Energy Assurance of Compliance Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 15 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this

  10. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and time) three correspond to the three broad categories of synchrotron experimental measurement techniques: spectroscopy (energy), scattering (momentum), and imaging...

  11. Adams County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Adams County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate...

  12. HSQ double patterning process for 12 nm resolution x-ray zone...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Soft x-ray zone plate microscopy is a powerful nano-analytic technique used for a wide ... GOLD; HYDROGEN; HYDROXYLATION; LENSES; MICROSCOPY; PLATES; PLATING; RESOLUTION; ...

  13. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, W.; Kim, J.; Rekawa, S.; Fischer, P.; Anderson, E. H.

    2009-06-05

    To extend soft x-ray microscopy to a resolution of order 10 nm or better, we developed a new nanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. The new process, based on the double patterning technique, has enabled us to fabricate high quality gold zone plates with 12 nm outer zones. Testing of the zone plate with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope, XM-1, in Berkeley, showed that the lens clearly resolved 12 nm lines and spaces. This result represents a significant step towards 10 nm resolution and beyond.

  14. Posters Climate Zones for Maritime Clouds A. B. White and D....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Posters Climate Zones for Maritime Clouds A. B. White and D. Ruffieux Cooperative ... of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. ...

  15. A Catalog of Vadose Zone Hydraulic Properties for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Eugene J.; Khaleel, Raziuddin; Heller, Paula R.

    2001-09-24

    The purpose of this catalog is to integrate all available soil physics data and information from vadose zone characterization and performance assessments into one useable, scientifically defensible document.

  16. DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Western States, May 28, 2008 | Department of Energy to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States. The Renewable Energy Zones Initiative will promote regional transmission planning and encourage the development of renewable sources of energy. PDF icon DOE to

  17. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  18. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the river’s shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms for Sr with Ca, a plant macronutrient as well as no discrimination between Sr and 90Sr. Willow 90Sr concentration ratios [CR’s; (pCi 90Sr/g dry wt. of new growth tissue)/(pCi 90Sr/g soil porewater)] were consistently greater than 65 with three-quarters of the assimilated label partitioned into the above ground shoot. Insect herbivore experiments also demonstrated no significant potential for bioaccumulation or food chain transfer from their natural activities. The objectives of this field study were three-fold: (1) to demonstrate that a viable, “managed” plot of coyote willows can be established on the shoreline of the Columbia River that would survive the same microenvironment to be encountered at the 100-NR-2 shoreline; (2) to show through engineered barriers that large and small animal herbivores can be prevented from feeding on these plants; and (3) to show that once established, the plants will provide sufficient biomass annually to support the phytoextraction technology. A field treatability demonstration plot was established on the Columbia River shoreline alongside the 100-K West water intake at the end of January 2007. The plot was delimited by a 3.05 m high chain-link fence and was approximately 10 x 25 m in size. A layer of fine mesh metal small animal screening was placed around the plot at the base of the fencing to a depth of 45 cm. A total of sixty plants were placed in six slightly staggered rows with 1-m spacing between plants. The actual plot size was 0.00461 hectare (ha). At the time of planting (March 12, 2007), the plot was located about 10 m from the river’s edge. Less than two weeks later (March 21), the river began the spring rise. Periodic (daily) or continuous flooding occurred at the site over the next 3 to 4 months. River levels at times were over the top of the enclosure’s fence. This same pattern was repeated for the next 2 years. It was however evident that even submerged for part, or all of the day, that the plants continued to flourish. There were no indications of herbivory or animal tracks observed within the plot although animals were present in the area. Biomass production over the three years followed a typical growth curve with a yield of about 1 kg for the first year when the trees were establishing themselves, 4 kg for the second, and over 20 kg for the third when the trees were entering the exponential phase of growth. On a metric Ton per hectare (mT/ha) basis this would be 0.2 mT/ha in 2007, 0.87 mT/ha in 2008, and 4.3 mT/ha in 2009. Growth curve extrapolation predicts 13.2 mT/ha during a fourth year and potentially 29.5 mT/ha following a fifth year. Using the observed Ca and Sr concentrations found in the plant tissues, and Sr CR’s calculated from groundwater analysis, projected biomass yields suggest the trees could prove effective in removing the contaminant from the 100-NR-2 riparian zone.

  19. U-Pb Ages of Secondary Silica at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Implications for the Paleohydrology of the Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.A. Neymark; Y. Amelin; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman

    2001-08-20

    U, Th, and Pb isotopes were analyzed in layers of opal and chalcedony from individual millimeter- to centimeter-thick calcite and silica coatings at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, a site that is being evaluated for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. These calcite and silica coatings on fractures and in lithophysal cavities in Miocene-age tuffs in the unsaturated zone (UZ) precipitated from descending water and record a long history of percolation through the UZ. Opal and chalcedony have high concentrations of U (10 to 780 ppm) and low concentrations of common Pb as indicated by large values of {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb (up to 53,806), thus making them suitable for U-Pb age determinations. Interpretations of U-Pb isotopes in opal samples at Yucca Mountain are complicated by the incorporation of excess {sup 234}U at the time of mineral formation, resulting in reverse discordance of U-Pb ages. However, the {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages are much less affected by deviation from initial secular equilibrium and provide reliable ages of most silica deposits between 0.6 and 9.8 Ma. For chalcedony subsamples showing normal age discordance, these ages may represent minimum times of deposition. Typically, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages are consistent with the microstratigraphy in the mineral coating samples, such that the youngest ages are for subsamples from outer layers, intermediate ages are from inner layers, and oldest ages are from innermost layers. {sup 234}U and {sup 230}Th in most silica layers deeper in the coatings are in secular equilibrium with {sup 238}U, which is consistent with their old age and closed system behavior during the past 0.5 m.y. U-Pb ages for subsamples of silica layers from different microstratigraphic positions in individual calcite and silica coating samples collected from lithophysal cavities in the welded part of the Topopah Spring Tuff yield slow long-term average depositional rates of 1 to 5 mm/m.y. These data imply that the deeper parts of the UZ at Yucca Mountain maintained long-term hydrologic stability over the past 10 m.y. despite significant climate variations. U-Pb ages for subsamples of silica layers from different microstratigraphic positions in individual calcite and silica coating samples collected from fractures in the welded part of the overlying Tiva Canyon Tuff indicate larger long-term average depositional rates up to 23 mm/m.y. and an absence of recently deposited materials (ages of outermost layers are 3-5 Ma). These differences between the characteristics of the coatings for samples from the shallower and deeper parts of the UZ may indicate that the nonwelded tuffs (PTn), located between the welded parts of the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs, play an important role in moderating UZ flow.

  20. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  1. Summary of Vadose -- Zone Conceptual Models for Flow and Contaminant Transport and 1999 - 2003 Progress on Resolving Deficiencies in Understanding the Vadose Zone at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Starr; Dana L. Dettmers; Brennon R. Orr; Thomas R. Wood

    2003-12-01

    The thick vadose zone that underlies the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been recognized both as an avenue through which contaminants disposed at or near the ground surface can migrate to groundwater in the underlying Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, and as a barrier to the movement of contaminants into the aquifer. Flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the INEEL is complicated by the highly heterogeneous nature of the geologic framework and by the variations in the behavior of different contaminants in the subsurface. The state of knowledge concerning flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at and near the INEEL IN 1999 was summarized in Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (Wood et al., 2000). These authors identified deficiencies in knowledge of flow and contaminant transport processes in the vadose zone, and provided recommendations for additional work that should be conducted to address these deficiencies. In the period since (Wood et al., 2000) was prepared, research has been published that, to some degree, address these deficiencies. This document provides a bibliography of reports, journal articles, and conference proceedings published 1999 through mid-2003 that are relevant to the vadose zone at or near the INEEL and provides a brief description of each work. Publications that address specific deficiencies or recommendations are identified, and pertinent information from selected publications is presented.

  2. QCD for Postgraduates (5/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Modern QCD - Lecture 5 We will introduce and discuss in some detail the two main classes of jets: cone type and sequential-recombination type. We will discuss their basic properties, as well as more advanced concepts such as jet substructure, jet filtering, ways of optimizing the jet radius, ways of defining the areas of jets, and of establishing the quality measure of the jet-algorithm in terms of discriminating power in specific searches. Finally we will discuss applications for Higgs searches involving boosted particles.

  3. Porotomo Sample Interferogram in HDF5 Format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabrez Ali

    2015-01-01

    HDF5 file containing phase, filtered phase, unwrapped range change and correlation for the a TSX pair (Track 53) spanning time interval 12-23-2011 to 10-26-2012.

  4. NERSC-5 Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Benchmarks NERSC-5 Benchmarks The NERSC-5 application benchmarks were used in the acquisition process that resulted in the NERSC Cray XT4 system ("Franklin"). CAM: CCSM Community Climate Model GAMESS: Computational Chemistry GTC: 3D Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code MADBench: Microwave Anisotropy Dataset Computational Analysis Benchmark MILC: MIMD Lattice Computation PARATEC: Parallel Total Energy Code PMEMD: Particle Mesh Ewald Molecular Dynamics Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:58

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2012-11-06

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

    2013-12-24

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  7. Potential effects of low-volume effluent discharges on past-practice vadose zone contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-30

    Collard, L. B., J. D. Davis, D. B. Barnett, 1996, Potential Effects of Low-Volume Effluent Discharges on Past Practice Vadose Zone Contamination: WHC-SD-LEF-ER-001, Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland Washington. This document estimates the behavior of extremely low-discharges of water in the unsaturated zone in the vicinity of past-practice facilities.

  8. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  9. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  10. I-5 Corridor Reinforcement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Damper Replacement Program Wind Projects I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Current project schedule and activities BPA now expects to release our final EIS early in 2016, followed...

  11. 5Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table for 5Li is subdivided into the folowing categories: Ground State Properties Cluster Model Shell Model Special States Model Calculations Model Discussions Complex...

  12. 5H General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H General Table The General Table for 5H is subdivided into the following categories: Cluster Model Hypernuclei Model Calculations Photodisintegration Pions...

  13. a5.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education ...... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ......

  14. Vadose Zone Hydrogeology Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nichols, William E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.

    2006-06-01

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and geochemical parameters and input values that will be used in vadose zone modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington, and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). This data package describes the geologic framework, the physical, hydrologic, and contaminant transport properties of the geologic materials, and deep drainage (i.e., recharge) estimates, and builds on the general framework developed for the initial assessment conducted using the System Assessment Capability (SAC) (Bryce et al. 2002). The general approach for this work was to update and provide incremental improvements over the previous SAC data package completed in 2001. As with the previous SAC data package, much of the data and interpreted information were extracted from existing documents and databases. Every attempt was made to provide traceability to the original source(s) of the data or interpretations.

  15. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. Over time, ...

  16. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  17. Task Time Tracker

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    This client-side web app tracks the amount of time spent on arbitrary tasks. It allosw the creation of an unlimited number of arbitrarily named tasks ans via simple interactions, tracks the amount of time spent working on the drfined tasks.

  18. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  19. ZERO-TIME INDICATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sander, H.H.

    1960-08-30

    The travel time of a nuclear shock wave from its point of origin to a location can be determined accurately by an apparatus for noting and comparably recording both zerotime, as indicated by the electromagnetic transient associated with the nuclear detonation, and shock wave arrival time.

  20. Time varying voltage combustion control and diagnostics sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Thornton, Jimmy D.; Huckaby, E. David; Fincham, William

    2011-04-19

    A time-varying voltage is applied to an electrode, or a pair of electrodes, of a sensor installed in a fuel nozzle disposed adjacent the combustion zone of a continuous combustion system, such as of the gas turbine engine type. The time-varying voltage induces a time-varying current in the flame which is measured and used to determine flame capacitance using AC electrical circuit analysis. Flame capacitance is used to accurately determine the position of the flame from the sensor and the fuel/air ratio. The fuel and/or air flow rate (s) is/are then adjusted to provide reduced flame instability problems such as flashback, combustion dynamics and lean blowout, as well as reduced emissions. The time-varying voltage may be an alternating voltage and the time-varying current may be an alternating current.

  1. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  2. FY 2005 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Volume 5 Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Non Non - - Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non Non - - Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund and Decommissioning Fund February 2004 Volume 5

  3. HDF5 Quincey Koziol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HDF5 Quincey Koziol koziol@lbl.gov NERSC Data and Analytics Services March 21, 2016 NERSC User Group Meeting What is HDF5? January 16, 2014 2 * HDF5 = = H ierarchical D ata F ormat, v 5 * A d ata m odel * Structures f or d ata o rganiza<on a nd s pecifica<on * Open s ource s o*ware * Translates d ata m odel o bjects t o fi le * Open fi le f ormat * Designed f or h igh v olume o r c omplex d ata HDF5 is designed ... * for high volume and/or complex data * for every size and type of system

  4. Nevada Test Site, 2006 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson

    2007-06-30

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2006 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2006; Warren and Grossman, 2007; National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2006 totaled 98.6 millimeters (mm) (3.9 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 80.7 mm (3.2 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 remains at the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that evaporation continues to slowly remove soil moisture that came from the heavy precipitation in the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005. The vegetated final cover at U-3ax/bl continues to remove moisture by evapotranspiration. There was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated. Water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received three times natural precipitation. All 2006 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  5. Parallel time integration software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    This package implements an optimal-scaling multigrid solver for the (non) linear systems that arise from the discretization of problems with evolutionary behavior. Typically, solution algorithms for evolution equations are based on a time-marching approach, solving sequentially for one time step after the other. Parallelism in these traditional time-integrarion techniques is limited to spatial parallelism. However, current trends in computer architectures are leading twards system with more, but not faster. processors. Therefore, faster compute speeds mustmore » come from greater parallelism. One approach to achieve parallelism in time is with multigrid, but extending classical multigrid methods for elliptic poerators to this setting is a significant achievement. In this software, we implement a non-intrusive, optimal-scaling time-parallel method based on multigrid reduction techniques. The examples in the package demonstrate optimality of our multigrid-reduction-in-time algorithm (MGRIT) for solving a variety of parabolic equations in two and three sparial dimensions. These examples can also be used to show that MGRIT can achieve significant speedup in comparison to sequential time marching on modern architectures.« less

  6. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  7. Time of Flight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Flight Techniques Since the LANSCE proton beam is pulsed, the energy of the neutrons that are produced can be determined by Time-of-Flight (TOF) techniques. Neutron Time-of-Flight Since the LANSCE proton beam is pulsed, the energy of the neutrons that are produced can be determined by Time-of-Flight (TOF) techniques. The proton beam pulse strikes the tungsten neutron production target and neutrons, gamma rays and charged particles are produced. The charged particles are removed from the beam

  8. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  9. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-01-01

    DOEs Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

  10. Microsoft Word - Rev5functionalaccountabilityimplementationplan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rev5functionalaccountabilityimplementationplan..doc Microsoft Word - Rev5functionalaccountabilityimplementationplan..doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Rev5functionalaccountabilityimple...

  11. January 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/y12times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Campbell Cloar Ken Davis Kathy Fahey John Holbrook Jamie Loveday Brett Pate Cindy Robinson Ray Smith Donna Watson I N S I D E Page 2 Angels in our midst Page 3 Preparing for a widespread fl u outbreak Page 3 10 tips to help you say what you mean Pages 4 and 5 Bunton, Domm and

  12. Mar_13Times.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MARCH 2013 inside this issue ... FIRP draws to a close Page 2 Reminisce: Y-12 turns 70 Page 4 Russia's secret city Page 5 Development retools its CONOPS Page 6 ... and other Y-12 news Miss an issue? Find us online, http://www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php MISSION, cont. on pg. 2 The National Nuclear Security Administration's Performance Evaluation Report for B&W Y-12, released Feb. 11, gave "Very Good" ratings to B&W Y-12 in areas related to all three core missions: maintaining

  13. RSE Table 5.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ",," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Distillate" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal"," " " ",,"Net","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel

  14. SPECIAL DATE AND TIME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPECIAL DATE AND TIME Evolving views of the outer solar system: new insights from NASA's New Horizons mission's historic first Pluto fly-by Dr. Kimberly Ennico Smith NASA Ames ...

  15. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter X-Ray Imaging of...

  16. A Markov Chain Analysis of Fish Movements to Determine Entrainment Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hedgepeth, J; Skalski, John R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    2004-10-01

    Fish can become entrained at water withdrawal locations such as fish bypasses or cooling water intakes. Accordingly, the size of a fish entrainment zone (FEZ) is often of interest to fisheries managers and facility operators. This study developed a new technique to map the FEZ, defined here as the region immediately upstream of a portal where the probability of fish movement toward the portal is greater than 90%. To map the FEZ, we applied a Markov chain analysis to fish movement data collected with an active tracking sonar. This device locks onto and follows a target, recording positions through a set of volumetric cells comprising the sampled volume. The probability of a fish moving from one cell to another was calculated from fish position data, which was used to populate a Markov transition matrix. We developed and applied the technique using data on salmon smolts migrating near the ice/trash sluiceway at The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River. The FEZ of the sluiceway entrance in 2000 as determined with this procedure was approximately 5 m across and extended 6-8 m out from the face of the dam in the surface layer 2-3 m deep. In conclusion, using a Markov chain analysis of fish track data we were able to describe and quantify the FEZ of the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam. This technique for FEZ mapping is applicable to other bioengineering efforts aimed at protecting fish populations affected by water withdrawals.

  17. CATCHING QUENCHING GALAXIES: THE NATURE OF THE WISE INFRARED TRANSITION ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Appleton, Philip N.; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Lisenfeld, Ute; Nyland, Kristina

    2014-10-10

    We present the discovery of a prominent bifurcation between early-type galaxies and late-type galaxies, in [4.6]-[12] μm colors from the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We then use an emission-line diagnostic comparison sample to explore the nature of objects found both within and near the edges of this WISE infrared transition zone (IRTZ). We hypothesize that this bifurcation might be due to the presence of hot dust and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features in late-type galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies selected through the Shocked Poststarburst Galaxy Survey (SPOGS), we are able to identify galaxies with strong Balmer absorption (EW(Hδ) > 5 Å) as well as emission lines inconsistent with star formation (deemed SPOG candidates, or SPOGs*) that lie within the optical green valley. Seyferts and low-ionization nuclear emission line regions, whose u – r colors tend to be red, are strongly represented within IRTZ, whereas SPOGs* tend to sit near the star-forming edge. Although active galactic nuclei are well represented in the IRTZ, we argue that the dominant IRTZ population is composed of galaxies that are in late stages of transitioning across the optical green valley, shedding the last of their remnant interstellar media.

  18. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  19. UNSATURATED ZONE CALCITE 813C EVIDENCE OF SOUTHERN NEVADA CLIMATES DURING THE PAST 9 MILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPH F. WHELAN AND RICHARD J. MOSCATI

    1998-01-26

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs in which the depth to the water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present-day arid to semi-arid environment, is considered a positive argument for the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relationship between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible transport and release of radionuclides. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration (Whelan et al., 1994). Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences allows the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite to be used to reconstruct general climate variations during the past 9 M.y.

  20. H5py

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amounts of numerical data, and easily manipulate that data from NumPy. H5py uses straightforward NumPy and Python metaphors, like dictionary and NumPy array syntax. For example,...