National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for time spread wti

  1. Spectral phase encoded time spread optical code division multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    -CDMA, efficient and compact W-CDMA chip develop- ment allowed rapid market-driven transition from the conventionalSpectral phase encoded time spread optical code division multiple access technology for next and summarize the progress of the spectral phase encoded time spreading (SPECTS) optical code division multiple

  2. Epidemic spreading in time-varying community networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Guangming E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com; Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Wang, Xingyuan E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com

    2014-06-15

    The spreading processes of many infectious diseases have comparable time scale as the network evolution. Here, we present a simple networks model with time-varying community structure, and investigate susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic spreading processes in this model. By both theoretic analysis and numerical simulations, we show that the efficiency of epidemic spreading in this model depends intensively on the mobility rate q of the individuals among communities. We also find that there exists a mobility rate threshold q{sub c}. The epidemic will survive when q?>?q{sub c} and die when q?spreading in complex networks with community structure.

  3. Time-Resolved Imaging of the Microbunching Instability and Energy Spread at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D.; Behrens, C.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T.; Zhou, F.

    2015-03-01

    The microbunching instability (MBI) is a well known problem for high brightness electron beams and has been observed at accelerator facilities around the world. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are particularly susceptible to MBI, which can distort the longitudinal phase space and increase the beam’s slice energy spread (SES). Past studies of MBI at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) relied on optical transition radiation to infer the existence of microbunching. With the development of the x-band transverse deflecting cavity (XTCAV), we can for the first time directly image the longitudinal phase space at the end of the accelerator and complete amore »comprehensive study of MBI, revealing both detailed MBI behavior as well as insights into mitigation schemes. The fine time resolution of the XTCAV also provides the first LCLS measurements of the final SES, a critical parameter for many advanced FEL schemes. Detailed MBI and SES measurements can aid in understanding MBI mechanisms, benchmarking simulation codes, and designing future high- brightness accelerators.« less

  4. Time-Resolved Imaging of the Microbunching Instability and Energy Spread at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zhou, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The microbunching instability (MBI) is a well known problem for high brightness electron beams and has been observed at accelerator facilities around the world. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are particularly susceptible to MBI, which can distort the longitudinal phase space and increase the beam’s slice energy spread (SES). Past studies of MBI at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) relied on optical transition radiation to infer the existence of microbunching. With the development of the x-band transverse deflecting cavity (XTCAV), we can for the first time directly image the longitudinal phase space at the end of the accelerator and complete a comprehensive study of MBI, revealing both detailed MBI behavior as well as insights into mitigation schemes. The fine time resolution of the XTCAV also provides the first LCLS measurements of the final SES, a critical parameter for many advanced FEL schemes. Detailed MBI and SES measurements can aid in understanding MBI mechanisms, benchmarking simulation codes, and designing future high- brightness accelerators.

  5. ANNUALISED SALARY APPLICATION This form is to be completed by `Seasonal' or `Part-time' staff wishing to have their salary spread over 52

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    ANNUALISED SALARY APPLICATION This form is to be completed by `Seasonal' or `Part-time' staff wishing to have their salary spread over 52 weeks on a pro-rata basis. The form can be completed on Salary Scheme Guidelines: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000414.html Signature

  6. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  7. Rifts in Spreading Wax Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolf Ragnarsson; J. Lewis Ford; Christian D. Santangelo; Eberhard Bodenschatz

    1995-10-19

    We report experimental results on the rift formation between two freezing wax plates. The plates were pulled apart with constant velocity, while floating on the melt, in a way akin to the tectonic plates of the earth's crust. At slow spreading rates, a rift, initially perpendicular to the spreading direction, was found to be stable, while above a critical spreading rate a "spiky" rift with fracture zones almost parallel to the spreading direction developed. At yet higher spreading rates a second transition from the spiky rift to a zig-zag pattern occurred. In this regime the rift can be characterized by a single angle which was found to be dependent on the spreading rate. We show that the oblique spreading angles agree with a simple geometrical model. The coarsening of the zig-zag pattern over time and the three-dimensional structure of the solidified crust are also discussed.

  8. strawberry-spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Date: 17 May 93 02:15:00 EDT From: KEVWIL@delphi.com ---------- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v7.04 Title: FRESH STRAWBERRY SPREAD Categories: ...

  9. Spreading of oil spilled under ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Chowdhury, T. )

    1990-12-01

    A new set of equations is presented to describe the process of oil spreading under ice in clam waters. These equations consider the gravity (buoyancy)-inertia phase, the gravity (buoyancy)-viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy-surface-tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to the termination of spreading is presented. Laboratory experiments were conducted using both real ice covers in a cold room and artificial ice covers. The experiments included different ice-cover roughnesses from smooth to rough, oils of different viscosities, and a variety of discharge conditions. The experimental data show close agreement with the theory. These equations can be used during cleanup or environmental impact assessment to estimate the area of an oil slick with respect to time.

  10. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  11. Using a Bear Put Spread 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Waller, Mark L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-07

    spread. In this example, assume the current Chicago Board of Trade December Corn contract is trad- ing at $6.00 per bushel. The associated December put option premiums are listed in Table 1. The producer begins the strategy by buying a put op- tion... near the money, in this case a $6.00 put op- tion for $0.90 per bushel ($4,500 per 5,000-bushel contract). At the same time, he also writes (sells) a put option with a strike price below the put option. In our example, he writes a $5.00 put option...

  12. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  13. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  14. APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntaimo, Lewis

    APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo Department of Industrial. Speedway Tucson, AZ 85721 In this article, the authors discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire to obtain timely simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform

  15. Wavepacket of the Universe and its spreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Czachor; Andrzej Posiewnik

    2015-10-16

    Wavepackets in quantum mechanics spread and the Universe in cosmology expands. We discuss a formalism where the two effects can be unified. The basic assumption is that the Universe is determined by a unitarily evolving wavepacket defined on space-time. Space-time is static but the Universe is dynamic. Spreading analogous to expansion known from observational cosmology is obtained if one regards time evolution as a discrete process with probabilities of jumps determined by a variational principle employing Kolmogorov-Nagumo-R\\'enyi averages. The choice of the R\\'enyi calculus implies that the form of the Universe involves an implicit fractal structure. The formalism automatically leads to two types of "time" parameters: $\\tau$, with dimension of $x^0$, and dimensionless $\\varepsilon=\\ln \\epsilon_\\tau$, related to the form of diffeomorphism that defines the dynamics. There is no preferred time foliation, but effectively the dynamics leads to asymptotic concentration of the Universe on spacelike surfaces that propagate in space-time. The analysis is performed explicitly in $1+1$ dimensions, but the unitary evolution operator is brought to a form that makes generalizations to other dimensions and other fields quite natural.

  16. Using a Bull Call Spread 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Waller, Mark L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-07

    The Bull Call Spread can be used to hedge against or to benefit from a rising market. The user buys a call option at a particular strike price and sells a call option at a higher strike price. Margin requirements, advantages and disadvantages...

  17. Electrically modulated dynamic spreading of drops on soft surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranabir Dey; Ashish Daga; Sunando DasGupta; Suman Chakraborty

    2015-04-07

    The intricate interaction between the deformability of a substrate and the dynamic spreading of a liquid drop on the same, under the application of an electrical voltage, has remained far from being well understood. Here, we demonstrate that electrospreading dynamics on soft substrates is dictated by the combined interplay of electrocapillarity, the wetting line friction and the viscoelastic energy dissipation at the contact line. Our results reveal that during such electro-elastocapillarity mediated spreading of a sessile drop, the contact radius evolution exhibits a universal power law in a substrate elasticity based non-dimensional time, with an electric potential dependent spreading exponent. Simultaneously, the macroscopic dynamic contact angle variation follows a general power law in the contact line velocity, normalized by elasticity dependent characteristic velocity scale. Our results are likely to provide the foundation for the development of a plethora of new applications involving droplet manipulations by exploiting the interplay between electrically triggered spreading and substrate-compliance over interfacial scales.

  18. Physical Proximity and Spreading in Dynamic Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Most infectious diseases spread on a dynamic network of human interactions. Recent studies of social dynamics have provided evidence that spreading patterns may depend strongly on detailed micro-dynamics of the social system. We have recorded every single interaction within a large population, mapping out---for the first time at scale---the complete proximity network for a densely-connected system. Here we show the striking impact of interaction-distance on the network structure and dynamics of spreading processes. We create networks supporting close (intimate network, up to ~1m) and longer distance (ambient network, up to ~10m) modes of transmission. The intimate network is fragmented, with weak ties bridging densely-connected neighborhoods, whereas the ambient network supports spread driven by random contacts between strangers. While there is no trivial mapping from the micro-dynamics of proximity networks to empirical epidemics, these networks provide a telling approximation of droplet and airborne modes o...

  19. New algorithms for adaptive optics point-spread function reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Gendron; Yann Clénet; Thierry Fusco; Gérard Rousset

    2006-06-28

    Context. The knowledge of the point-spread function compensated by adaptive optics is of prime importance in several image restoration techniques such as deconvolution and astrometric/photometric algorithms. Wavefront-related data from the adaptive optics real-time computer can be used to accurately estimate the point-spread function in adaptive optics observations. The only point-spread function reconstruction algorithm implemented on astronomical adaptive optics system makes use of particular functions, named $U\\_{ij}$. These $U\\_{ij}$ functions are derived from the mirror modes, and their number is proportional to the square number of these mirror modes. Aims. We present here two new algorithms for point-spread function reconstruction that aim at suppressing the use of these $U\\_{ij}$ functions to avoid the storage of a large amount of data and to shorten the computation time of this PSF reconstruction. Methods. Both algorithms take advantage of the eigen decomposition of the residual parallel phase covariance matrix. In the first algorithm, the use of a basis in which the latter matrix is diagonal reduces the number of $U\\_{ij}$ functions to the number of mirror modes. In the second algorithm, this eigen decomposition is used to compute phase screens that follow the same statistics as the residual parallel phase covariance matrix, and thus suppress the need for these $U\\_{ij}$ functions. Results. Our algorithms dramatically reduce the number of $U\\_{ij}$ functions to be computed for the point-spread function reconstruction. Adaptive optics simulations show the good accuracy of both algorithms to reconstruct the point-spread function.

  20. Effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading: A fluctuation intensity transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2014-09-15

    This paper studies effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading. It reports results of numerical experiments using global gyrokinetic simulations. We examine propagation of turbulence, triggered by an identical linear instability in a source region, into an adjacent, linearly stable region with variable q-profile. The numerical experiments are designed so as to separate the physics of turbulence spreading from that of linear stability. The strength of turbulence spreading is measured by the penetration depth of turbulence. Dynamics of spreading are elucidated by fluctuation intensity balance analysis, using a model intensity evolution equation which retains nonlinear diffusion and damping, and linear growth. It is found that turbulence spreading is strongly affected by magnetic shear s, but is hardly altered by the safety factor q itself. There is an optimal range of modest magnetic shear which maximizes turbulence spreading. For high to modest shear values, the spreading is enhanced by the increase of the mode correlation length with decreasing magnetic shear. However, the efficiency of spreading drops for sufficiently low magnetic shear even though the mode correlation length is comparable to that for the case of optimal magnetic shear. The reduction of spreading is attributed to the increase in time required for the requisite nonlinear mode-mode interactions. The effect of increased interaction time dominates that of increased mode correlation length. Our findings of the reduction of spreading and the increase in interaction time at weak magnetic shear are consistent with the well-known benefit of weak or reversed magnetic shear for core confinement enhancement. Weak shear is shown to promote locality, as well as stability.

  1. Damage spreading and coupling in Markov chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etienne P. Bernard; Cédric Chanal; Werner Krauth

    2011-06-23

    In this paper, we relate the coupling of Markov chains, at the basis of perfect sampling methods, with damage spreading, which captures the chaotic nature of stochastic dynamics. For two-dimensional spin glasses and hard spheres we point out that the obstacle to the application of perfect-sampling schemes is posed by damage spreading rather than by the survey problem of the entire configuration space. We find dynamical damage-spreading transitions deeply inside the paramagnetic and liquid phases, and show that critical values of the transition temperatures and densities depend on the coupling scheme. We discuss our findings in the light of a classic proof that for arbitrary Monte Carlo algorithms damage spreading can be avoided through non-Markovian coupling schemes.

  2. A new theory for interface spreading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puthran, Hansraj Nagappa

    1994-01-01

    A new theory for interface spreading during sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of spheres has been developed. Employing no adjustable parameters, it compares well with new data obtained using magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Modeling of LNG Pool Spreading and Vaporization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basha, Omar 1988-

    2012-11-20

    In this work, a source term model for estimating the rate of spreading and vaporization of LNG on land and sea is introduced. The model takes into account the composition changes of the boiling mixture, the varying thermodynamic properties due...

  4. Detecting the Influence of Spreading in Social Networks with Excitable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Sen; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    Detecting spreading outbreaks in social networks with sensors is of great significance in applications. Inspired by the formation mechanism of human's physical sensations to external stimuli, we propose a new method to detect the influence of spreading by constructing excitable sensor networks. Exploiting the amplifying effect of excitable sensor networks, our method can better detect small-scale spreading processes. At the same time, it can also distinguish large-scale diffusion instances due to the self-inhibition effect of excitable elements. Through simulations of diverse spreading dynamics on typical real-world social networks (facebook, coauthor and email social networks), we find that the excitable senor networks are capable of detecting and ranking spreading processes in a much wider range of influence than other commonly used sensor placement methods, such as random, targeted, acquaintance and distance strategies. In addition, we validate the efficacy of our method with diffusion data from a real-wor...

  5. Credit Spreads and Bond Price-Based Pricing Credit Spreads and Bond Price-Based Pricing Chapter 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    ;Defaultable Floater Coupons paid at time Tkn are Libor + spread n-1(L(Tkn-1 , Lkn ) + spar ) = ( 1 B(Tkn-1 , Lkn ) - 1) + spar n-1 The value of defaultable 1 B(Tkn-1 ,Lkn) at time Tkn-1 is: 1 B(Tkn-1 , Lkn ) ¯B III All together ¯C(0) = N n=1 n-1F(0, Tkn-1 , Tkn )¯B(0, Tkn ) +spar N n=1 n-1 ¯B(0, Tkn ) +¯B(0, Tk

  6. Information Spread Over an Internet-mediated Social Network: Phases, Speed, Width, and Effects of Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvania, Abigail C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked at the effect of promotion in the speed and width of spread of information on the Internet by tracking the diffusion of news articles over a social network. Speed of spread means the number of readers that the news has reached in a given time, while width of spread means how far the story has travelled from the news originator within the social network. After analyzing six stories in a 30-hour time span, we found out that the lifetime of a story's popularity among the members of the social network has three phases: Expansion, Front-page, and Saturation. Expansion phase starts when a story is published and the article spreads from a source node to nodes within a connected component of the social network. Front-page phase happens when a news aggregator promotes the story in its front page resulting to the story's faster rate of spread among the connected nodes while at the same time spreading the article to nodes outside the original connected component of the social network. Saturation...

  7. The Central Basin Spreading Center in the Philippine Sea: Structure of an extinct spreading center and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okino, Kyoko

    The Central Basin Spreading Center in the Philippine Sea: Structure of an extinct spreading center of the West Philippine Basin (WPB), display along-axis variations of spreading style. We have described, seafloor morphology, extinct spreading center, Philippine Sea Citation: Okino, K., and K. Fujioka

  8. Generation of tsunamis by a slowly spreading uplift of the sea oor Maria I. Todorovska*, Mihailo D. Trifunac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Generation of tsunamis by a slowly spreading uplift of the sea ¯oor Maria I. Todorovska*, Mihailo D spreading of the sea ¯oor uplift. A linearized solution for constant water depth is derived by transform methods (Laplace in time and Fourier in space), for sea ¯oor uplift represented by a sliding Heaviside

  9. A Markov model for the spread of Hepatitis C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutin, Laure; Dhersin, Jean-Stephane

    2008-01-01

    We propose a Markov model for the spread of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) among drug users who use injections. We then proceed to an asymptotic analysis (large initial population) and show that the Markov process is close to the solution of a non linear autonomous differential system. We prove both a law of large numbers and functional central limit theorem to precise the speed of convergence towards the limiting system. The deterministic system itself converges, as time goes to infinity, to an equilibrium point. This corroborates the empirical observations about the prevalence of HCV.

  10. Multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communication. A method includes individually spread-spectrum modulating at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers, wherein the resulting individually spread-spectrum modulated at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers are substantially mutually orthogonal with respect to both frequency division multiplexing and spread-spectrum modulation.

  11. COMPARING SIMULATION METHODS FOR FIRE SPREADING ACROSS A FUEL BED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wainer, Gabriel

    choice to solve the problem. Diffusion processes (oil spills, fire spread, insect infestation, etcCOMPARING SIMULATION METHODS FOR FIRE SPREADING ACROSS A FUEL BED Alexandre Muzy Computer Modeling computer simulation of a semi-physical fire spread model. Forest fire is a com- plex phenomenon, which

  12. Spreading of energy in the Ding-Dong model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Pikovsky, A.

    2012-06-15

    We study the properties of energy spreading in a lattice of elastically colliding harmonic oscillators (Ding-Dong model). We demonstrate that in the regular lattice the spreading from a localized initial state is mediated by compactons and chaotic breathers. In a disordered lattice, the compactons do not exist, and the spreading eventually stops, resulting in a finite configuration with a few chaotic spots.

  13. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  14. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  15. Understanding Spreading Patterns on Social Networks Based on Network Topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Akrati; Gupta, Yayati

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the proposal of first epidemic model, scientists have been attempting to estimate the growth of a disease/contagion while in its premature stage. Despite being the focus of researchers for a long time, understanding epidemiology remains as error prone as a weather forecast, mainly because of the unavailability of large amount of data. An epidemic spread is analogous to the diffusion of memes in social networking sites. Diffusion of memes can be easily studied provided large datasets and computational powers to extract information from online networks. So, studying a meme spreading pattern can help us in understanding epidemiology. In this paper, we analyse the impact of the topology of a social network, specifically its meso scale properties- community structure and core-periphery structure, on a meme traversing over it. We propose a meme propagation model for synthetic scale free graphs which resemble real world graphs and observe the process of a meme going viral on such a network. We also valida...

  16. Post-Tanner stages of droplet spreading: the energy balance approach revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serguei Mechkov; Anne-Marie Cazabat; Gleb Oshanin

    2009-09-10

    The spreading of a circular liquid drop on a solid substrate can be described by the time evolution of its base radius R(t). In complete wetting the quasistationary regime (far away from initial and final transients) typically obeys the so-called Tanner law, with R t^alpha_T, alpha_T=1/10. Late-time spreading may differ significantly from the Tanner law: in some cases the drop does not thin down to a molecular film and instead reaches an equilibrium pancake-like shape; in other situations, as revealed by recent experiments with spontaneously spreading nematic crystals, the growth of the base radius accelerates after the Tanner stage. Here we demonstrate that these two seemingly conflicting trends can be reconciled within a suitably revisited energy balance approach, by taking into account the line tension contribution to the driving force of spreading: a positive line tension is responsible for the formation of pancake-like structures, whereas a negative line tension tends to lengthen the contact line and induces an accelerated spreading (a transition to a faster power law for R(t) than in the Tanner stage).

  17. Spreading of the Free Boundary of an Ideal Fluid in a Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Spreading of the Free Boundary of an Ideal Fluid in a Vacuum Thomas C. Sideris Department by an ideal fluid surrounded by vacuum will be shown to grow linearly in time provided the pressure an ideal fluid occupying a bounded region in space surrounded by vacuum. The boundary of this region

  18. EECE 595: SPREAD SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS 1 Distributed Power Control in CDMA Cellular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    station will corrupt the other signals. Another reason for power control is the battery life time. High of each mobile station. The transmission power of the mobile stations is determined solely on localEECE 595: SPREAD SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS 1 Distributed Power Control in CDMA Cellular System Aly El

  19. FireStream: Sensor Stream Processing for Monitoring Fire Spread Venkatesh Raghavan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    locations required for spatial analysis, the Sen- sor Store, a collection of metadata pertinent to sensorsFireStream: Sensor Stream Processing for Monitoring Fire Spread Venkatesh Raghavan1 , ElkeStream, a sensor stream processing system which provides services for run-time de- tection, monitoring

  20. The ROSAT HRI Point Spread Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Predehl; Almudena Prieto

    2001-09-28

    A sample of the brightest point-like sources observed with the ROSAT-HRI were analysed to asses on the intrinsic shape of the ROSAT-HRI Point Spread Function (PSF). Almost all of the HRI observations collected during the ROSAT lifetime are found to be artificially broadened by factors up two ~2 due to residual errors in the ROSAT aspect solution. After correction by departing pointing positions, the width of the core of the PSF is found to be less than 5 arcsec (half energy width, HEW). On the basis of these results, an improved analytical representation of the ROSAT-HRI PSF is provided. However, for most of the new observations the source countrate is too weak to allow reliable recovering pf the ROSAT-HRI resolution. Therefore, a series of examples (data, correction, and theoretical PSF) are given in order to help the ROSAT user in determining whether "his/her source" is extended or not.

  1. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, B

    2012-03-19

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a limited, defined region. Using this technique a 460 MeV electron beam was produced with an energy spread of 5%. This technique is directly scalable to multi-GeV electron beam generation with sub-percent energy spreads.

  2. Longitudinal bunch profile and electron beam energy spread

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ring Parameters Previous: Storage Ring Operation Modes Longitudinal bunch profile and electron beam energy spread Longitudinal bunch profile depends mainly on the single bunch...

  3. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 011999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999red...

  4. HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV and evolution studied through computer modeling HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling This approach distinguishes between susceptible and infected...

  5. Multi-gigaelectronvolt, low-energy spread acceleration of positrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multi-gigaelectronvolt, low-energy spread acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  6. Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1 , Bithika Khargharia2 , Bernard P. Zeigler2 , Maria J. Vasconcelos3 Abstract In this paper we discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform and non-uniform environmental

  7. PRICING AND HEDGING SPREAD OPTIONS RENE CARMONA AND VALDO DURRLEMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    a chance to venture in the poorly understood world of asset valuation and real options which are the objectPRICING AND HEDGING SPREAD OPTIONS REN´E CARMONA AND VALDO DURRLEMAN ABSTRACT. We survey the theoretical and the computational problems associated with the pricing of spread options. These options

  8. Implied and Local Correlations from Spread Options Rene Carmona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    cor- relation skew examplifies how inaccurate the constant correlation assumption in the multivariate a set of special parameters, and we propose a calibration procedure using option prices on individual. For example, the spark spread option is a spread between natural gas and electric power. The underlying is St

  9. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted of: (1) comparison to an analytical solution for the dam break problem, (2) water spreading tests in a 1/10 linear scale model of the Mark I containment by Theofanous et al., and (3) steel spreading tests by Suzuki et al. that were also conducted in a geometry similar to the Mark I. The objective of this work was to utilize the MELTSPREAD code to check the assumption of uniform melt spreading in the EPR core catcher design. As a starting point for the project, the code was validated against the worldwide melt spreading database that emerged after the code was originally written in the very early 1990's. As part of this exercise, the code was extensively modified and upgraded to incorporate findings from these various analytical and experiment programs. In terms of expanding the ability of the code to analyze various melt simulant experiments, the options to input user-specified melt and/or substrate material properties was added. The ability to perform invisicid and/or adiabatic spreading analysis was also added so that comparisons with analytical solutions and isothermal spreading tests could be carried out. In terms of refining the capability to carry out reactor material melt spreading analyses, the code was upgraded with a new melt viscosity model; the capability was added to treat situations in which solid fraction buildup between the liquidus-solidus is non-linear; and finally, the ability to treat an interfacial heat transfer resistance between the melt and substrate was incorporated. This last set of changes substantially improved the predictive capability of the code in terms of addressing reactor material melt spreading tests. Aside from improvements and upgrades, a method was developed to fit the model to the various melt spreading tests in a manner that allowed uncertainties in the model predictions to be statistically characterized. With these results, a sensitivity study was performed to investigate the assumption of uniform spreading in the EPR core catcher that addressed parametric variations in: (1) melt pour mass, (2) melt composition, (3) me

  10. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  11. The Power of a Good Idea: Quantitative Modeling of the Spread of Ideas from Epidemiological Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Cintron-Arias, A. (Cornell University); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT); Castillo-Chavez, C. (Arizona State University)

    2005-05-05

    The population dynamics underlying the diffusion of ideas hold many qualitative similarities to those involved in the spread of infections. In spite of much suggestive evidence this analogy is hardly ever quantified in useful ways. The standard benefit of modeling epidemics is the ability to estimate quantitatively population average parameters, such as interpersonal contact rates, incubation times, duration of infectious periods, etc. In most cases such quantities generalize naturally to the spread of ideas and provide a simple means of quantifying sociological and behavioral patterns. Here we apply several paradigmatic models of epidemics to empirical data on the advent and spread of Feynman diagrams through the theoretical physics communities of the USA, Japan, and the USSR in the period immediately after World War II. This test case has the advantage of having been studied historically in great detail, which allows validation of our results. We estimate the effectiveness of adoption of the idea in the three communities and find values for parameters reflecting both intentional social organization and long lifetimes for the idea. These features are probably general characteristics of the spread of ideas, but not of common epidemics.

  12. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

  13. Nature of Flow and Gas Dynamics Below Spreading Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Jordan F; Avisar, Dror; Hudson, G. Bryant

    2005-01-01

    breakthrough curve at El Rio #8. Pond 2 El Rio #5 El Rio #6Ne and Xe concentrations in Pond 2 and groundwater samples.vadose zone beneath a spreading pond in more detail than was

  14. Bearing estimation techniques for improved performance spread spectrum receivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, John S

    The main topic of this thesis is the use of bearing estimation techniques combined with multiple antenna elements for spread spectrum receivers. The motivation behind this work is twofold: firstly, this type of receiver structure may offer...

  15. Intense spreading of radar echoes from ionospheric plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorfman, Seth E

    2005-01-01

    On December 25, 2004, a large-scale ionospheric plasma bubble was observed over Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, inducing significant range spreading on ionograms. This phenomena may be explained by means of the E x B ...

  16. Prevent the Spread of Zoonotic Diseases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Josefa

    2008-11-10

    for at least 15 seconds to remove germs.? When warm water is not available, wash for a longer time.? When soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand ? sanitizer. Practice Food Safety Do not consume unpasteurized milk and milk products.? Do...

  17. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread andposition detection of electron beams from laser-plasmaLPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance

  18. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta

    2014-01-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from ten neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found from any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional ampli...

  19. Impacts of complex behavioral responses on asymmetric interacting spreading dynamics in multiplex networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Quan-Hui; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Information diffusion and disease spreading in communication-contact layered network are typically asymmetrically coupled with each other, in which how an individual being aware of disease responds to the disease can significantly affect the disease spreading. Many recent studies have demonstrated that human behavioral adoption is a complex and non-Markovian process, where the probability of adopting one behavior is dependent on the cumulative times of the received information and the social reinforcement effect of these cumulative information. We study the impact of such a non-Markovian vaccination adoption behavior on the epidemic dynamics and the control effects. We find that this complex adoption behavior caused from the communication layer can significantly increase the epidemic threshold and reduce the final infection rate. By defining the social cost as the sum of the cost of vaccination and the cost of treatment, we show that there exists an optimal social reinforcement effect or optimal information t...

  20. Scanning Raman spectroscopy for characterizing compositionally spread films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venimadhav, A.; Yates, K. A.; Blamire, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    compositionally spread films Venimadhav. A?, Yates K. A., Blamire M. G. Department of Materials Science, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ, UK Abstract Composition-spread La1-xSrxMnO3 thin films were prepared by pulsed laser... . This is close to the the phase coexistence predicted for LSMO single crystals at x = 0.17 [23]. Above x = 0.2, the 640 cm-1 mode completely disappears. The intensity of the 436 cm-1 peak in figure 4(b) shows maximum at x = 0.35. It is worth mentioning...

  1. Predicting the extinction of Ebola spreading in Liberia due to mitigation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez, L D; Stanley, H E; Braunstein, L A

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus is spreading throughout West Africa, causing thousands of deaths. When developing strategies to slow or halt the epidemic, mathematical models that reproduce the spread of this virus are essential for understanding which variables are relevant. We study the propagation of the Ebola virus through Liberia by using a model in which people travel from one county to another in order to quantify the effectiveness of different strategies. For the initial months in which the Ebola virus spreads, we find that the arrival times of the disease into the counties predicted by our model are in good agreement with World Health Organization data. We also find that reducing mobility delays the arrival of Ebola virus in each county by only a few weeks, and as a consequence, is insufficient to contain the epidemic. Finally we study the effect of a strategy focused on increasing safe burials and hospitalization under two scenarios: (i) one implemented in mid-July 2014 and (ii) one in mid-August, which was the act...

  2. Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price.

  3. Salary Spread Request Instructions: Please complete and print this form to elect or cancel salary spread. Once completed, the form should be sent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    Salary Spread Request Instructions: Please complete and print this form to elect or cancel salary. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ REQUIREMENTS: Employees with a nine-month basis assignment may be eligible to spread their salary evenly over the 12 months of the fiscal year by completing this Salary Spread Request form. Once elected, the salary

  4. Wireless spread-spectrum telesensor chip with synchronous digital architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Emery, Michael Steven

    2005-03-08

    A fully integrated wireless spread-spectrum sensor incorporating all elements of an "intelligent" sensor on a single circuit chip is capable of telemetering data to a receiver. Synchronous control of all elements of the chip provides low-cost, low-noise, and highly robust data transmission, in turn enabling the use of low-cost monolithic receivers.

  5. On the Spread of Viruses on the Internet Noam Berger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberi, Amin

    distribution [14], this work is relevant both in the context of the spread of computer viruses on the Internet of antivirus software. Computers with the software installed are not permanently immune from the virus, but they are regularly scanned for the presence of the virus, and the software removes the virus if the computer is found

  6. On the Spread of Viruses on the Internet Noam Berger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chayes, Jennifer Tour

    , and the software removes the virus if the computer is found to be infected. A computer can be infected by the same. In this case, the antivirus software prevents any given computer from being reinfected with the same virusOn the Spread of Viruses on the Internet Noam Berger Christian Borgs Jennifer T. Chayes Amin

  7. Efficient Communication over Highly Spread Underwater Acoustic Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schniter, Philip

    unforgiving wireless medium" [2]. In fact, re- liable high-rate underwater acoustic communication remains a principal challenge in the construction of underwater net- works. The physical characteristics of the UAC of optimal and fail altogether in very highly spread environments such as the surf zone [20

  8. ACOUSTIC PULSE SPREADING IN A RANDOM FRACTAL KNUT S LNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solna, Knut

    ACOUSTIC PULSE SPREADING IN A RANDOM FRACTAL KNUT S#28;LNA #3; Abstract. Fractal medium models are used to model for instance the heterogeneous earth and the turbulent atmosphere. A wave pulse with the medium uctuations. The modi#12;cation in the pulse shape depends on the roughness of the medium and can

  9. Building a Simulation of the Spread of a Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Repenning, Alexander

    Building a Simulation of the Spread of a Virus Using the AgentSheets simulation-authoring tool of how to use the AgentSheets® simulation-authoring tool to 1) create a simulation of a virus attack. Create a simulation of a virus attack To illustrate how an AgentSheets simulation is created from scratch

  10. UMTS Capacity and Throughput Maximization for Different Spreading Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Robert

    for signal-to-interference threshold from 5 dB to 10 dB and spreading factor values of 256, 64, 16, and 4 Erlang capacity based on the Lost Call Held (LCH) model as described in [4]. This algorithm calculates expression of Erlang capacity for a single type of traffic loading and compare analytical results

  11. Paper No. : 0317 LATERAL SPREADING DURING CENTRIFUGE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Stuart

    Paper No. : 0317 LATERAL SPREADING DURING CENTRIFUGE MODEL EARTHQUAKES Stuart K. Haigh1 , S sand marker lines within centrifuge models. A series of dynamic centrifuge model tests have been these free boundaries from previous earthquakes. Dynamic centrifuge modelling was carried out using sloping

  12. An Efficient Local Strategy to Control Information Spreading in Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Anoop

    2015-01-01

    In social networks, control of rumor spread is an active area of research. SIR model is generally used to study the rumor dynamics in network while considering the rumor as an epidemic. In disease spreading model, epidemic is controlled by removing central nodes in the network. Full network information is needed for such removal. To have the information of complete network is difficult proposition. As a consequence, the search of an algorithm that may control epidemic without needing global information is a matter of great interest. In this paper, an immunization strategy is proposed that uses only local information available at a node, viz. degree of the node and average degree of its neighbour nodes. Proposed algorithm has been evaluated for scale-free network using SIR model. Numerical results show that proposed method has less complexity and gives significantly better results in comparison with other strategies while using only local information.

  13. Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Assessing the Risk of Invasive Spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    With, Kimberly A.

    Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Assessing the Risk of Invasive Spread in Fragmented Landscapes in the field of landscape ecology, provide a tool for assessing the risk of invasive spread in fragmented landscapes. A percolation-based analysis of the potential for invasive spread in fragmented landscapes

  14. Approximations for Bit Error Probabilities in SSMA Communication Systems Using Spreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Gerhard

    Approximations for Bit Error Probabilities in SSMA Communication Systems Using Spreading Sequences@mi.uni-erlangen.de Abstract-- In previous research, we considered SSMA (spread spectrum multiple access) communication systems of spread spectrum multiple access (SSMA) communication systems, the standard Gaussian approximation (SGA

  15. Efficiency and Energy Spread in Laser-Wakefield Acceleration A. J. W. Reitsma,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Efficiency and Energy Spread in Laser-Wakefield Acceleration A. J. W. Reitsma,1 R. A. Cairns,2 R 2004; published 4 March 2005) The theoretical limits on efficiency and energy spread of the laser. An inherent trade-off between energy spread and efficiency exists. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.085004 PACS

  16. Spread of North American wind-dispersed trees in future environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yanping

    LETTER Spread of North American wind-dispersed trees in future environments Ran Nathan,1 * Nir a formidable challenge to be confronted. We modelled the spread of North American wind- dispersed trees species, predicted wind-driven spread will match future climate changes, conditioned on seed abscission

  17. Efficient reconstruction of transmission probabilities in a spreading process from partial observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lokhov, Andrey Y

    2015-01-01

    An important problem of reconstruction of diffusion network and transmission probabilities from the data has attracted a considerable attention in the past several years. A number of recent papers introduced efficient algorithms for the estimation of spreading parameters, based on the maximization of the likelihood of observed cascades, assuming that the full information for all the nodes in the network is available. In this work, we focus on a more realistic and restricted scenario, in which only a partial information on the cascades is available: either the set of activation times for a limited number of nodes, or the states of nodes for a subset of observation times. To tackle this problem, we first introduce a framework based on the maximization of the likelihood of the incomplete diffusion trace. However, we argue that the computation of this incomplete likelihood is a computationally hard problem, and show that a fast and robust reconstruction of transmission probabilities in sparse networks can be achi...

  18. Golden Spread Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectric JumpAtlasBridge Strategies Jump to:Spread

  19. Thermonuclear Flame Spreading on Rapidly Spinning Neutron Stars: Indications of the Coriolis Force?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudip Bhattacharyya; Tod E. Strohmayer

    2007-08-27

    Millisecond period brightness oscillations during the intensity rise of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are likely caused by an azimuthally asymmetric, expanding burning region on the stellar surface. The time evolution of the oscillation amplitude during the intensity rise encodes information on how the thermonuclear flames spread across the stellar surface. This process depends on properties of the accreted burning layer, surface fluid motions, and the surface magnetic field structure, and thus can provide insight into these stellar properties. We present two examples of bursts from different sources that show a decrease in oscillation amplitude during the intensity rise. Using theoretical modeling, we demonstrate that the observed amplitude evolution of these bursts is not well described by a uniformly expanding circular burning region. We further show that by including in our model the salient aspects of the Coriolis force (as described by Spitkovsky, Levin, and Ushomirsky) we can qualitatively reproduce the observed evolution curves. Our modeling shows that the evolutionary structure of burst oscillation amplitude is sensitive to the nature of flame spreading, while the actual amplitude values can be very useful to constrain some source parameters.

  20. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  1. Classification of Message Spreading in a Heterogeneous Social Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jendoubi, Siwar; Liétard, Ludovic; Yaghlane, Boutheina Ben

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, social networks such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn become increasingly popular. In fact, they introduced new habits, new ways of communication and they collect every day several information that have different sources. Most existing research works fo-cus on the analysis of homogeneous social networks, i.e. we have a single type of node and link in the network. However, in the real world, social networks offer several types of nodes and links. Hence, with a view to preserve as much information as possible, it is important to consider so-cial networks as heterogeneous and uncertain. The goal of our paper is to classify the social message based on its spreading in the network and the theory of belief functions. The proposed classifier interprets the spread of messages on the network, crossed paths and types of links. We tested our classifier on a real word network that we collected from Twitter, and our experiments show the performance of our belief classifier.

  2. Fusion rate enhancement due to energy spread of colliding nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fiorentini; C. Rolfs; F. L. Villante; B. Ricci

    2002-10-24

    Experimental results for sub-barrier nuclear fusion reactions show cross section enhancements with respect to bare nuclei which are generally larger than those expected according to electron screening calculations. We point out that energy spread of target or projectile nuclei is a mechanism which generally provides fusion enhancement. We present a general formula for calculating the enhancement factor and we provide quantitative estimate for effects due to thermal motion, vibrations inside atomic, molecular or crystal system, and due to finite beam energy width. All these effects are marginal at the energies which are presently measurable, however they have to be considered in future experiments at still lower energies. This study allows to exclude several effects as possible explanation of the observed anomalous fusion enhancements, which remain a mistery.

  3. Exploring the complex pattern of information spreading in online blog communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Sen; Tang, Shaoting; Zheng, Zhiming; Makse, Hernan A

    2015-01-01

    Information spreading in online social communities has attracted tremendous attention due to its utmost practical values in applications. Despite that several individual-level diffusion data have been investigated, we still lack the detailed understanding of the spreading pattern of information. Here, by comparing information flows and social links in a blog community, we find that the diffusion processes are induced by three different spreading mechanisms: social spreading, self-promotion and broadcast. Although numerous previous studies have employed epidemic spreading models to simulate information diffusion, we observe that such models fail to reproduce the realistic diffusion pattern. In respect to users behaviors, strikingly, we find that most users would stick to one specific diffusion mechanism. Moreover, our observations indicate that the social spreading is not only crucial for the structure of diffusion trees, but also capable of inducing more subsequent individuals to acquire the information. Our ...

  4. Impact of picolitre droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces with ultra-low spreading ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, P.S.; Berson, A.; Talbot, E.L.; Wood, T.J.; Schofield, W.C.E.; Bain, C.D.; Badyal, J.P.S.

    2011-01-01

    :24 1 IMPACT OF PICOLITRE DROPLETS ON SUPERHYDROPHOBIC SURFACES WITH ULTRA-LOW SPREADING RATIOS P. S. Brown, A. Berson, E. L. Talbot, T. J. Wood, W. C. E. Schofield, C. D. Bain†, and J. P. S. Badyal†* Department of Chemistry Science... the dynamics of wetting to be precisely controlled. Final spreading ratios as low as 0.63 can be achieved. Comparison of the maximum spreading ratio and droplet oscillation frequencies with models described in the literature shows that both are found...

  5. Static pushover analyses of pile groups in liquefied and laterally spreading ground in centrifuge tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenberg, Scott J; Boulanger, R W; Kutter, Bruce L; Chang, Dongdong

    2007-01-01

    spreading ground during centrifuge tests. ” J. Geotech.and Liu, L. ?1995?. “Centrifuge modeling of liquefactionGonzales, L. ?2005?. “Centrifuge modeling of permeability

  6. Signature of wide-spread clumping in B supergiant winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinja, Raman

    2010-01-01

    We seek to establish additional observational signatures of the effects of clumping in OB star winds. The action of clumping on strategic wind-formed spectral lines is tested to steer the development of models for clumped winds and thus improve the reliability of mass-loss determinations for massive stars.The SiIV 1400 resonance line doublets of B0 to B5 supergiants are analysed using empirical line-synthesis models. The focus is on decoding information on wind clumping from measurements of ratios of the radial optical depths (tau_(rad)(w)) of the red and blue components of the SiIV doublet. We exploit in particular the fact that the two doublet components are decoupled and formed independently for targets with relatively low wind terminal velocities. Line-synthesis analyses reveal that the mean ratio of tau_(rad)(w) of the blue to red SiIV components are rarely close to the canonical value of ~ 2 (expected from atomic constants), and spread instead over a range of values between ~1 and 2. These results are i...

  7. GIS-Based Epidemiological Modeling of an Emerging Forest Disease: Spread of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    247 GIS-Based Epidemiological Modeling of an Emerging Forest Disease: Spread of Sudden Oak Death applied in a GIS to real-world wildland landscapes. In this paper, we present and evaluate a GIS model was implemented (1990-2005) in a GIS to simulate disease spread across California at a spatial

  8. A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice Mark Sussman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Mark

    A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice Mark Sussman Department) The spreading of oil underneath a sheet of ice is computed using an adaptive level set method for incompressible of a body of oil under ice in water. The computational models are used to make further observations

  9. A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice Mark Sussman Department) Abstract The spreading of oil underneath a sheet of ice is computed using an adaptive level set method the final steady profile of a body of oil under ice in water. The computational models are used to make

  10. Short Paper: OFDM in Deep Water Acoustic Channels with Extremely Long Delay Spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    Short Paper: OFDM in Deep Water Acoustic Channels with Extremely Long Delay Spread Zhaohui Wang ABSTRACT Deep water horizontal channels usually have very long de- lay spreads relative to shallow water-block-interference (IBI) in the received signals. In this paper, we consider the application of ZP-OFDM in deep water

  11. Spread spectrum communication system with chaotic frequency A. R. Volkovskii,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsimring, Lev S.

    Spread spectrum communication system with chaotic frequency modulation A. R. Volkovskii,a L. Sh spread spectrum communication system utilizing chaotic frequency modulation of sinusoidal signals-based communication system. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1942327 The ability of chaotic

  12. Slug pellet spreading: the double-disc performances available with a single disc spreader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Slug pellet spreading: the double-disc performances available with a single disc spreader D for slug pellets application. The principal aim of this paper is to show the chosen way to reach spreading pellets 1 Introduction In France, slugs are considered as a harmful destroyer for crops. Their activities

  13. Quantifying fluctuations in market liquidity: Analysis of the bid-ask spread Vasiliki Plerou,* Parameswaran Gopikrishnan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying fluctuations in market liquidity: Analysis of the bid-ask spread Vasiliki Plerou the statistical features of the bid-ask spread offers the possibility of understanding some aspects of market liquidity. Using quote data for the 116 most frequently traded stocks on the New York Stock Exchange over

  14. Spreading of thermonuclear flames on the neutron star in SAX J1808.4-3658: an observational tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudip Bhattacharyya; Tod E. Strohmayer

    2006-04-03

    We analyse archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) proportional counter array (PCA) data of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the 2002 outburst of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658. We present evidence of nonmonotonic variations of oscillation frequency during burst rise, and correlations among the time evolution of the oscillation frequency, amplitude, and the inferred burning region area. We also discuss that the amplitude and burning region area evolutions are consistent with thermonuclear flame spreading on the neutron star surface. Based on this discussion, we infer that for the 2002 Oct. 15 thermonuclear burst, the ignition likely occured in the mid-latitudes, the burning region took ~ 0.2 s to nearly encircle the equatorial region of the neutron star, and after that the lower amplitude oscillation originated from the remaining asymmetry of the burning front in the same hemisphere where the burst ignited. Our observational findings and theoretical discussion indicate that studies of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during burst rise can provide a powerful tool to understand thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron star surfaces under extreme physical conditions.

  15. Endemic models for the spread of infectious diseases with arbitrarily ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIAM (#1) 1035 1999 Jan 20 12:53:14

    2000-10-03

    have general length distributions and disease survival functions, the different time ..... In order to describe the duration of the various stages and the related disease ...... Approaches to Problems in Resource Management and Epidemiology, ...

  16. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Moore, James A. (Powell, TN)

    2012-01-03

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  17. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F; Moore, James A

    2012-10-30

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  18. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Moore, James A. (Powell, TN)

    2011-01-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  19. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN) [Loudon, TN; Moore, James A. (Powell, TN) [Powell, TN

    2009-12-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  20. PHY and MAC Layer Design of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Based Smart Meter Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The smart grid is a combined process of revitalizing the traditional power grid applications and introducing new applications to improve the efficiency of power generation, transmission and distribution. This can be achieved by leveraging advanced communication and networking technologies. Therefore the selection of the appropriate communication technology for different smart grid applications has been debated a lot in the recent past. After comparing different possible technologies, a recent research study has arrived at a conclusion that the 3G cellular technology is the right choice for distribution side smart grid applications like smart metering, advanced distribution automation and demand response management system. In this paper, we argue that the current 3G/4G cellular technologies are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications and propose a Hybrid Spread Spectrum (HSS) based Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as one of the alternatives to 3G/4G technologies. We present a preliminary PHY and MAC layer design of a HSS based AMI network and evaluate their performance using matlab and NS2 simulations. Also, we propose a time hierarchical scheme that can significantly reduce the volume of random access traffic generated during blackouts and the delay in power outage reporting.

  1. Determining System Parameters for Optimal Performance of Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Xiao [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their use in military communications because they accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence (DS) modulation with "fast" frequency hopping (FFH), denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, an optimization problem is formulated that maximizes the DS/FFH communication system performance in terms of probability of bit error and solves for the system design parameters. The objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. System design parameters of interest are the length of the DS code sequence, number of frequency hopping channels, number of channels corrupted by wide-band jamming, and number of hops per bit. The proposed formulation takes into account the effects from wide-band and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference and/or varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician multipath fading. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the method s viability.

  2. VR/Urban: Spread.gun Design Process and Challenges in Developing a Shared Encounter for Media Faades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornecker, Eva

    VR/Urban: Spread.gun ­ Design Process and Challenges in Developing a Shared Encounter for Media intervention tool called Spread.gun, which was created for the Media Façade Festival 2008 in Berlin. Main social change. In this paper, we discuss our Spread.gun installation as a case study exemplifying

  3. Energy spread reduction of electron beams produced via laser wakefield acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Electron Beam Energy Spread Reduction bywake?eld-accelerated electron beams,” Phys. Rev. Lett. (S. M. Hooker, “Gev electron beams from a centimetre-scale

  4. A Hidden Markov Chain Model for the Term Structure of Bond Credit Risk Spreads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, L; Allen, David E; Morkel-Kingsbury, N

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a Markov chain model for the term structure and credit risk spreads of bond processes. It allows dependency between the stochastic process modeling the interest rate and the Markov chain process describing ...

  5. Beam energy spread in FERMI@elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A

    2008-01-01

    spread in FERMI@elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeamcathode area in the electron guns know in the literature asmost visible within the electron gun where the electron beam

  6. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator, Undulator, Electron Beam Diagnostic PACS: 52 .of an undulator-based electron beam diagnostic to be used inElectron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic M.S.

  7. The spread of violent civil conflict : rare state-driven, and preventable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Nathan Wolcott

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation advances and tests an explanation for the spread of violent civil conflict from one state to another. The fear of such "substate conflict contagion" is frequently invoked by American policymakers as a ...

  8. The tectonics and three-dimensional structure of spreading centers--microearthquake studies and tomographic inversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, Douglas R

    1987-01-01

    Two-thirds of the Earth's surface has been formed along a global system of spreading centers that are presently manifested in several different structural forms, including the classic rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, ...

  9. Auxiliary material for Observation of the Spread of Slow Deformation in Greece Following the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Auxiliary material for Observation of the Spread of Slow Deformation in Greece Following of Engineering Seismology and Earthquake Engineering ITSAK, P.O. Box 53, 55102 Thessaloniki, Greece 4 Université

  10. Catalysts of conflict : how refugee crises lead to the spread of civil war

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lischer, Sarah Kenyon

    2002-01-01

    The spread of civil war due to refugee crises has occurred repeatedly throughout history. In some refugee crises, the sending state pursues the refugees, subjecting them to military attack. In other cases, militant exiles ...

  11. Reviewed research article Crustal deformation in Iceland: Plate spreading and earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Árnadóttir, Þóra

    Reviewed research article Crustal deformation in Iceland: Plate spreading and earthquake, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavík, Iceland 2 Physics Department, Icelandic Meteorological Office, Reykjavík, Iceland 3 GPS Research Center, Wuhan University 129 Luoyu Road

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial spread of an alien tree species in a heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petite, Samuel

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial spread of an alien tree species in a heterogeneous forest landscape the observed invasion patterns of an alien tree species, Prunus serotina Ehrh., in a heterogeneous managed

  13. Landau damping effects and evolutions of energy spread in small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yingjie [Michigan State University; Wang, Langfa [SLAC; Lin, Fanglei [JLAB

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the Landau damping effects on the microwave instability of a coasting long bunch in an isochronous ring due to finite energy spread and emittance. Our two-dimensional (2D) dispersion relation gives more accurate predictions of the microwave instability growth rates of short-wavelength perturbations than the conventional 1D formula. The long-term evolution of energy spread is also studied by measurements and simulations.

  14. Wake fields and energy spread for the eRHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, A.; Kayran, D.

    2011-10-16

    Wake fields in high-current ERLs can cause significant beam quality degradations. Here we summarize effects of coherent synchrotron radiation, resistive wall, accelerating cavities and wall roughness for ERL parameters of the eRHIC project. A possibility of compensation of such correlated energy spread is also presented. An emphasis in the discussion is made on the suppression of coherent synchrotron radiation due to shielding and a possible reduction of wall roughness effects for realistic surfaces. In this report we discuss the wake fields with a focus on their effect on the energy spread of the beam. Other effects of wake fields are addressed elsewhere. An energy spread builds up during a pass though a very long beam transport in the eRHIC ERL under design. Such energy spread become important when beam is decelerated to low energy, and needs to be corrected. Several effects, such as Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR), Resistive Wall (RW), accelerating RF cavities (RF) and Wall Roughness (WR) were considered. In this paper, we briefly summarize major contributions to energy spread from the wake fields for eRHIC parameters, and present possible energy spread compensation for decelerated beam. In the rest of the report we discuss effects which we believe are suppressed for the eRHIC parameters.

  15. Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_past_wti.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1 2011NovemberTexas

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2009_2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1 2011NovemberTexas09

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2011_2012.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1

  19. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, IIT Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  20. Spreading of crude petroleum in brash ice; Effects of oil`s physical properties and water current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayed, M.; Kotlyar, L.S.; Sparks, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    Experiments were conducted in a refrigerated, circulating current flume to examine crude oil spreading in brash ice. Amauligak, Hibernia and Norman Wells crudes were tested. Measurements of the physical properties of the oils were also conducted, including: surface and interfacial tensions as well as viscosities. Spreading coefficients were calculated from measured surface and interfacial tensions. Results were obtained for original and weathered oils. For the spreading tests, spill volumes up to 3 liters and water currents up to 0.55 m/s were used. Tests were done using both fresh water ice and saline ice. Slick dimensions were measured, and modes of oil spreading were observed. Slick dimensions depended on oil type, but were not influenced by water current. Oils of high spreading coefficient and low viscosity spread over larger areas than those with low spreading coefficient and high viscosity.

  1. Using convolutional decoding to improve time delay and phase estimation in digital communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Mason, John J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-01-26

    The time delay and/or phase of a communication signal received by a digital communication receiver can be estimated based on a convolutional decoding operation that the communication receiver performs on the received communication signal. If the original transmitted communication signal has been spread according to a spreading operation, a corresponding despreading operation can be integrated into the convolutional decoding operation.

  2. Upper bounds on wavepacket spreading for random Jacobi matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlana Jitomirskaya; Hermann Schulz-Baldes

    2007-02-15

    A method is presented for proving upper bounds on the moments of the position operator when the dynamics of quantum wavepackets is governed by a random (possibly correlated) Jacobi matrix. As an application, one obtains sharp upper bounds on the diffusion exponents for random polymer models, coinciding with the lower bounds obtained in a prior work. The second application is an elementary argument (not using multiscale analysis or the Aizenman-Molchanov method) showing that under the condition of uniformly positive Lyapunov exponents, the moments of the position operator grow at most logarithmically in time.

  3. Production of low axial energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.H.Y.

    1998-05-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as: ion projection lithography (IPL) and focused ion beams for the next generation lithographic tools and nuclear science experiments such as radioactive ion beam production. The axial ion energy spread for multicusp source is approximately 6 eV which is too large for IPL and radioactive ion beam applications. The addition of a magnetic filter which consists of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably. The reduction is due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. Axial ion energy spread of the filament driven ion source has been measured using three different techniques. In all cases, it was found to be less than 2 eV. Energy spread of the radio frequency (RF) driven source has also been explored, and it was found to be less than 3 eV with the proper RF-shielding. A new multicusp source configuration has been designed and constructed to further reduce the energy spread. To achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution, a cylindrical magnetic filter has been designed and constructed for a 2-cm-diameter source. This new source configuration, the co-axial source, is new in its kind. The energy spread in this source has been measured to be a record low of 0.6 eV. Because of the novelty of this device, some plasma parameters inside the source have been studied. Langmuir probe has been used to measure the plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density distribution.

  4. Simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas on water. Final report, December 12, 1978-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.R.; Reid, R.C.

    1981-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the boiling and spreading of liquid nitrogen, liquid methane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water in a one-dimensional configuration. Primary emphasis was placed on the LPG studies. Experimental work involved the design and construction of a spill/spread/boil apparatus which permitted the measurement of spreading and local boil-off rates. With the equations of continuity and momentum transfer, a mathematical model was developed to describe the boiling-spreading phenomena of cryogens spilled on water. The model accounted for a decrease in the density of the cryogenic liquid due to bubble formation. The boiling and spreading rates of LPG were found to be the same as those of pure propane. An LPG spill was characterized by the very rapid and violent boiling initially and highly irregular ice formation on the water surface. The measured local boil-off rates of LPG agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions from a moving boundary heat transfer model. The spreading velocity of an LPG spill was found to be constant and determined by the size of the distributor opening. The maximum spreading distance was found to be unaffected by the spilling rate. These observations can be explained by assuming that the ice formation on the water surface controls the spreading of LPG spills. While the mathematical model did not predict the spreading front adequately, it predicted the maximum spreading distance reasonably well.

  5. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-10-14

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  6. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-05-20

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  7. Events Determine Spreading Patterns: Information Transmission via Internal and External Influences on Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Sun, Gui-Quan; Hui, Pak Ming

    2015-01-01

    Recently, information transmission models motivated by the classical epidemic propagation, have been applied to a wide-range of social systems, generally assume that information mainly transmits among individuals via peer-to-peer interactions on social networks. In this paper, we consider one more approach for users to get information: the out-of-social-network influence. Empirical analyses of eight typical events' diffusion on a very large micro-blogging system, \\emph{Sina Weibo}, show that the external influence has significant impact on information spreading along with social activities. In addition, we propose a theoretical model to interpret the spreading process via both internal and external channels, considering three essential properties: (i) memory effect; (ii) role of spreaders; and (iii) non-redundancy of contacts. Experimental and mathematical results indicate that the information indeed spreads much quicker and broader with mutual effects of the internal and external influences. More importantly...

  8. Methods and apparatuses for self-generating fault-tolerant keys in spread-spectrum systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Subramanian, Vijayarangam

    2015-12-15

    Self-generating fault-tolerant keys for use in spread-spectrum systems are disclosed. At a communication device, beacon signals are received from another communication device and impulse responses are determined from the beacon signals. The impulse responses are circularly shifted to place a largest sample at a predefined position. The impulse responses are converted to a set of frequency responses in a frequency domain. The frequency responses are shuffled with a predetermined shuffle scheme to develop a set of shuffled frequency responses. A set of phase differences is determined as a difference between an angle of the frequency response and an angle of the shuffled frequency response at each element of the corresponding sets. Each phase difference is quantized to develop a set of secret-key quantized phases and a set of spreading codes is developed wherein each spreading code includes a corresponding phase of the set of secret-key quantized phases.

  9. Methods and apparatuses for self-generating fault-tolerant keys in spread-spectrum systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Subramanian, Vijayarangam

    2015-12-22

    Self-generating fault-tolerant keys for use in spread-spectrum systems are disclosed. At a communication device, beacon signals are received from another communication device and impulse responses are determined from the beacon signals. The impulse responses are circularly shifted to place a largest sample at a predefined position. The impulse responses are converted to a set of frequency responses in a frequency domain. The frequency responses are shuffled with a predetermined shuffle scheme to develop a set of shuffled frequency responses. A set of phase differences is determined as a difference between an angle of the frequency response and an angle of the shuffled frequency response at each element of the corresponding sets. Each phase difference is quantized to develop a set of secret-key quantized phases and a set of spreading codes is developed wherein each spreading code includes a corresponding phase of the set of secret-key quantized phases.

  10. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  11. Predictive study on the risk of malaria spreading due to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Masaji

    1996-12-31

    Global warming will bring about a temperature elevation, and the habitat of vectors of infectious diseases, such as malaria and dengue fever, will spread into subtropical or temperate zone. The purpose of this study is to simulate the spreading of these diseases through reexamination of existing data and collection of some additional information by field survey. From these data, the author will establish the relationship between meteorological conditions, vector density and malaria occurrence. And then he will simulate and predict the malaria epidemics in case of temperature elevation in southeast Asia and Japan.

  12. R Supplement R.1 First Things First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . soiltemp - A 64 × 36 matrix of surface soil temperatures. Chapter 2 oil - Crude oil, WTI spot price FOB (in weekly spot price FOB (in cents per gallon) over the same time period as oil. varve - Sedimentary

  13. Laminin isoforms differentially regulate adhesion, spreading, proliferation, and ERK activation of h1 integrin-null cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    Laminin isoforms differentially regulate adhesion, spreading, proliferation, and ERK activation signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, whereas all these responses occurred in response to adhesion

  14. 1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Jerome A.

    1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal] Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing 6 anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative 7 to the ambient groundwater

  15. Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative to the ambient groundwater. The buoyant plume

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting regional spread of non-native species using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    that are transported by ocean currents. Given the importance of currents in steering these propagules, ocean- ographic- ingly made use of oceanographic circulation models to estimate currents and track species dispersal models designed to estimate and forecast currents could be valuable for forecasting the spread (Queiroga

  17. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ENERGY SPREAD IN A SPACE-CHARGE DOMINATED ELECTRON BEAM *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valfells, Ágúst

    EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ENERGY SPREAD IN A SPACE-CHARGE DOMINATED ELECTRON BEAM * Y. Cui , Y. Zou, A. Experimental Setup Electron Beam Ground Shielding High Voltage Cylinder Retarding Mesh Collector High Voltage. Valfells, I. Haber, R. Kishek, M. Reiser, P. G. O'Shea Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied

  18. Assessing fire risk using Monte Carlo simulations of fire spread Yohay Carmel a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing fire risk using Monte Carlo simulations of fire spread Yohay Carmel a, *, Shlomit Paz b of Haifa, Haifa, Israel 1. Introduction Fires are a major source of forest destruction in the Mediterranean., 2000). Mediterranean fires are largely determined by climatic conditions; long, dry summers with high

  19. Job Opportunities through Entertainment: Virally Spread Speech-Based Services for Low-Literate Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahore Uni. of Mgmt. Sciences Lahore, Pakistan {farhan.haq, zain.tariq, umar}@lums.edu.pk ABSTRACT We in 2011, we report on its first large-scale sustained deployment. In 24/7 operation in Pakistan since May among low- skilled office workers in Lahore, Pakistan, in 3 weeks Polly spread to 2,000 users and logged

  20. The reciprocity properties of geometrical spreading Roel Snieder1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    , the acoustic wave equation or the elastic wave equation satisfy reciprocity. This implies that when a point-geometric approximation of the acoustic wave equation satis¢es reciprocity. The analysis is based on the equations for the geometrical spreading for the acoustic wave equation therefore also hold for the elastic wave equation

  1. Dynamics of capillary spreading along hydrophilic microstripes Anton A. Darhuber and Sandra M. Troian*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troian, Sandra M.

    interesting approaches for fluid migration and flow control in confining networks. The capillary spreading of liquids on corrugated surfaces can be enhanced by capillary migration and wicking into narrow surface speed as a function of distance is proportional to the groove depth 12,15 . In this paper we consider

  2. Block Spreading for MUI/ISI-Resilient Generalized Multi-carrier CDMA with Multirate Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    1 of 5 Block Spreading for MUI/ISI-Resilient Generalized Multi-carrier CDMA with Multirate) and intersymbol interference (ISI) arising due to wireless multipath propagation, motivate well multirate wideband Quality of Service (QoS) and rate- scalability, have low complexity, and exhibit resilience to MUI and ISI

  3. Recent Advances in Modelling of Liquefaction and Lateral Spreading S.P.G. Madabhushi*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Stuart

    59 Recent Advances in Modelling of Liquefaction and Lateral Spreading S.P.G. Madabhushi* , B Teymur, SK Haigh and AJ Brennan Department of Engineering, Schofield Centrifuge Centre, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UNITED KINGDOM, mspg1@eng.cam.ac.uk Use of geotechnical centrifuges to investigate

  4. A simple bioclogging model that accounts for spatial spreading of bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaret, Laurent

    A simple bioclogging model that accounts for spatial spreading of bacteria HJ Eberla , L Demaretb is presented that accounts for spatial expansion of the bacterial popu- lation in the soil. The bacteria move harmful environ- mental factors and mechanical washout. Naturally occurring bacteria are a major

  5. Yarkovsky-Driven Spreading of the Eureka Family of Mars Trojans Matija Cuk1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarkovsky-Driven Spreading of the Eureka Family of Mars Trojans Matija ´Cuk1 , Apostolos A orbital grouping that was affected by a negative acceleration (i.e. one against the orbital motion above about 25 (Murray and Dermott, 1999). In our Solar System, only Jupiter, Neptune and Mars are known

  6. LONG EXPOSURE POINT SPREAD FUNCTION ESTIMATION FROM SOLAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS LOOP DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astronomer, National Solar Observatory, New Mexico, USA Dr. Haimin Wang, Dissertation Co-Advisor DateABSTRACT LONG EXPOSURE POINT SPREAD FUNCTION ESTIMATION FROM SOLAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS LOOP DATA during solar observations due to the lack of point sources in the field-of-view. Moreover, the highly

  7. Lifeasweknowit To understand the human genome, researchers must spread their wings to all branches of life.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    and a worm to its ENCODE project, which aims to catalogue all the functional parts of the human genome is moving more forcefully into purely human genomics. The biggest new projects recently announcedLifeasweknowit To understand the human genome, researchers must spread their wings to all branches

  8. New Florida Cattle Identification Program to Protect Florida's Cattle Industry; Mitigate Spread of Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    New Florida Cattle Identification Program to Protect Florida's Cattle Industry; Mitigate Spread. In the past, Florida cattle have struggled with animal disease outbreaks, such as Brucellosis and Tuberculosis and those diseases, present in other states, still threaten our cattle today. The Florida Department

  9. Successful spread of a biocontrol agent reveals a biosecurity failure: elucidating long distance invasion pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    Successful spread of a biocontrol agent reveals a biosecurity failure: elucidating long distance to successful invasion. In this study, the dispersal of a classical biological control agent, the mymarid egg. Survey results suggest that invasive orga- nisms, like deliberately released biological control agents

  10. Doppler Spread Estimation for Wireless OFDM Tevfik Yucek, Ramy M. A. Tannious, and Huseyin Arslan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values in Rayleigh fading channels. I. INTRODUCTION OFDM has been applied and licensed-exempt bands, various delay spreads, asymmetric traffic loads in downlink and uplink and wide considerably within one OFDM symbol because of high MSS mobility, orthogonality between subcarriers is lost

  11. Observation of the spread of slow deformation in Greece following the breakup of the slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Observation of the spread of slow deformation in Greece following the breakup of the slab Virginie Engineering, ITSAK, Thessaloniki, Greece, 4 Université de Savoie, ISTerre, Le Bourget du Lac, France, 5 analyze here a "storm" of earthquakes in Greece and show that their interaction provides remarkable

  12. Examination of wind speed thresholds for vorticity-driven lateral fire spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    , to specifically consider the effect of wind speed in generating the fire-induced vorticity necessary to drive wind speed, below which the prevailing winds are too weak to drive the vorticity-generating interactionExamination of wind speed thresholds for vorticity-driven lateral fire spread J.J. Sharples a , C

  13. Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries: U of A grad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao "Howard"

    Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries: U of A grad EDMONTON Volcanic ash, which can provide valuable snapshots of Earth's history, appears to drift much farther than of science that uses layers of "tephra," or ash, to link and date events in Earth's history. When a volcano

  14. A Spreading Activation Framework for Ontology-enhanced Adaptive Information Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Spreading Activation Framework for Ontology-enhanced Adaptive Information Access Md Maruf Hasan for Ontology-enhanced Adaptive Information Access Md Maruf Hasan, Enrico Motta, John B. Domingue, Simon. Expert's feedback is captured and the network weights are continuously adapted. This framework

  15. Wakefield Induced Correlated Energy Spread and Emittance Growth at TTF FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Wakefield Induced Correlated Energy Spread and Emittance Growth at TTF FEL Feng ZHOU DESY) at DESY. During FEL operations, the longitudinal and transverse wakefields which are generated by vacuum and emittance growth at the TTF FEL of phase I and II. 1 Introduction The Free Electron Laser at the TESLA Test

  16. Chemical Wave Packet Propagation, Reflection, and Spreading Lingfa Yang and Irving R. Epstein*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    or away from an initiating perturbation, are found in a reaction-diffusion model with a finite wave. The phase velocity, group velocity, and spreading velocity calculated by linear stability analysis packets in reaction-diffusion systems are rarely seen, even though wave packets have been intensively

  17. Chemical Wave Packet Propagation, Reflection, and Spreading Lingfa Yang and Irving R. Epstein*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Lingfa

    Chemical Wave Packet Propagation, Reflection, and Spreading Lingfa Yang and Irving R. Epstein 02454-9110 ReceiVed: May 8, 2002; In Final Form: July 10, 2002 Chemical waves can travel in well-defined packets. Two types of phase wave packets, distinguished by whether their component waves move toward

  18. Icelandic rhythmics: Annual modulation of land elevation and plate spreading by snow load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    Icelandic rhythmics: Annual modulation of land elevation and plate spreading by snow load Ronni to annual snow load in Iceland. The load is modeled using Green's functions for an elastic halfspace and a simple sinusoidal load history on Iceland's four largest ice caps. We derive E = 40 ± 15 GPa as a minimum

  19. Energy Loss and Energy Spread Growth in a Planar Undulator(LCC-0086)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J

    2003-10-07

    The change in beam energy spread due to transmission through a long, planar undulator is calculated. This change is shown to be gaussian as expected from the central limit theorem and large number of photons emitted per electron. These results are compared with Saldin et al. [2] expressions. Numerical results for the case of the TESLA beam and for an NLC beam are given.

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Species diversity and drivers of spread of alien fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Species diversity and drivers of spread of alien fungi (sensu lato) in Europe February 2009 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract A first comprehensive inventory of alien at the two spatial scales. Some taxonomic/phylogenetic orders were shown to be over-represented in alien

  1. Spreading of EGF Receptor Activity into EGF-free Regions and Molecular Therapies of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrit Jentsch; Reiner Kree

    2008-03-18

    The primary activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has become a prominent target for molecular therapies against several forms of cancer. But despite considerable progress during the last years, many of its aspects remain poorly understood. Experiments on lateral spreading of receptor activity into ligand-free regions challenge the current standard models of EGFR activation. Here, we propose and study a theoretical model, which explains spreading into ligand-free regions without introducing any new, unknown kinetic parameters. The model exhibits bistability of activity, induced by a generic reaction mechanism, which consists of activation via dimerization and deactivation via a Michaelis-Menten reaction. It possesses slow propagating front solutions and faster initial transients. We analyze relevant experiments and find that they are in quantitative accordance with the fast initial modes of spreading, but not with the slow propagating front. We point out that lateral spreading of activity is linked to pathological levels of persistent receptor activity as observed in cancer cells and exemplify uses of this link for the design and quick evaluation of molecular therapies targeting primary activation of EGFR.

  2. Observational Estimates of Entrainment and Vertical Salt Flux in the Interior of a Spreading River Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    Observational Estimates of Entrainment and Vertical Salt Flux in the Interior of a Spreading River@ocean.washington.edu #12;Abstract: Observational estimates of entrainment and vertical salt flux into the tidally- pulsed are used to determine the plume depth and entrainment velocity throughout the experiment. This approach

  3. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, James T.

    Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species Ganesh P of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms. australis stands expanded in size by 6­35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over

  4. Spark Spread

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2, 2014 Smith Named asInitiativesApache SparkSpark

  5. Towards predictive simulation of wildfire spread at regional scale using ensemble-based data assimilation to correct the fire front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tation properties and wind conditions based on Rothermel's model; a series of observations of the fire;1. INTRODUCTION Computer-based wildfire spread modeling has emerged during the past two decades as a powerful toolTowards predictive simulation of wildfire spread at regional scale using ensemble-based data

  6. Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies in the Perth Abyssal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granot, Roi

    Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies the early spreading history between India and Australia during the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana. However from Australia with Greater India during initial breakup at ~130 Ma, then rifted from India following

  7. RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site Proposal for Hotspot-Influenced Oceanic Spreading Centers: Iceland and the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey Ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site Proposal for Hotspot-Influenced Oceanic Spreading Centers: Iceland and the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey Ridges Summary We propose that the Reykjanes Ridge, Iceland, and the Kolbeinsey efforts have focused on spreading rate as the primary variable, the Iceland-MAR system offers

  8. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Half spreading rate (mm per year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    60° 30° 0° 30° 60° 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Half spreading rate (mm per year) Pacific Ocean you increase the speed of a continent ploughing through Earth's viscous, churning mantle? Kumar et al palaeomagnetic data and rates of seafloor spreading, and sets India apart from all its neighbours. Africa, Antarc

  9. Social Media: Weather-Ready Wednesday Please help the NWS spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social Media: Weather-Ready Wednesday #WRW Please help the NWS spread these important safety build a WeatherReady Nation. WeatherReady Wednesday is a National Weather Service initiative to help spread weather safety messages each week. Each week you can pick a different topic to share. It can

  10. Diffusive spreading of time-dependent pressures in elastic microfluidic Bernhard K. Wunderlich, Ulrich A. Kleinger and Andreas R. Bausch*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For oscillatory flows, the channel acts as a low-pass filter with a cutoff frequency ucutoff ¼ 2pDplÀ2 , so on the elastic properties of PDMS have been proposed for the construction of flow-regula- tory devices,2,3 valves of microfluidic devices for fluid control comprising mixing, valves and droplet posi- tions.15,16 While membrane

  11. Revealing latent factors of temporal networks for mesoscale intervention in epidemic spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Barrat, Alain; Cattuto, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    The customary perspective to reason about epidemic mitigation in temporal networks hinges on the identification of nodes with specific features or network roles. The ensuing individual-based control strategies, however, are difficult to carry out in practice and ignore important correlations between topological and temporal patterns. Here we adopt a mesoscopic perspective and present a principled framework to identify collective features at multiple scales and rank their importance for epidemic spread. We use tensor decomposition techniques to build an additive representation of a temporal network in terms of mesostructures, such as cohesive clusters and temporally-localized mixing patterns. This representation allows to determine the impact of individual mesostructures on epidemic spread and to assess the effect of targeted interventions that remove chosen structures. We illustrate this approach using high-resolution social network data on face-to-face interactions in a school and show that our method afford...

  12. On the spreading of Weddell Sea deep water in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locarnini, Ricardo A

    1991-01-01

    that this WSDW, flowing northeastward through the Georgia Passage, might supply part of the coldest bottom water that enters the Argentine Basin through the Falkland Ridge Gap. 23 THE SCOTIA SEA AND THE WEDDELL SEA DEEP WATER OUTFLOW The occurrence...ON THE SPREADING OF WEDDELL SEA DEEP WATER IN THE SOUTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN A Thesis by RICARDO ALEJANDRO LOCARNINI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  13. Obtaining statistics of cascading line outages spreading in an electric transmission network from standard utility data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We show how to use standard transmission line outage historical data to obtain the network topology in such a way that cascades of line outages can be easily located on the network. Then we obtain statistics quantifying how cascading outages typically spread on the network. Processing real outage data is fundamental for understanding cascading and for evaluating the validity of the many different models and simulations that have been proposed for cascading in power networks.

  14. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  15. Saturday: Lasagna and potato wedges prep time: 30mins Cooking time: 1 hr Items: 1 ice-cream container and 1 yoghurt container of white sauce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    Saturday: Lasagna and potato wedges prep time: 30mins Cooking time: 1 hr Items: 1 ice-cream container and 1 yoghurt container of white sauce 2 ice-cream containers of meat mixture 1 yoghurt container! If you want it to cook in time, DON"T OPEN THE OVEN!) The potato wedges are already cooked, so spread

  16. Russia's Wild Wild South: Two Tales of Economic Woes, Political Corruption and Spreading Insurgent Violence in Ingushetia and Dagestan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandstaff, John M.

    2011-05-14

    The Northern Caucasus has been a troubled region for the Russian Federation for nearly two decades. In the 1990s, two wars took place in Chechnya and violence spread into the neighboring republics of Ingushetia and Dagestan. ...

  17. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented Sandia decontamination chemistry were developed and tested against a few surrogate pathogens under conditions of relatively heavy organic load. Tests were conducted on surfaces commonly found in agricultural environments. Wide spectrum decontamination efficacy, low corrosivity, and biodegradability issues were addressed in developing an enhanced detergency formulation. A method for rapid assessment of loss of pathogenic activity (inactivation) was also assessed. This enhanced technology will enable rapid assessment of contamination following an intentional event, and will also be extremely useful in routine assessment of agricultural environments. The primary effort during the second year was progress towards a demonstration of both decontamination and viral inactivation technologies of Foot and Mouth virus (FMDv) using the modified SNL chemistry developed through this project. Lab studies using a surrogate virus (bovine enterovirus) were conducted using DF200, modified DF200 chemistry, and decontaminants currently recommended for use in heavily loaded organic, agricultural environments (VirkonS, 10% bleach, sodium hydroxide and citric acid). Tests using actual FMD virus will be performed at the Department of Homeland Security's Plum Island facilities in the fall of 2005. Success and the insight gained from this project will lead to enhanced response capability, which will benefit agencies such as USDA, DHS, DOD, and the agricultural industry.

  18. Development of a system for quantifying the rate of spread of oak wilt using remote sensing and geographic information systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ware, Charles William

    1990-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF A SYSTEM FOR QUANTIFYING THE RATE OF SPREAD OF OAR WILT USING REMOTE SENSING AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS A Thesis by CHARLES WILLIAM WARE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial... of Spread of Oak Wilt Using Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems. (December 1990) Charles William Ware, B. S. , Stephen F. Austin St. Univ. Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert Maggio Oak wilt, caused by the fungus Ce atoc st's fa...

  19. Load tests on five large spread footings on sand and evaluation of prediction methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbens, Robert Melvin

    1995-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cross-Hole Wave Tests. Dilatometer Tests . . Borehole Shear Tests. . Step Blade Tests. 5 9 17 22 28 34 34 39 45 54 56 64 64 LOAD TEST SETUP 3. 1 3. 2 3. 3 3. 4 3. 5 3. 6 General Setup. Spread Footing Construction Reaction Shaft... INVOLVED Mr. Mike Adams Dr. Allan Lutenegger Dr. Don Degroot Buchanan/Soil Mechanics Dr. Derek Morris Mr. Tony Yen Mr. John Del hia PiezoCone Penetration Test Dilatometer Tests Dilatometer Test w/Thrust Measurements Pressuremeter Tests Step...

  20. Spread and transmission of bacterial pathogens in experimental nematode populations of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, S. Anaid; Restif, Olivier

    2014-06-22

    . After incubation the sample was 195 centrifuged (1500 rpm for 1 min) and washed twice with M9 to remove 196 antibiotics. The pelleted sample from each tube with the progeny was then 197 transferred to an agar plate containing antibiotics as before. We... Journal of Soil Biology. 540 42:S70–S78 541 542 13. Grewal PS. 1991. Effects of Caenorhabditis elegans on the spread of 543 the bacterium Pseudomonas tolaasii in mushrooms. Ann. appl. Biol. 118: 47-544 55. 545 546 14. Gibbs DS, Anderson GL...

  1. Spreading an Idea From the William Kamkwamba TED Talk | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines Candidates fSpreading an

  2. How Do You Spread the Word About Saving Energy? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - Buildingof EnergyTown,FinanceWithatMoneySpread

  3. Multipath channels Path timing critical (versus amplitude information)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    1 · Multipath channels · Path timing critical (versus amplitude information) ­ Certain modulations: PPM ­ Location/Ranging · Model ­ Delay spread ­ L paths (M choose L possible profiles) ­ Independent path amplitudes ­ Block constant channel ­ AW GN 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 -0.02 0 0.02 The Channel

  4. Generation of very low energy-spread electron beams using low-intensity laser pulses in a low-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Samant, Sushil Arun; Sarkar, Deepangkar; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Jha, Pallavi

    2011-03-15

    The possibility of obtaining high-energy electron beams of high quality by using a low-density homogeneous plasma and a low-intensity laser (just above the self-injection threshold in the bubble regime) has been explored. Three-dimensional simulations are used to demonstrate, for the first time, an energy-spread of less than 1%, from self-trapping. More specifically, for a plasma density of 2x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a laser intensity of a{sub 0}=2, a high-energy (0.55 GeV), ultrashort (1.4 fs) electron beam with very low energy-spread (0.55%) and high current (3 kA) is obtained. These parameters satisfy the requirements for drivers of short-wavelength free-electron lasers. It is also found that the quality of the electron beam depends strongly on the plasma length, which therefore needs to be optimized carefully to get the best performance in the experiments.

  5. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  6. Damage spreading in spatial and small-world random boolean networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qiming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Teuscher, Christof [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are often used as generic models for certain dynamics of complex systems, ranging from social networks, neural networks, to gene or protein interaction networks. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ({bar K} << 1) and that the critical connectivity of stability K{sub s} changes compared to random networks. At higher {bar K}, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  7. A chemical trompe-l'\\oe{}il: no iron spread in the globular cluster M22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucciarelli, A; Massari, D; Pancino, E; Stetson, P B; Ferraro, F R; Lanzoni, B; Lardo, C

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with UVES and UVES-FLAMES at the Very Large Telescope of 17 giants in the globular cluster M22, a stellar system suspected to have an intrinsic spread in the iron abundance. We find that when surface gravities are derived spectroscopically (by imposing to obtain the same iron abundance from FeI and FeII lines) the [Fe/H] distribution spans ~0.5 dex, according to previous analyses. However, the gravities obtained in this way correspond to unrealistic low stellar masses (0.1-0.5 Msun) for most of the surveyed giants. Instead, when photometric gravities are adopted, the [FeII/H] distribution shows no evidence of spread at variance with the [FeI/H] distribution. This difference has been recently observed in other clusters and could be due to non-local thermodynamical equilibrium effects driven by over-ionization mechanisms, that mainly affect the neutral species (thus providing lower [FeI/H]) but leave [FeII/H] unaltered. We confirm that the s-process el...

  8. X-ray Burst Oscillations: From Flame Spreading to the Cooling Wake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simin Mahmoodifar; Tod Strohmayer

    2015-10-16

    Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes observed from the surface of accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries. Oscillations have been observed during the rise and/or decay of some of these X-ray bursts. Those seen during the rise can be well explained by a spreading hot spot model, but to date there haven't been any quantitative studies that consistently track the oscillation amplitude both during the rise and decay (tail) of bursts. Here we compute the light curves and amplitudes of oscillations in X-ray burst models that realistically account for both flame spreading and subsequent cooling. We present results for two such "cooling wake" models, a "canonical" cooling model where each patch on the neutron star surface heats and cools identically, and an "asymmetric" model where parts of the star cool at different rates. We show that while canonical cooling models can generate oscillations in the tails of bursts, they cannot easily produce the highest observed modulation amplitudes. Alternatively, a simple model with asymmetric cooling can achieve higher amplitudes consistent with the observations.

  9. Marangoni spreading due to a localized alcohol supply on a thin water film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-Sánchez, José Federico; Snoeijer, J H

    2013-01-01

    Bringing the interfaces of two miscible fluids into contact naturally generates strong gradients in surface tension. Here we investigate such a Marangoni-driven flow by continuously supplying isopropyl alcohol (IPA) on a film of water, using micron-sized droplets of IPA-water mixtures. These droplets create a localized depression in surface tension that leads to the opening of a circular and thin region in the water film. At the edge of the thin region, there is a rim growing and collecting the water of the film. We find that the spreading radius scales as $r \\sim t^{1/2}$. This result can be explained from a balance between Marangoni and viscous stresses, assuming that the gradients in surface tension are smoothened out over the entire size of the circular opening. We derive a scaling law that accurately predicts the influence of the IPA flux as well as the thickness of the thin film at the interior of the spreading front.

  10. Spreading layers in accreting objects: role of acoustic waves for angular momentum transport, mixing and thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippov, Alexander A; Stone, James M

    2015-01-01

    Disk accretion at high rate onto a white dwarf or a neutron star has been suggested to result in the formation of a spreading layer (SL) - a belt-like structure on the object's surface, in which the accreted matter steadily spreads in the poleward (meridional) direction while spinning down. To assess its basic characteristics we perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of supersonic SLs in the relevant morphology with a simple prescription for cooling. We demonstrate that supersonic shear naturally present at the base of the SL inevitably drives sonic instability that gives rise to large scale acoustic modes governing the evolution of the SL. These modes dominate the transport of momentum and energy, which is intrinsically global and cannot be characterized via some form of local effective viscosity (e.g. $\\alpha$-viscosity). The global nature of the wave-driven transport should have important implications for triggering Type I X-ray bursts in low mass X-ray binaries. The nonlinear evolution of waves ...

  11. Interplay between the local information based behavioral responses and the epidemic spreading in complex networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Can; Chen, Han-Shuang; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Tang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spreading of an infectious disease can trigger human behavior responses to the disease, which in turn plays a crucial role on the spreading of epidemic. In this study, to illustrate the impacts of the human behavioral responses, a new class of individuals, $S^F$, is introduced to the classical susceptible-infected-recovered ($SIR$) model. In the model, $S^F$ state represents that susceptible individuals who take self-initiate protective measures to lower the probability of being infected, and a susceptible individual may go to $S^F$ state with a response rate when contacting an infectious neighbor. Via the percolation method, the theoretical formulas for the epidemic threshold as well as the prevalence of epidemic are derived. Our finding indicates that, with the increasing of the response rate, the epidemic threshold is enhanced and the prevalence of epidemic is reduced. The analytical results are also verified by the numerical simulations. In addition, we demonstrate that, because the mean field method ...

  12. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  13. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  14. Analysis, Optimization, and Implementation of a Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum Technique for Smart Grid Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Ma, Xiao; Killough, Stephen M; Kuruganti, Teja; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence modulation with fast frequency hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, error-probability analyses are performed for a hybrid DS/FFH system over standard Gaussian and fading-type channels, progressively including the effects from wide- and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference, and varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician fading. In addition, an optimization approach is formulated that minimizes the bit-error performance of a hybrid DS/FFH communication system and solves for the resulting system design parameters. The optimization objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. We also present our efforts toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid DS/FFH radio transceiver using a single field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Numerical and experimental results are presented under widely varying design parameters to demonstrate the adaptability of the waveform for varied harsh smart grid RF signal environments.

  15. Global warming and the potential spread of vector-borne diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patz, J.

    1996-12-31

    Climatic factors influence many vector-borne infectious diseases, in addition to demographic, biological, and ecological determinants. The United Nation`s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates an unprecedented global rise of 2.0 C by the year 2100. Of major concern is that these changes can affect the spread of many serious infectious diseases, including malaria and dengue fever. Global warming would directly affect disease transmission by shifting the mosquito`s geographic range, increasing reproductive and biting rates, and shortening pathogen incubation period. Human migration and damage to health infrastructures from the projected increase in climate variability and sea level rise could indirectly contribute to disease transmission. A review of this literature, as well as preliminary data from ongoing studies will be presented.

  16. Effective spreading from multiple leaders identified by percolation in social networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Shenggong; Yeung, Chi Ho; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Social networks constitute a new platform for information propagation, but its success is crucially dependent on the choice of spreaders who initiate the spreading of information. In this paper, we remove edges in a network at random and the network segments into isolated clusters. The most important nodes in each cluster then form a group of influential spreaders, such that news propagating from them would lead to an extensive coverage and minimal redundancy. The method well utilizes the similarities between the pre-percolated state and the coverage of information propagation in each social cluster to obtain a set of distributed and coordinated spreaders. Our tests on the Facebook networks show that this method outperforms conventional methods based on centrality. The suggested way of identifying influential spreaders thus sheds light on a new paradigm of information propagation on social networks.

  17. Practical biological spread-out Bragg peak design of carbon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Chang, Seduk; Jang, Hong Suk; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Park, Dong Wook; Hwang, Won Taek; Yang, Tea-Keun

    2015-01-01

    The carbon beams show more advantages on the biological properties compared with proton beams in radiation therapy. The carbon beam shows high linear energy transfer (LET) to medium and it increases the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To design spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of biological dose using carbon beam, a practical method was purposed by using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation code. The various Bragg peak profiles and LET was calculated for each slice at the target region. To generate appropriate biological SOBP, a set of weighting factor, which is a power function in terms of energy step, was applied to the obtained each physical dose. The designed biological SOBP showed 1.34 % of uniformity.

  18. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  19. The estimation of fuel cell operating time for predictive maintenance R. Onanena a,b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 The estimation of fuel cell operating time for predictive maintenance strategies R. Onanena a of the limiting factors for the spreading of the fuel cell technology is the durability and researches to extend fuel cell operating time based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. It consists

  20. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  1. Chow Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  2. Can we stop the spread of influenza in schools with face masks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Valle, Sara Y; Tellier, Raymond; Settles, Gary; Tang, Julian

    2009-01-01

    In the absence of a strain-specific vaccine and the potential resistance to antiviral medication, nonpharmaceutical interventions can be used to reduce the spread of an infectious disease such as influenza. The most common non-pharmaceutical interventions include school closures, travel restrictions, social distancing, enforced or volunteer home isolation and quarantine, improved hand hygiene, and the appropriate wearing of face masks. However, for some of these interventions, there are some unavoidable economic costs to both employees and employers, as well as possible additional detriment to society as a whole. For example, it has been shown that school-age children are most likely to be infected and act as sources of infection for others, due to their greater societal interaction and increased susceptibility. Therefore, preventing or at least reducing infections in children is a logical first-line of defense. For this reason, school closures have been widely investigated and recommended as part of pandemic influenza preparedness, and some studies support this conclusion. Yet, school closures would result in lost work days if at least one parent must be absent from work to care for children who would otherwise be at school. In addition, the delay in-academic progress may be detrimental due to mass school absenteeism. In particular, the pandemic influenza guidance by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends school closures for less than four weeks for Category 2 and 3 pandemics (i.e., similar to the milder 1957 and 1968 pandemics) and one to three months for Category 4 and 5 pandemics (i .e., similar to the 1918 pandemic ). Yet, given the above, it is clear that closing schools for up to three months is unlikely to be a practical mitigation strategy for many families and society. Thus modelers and policy makers need to weigh all factors before recommending such drastic measures, particularly if the agent under consideration typically has low mortality and causes a mild disease. Therefore, we contend that face masks are an effective, practical, non-pharmaceutical intervention that would reduce the spread of disease among school-children, while keeping schools open. Influenza spreads through person-to-person contact, via transmission by large droplets or aerosols (droplet nuclei) produced by breathing, talking, coughing or sneezing, as well as by direct (though most people touch very few others in their daily lives) or indirect (i.e., via fomites) contact. Face masks act as a physical barrier to reduce the amount of potentially infectious inhaled and exhaled particles, although they would not reliably protect the wearer against aerosols; a recent study also demonstrated that they can redirect and decelerate exhaled airflows (when worn by an infected individual) to prevent them from entering the breathing zones of others. Thus, if a whole classroom were to don face masks, disease transmission would be expected to be greatly diminished. Another recent study on face masks and hand hygiene show a 10-50% transmission reduction for influenza-like illnesses. Furthermore, face masks can act as an effective physical reminder and barrier to transmission by preventing the wearer from touching any potentially infectious secretions from their mucous membranes (i.e., from the nose and mouth), which is another mechanism for direct and indirect contact transmission for influenza. A recent systematic review has suggested that wearing masks can be highly effective in limiting the transmission of respiratory infections, such as influenza. Yet, admittedly, the effectiveness of this intervention strategy is highly dependent on compliance (i.e., the willingness to wear the mask in all appropriate situations), which in tum depends on comfort, convenience, fitness, and hygiene. Importantly, masks themselves must not become a source of infection (or reinfection); as such they should be replaced or sanitized daily (where possible) to maximize effectiveness. One solution could be for masks to be touted as fashion accessories, whi

  3. Single Cells Spreading on a Protein Lattice Adopt an Energy Minimizing Shape Benoit Vianay,1,* Jos Kafer,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single Cells Spreading on a Protein Lattice Adopt an Energy Minimizing Shape Benoit Vianay,1,* Jos diagram obtained numerically suggest that the observed shapes correspond to metastable states in an energy landscape. Our results justify in fine the purely mechanical approach used in alternative models [17

  4. 368 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 The Impact of Silicon CCD Photon Spread on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be achieved. Short-pass filtering provides partial correction of the photon spread with the advantage material at all stages of fabrication, from bricks and as-cut wafers to complete solar cells for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 2602, Australia (e-mail: daniel

  5. What can you do to stop the flu? Cover your cough! Help stop the spread of germs by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Peter

    What can you do to stop the flu? · Cover your cough! Help stop the spread of germs by covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze with a tissue or with your upper sleeve. · Wash your hands surfaces. · Flu symptoms include: - Fever - Extreme tiredness - Headache - Cough - Muscle aches - Runny

  6. Profit-Charging Market Makers with Bounded Loss, Vanishing Bid/Ask Spreads, and Unlimited Market Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    are oppo- sitional. In this paper, we design market makers that satisfy all four. We achieveProfit-Charging Market Makers with Bounded Loss, Vanishing Bid/Ask Spreads, and Unlimited Market desiderata for automated market makers have appeared in the literature: (1) bounded loss, (2) the abil- ity

  7. Profit-Charging Market Makers with Bounded Loss, Vanishing Bid/Ask Spreads, and Unlimited Market Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are oppo- sitional. In this paper, we design market makers that satisfy all four. We achieve-agent Systems General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Economics Additional Key Words and Phrases: Market MakingProfit-Charging Market Makers with Bounded Loss, Vanishing Bid/Ask Spreads, and Unlimited Market

  8. Analysis of farm-to-retail price spreads for whole and two percent milk in seven selected cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Marla Lashea

    2004-09-30

    price spread of whole and two percent milk were the retail price for whole and two percent milk, marketing costs such as fuel and labor costs, milk production, seasonality, and structural change. Monthly data were collected over a 106 month period...

  9. ICELANDIC RHYTHMICS: ANNUAL MODULATION OF LAND ELEVATION AND PLATE SPREADING BY SNOW LOAD (AGU G33B-0055)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    ICELANDIC RHYTHMICS: ANNUAL MODULATION OF LAND ELEVATION AND PLATE SPREADING BY SNOW LOAD (AGU ­ G Volcanological Center, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland 2 Icelandic Meteorological Office, Reykjavik, Iceland 3 IRD, UMR5559, Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique

  10. Stable Electron Beams With Low Absolute Energy Spread From a Laser Wakefield Accelerator With Plasma Density Ramp Controlled Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    -keV level energy spread and central energy sta- bility by using the plasma density profile to control self is reached. Because dephasing limits electron energy gain [2], low densities ( to order of 100 keV at GeV energies and beyond. RESULTS In the present experiments, the density profile

  11. X-ray optical systems: from metrology to Point Spread Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, D

    2015-01-01

    One of the problems often encountered in X-ray mirror manufacturing is setting proper manufacturing tolerances to guarantee an angular resolution - often expressed in terms of Point Spread Function (PSF) - as needed by the specific science goal. To do this, we need an accurate metrological apparatus, covering a very broad range of spatial frequencies, and an affordable method to compute the PSF from the metrology dataset. [...] However, the separation between these spectral ranges is difficult do define exactly, and it is also unclear how to affordably combine the PSFs, computed with different methods in different spectral ranges, into a PSF expectation at a given X-ray energy. For this reason, we have proposed a method entirely based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle to compute the diffracted field of real Wolter-I optics, including measured defects over a wide range of spatial frequencies. Owing to the shallow angles at play, the computation can be simplified limiting the computation to the longitudinal prof...

  12. Simulation of ultrathin lubricant films spreading over various carbon Stephen J. Vinay, David M. Phillips, Young Sil Lee, Charles M. Schroeder, Xiaoding Ma et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Charles

    Simulation of ultrathin lubricant films spreading over various carbon surfaces Stephen J. Vinay://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Simulation of ultrathin lubricant films spreading over various carbon surfaces Stephen J. Vinay surface composition and lubricant endgroup functionality, is described. Theoretical development based

  13. Inhibited cell spreading on polystyrene nanopillars fabricated by nanoimprinting and in situ This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

    Inhibited cell spreading on polystyrene nanopillars fabricated by nanoimprinting and in situ elongation This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 385301 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/21/38/385301 Inhibited cell spreading on polystyrene

  14. Email networks and the spread of computer viruses M. E. J. Newman, 1 Stephanie Forrest, 1, 2 and Justin Balthrop 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Mark

    Email networks and the spread of computer viruses M. E. J. Newman, 1 Stephanie Forrest, 1, 2 Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131--1386 Many computer viruses spread via electronic of computer virus epidemics. The structure of various networks, including social and computer networks, has

  15. Industrial Wireless Sensors: A User's Perspective on the Impact of Standards on Wide-spread Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taft, Cyrus W. [Taft Engineering, Inc.] [Taft Engineering, Inc.; Manges, Wayne W [ORNL] [ORNL; Sorge, John N [Southern Company Services, Inc.] [Southern Company Services, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    The role of wireless sensing technologies in industrial instrumentation will undoubtedly become more important in the years ahead. . Deployment of such instrumentation in an industrial setting with its heightened security and robustness criteria hinges on user acceptance of verified performance as well as meeting cost requirements. Today, industrial users face many choices when specifying a wireless sensor network, including radio performance, battery life, interoperability, security, and standards compliance. The potential market for industrial wireless sensors is literally millions of wireless instruments and it is imperative that accurate information for applying the technology to real-world applications be available to the end-user so that they can make informed deployment decisions. The majority of industrial wireless automation designs now being deployed or being considered for deployment are based on three different standards . The HART Communications Foundation s WirelessHART (IEC 62591), the International Society of Automation s ISA100.11a, and the offering from the Industrial Wireless Alliance of China known as WIA-PA (IEC 62601). Aside from these industrial automation standards, users must also be cognizant of the underlying wireless network standards IEEE 802.11, IEEE 802.15.4, and IEEE 802.15.3a and their interactions with the three principal industrial automation protocols mentioned previously. The crucial questions being asked by end users revolve around sensor network performance, interoperability, reliability, and security. This paper will discuss potential wireless sensor applications in power plants, barriers to the acceptance of wireless technology, concerns related to standards, and provide an end user prospective on the issues affecting wide-spread deployment of wireless sensors. Finally, the authors conclude with a discussion of a recommended path forward including how standards organizations can better facilitate end user decision making and how end users can locate and use objective information for decision making.

  16. Capacity Allocation in Multi-cell UMTS Networks for Different Spreading Factors with Perfect and Imperfect Power Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Robert

    -to-interference thresh- old from 5 dB to 10 dB and spreading factor values of 256, 64, 16, and 4. 1. Introduction 3G Erlang capacity based on the Lost Call Held (LCH) model as described in [4]. This algorithm cal- culates derive a closed form ex- pression of Erlang capacity for a single type of traffic loading and compare

  17. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  18. Estimation and prediction of travel time from loop detector data for intelligent transportation systems applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanajakshi, Lelitha Devi

    2005-11-01

    ., or from indirect methods such as loop detectors. Because of their wide spread deployment, travel time estimation from loop detector data is one of the most widely used methods. However, the major criticism about loop detector data is the high probability...

  19. Time scales in nuclear giant resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WD Heiss; RG Nazmitdinov; FD Smit

    2009-12-18

    We propose a general approach to characterise fluctuations of measured cross sections of nuclear giant resonances. Simulated cross sections are obtained from a particular, yet representative self-energy which contains all information about fragmentations. Using a wavelet analysis, we demonstrate the extraction of time scales of cascading decays into configurations of different complexity of the resonance. We argue that the spreading widths of collective excitations in nuclei are determined by the number of fragmentations as seen in the power spectrum. An analytic treatment of the wavelet analysis using a Fourier expansion of the cross section confirms this principle. A simple rule for the relative life times of states associated with hierarchies of different complexity is given.

  20. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  1. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  2. The influence of ridge geometry at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (9?-25?E) : basalt composition sensitivity to variations in source and process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standish, Jared Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Between 90-25° E on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge lie two sharply contrasting supersegments. One 630 km long supersegment erupts N-MORB that is progressively enriched in incompatible element concentrations ...

  3. Impact of Non-Poissonian Activity Patterns on Spreading Processes Alexei Vazquez,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez, Alexei

    2006; published 10 April 2007) Halting a computer or biological virus outbreak requires a detailed of computer viruses, which, according to virus bulletins, show a decay time close to a year, in contrast 130 known computer viruses in 1993, a number that has exploded to 4767 in April 2006

  4. Modeling and analyzing spread of epidemic diseases: case study based on cervical cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parvin, Hoda

    2009-05-15

    are faced with the decision of how many cancer treatments to subsidize, how many vaccinations to give and how many tests to be performed in each period of a given time horizon. To aid this decision-making exercise, a stochastic dynamic optimal control...

  5. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  6. Time and Labor Manual -Time Keepers -LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor Manual

  7. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  8. 10/16/14 1:29 PMThe Virus Next Time? -Civil Beat Page 1 of 4http://www.civilbeat.com/2014/10/the-virus-next-time/#comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    10/16/14 1:29 PMThe Virus Next Time? - Civil Beat Page 1 of 4http://www.civilbeat.com/2014/10/the-virus-next-time/#comments The Virus Next Time? Take action against new viruses by making Hawaii less hospitable for mosquitoes on the African outbreak of Ebola virus and whether it could spread to the rest of the planet, another fortunately

  9. Incorporating social contact data in spatio-temporal models for infectious disease spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Routine public health surveillance of notifiable infectious diseases gives rise to weekly counts of reported cases - possibly stratified by region and/or age group. A well-established approach to the statistical analysis of such surveillance data are endemic-epidemic time-series models. The temporal dependence inherent to communicable diseases is thereby taken into account by an observation-driven formulation conditioning on past counts. Additional spatial dynamics in areal-level counts are largely driven by human travel and can be captured by power-law weights based on the order of adjacency. However, social contacts are highly assortative also with respect to age. For example, characteristic pathways of directly transmitted pathogens are linked to childcare facilities, schools and nursing homes. We therefore investigate how a spatio-temporal endemic-epidemic model can be extended to take social contact data into account. The approach is illustrated in a case study on norovirus gastroenteritis in Berlin, 201...

  10. PET image reconstruction with system matrix based on point spread function derived from single photon incidence response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin, Fan; Ming-Kai, Yun; Xiao-Li, Sun; Xue-Xiang, Cao; Shuang-Quanm, Liu; Pei, Chai; Dao-Wu, Li; Long, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they can provide accurate physical model and geometric system description. The reconstructed image quality mainly depends on the system matrix model which describes the relationship between image space and projection space for the IR method. The system matrix can contain some physics factors of detection such as geometrical component and blurring component. Point spread function (PSF) is generally used to describe the blurring component. This paper proposes an IR method based on the PSF system matrix, which is derived from the single photon incidence response function. More specifically, the gamma photon incidence on a crystal array is simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and then the single photon incidence response functions are obtained. Subsequently, using the single photon incidence response functions, the coincidence blurring factor is acquired according to the...

  11. AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2011-09-30

    While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

  12. Generation of Low Absolute Energy Spread Electron Beams in Laser Wakefield Acceleration Using Tightly Focused Laser through Near-Ionization-Threshold Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C H; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced ionization injection scheme using a tightly focused laser pulse with intensity near the ionization potential to trigger the injection process in a mismatched pre-plasma channel has been proposed and examined via multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The core idea of the proposed scheme is to lower the energy spread of trapped beams by shortening the injection distance. We have established theory to precisely predict the injection distance, as well as the ionization degree of injection atoms/ions, electron yield and ionized charge. We have found relation between injection distance and laser and plasma parameters, giving a strategy to control injection distance hence optimizing beam's energy spread. In the presented simulation example, we have investigated the whole injection and acceleration in detail and found some unique features of the injection scheme, like multi-bunch injection, unique longitudinal phase-space distribution, etc. Ultimate electron beam has a relative energy spread (rm...

  13. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  14. Formation and spread of callus tissue and tangential rows of resin ducts in Larix decidua and Picea abies following rockfall impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Formation and spread of callus tissue and tangential rows of resin ducts in Larix decidua and Picea After mechanical wounding, callus tissue and tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) are formed extension, traumatic resin ducts. Introduction Rockfall is a common mass movement process in alpine

  15. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  16. Abundance and spread of the invasive red algae, Kappaphycus spp., in Kane'ohe Bay, Hawai'i and an experimental assessment of management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer E.

    ) investigate control options including manual removal and the use of biocontrol agents. Kappaphycus spp-808-236-7443) Received 7 July 2003; accepted in revised form 29 April 2004 Key words: algal blooms, biocontrol be a useful bio- control agent. Because Kappaphycus spp. are still spreading in Kane'ohe Bay and can overgrow

  17. Patterns and pathways in the post-establishment spread of non-indigenous aquatic species: the slowing invasion of North American inland lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Patterns and pathways in the post-establishment spread of non-indigenous aquatic species, but the location of the initial founding population, the mechanisms and pathways of dispersal, and the distribution' over an inhospitable terrestrial environment. Hydrological connections are not always benign passages

  18. -Spreading of the invaSive CarpobrotuS aff. acinaciformis in Mediterranean eCoSySteMS -45 Applied Vegetation Science 11: 45-54, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    two years (2002-2003) , comparing two habitats (rocky coast vs. coastal dune) and two different light Vegetation Science 11: 45-54, 2008 doi: 10.3170/2007-7-18303, published online 20 November 2007 © IAVS colo- nization of heterogeneous coastal Mediterranean environments spreading well beyond the open sand

  19. Disturbance spreading in incommensurate and quasiperiodic systems Department of Physics and Centre of Nonlinear Studies, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baowen

    Disturbance spreading in incommensurate and quasiperiodic systems Bambi Hu Department of Physics found that 1 with the exponent of distribution function of frequency at zero frequency, i.e., ( ) as 0, the classical transport in incommen- surate and quasiperiodic sytems and its relation with phonon frequency

  20. ABSTRACT: Farms that once spread only manures are now also applying sewage biosolids (sludge) and/or other wastes such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT: Farms that once spread only manures are now also applying sewage biosolids (sludge) and streamwater concentrations in most cases. (KEY TERMS: nonpoint source pollution; sludge; waste/sewage such as food processing wastes and sewage biosolids (sludge). A concurrent trend in agriculture is the con

  1. Awareness and Movement vs. the Spread of Epidemics - Analyzing a Dynamic Model for Urban Social/Technological Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsässer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We consider the spread of epidemics in technological and social networks. How do people react? Does awareness and cautious behavior help? We analyze these questions and present a dynamic model to describe the movement of individuals and/or their mobile devices in a certain (idealistic) urban environment. Furthermore, our model incorporates the fact that different locations can accommodate a different number of people (possibly with their mobile devices), who may pass the infection to each other. We obtain two main results. First, we prove that w.r.t. our model at least a small part of the system will remain uninfected even if no countermeasures are taken. The second result shows that with certain counteractions in use, which only influence the individuals' behavior, a prevalent epidemic can be avoided. The results explain possible courses of a disease, and point out why cost-efficient countermeasures may reduce the number of total infections from a high percentage of the population to a negligible fraction.

  2. Mirrors for X-ray telescopes: Fresnel diffraction-based computation of Point Spread Functions from metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raimondi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The imaging sharpness of an X-ray telescope is chiefly determined by the optical quality of its focusing optics, which in turn mostly depends on the shape accuracy and the surface finishing of the grazing incidence X-ray mirrors that compose the optical modules. In order to ensure the imaging performance during the mirror manufacturing, a fundamental step is represented by the prediction of the mirror Point Spread Function (PSF) from the metrology of its surface. Traditionally, the PSF computation in X-rays is assumed to be different depending on whether the surface defects are classified as figure errors or roughness [...] The aim of this work is to overcome this limit, providing analytical formulae, valid at any light wavelength, to compute the PSF of an X-ray mirror shell from the measured longitudinal profiles and the roughness Power Spectral Density (PSD), without distinguishing spectral ranges with different treatments. The method we adopted is based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle to compute the diffr...

  3. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  4. Space time and the passage of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F. R. Ellis; Rituparno Goswami

    2012-08-26

    This paper examines the various arguments that have been put forward suggesting either that time does not exist, or that it exists but its flow is not real. I argue that (i) time both exists and flows; (ii) an Evolving Block Universe (`EBU') model of spacetime adequately captures this feature, emphasizing the key differences between the past, present, and future; (iii) the associated surfaces of constant time are uniquely geometrically and physically determined in any realistic spacetime model based in General Relativity Theory; (iv) such a model is needed in order to capture the essential aspects of what is happening in circumstances where initial data does not uniquely determine the evolution of spacetime structure because quantum uncertainty plays a key role in that development. Assuming that the functioning of the mind is based in the physical brain, evidence from the way that the mind apprehends the flow of time prefers this evolving time model over those where there is no flow of time.

  5. On Some General Physical Aspects of the Real Physical Space and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Gevorkian; R. A. Gevorkian

    2001-01-24

    The paper discusses some aspects of real physical space and time: structure of electrodynamics; structure of gravitational-inert theory in the real world; formation of the real matter; Mach's principle and the radiational cosmic mass; spread and transmission of information in the space of the real world; fundamental and main physical constants, protostar or 3+1-dimensional matter; and some philosophical and general physical approaches to solutions of physical problems.

  6. Manage Your Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lynn

    2000-06-27

    People view time in different ways, but we all could do a better job of managing our time. This publication explains three different time management tools: the 24-hour time log and chart; a self-assessment of thinking styles and time management...

  7. Pulse transmission receiver with higher-order time derivative pulse correlator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-16

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission receiver includes: a higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a demodulation decoder coupled to the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a clock coupled to the demodulation decoder; and a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to both the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator and the clock. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  8. High Occurrence of Aberrant Lymph Node Spread on Magnetic Resonance Lymphography in Prostate Cancer Patients With a Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M., E-mail: H.Meijer@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Witjes, J. Alfred [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the pattern of lymph node spread in prostate cancer patients with a biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy, eligible for salvage radiotherapy; and to determine whether the clinical target volume (CTV) for elective pelvic irradiation in the primary setting can be applied in the salvage setting for patients with (a high risk of) lymph node metastases. Methods and Materials: The charts of 47 prostate cancer patients with PSA recurrence after prostatectomy who had positive lymph nodes on magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) were reviewed. Positive lymph nodes were assigned to a lymph node region according to the guidelines of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) for delineation of the CTV for pelvic irradiation (RTOG-CTV). We defined four lymph node regions for positive nodes outside this RTOG-CTV: the para-aortal, proximal common iliac, pararectal, and paravesical regions. They were referred to as aberrant lymph node regions. For each patient, clinical and pathologic features were recorded, and their association with aberrant lymph drainage was investigated. The distribution of positive lymph nodes was analyzed separately for patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <1.0 ng/mL. Results: MRL detected positive aberrant lymph nodes in 37 patients (79%). In 20 patients (43%) a positive lymph node was found in the pararectal region. Higher PSA at the time of MRL was associated with the presence of positive lymph nodes in the para-aortic region (2.49 vs. 0.82 ng/mL; p = 0.007) and in the proximal common iliac region (1.95 vs. 0.59 ng/mL; p = 0.009). There were 18 patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL. Ten of these patients (61%) had at least one aberrant positive lymph node. Conclusion: Seventy-nine percent of the PSA-recurrent patients had at least one aberrant positive lymph node. Application of the standard RTOG-CTV for pelvic irradiation in the salvage setting therefore seems to be inappropriate.

  9. An investigation of the effect of diffusivity on the transport and spread of contaminants in groundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, D.; Stewart, M.; Muyshondt, A.

    1997-07-01

    Contaminant transport in groundwater is modeled using an advection diffusion equation. The diffusion component of the model is due to molecular diffusion and advection through the flow passages in the soil matrix which are smaller than the resolvable length scales. In addition to the physical diffusion, the advection/diffusion equation requires a certain amount of diffusion for the governing equations to be stable. If there is insufficient physical diffusion the cell Peclet number is less than 2 and oscillations in the solution occur. Balance numerical diffusion must be supplied for a stable solution. Numerical simulations of contaminant transport in groundwater flows must therefore include accurate models of as many of three forms of diffusion. One represents the subscale fluid path diffusion (either tensor, vector, or scalar in form), another is the scalar molecular diffusion (scalar), and the numerical stabilizing diffusion (again either tensor, vector, or scalar in form). The final result must reasonably model contaminant spread and transport for the predictions to be useful. In the literature, measurements of contaminant diffusivity are usually made using one dimensional experiments. Because of the dependence on higher level models to capture all of the physics in contaminant transport, it is to validate these models using realistic multidimensional geometries with comparisons to experimental data. Here, the effects of different diffusion models are examined and compared for two important cases. The first is a contaminant plume originating at the surface and extracted at a drain. The second case is an isolated region of contamination which is advected and diffused towards the drain. In the second case, qualitative comparisons can be made with limited visualization data. These results will eventually be used with a comprehensive experimental program to validate models of diffusion transport.

  10. On Time. 6b: Quantum Mechanical Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Raju

    2008-08-09

    The existence of small amounts of advanced radiation, or a tilt in the arrow of time, makes the basic equations of physics mixed-type functional differential equations. The novel features of such equations point to a microphysical structure of time. This corresponds to a change of logic at the microphysical level. We show that the resulting logic is a quantum logic. This provides a natural and rigorous explanation of quantum interference. This structured-time interpretation of quantum mechanics is briefly compared with various other interpretations of q.m.

  11. Yet another time about time - Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen L. Simeonov

    2015-08-29

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle. It goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines. Time has been a central theme in physical and life sciences, philosophy, psychology, music, art and many more. This theme is known with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories. What has been explored concerns its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.). Of particular interest have been parameters of time such as duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), varieties of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as arrow, stream, texture, width, depth, density, even scent. Perhaps the most distinct characteristic of this fundamental concept is the absolute time constituting the flow of consciousness according to Husserl, the reflection of pure (human) nature without having the distinction between exo and endo. This essay is a personal reflection upon the meaning of time in modern physics and phenomenological philosophy.

  12. Universal Time Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenter Nimtz

    2009-01-26

    How much time does a tunneling wave packet spent in traversing a barrier? Quantum mechanical calculations result in zero time inside a barrier . In the nineties analogous tunneling experiments with microwaves were carried out. The results agreed with quantum mechanical calculations. Electron tunneling time is hard to measure being extremely short and parasitic effects due to the electric charge of electrons may be dominant. However, quite recently the atomic ionization tunneling time has been measured. Experimental data of photonic, phononic, and electronic tunneling time is available now and will be presented. It appears that the tunneling time is a universal property independent of the field in question.

  13. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

  14. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory's Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

  15. Time Asymmetric Quantum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bohm

    1999-02-26

    Mathematical and phenomenological arguments in favor of asymmetric time evolution of micro-physical states are presented.

  16. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  17. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  18. Absolute Time Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matolcsi; P. Van

    2006-10-23

    A four dimensional treatment of nonrelativistic space-time gives a natural frame to deal with objective time derivatives. In this framework some well known objective time derivatives of continuum mechanics appear as Lie-derivatives. Their coordinatized forms depends on the tensorial properties of the relevant physical quantities. We calculate the particular forms of objective time derivatives for scalars, vectors, covectors and different second order tensors from the point of view of a rotating observer. The relation of substantial, material and objective time derivatives is treated.

  19. Time scales in LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pireaux

    2007-03-23

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  20. Time in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curt A. Moyer

    2013-05-23

    The failure of conventional quantum theory to recognize time as an observable and to admit time operators is addressed. Instead of focusing on the existence of a time operator for a given Hamiltonian, we emphasize the role of the Hamiltonian as the generator of translations in time to construct time states. Taken together, these states constitute what we call a timeline, or quantum history, that is adequate for the representation of any physical state of the system. Such timelines appear to exist even for the semi-bounded and discrete Hamiltonian systems ruled out by Pauli's theorem. However, the step from a timeline to a valid time operator requires additional assumptions that are not always met. Still, this approach illuminates the crucial issue surrounding the construction of time operators, and establishes quantum histories as legitimate alternatives to the familiar coordinate and momentum bases of standard quantum theory.

  1. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  2. SU-E-J-115: Using Markov Chain Modeling to Elucidate Patterns in Breast Cancer Metastasis Over Time and Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comen, E; Mason, J; Kuhn, P; Nieva, J; Newton, P; Norton, L; Venkatappa, N; Jochelson, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, breast cancer metastasis is described as a process wherein cancer cells spread from the breast to multiple organ systems via hematogenous and lymphatic routes. Mapping organ specific patterns of cancer spread over time is essential to understanding metastatic progression. In order to better predict sites of metastases, here we demonstrate modeling of the patterned migration of metastasis. Methods: We reviewed the clinical history of 453 breast cancer patients from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center who were non-metastatic at diagnosis but developed metastasis over time. We used the variables of organ site of metastases as well as time to create a Markov chain model of metastasis. We illustrate the probabilities of metastasis occurring at a given anatomic site together with the probability of spread to additional sites. Results: Based on the clinical histories of 453 breast cancer patients who developed metastasis, we have learned (i) how to create the Markov transition matrix governing the probabilities of cancer progression from site to site; (ii) how to create a systemic network diagram governing disease progression modeled as a random walk on a directed graph; (iii) how to classify metastatic sites as ‘sponges’ that tend to only receive cancer cells or ‘spreaders’ that receive and release them; (iv) how to model the time-scales of disease progression as a Weibull probability distribution function; (v) how to perform Monte Carlo simulations of disease progression; and (vi) how to interpret disease progression as an entropy-increasing stochastic process. Conclusion: Based on our modeling, metastatic spread may follow predictable pathways. Mapping metastasis not simply by organ site, but by function as either a ‘spreader’ or ‘sponge’ fundamentally reframes our understanding of metastatic processes. This model serves as a novel platform from which we may integrate the evolving genomic landscape that drives cancer metastasis. PS-OC Trans-Network Project Grant Award for “Data Assimilation and ensemble statistical forecasting methods applied to the MSKCC longitudinal metastatic breast cancer cohort.”.

  3. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

    2015-02-06

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  4. Time functions as utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2009-09-04

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K^+ relation (Seifert's relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg's and Levin's theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K^+ (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin's theorem and smoothing techniques.

  5. Time Domain Reflectometry Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Time Domain Reflectometry Theory Application Note 1304-2 For Use with Agilent 86100 Infiniium DCA #12;2 The most general approach to evaluating the time domain response of any electromagnetic system a concise presentation of the fundamentals of TDR and then relates these fundamentals to the parameters

  6. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  7. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  8. An inhomogeneous model for the Galactic halo: a possible explanation for the spread observed in s- and r-process elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cescutti

    2008-02-05

    We propose an explanation for the considerable scatter of the abundances of neutron capture elements observed in low-metallicity stars in the solar vicinity, compared to the small star-to-star scatter observed for the alpha-elements. We have developed a stochastic chemical evolution model in which the main assumption is a random formation of new stars subject to the condition that the cumulative mass distribution follows a given initial mass function. With our model, we are able to reproduce the different spreads of neutron capture elements and alpha-elements in low-metallicity stars. The reason for different observed spread in neutron capture elements and alpha-elements resides in the random birth of stars, coupled with different stellar mass ranges, from which alpha-elements and neutron capture elements originate. In particular, the site of production of alpha-elements is the whole range of massive stars, from 10 to 80 Msun whereas the mass range of production for neutron capture elements lies between 12 and 30 Msun.

  9. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  10. The Williston time capsule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, David (David Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    This project is a time capsule of the oil economy, created by entombing everyday objects made from and powered by petroleum into a landscape that spatially recreates the processes of drilling and fracking a contemporary ...

  11. Sublinear Time Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinfeld, Ronitt

    Sublinear time algorithms represent a new paradigm in computing, where an algorithm must give some sort of an answer after inspecting only a very small portion of the input. We discuss the types of answers that one can ...

  12. Time, energy & form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  13. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  14. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  15. Time in quantum mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapin, Kimberly R.

    1997-01-01

    TIME IN QUANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Marian O. Scully (Chair... of Committee) Edward S. Fry (Member) aan Laane (Member) Thomas W. Adair, III (Head of Department) August 1997 Major Subject: Physics TIME IN QIJANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  16. The thermodynamics of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dries Sels; Michiel Wouters

    2015-01-22

    The problem of time is a deep paradox in our physical description of the world. According to Aristotle's relational theory, time is a measure of change and does not exist on its own. In contrast, quantum mechanics, just like Newtonian mechanics, is equipped with a master clock that dictates the evolution of a system. This clock is infinitely precise and tacitly supplied free of charge from outside physics. Not only does this absolute time make it notoriously difficult to make a consistent theory of quantum gravity, it is also the underlying problem in establishing the second law. Indeed, contrary to our experience, the Wheeler-deWitt equation --a canonical quantization of general relativity-- predicts a static universe. Similarly, when simply concerned with the dynamics of a closed quantum system, there is no second law because the Von Neumann entropy is invariant under unitary transformations. Here we are mainly concerned with the latter problem and we show that it can be resolved by attributing a minimal amount of resources to the measurement of time. Although there is an absolute time in quantum mechanics, an observer can only establish a time by measuring a clock. For a local measurement, the minimal entropy production is equal to the number of ticks. This lower bound is attained by a black hole.

  17. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor 9.1 Time

  18. Timed Alternating-Time Temporal Logic Thomas A. Henzinger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    equally powerful options for updating the state of the game, advancing time, or blocking time. Second, we in order to specify real-time objectives for games played on timed structures. We define the semantics Timed games are a formal model for the synthesis of real-time systems [22, 20]. While much research

  19. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments andTheTime-Resolved Time-Resolved

  20. Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 2-Jun-15 Wednesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 3-Jun-15 Thursday CLOSED

  1. Time in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Brout; R. Parentani

    1999-02-05

    The notion of time in cosmology is revealed through an examination of transition matrix elements of radiative processes occurring in the cosmos. To begin with, the very concept of time is delineated in classical physics in terms of correlations between the succession of configurations which describe a process and a standard trajectory called the clock. The total is an isolated system of fixed energy. This is relevant for cosmology in that the universe is an isolated system which we take to be homogeneous and isotropic. Furthermore, in virtue of the constraint which arises from reparametrization invariance of time, it has total energy zero. Therefore the momentum of the scale factor is determined from the energy of matter. In the quantum theory this is exploited through use of the WKB approximation for the wave function of the scale factor, justified for a large universe. The formalism then gives rise to matrix elements describing matter processes. These are shown to take on the form of usual time dependent quantum amplitudes wherein the temporal dependence is given by a background which is once more fixed by the total energy of matter.

  2. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  3. Presenter:! Time & Date: !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    a checkbook, you can understand which energy options have the promise of supporting humankind - wind, hydro://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! #12;A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! Presenter: Liz Moyer! Time a bigger, richer population without fossil fuels (which will definitely run out someday)? Energy is a hot

  4. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  5. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  6. High energy x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for high-throughput analysis of composition spread thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoire, John M. [Department of Physics, and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States); DiSalvo, Francis J. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States); Dover, R. Bruce van [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    High-throughput crystallography is an important tool in materials research, particularly for the rapid assessment of structure-property relationships. We present a technique for simultaneous acquisition of diffraction images and fluorescence spectra on a continuous composition spread thin film using a 60 keV x-ray source. Subsequent noninteractive data processing provides maps of the diffraction profiles, thin film fiber texture, and composition. Even for highly textured films, our diffraction technique provides detection of diffraction from each family of Bragg reflections, which affords direct comparison of the measured profiles with powder patterns of known phases. These techniques are important for high throughput combinatorial studies as they provide structure and composition maps which may be correlated with performance trends within an inorganic library.

  7. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  8. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  9. Space-time diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  10. Time Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    malicious attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel signature model ­ Time Valid One-Time Signature (TVTime Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication Qiyan Wang, Himanshu-OTS) ­ to boost the efficiency of regular one-time signature schemes. Based on the TV-OTS model, we design

  11. Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-01-01

    studies evaluating the advertising of ED wait times. Only 1potentially used for advertising may be inaccurate. AccessedE ditorial Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times Scott

  12. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 162 Fall 2001. Date: Wednesday December 12, 2001. Time: 7:00 pm -9:00 pm. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  13. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 161 Fall 2001. Date: Friday December 14, 2001. Time: 8:00 am -10:00 am. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  14. 1. 2 , 4 2 ( Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    format with double line spacing (font Times New Roman, 12 pt; margins: left and up -- 30 mm, right , . 20. , , . 1. 2 , 4 2 ( Times New Roman, 12 pt

  15. Denoising Deterministic Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven P. Lalley; Andrew B. Nobel

    2006-04-21

    This paper is concerned with the problem of recovering a finite, deterministic time series from observations that are corrupted by additive, independent noise. A distinctive feature of this problem is that the available data exhibit long-range dependence and, as a consequence, existing statistical theory and methods are not readily applicable. This paper gives an analysis of the denoising problem that extends recent work of Lalley, but begins from first principles. Both positive and negative results are established. The positive results show that denoising is possible under somewhat restrictive conditions on the additive noise. The negative results show that, under more general conditions on the noise, no procedure can recover the underlying deterministic series.

  16. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  17. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  18. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses appeared in a minute fraction of cytokeratin- and vimentin-positive CTCs. Small subpopulations of PCa cells bearing BRCA1 losses might be one confounding factor initiating tumor dissemination and might provide an early indicator of shortened disease-free survival.

  19. Seasonal and Diurnal Patterns of Spatial Spread, Grouping Dynamics and Influence of Resources on a Free-Ranging Cattle Herd in a Semi-Arid Rangeland in South Texas, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheleuitte-Nieves, Christopher

    2012-10-19

    Index, an indicator of available forage biomass, was calculated using satellite imagery. Number of GPS fixes was used as an indicator of animal use of shade patches and water and supplemental feeding areas. In this semi-arid environment, herd spread...

  20. Single Cells Spreading on a Protein Lattice Adopt an Energy Minimizing Shape Benoit Vianay,1 Jos Kfer,2, Emmanuelle Planus,3 Marc Block,3 Franois Graner,2,4 and Herv Guillou1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Cells Spreading on a Protein Lattice Adopt an Energy Minimizing Shape Benoit Vianay,1 Jos suggest that the observed shapes correspond to metastable states in an energy landscape. Our results justify in fine the purely mechanical approach used in alternative models [17­19]. Each pattern is made

  1. A garden mulch is any material spread on the soil surface to modify the environment where the plant is growing. The materials used can be natural or synthetic and can be used in any number of combinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    companies manufacture recycled paper into mulch, sold in rolls and installed much like black plastic. OtherA garden mulch is any material spread on the soil surface to modify the environment where the plant within a single garden or around a homestead. The proper selection and use of a mulch will result

  2. Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender Philosophy of time, as practiced throughout the last hundred venue for attacking questions about the nature of time--in sharp contrast to the primary venue slowly in philosophy of time.1 Since twentieth-century analytic philosophy as a whole often drew

  3. Untameable Timed Automata! (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    are a widely studied model for real­time systems. Since 8 years, several tools implement this model­life systems. 1 Introduction Real­Time Systems ­ Since their introduction by Alur and Dill in [AD94], timed au­ tomata are one of the most studied models for real­time systems. Numerous works have been devoted

  4. Untameable Timed Automata! (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    model for real-time systems. Since 8 years, several tools implement this model and are successfully used for a restricted class of timed automata, which has been sufficient for modeling numerous real-life systems. 1 Introduction Real-Time Systems - Since their introduction by Alur and Dill in [AD94], timed au- tomata are one

  5. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine?, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine ?powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine? represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

  6. Studies on upward flame spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollner, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    5.3: Progression of the pyrolysis front. . . . . . . . .100 x Figure A.5: Pyrolysis heights measured by surface3.5.2 Pyrolysis Heights . . . . . . . . . . . . vi 3.5.3

  7. Studies on upward flame spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollner, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    heat-release rate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pyrolysis height as a function of heat-release rate per unitis proportional to the heat-release rate shown only during

  8. Studies on upward flame spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollner, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    has been devoted to thermoplastics, PMMA being the materialthat often found for thermoplastic materials but higher thanfront face. Unlike most thermoplastic fuels used in previous

  9. spread_comp_02 TOC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherizeeEnergyMonumentWest From:FORM9,Introduction .

  10. Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels Michael Wahla and Hans-Jürgen Rahn PicoQuant GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29, D-12489 Berlin December 2006; accepted 19 February 2007; published online 23 March 2007 Time-correlated single photon

  11. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS Copyright create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall

  12. Date of Injury Date Time In Time Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : NORMAL Work Schedule (ie: MF, 8am5pm)First Name Last Name # of hours missed from work #12;RISK MGTDate of Injury Date Time In Time Out Total time worked medical appt no work within restrictions Next Medical Appointment(s): Tuesday of each week. Risk Mgt email: workcomp@colostate.edu; fax

  13. Time translation of quantum properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Vanni; R. Laura

    2008-12-03

    Based on the notion of time translation, we develop a formalism to deal with the logic of quantum properties at different times. In our formalism it is possible to enlarge the usual notion of context to include composed properties involving properties at different times. We compare our results with the theory of consistent histories.

  14. Time machines and quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J Hadley

    2006-12-02

    There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could be it.

  15. The LCLS Timing Event System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  16. Setting and Maintaining Arecibo Observatory's Timing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequency Standard 14 Time Code Generators TRAK Synchronized Time Code Generator 38 EECO Time Code Generator the time codes if the TRAC Synchronized Time Code Generator fails. Soon the TrueTime time code generator) Time Code Generator TRAK Synchronized Time Code Generator EECO Time Code Generator Transfer standard

  17. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-06-14

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  18. Local-time effect on small space-time scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Panchelyuga; V. A. Kolombet; M. S. Panchelyuga; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-10-18

    The paper presents an investigation of local-time effect - one of the manifestations of macroscopic fluctuations phenomena. Was shown the existence of the named effect for longitudinal distance between locations of measurements up to 500 meters. Also a structure of intervals distribution in neighborhood of local-time peak was studied and splitting of the peak was found out. Obtained results lead to conclusion about sharp anisotropy of space-time.

  19. Time Consistent Risk Measure Under Stopping Time Framework ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-13

    to the stochastic volatility of security markets and constantly change of economic and financial information, the earliest target reaching time is random, it then ...

  20. On the Flow of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F R Ellis

    2008-12-01

    Current theoretical physics suggests the flow of time is an illusion: the entire universe just is, with no special meaning attached to the present time. This paper points out that this view, in essence represented by usual space-time diagrams, is based on time-reversible microphysical laws, which fail to capture essential features of the time-irreversible nature of decoherence and the quantum measurement process, as well as macro-physical behaviour and the development of emergent complex systems, including life, which exist in the real universe. When these are taken into account, the unchanging block universe view of spacetime is best replaced by an evolving block universe which extends as time evolves, with the potential of the future continually becoming the certainty of the past; spacetime itself evolves, as do the entities within it. However this time evolution is not related to any preferred surfaces in spacetime; rather it is associated with the evolution of proper time along families of world lines. The default state of fundamental physics should not be taken to be a time irreversible evolution of physical states: it is an ongoing irreversible development of time itself.

  1. Time is not the problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Dreyer

    2009-04-22

    Attempts to quantize general relativity encounter an odd problem. The Hamiltonian that normally generates time evolution vanishes in the case of general relativity as a result of diffeomorphism invariance. The theory seems to be saying that time does not exist. The most obvious feature of our world, namely that time seems to progress and that the world changes accordingly becomes a problem in this presumably fundamental theory. This is called the problem of time. In this essay we argue that this problem is the result of an unphysical idealization. We are caught in this "problem of time" trap because we took a wrong turn in the early days of relativity by permanently including a split of geometry and matter into our physical theories. We show that another possibility exists that circumvents the problem of time and also sheds new light on other problems like the cosmological constant problem and the horizon problem in early universe cosmology.

  2. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  3. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  4. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  5. Commencement Ceremony Department Time Location Department and Major Time Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    Engineering 15:30 Bldg. 63 Classroom 01 (2nd Fl.) Industrial and Management Systems Engineering 15:30 Bldg. 63 and Management 15:30 Bldg. 63 Classroom 01 (2nd Fl.) Department Time Location Department and Major Time Location:30 Bldg. 57 202 Modern Mechanical Engineering 10:30 Bldg. 57 202 Industrial and Management Systems

  6. 49 Stress-timed vs. Syllable-timed Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehler, Jacques

    49 Stress-timed vs. Syllable- timed Languages Marina Nespor Mohinish Shukla Jacques Mehler 1; Prince 1983; Nespor & Vogel 1989; chapter 43: representations of word stress), the element that "establishes order" in the flow of speech is stress: universally, stressed and unstressed positions alternate

  7. Time Structure of Muonic Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cazon; R. A. Vazquez; A. A. Watson; E. Zas

    2003-11-10

    An analytical description of the time structure of the pulses induced by muons in air showers at ground level is deduced assuming the production distance distribution for the muons can be obtained elsewhere. The results of this description are compared against those obtained from simulated showers using AIRES. Major contributions to muon time delays are identified and a relation between the time structure and the depth distribution is unveiled.

  8. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    v List of Tables Comparison of time migration and depthof seismic imaging: time migration and depth migration. TimeComparison of time migration and depth migration Adequate

  9. Time and maps Menno-Jan Kraak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and maps Menno-Jan Kraak Time and maps ! · Why interested in time? · What is time and · How is time perceived? · How is time represented? Why interested in time? GIScience perspective) - analysis of changes over time - analysis of patterns of change over time ! · Development of methods

  10. Quantum gravity, the origin of time and time's arrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffat, J.W. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-03-01

    The local Lorentz and diffeomorphism symmetries of Einstein's gravitational theory are spontaneously broken by a Higgs mechanism by invoking a phase transition in the early universe, at a critical temperature [Tc] below which the symmetry is restored. The spontaneous breakdown of the vacuum state generates an external time, and the wave function of the universe satisfies a time-dependent Schroedinger equation, which reduces to the Wheeler-deWitt equation in the classical regime for T<[Tc], allowing a semiclassical WKB approximation to the wave function. The conservation of energy is spontaneously violated for T>[Tc], and matter is created fractions of seconds after the big bang, generating the matter in the Universe. The time direction of the vacuum expectation value of the scalar Higgs field generates a time asymmetry, which defines the cosmological arrow of time and the direction of increasing entropy as the Lorentz symmetry is restored at low temperatures. 52 refs.

  11. Heat release timing in a nonpremixed Helmholtz pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.M. (Tam Kang Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)); Waldherr, G.; Jagoda, J.I.; Zinn, B.T. (Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Lab. for Pulse Combustion Processing)

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanism by which heat release fluctuations drive pressure pulsations in Helmholtz pulse combustors with nonpremixed fuel and air injection, similar to those used in commercialized pulse furnaces. Flow and flame spread in the mixing chamber were mapped using high-speed shadowgraphy, extensive laser Doppler velocimetry, and radical imaging. Flow visualization and velocity measurements showed that a fuel jet followed by an air jet enter the pulse combustor as soon as the combustor pressure drops below the reactants' supply pressures. If most of the heat were released at that time, the heat release and pressure fluctuations would be out of phase, which according to Rayleigh's criterion, would prevent pulse combustion operation. In practice, pulse combustion operation is attained through the interaction of several processes. First, the fuel jet is ignited as soon as it enters the mixing chamber, generating pockets of burning gas. This reacting flow is entrained and convected by the air jet, which follows the fuel jet into the combustor, first downstream and then upstream in the mixing chamber. Simultaneously, fuel and air continue to enter the combustor, but are not immediately ignited, either because of excessive flame stretch caused by the fast moving fuel and air jets or because the air stream has displaced any hot gases that could act as ignition sources. Once the reacting gas pockets return to the upstream half of the mixing chamber, they ignite the combustible mixture that has collected there. This causes a rapid increase in heat release rate, which leads the pressure oscillation by around 30[degree]. This investigation showed that the interaction between complex flow and combustion process within the mixing chamber causes the time delay needed to produce heat release oscillations that are nearly in phase with the pressure oscillations, thus assuring pulse combustion operation.

  12. Quantum superposition principle and gravitational collapse: Scattering times for spherical shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrus, M.; Hajicek, P.

    2005-09-15

    A quantum theory of spherically symmetric thin shells of null dust and their gravitational field is studied. In Nucl. Phys. B603, 555 (2001), it has been shown how superpositions of quantum states with different geometries can lead to a solution of the singularity problem and black hole information paradox: the shells bounce and re-expand and the evolution is unitary. The corresponding scattering times will be defined in the present paper. To this aim, a spherical mirror of radius R{sub m} is introduced. The classical formula for scattering times of the shell reflected from the mirror is extended to quantum theory. The scattering times and their spreads are calculated. They have a regular limit for R{sub m}{yields}0 and they reveal a resonance at E{sub m}=c{sup 4}R{sub m}/2G. Except for the resonance, they are roughly of the order of the time the light needs to cross the flat space distance between the observer and the mirror. Some ideas are discussed of how the construction of the quantum theory could be changed so that the scattering times become considerably longer.

  13. Time Dependence of ACIS Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    Time Dependence of ACIS Contamination Chandra Calibration Workshop 27 October 2003 Catherine Grant Source · Measuring the decay · Monitoring contamination with the ECS · Models of ECS time dependence · Monitoring contamination with the LETG · Agreement between models #12;ACIS External Calibration Source

  14. STARBASE: MANAGING CONTENTION AND TIMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    systems (RT­DBMS) has primarily based on simulation. This chapter discusses how current real­time technology has been applied to architect an actual RT­DBMS on a real­time microkernel operating system. A real RT­DBMS must confront many practical issues which simulations typically ignore: race conditions

  15. The Time of Our Lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor, David Hugh

    2001-01-01

    The article shows how McTaggart’s distinction between A- and B-series ways of locating events in time prompted and enabled the twentieth century’s most important advances in the philosophy of time. It argues that, even if the B-series represents...

  16. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R N Manchester

    2006-04-13

    Given sufficient sensitivity, pulsar timing observations can make a direct detection of gravitational waves passing over the Earth. Pulsar timing is most sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies in the nanoHertz region, with the most likely astronomical sources being binary super-massive black holes in galaxy cores. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to make precision timing observations of a sample of about 20 millisecond pulsars with a principal goal of making a direct detection of gravitational waves. Observations commenced about one year ago and so far sub-microsecond timing residuals have been achieved for more than half of these pulsars. New receiver and software systems are being developed with the aim of reducing these residuals to the level believed necessary for a positive detection of gravitational waves.

  17. Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the time-dependent generalization of an 'ordinary' autonomous human musculo-skeletal biomechanics. We start with the configuration manifold of human body, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF). This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. On this extended configuration space we develop time-dependent biomechanical Lagrangian dynamics, using derived jet spaces of velocities and accelerations, as well as the underlying geometric evolution of the mass-inertia matrix. Keywords: Human time-dependent biomechanics, configuration manifold, jet spaces, geometric evolution

  18. Time-Domain Reflectometry for Tamper Indication in Unattended Monitoring Systems for Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Smith, Leon E.; Moore, David E.; Sheen, David M.; Conrad, Ryan C.

    2014-12-17

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended, remotely monitored measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) leads a collaboration that is exploring various tamper-indicating (TI) measures that could help to address some of the long-standing detector and data-transmission authentication challenges with IAEA’s unattended systems. PNNL is investigating the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This report describes PNNL’s progress and preliminary findings from the first year of the study, and describes the path forward.

  19. Pulse transmission receiver with higher-order time derivative pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-08-12

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission receiver includes: a front-end amplification/processing circuit; a synchronization circuit coupled to the front-end amplification/processing circuit; a clock coupled to the synchronization circuit; a trigger signal generator coupled to the clock; and at least one higher-order time derivative pulse generator coupled to the trigger signal generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  20. Large-Scale Variability Characterization and Robust Design Techniques for Nanoscale SRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    2.22 Definition of WTV and WTI from measured N-61]. The write trip voltage (WTV) is defined as the voltageillustrates the definitions of WTV and WTI on the N-curve.

  1. Analysis and Modeling of Large-Scale Variation on DACs and SRAMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Henry Arnold

    2013-01-01

    a) Test setups for SVNM and SINM (plus WTV and WTI). (b)SVNM, SINM, WTV, and WTI. . 58as write trip voltage (WTV) while the peak current is

  2. Time parallel gravitational collapse simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas; Ruprecht, Daniel; Krause, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates the applicability of the parallel-in-time method Parareal to the numerical solution of the Einstein gravity equations for the spherical collapse of a massless scalar field. To account for the shrinking of the spatial domain in time, a tailored load balancing scheme is proposed and compared to load balancing based on number of time steps alone. The performance of Parareal is studied for both the sub-critical and black hole case; our experiments show that Parareal generates substantial speedup and, in the super-critical regime, can also reproduce the black hole mass scaling law.

  3. User Experiment Time-Line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiment Time-Line Event Target Call for proposal 2 months before proposals are due PAC Proposals Due 7 weeks before PAC meeting TAC Report for PAC Proposals (includes...

  4. Time Machine at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; I. V. Volovich

    2007-10-25

    Recently, black hole and brane production at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been widely discussed. We suggest that there is a possibility to test causality at the LHC. We argue that if the scale of quantum gravity is of the order of few TeVs, proton-proton collisions at the LHC could lead to the formation of time machines (spacetime regions with closed timelike curves) which violate causality. One model for the time machine is a traversable wormhole. We argue that the traversable wormhole production cross section at the LHC is of the same order as the cross section for the black hole production. Traversable wormholes assume violation of the null energy condition (NEC) and an exotic matter similar to the dark energy is required. Decay of the wormholes/time machines and signatures of time machine events at the LHC are discussed.

  5. Vocal Timing in the Bat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Jenna N

    2013-05-01

    respond to continuous noise by increasing their call rate, and that the switch between the responses to intermittent noise and continuous noise occurs at a duty cycle of 50% or higher. Overall, this dissertation establishes that bats alter the timing...

  6. TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    MASTER CON TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970 ADVANCE REGISTRATION NOVEMBER 3-21 IN, please leave it or pass it along so that other students may use it. #12;Winter Quarter 1970. Examination

  7. Modeling of Time with Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor I. Smolyaninov; Yu-Ju Hung

    2011-05-12

    Metamaterials have been already used to model various exotic "optical spaces". Here we demonstrate that mapping of monochromatic extraordinary light distribution in a hyperbolic metamaterial along some spatial direction may model the "flow of time". This idea is illustrated in experiments performed with plasmonic hyperbolic metamaterials. Appearance of the "statistical arrow of time" is examined in an experimental scenario which emulates a Big Bang-like event.

  8. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  9. On the Nature of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radovan, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The paper puts forward a conceptual framework in which the phenomenon of time can be presented and discussed in a proper way. We argue that change is ontologically and epistemologically a more basic phenomenon than time. Time is an abstract entity created by the human mind on the basis of the experience of change. Physical reality is a process of ceaseless becoming and vanishing; time is not a part of that process. Time is the abstract bank in relation to which we measure the intensity and amount of the flow (change) of physical reality. We must differentiate physical reality from abstract entities (language) by means of which we speak about this reality. It is necessary to differentiate a formal description (formulas) from its interpretation: a correct formal description can be interpreted in a logically inconsistent and factually wrong way. We argue that the discourse about the relativity of time joins (mixes) physical reality and language, and gives an inconsistent interpretation of correct formulas. Regar...

  10. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  11. Measuring time with physical clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esteban Castro-Ruiz; Flaminia Giacomini; ?aslav Brukner

    2015-07-07

    In general relativity, the picture of spacetime assigns an ideal clock to each spacetime point. Being ideal, gravitational effects due to these clocks are ignored and the flow of time according to one clock is not affected by the presence of surrounding clocks. However, if time is defined operationally, as a pointer position of a physical clock that obeys the laws of quantum mechanics and general relativity, such a picture is at most a convenient fiction. We show that the mass-energy equivalence implies gravitational interaction between the clocks, while the superposition of energy eigenstates leads to a non-fixed metric background. Based only on the assumption that both quantum mechanics and general relativity are valid in this situation, we show that the clocks necessarily get entangled through time dilation effect, which eventually leads to a loss of coherence of a single clock. Hence, the time as measured by a single clock is not well-defined. However, the general relativistic notion of time is recovered in the classical limit of clocks.

  12. Static timing analysis in VLSI design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shuo

    2006-01-01

    II.B Static Timing AnalysisStatic Timing Analysis in the Design Flow FalseChip Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I.C Static Timing

  13. Time Series Analysis 1 Time series in astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    (supernovae, gamma-ray bursts) Difficulties in astronomical time series Gapped data streams: Diurnal & monthly phenomena: thermonuclear (novae, X-ray bursts), magnetic reconnection (solar/stellar flares), star death); pulsation (helioseismology, Cepheids) Stochastic phenomena: accretion (CVs, X-ray binaries, Seyfert gals

  14. Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions Liang Fu, C. L. Kane, and E. J. Mele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Charles

    ) effect. Unlike two dimensions, where a single Z2 topological invariant governs the effect, in three (STI) topological insulators. The WTI are like layered 2D QSH states, but are destroyed by disorder will refer to as weak (WTI) and strong (STI) topological insulators. With disorder, the WTI is equivalent

  15. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  16. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE�s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE�s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  17. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  18. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  19. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  20. Precision Timing Via Cerenkov Radiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ) beam splitter EG&G Ortec 9306 EG&G Ortec 9306 Microchannel­plate Photo Multiplier (MCP­PMT) 1 GHz Preamplifier Semiconductor Photo Diode 1 GHz Preamplifier EG&G Ortec 9307 EG&G Ortec 9307 ``Pico Timing Converter (TAC) 10 ns delay Stop Start Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA) beam splitter EG&G Ortec 9306 1 GHz

  1. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabil Ghodbane

    2002-12-12

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  2. Theory of Earthquake Recurrence Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saichev; D. Sornette

    2006-05-31

    The statistics of recurrence times in broad areas have been reported to obey universal scaling laws, both for single homogeneous regions (Corral, 2003) and when averaged over multiple regions (Bak et al.,2002). These unified scaling laws are characterized by intermediate power law asymptotics. On the other hand, Molchan (2005) has presented a mathematical proof that, if such a universal law exists, it is necessarily an exponential, in obvious contradiction with the data. First, we generalize Molchan's argument to show that an approximate unified law can be found which is compatible with the empirical observations when incorporating the impact of the Omori law of earthquake triggering. We then develop the full theory of the statistics of inter-event times in the framework of the ETAS model of triggered seismicity and show that the empirical observations can be fully explained. Our theoretical expression fits well the empirical statistics over the whole range of recurrence times, accounting for different regimes by using only the physics of triggering quantified by Omori's law. The description of the statistics of recurrence times over multiple regions requires an additional subtle statistical derivation that maps the fractal geometry of earthquake epicenters onto the distribution of the average seismic rates in multiple regions. This yields a prediction in excellent agreement with the empirical data for reasonable values of the fractal dimension $d \\approx 1.8$, the average clustering ratio $n \\approx 0.9$, and the productivity exponent $\\alpha \\approx 0.9$ times the $b$-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law.

  3. SHARP - III: First Use Of Adaptive Optics Imaging To Constrain Cosmology With Gravitational Lens Time Delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Geoff C F; Wong, Kenneth C; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Chiueh, Tzihong; Halkola, Aleksi; Hu, I Shing; Auger, Matthew W; Koopmans, Leon V E; Lagattuta, David J; McKean, John P; Vegetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of $\\sim 7\\%$. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ1...

  4. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  5. Treating Time Travel Quantum Mechanically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John-Mark A. Allen

    2014-10-10

    The fact that closed timelike curves (CTCs) are permitted by general relativity raises the question as to how quantum systems behave when time travel to the past occurs. Research into answering this question by utilising the quantum circuit formalism has given rise to two theories: Deutschian-CTCs (D-CTCs) and "postselected" CTCs (P-CTCs). In this paper the quantum circuit approach is thoroughly reviewed, and the strengths and shortcomings of D-CTCs and P-CTCs are presented in view of their non-linearity and time travel paradoxes. In particular, the "equivalent circuit model"---which aims to make equivalent predictions to D-CTCs, while avoiding some of the difficulties of the original theory---is shown to contain errors. The discussion of D-CTCs and P-CTCs is used to motivate an analysis of the features one might require of a theory of quantum time travel, following which two overlapping classes of new theories are identified. One such theory, the theory of "transition probability" CTCs (T-CTCs), is fully developed. The theory of T-CTCs is shown not to have certain undesirable features---such as time travel paradoxes, the ability to distinguish non-orthogonal states with certainty, and the ability to clone or delete arbitrary pure states---that are present with D-CTCs and P-CTCs. The problems with non-linear extensions to quantum mechanics are discussed in relation to the interpretation of these theories, and the physical motivations of all three theories are discussed and compared.

  6. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester

    2007-11-12

    Detection and study of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is a major goal of current astrophysics. Ground-based laser-interferometer systems such as LIGO and VIRGO are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies of order 100 Hz, whereas space-based systems such as LISA are sensitive in the millihertz regime. Precise timing observations of a sample of millisecond pulsars widely distributed on the sky have the potential to detect gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Potential sources of such waves include binary super-massive black holes in the cores of galaxies, relic radiation from the inflationary era and oscillations of cosmic strings. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of such a system in which 20 millisecond pulsars have been observed using the Parkes radio telescope at three frequencies at intervals of two -- three weeks for more than two years. Analysis of these data has been used to limit the gravitational wave background in our Galaxy and to constrain some models for its generation. The data have also been used to investigate fluctuations in the interstellar and Solar-wind electron density and have the potential to investigate the stability of terrestrial time standards and the accuracy of solar-system ephemerides.

  7. Timing the Parkes Multibeam Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester; A. G. Lyne; F. Camilo; V. M. Kaspi; I. H. Stairs; F. Crawford; D. J. Morris; J. F. Bell; N. D'Amico

    1999-11-17

    Measurement of accurate positions, pulse periods and period derivatives is an essential follow-up to any pulsar survey. The procedures being used to obtain timing parameters for the pulsars discovered in the Parkes multibeam pulsar survey are described. Completed solutions have been obtained so far for about 80 pulsars. They show that the survey is preferentially finding pulsars with higher than average surface dipole magnetic fields. Eight pulsars have been shown to be members of binary systems and some of the more interesting results relating to these are presented.

  8. Regression quantiles for time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Zongwu

    2002-02-01

    ~see, e+g+, Ibragimov and Linnik, 1971, p+ 316!+ Namely, partition REGRESSION QUANTILES FOR TIME SERIES 187 $1, + + + , n% into 2qn 1 1 subsets with large block of size r 5 rn and small block of size s 5 sn+ Set q 5 qn 5 ? n rn 1 sn? , (A.7) where {x...! are the standard Lindeberg–Feller conditions for asymptotic normality of Qn,1 for the independent setup+ Let us first establish ~A+8!+ To this effect, we define the large-block size rn by rn 5 {~nhn!102} and the small-block size sn 5 {~nhn!1020log n}+ Then, as n r...

  9. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  10. Time Scales in Spectator Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; for the ALADIN collaboration

    2000-09-07

    Proton-proton correlations and correlations of p-alpha, d-alpha, and t-alpha from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations. PACS numbers: 25.70.Pq, 21.65.+f, 25.70.Mn

  11. Time-Bounded Verification Joel Ouaknine1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, James

    Time-Bounded Verification Jo¨el Ouaknine1 , Alexander Rabinovich2 , and James Worrell1 1 Oxford prob- lems for timed automata over time intervals of fixed, bounded length. One of our main results is that time-bounded language inclusion for timed automata is 2EXPSPACE-complete. We also investigate the satis

  12. Topology, finite time Lyapunov exponents, and barriers for diffusive transport in advection-diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Xianzhu [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Boozer, A.H. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A wide range of transport problems are of advection-diffusion type. Typical fluid problems of this type are the relaxation of temperature differences in a room or the spread of a contaminant in a river. Important examples in plasma include the relaxation of electrons in a region of stochastic magnetic field lines and the evolution of the magnetic field embedded in a conducting fluid. The archetypal model equation is the advection-diffusion equation. The quantity being transported is {phi}. The flow velocity of the medium, v(x, t), is assumed given and independent of {phi}. The diffusive flux is {Tau}{sub d} = -D{del}{phi}. If the flow is chaotic, the properties of the transport are determined by the spatial and time dependence of the finite time Lyapunov exponent {lambda}({xi}, t). The rapid diffusive transport occurs only along the field line (s line) of the vector s, which defines the stable direction in which neighboring points asymptotically converge. The topology of the s lines affects the diffusive transport through the finite time Lyapunov exponent. We discover that the spatial variation of the finite time Lyapunov exponent along the s lines is smooth and determined by the topology of the s lines. For example, the finite time Lyapunov exponent reaches local minima if the s line makes a sharp bend. These topological bends hinder the diffusive transport and act as a barrier for diffusive relaxation. Such barriers for diffusion reside inside the chaotic region and they persist even the flow is highly chaotic. In the case of the electron relaxation in a region of stochastic field lines, there is a rapid diffusive relaxation of the spatial inhomogeneity in the electron distribution function which is typical of the chaotic transport of a passive scalar. But the diffusive relaxation of the pitch angle distribution is much slower.

  13. Time and Location in Sensor Networks Institute for Pervasive Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the observed physical processes. Examples include monitoring the be- havior of animals in their natural habitats, monitoring the spreading of environmental pollutions in air and water, and monitoring seismic influences. The small size severely limits the onboard resources of a sensor node (energy, communication

  14. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  15. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  16. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  17. Real time analysis under EDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  18. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction Francesco Sottile LSI, Ecole Polytechnique (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Palaiseau, 7 February 2012 1 / 32 #12;Outline 1 Frontiers 4 Perspectives and Resources Francesco Sottile (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

  19. INVESTIGATION Genomic Background and Generation Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    INVESTIGATION Genomic Background and Generation Time Influence Deleterious Mutation Rates variation is generated and how selection shapes mutation rates over evolutionary time requires knowledge, genomic background and generation time, on deleterious mutation in Daphnia pulicaria, a cyclically

  20. AUTOMATIC PROGRAM TIMING PROFILES WITH FTN4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Richard.

    2010-01-01

    September 22-25, 1980 AUTOMATIC PROGRAM TIMING PROFILES WITHW-7405-ENG-48 LBL-1l290 Automatic Program Timing ProfilesW-1405-ENG-48 LBL-11290 Automatic Program Timing Profiles

  1. Time Travel and the Reality of Spontaneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Raju

    2008-04-05

    Contrary to the informed consensus, time travel implies spontaneity (as distinct from chance) so that time travel can only be of the second kind.

  2. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  3. Time change Almut E. D. Veraart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time change Almut E. D. Veraart CREATES University of Aarhus Aarhus Denmark +45 8942 2142 averaart 272595 winkel@stats.ox.ac.uk TimeChange8.tex ­ LaTeX2e Abstract The mathematical concept of time­changing continuous­time stochastic pro- cesses can be regarded as one of the standard tools for building financial

  4. Updatable Timed Automata Patricia Bouyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    decidable and undecidable classes of updatable timed automata. We also study the expressive power classes of timed systems. 1 Introduction Since their introduction by Alur and Dill [AD90,AD94], timed automata are one of the most-studied and most-established models for real-time systems. Numerous works have

  5. Time Zone Information Compiled by John Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, John

    Deviations From Standard Time 1 The U.S. is on daylight saving time from the first Sunday in April @ 2am til the last Sunday in October @ 2am. Western Europe is on daylight saving time generally from the last Sunday designation. Additionally, it proclaims daylight saving time as does Europe. India's standard is at +05

  6. Timed CSP: A Retrospective Joel Ouaknine 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    APC 2005 Timed CSP: A Retrospective Jo¨el Ouaknine 1 Oxford University Computing Laboratory, UK Timed CSP, from its inception nearly twenty years ago to very recent semantical and algorithmic developments. Key words: Process algebra, Timed CSP. Timed CSP was first proposed in 1986 by Reed and Roscoe

  7. A Concurrency-Preserving Translation from Time Petri Nets to Networks of Timed Automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    A Concurrency-Preserving Translation from Time Petri Nets to Networks of Timed Automata Sandie time Petri nets (TPN) [17] and networks of timed automata (NTA) [3]. These formalisms have different}@lsv.ens-cachan.fr Abstract--Real-time distributed systems may be modeled in different formalisms such as time Petri nets (TPN

  8. Time and Causation 1 Walter J Freeman Perception of time and causation through the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    Time and Causation 1 Walter J Freeman Perception of time and causation through the kinesthesia, kinesthesia, perception, time Abstract Perception is an intentional action through space in time by which. Perceived time differs from world time in ways that are determined by the neural mechanisms

  9. Time and Causation 1 Walter J Freeman Perception of time and causation through the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    Time and Causation 1 Walter J Freeman Perception of time and causation through the kinesthesia, perception, time Abstract Perception is an intentional action through space in time by which the finite brain. Perceived time differs from world time in ways that are determined by the neural mechanisms

  10. Time and Matter An International Colloquium on the Science of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Matter An International Colloquium on the Science of Time August 11 - 17, 2002 at Venice International University, Italy Topics: Precise measurements of time Arrow of time in classical and quantum physics Tunneling time and various paradoxa in quantum physics Matter, antimatter and microscopic time

  11. Timed AlternatingTime Temporal Logic # Thomas A. Henzinger 1 and Vinayak S. Prabhu 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    powerful options for updating the state of the game, advancing time, or blocking time. Second, we wish in order to specify real­time objectives for games played on timed structures. We define the semantics Timed games are a formal model for the synthesis of real­time systems [22, 20]. While much research e

  12. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  13. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Sebastian; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2015-01-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of genera...

  14. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

  15. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-23

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

  16. Did a Switch in Time Save Nine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Kevin M.; Ho, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Benjamin A. Kleinerman. 2002. “A Switch in Time Saves Nine:John W. 1969. “The Big Switch: Justice Roberts and theG. 2005. “When Did the ”Switch in Time” Actually Occur? :

  17. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

  18. Arnold Schwarzenegger REAL-TIME GRID RELIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research (PIER) California Energy Commission Beth Chambers Contract Manager Jamie Patterson (VSA) prototype to monitor system voltage conditions and provide real time dispatchers with reliabilityArnold Schwarzenegger Governor REAL-TIME GRID RELIABILITY MANAGEMENT California ISO Real

  19. Space does not exist, so time can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fotini Markopoulou

    2009-09-10

    It is often said that in general relativity time does not exist. This is because the Einstein equations generate motion in time that is a symmetry of the theory, not true time evolution. In quantum gravity, the timelessness of general relativity clashes with time in quantum theory and leads to the ``problem of time'' which, in its various forms, is the main obstacle to a successful quantum theory of gravity. I argue that the problem of time is a paradox, stemming from an unstated faulty premise. Our faulty assumption is that space is real. I propose that what does not fundamentally exist is not time but space, geometry and gravity. The quantum theory of gravity will be spaceless, not timeless. If we are willing to throw out space, we can keep time and the trade is worth it.

  20. Detection Methods for Astronomical Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coehlo, Nathan Kirk

    2010-01-01

    Time Series by Nathan Kirk Coehlo A dissertation submittedCopyright 2010 by Nathan Kirk Coehlo Abstract DetectionTime Series by Nathan Kirk Coehlo Doctor of Philosophy in

  1. REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01

    for grid topology changes (implying online  security and Security Constrained Economic Dispatch (SCED) procedures.   Built upon GRID-grid, reliability, real?time operator tools, time synchronized phasor  measurements, voltage security.  

  2. Sandia Energy - Time-Resolved FTIR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time-Resolved FTIR Time-Resolved FTIRAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:31:27+00:00 Combustion chemistry involves many exothermic reactions, which produce hot molecules. For these...

  3. Can hedge funds time market liquidity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Charles

    We explore a new dimension of fund managers' timing ability by examining whether they can time market liquidity through adjusting their portfolios' market exposure as aggregate liquidity conditions change. Using a large ...

  4. VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES volatility time, to show convexity of option prices in the underlying asset if the contract function is convex as well as continuity and monotonicity of the option price in the volatility

  5. Each instant of time a new Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir Aharonov; Sandu Popescu; Jeff Tollaksen

    2013-05-07

    We present an alternative view of quantum evolution in which each moment of time is viewed as a new "universe" and time evolution is given by correlations between them.

  6. Time symmetry in wave function collapse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Bedingham

    2015-02-25

    A framework for wave function collapse models that is symmetric under time reversal is presented. Within this framework there are equivalent pictures of collapsing wave functions evolving in both time directions. The backwards-in-time Born rule can be broken by an initial condition on the Universe resulting in asymmetric behaviour. Similarly the forwards-in-time Born rule can in principle be broken by a final condition on the Universe.

  7. Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded to Large-Scale Distributed Stephen Boyd Neal Parikh Lectures, UC Berkeley, 3/30/2015 1 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large-Scale Distributed Optimization Summary 2 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large

  8. Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Convex Optimization: from Real-Time Embedded to Large-Scale Distributed Stephen Boyd Neal Parikh of Edinburgh, June 25 2014 1 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large-Scale Distributed Optimization Summary 2 #12;Outline Convex Optimization Real-Time Embedded Optimization Large

  9. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An Introduction Francesco Sottile Laboratoire des Solides) Belfast, 29 Jun 2007 Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Francesco Sottile #12;Intro Formalism Linear Response Formalism 3 TDDFT in practice: The ALDA: Achievements and Shortcomings 4 Resources Time

  10. Symbolic Verification of Timed Asynchronous Hardware Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Ken

    of system level verification by applying symbolic model checking techniques to help mitigate the state constraints into verification models to prove timed behavioral correctness of systems employing timed protocol to model timing in asynchronous hardware protocols ­ a novel mapping of tim- ing into the verification flow

  11. Timed Automata with Observers under Energy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    of schedules given an initial energy level of one. For one-clock priced timed automata both the lowerTimed Automata with Observers under Energy Constraints Patricia Bouyer Lab. Spécification et@lsv.ens-cachan.fr ABSTRACT In this paper we study one-clock priced timed automata in which prices can grow linearly ( p = k

  12. Business Time in the Foreign Exchange Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Business Time in the Foreign Exchange Markets Mark J L Orr Centre for Cognitive Science Edinburgh University June 1997 #12; Business Time in the Foreign Exchange Markets Mark J L Orr y Centre for Cognitive; Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 The Price Change Scaling Law 5 3 Business Time 7 4 The BZW Data 11 5 Volatility

  13. Finite-Time Stability of Discrete-Time Nonlinear Systems: Analysis and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite-Time Stability of Discrete-Time Nonlinear Systems: Analysis and Design S. Mastellone, P. Dorato, C. T. Abdallah Abstract-- Finite-time stability of nonlinear discrete-time systems is studied we propose a new analysis result for fi- nite time stability of deterministic and stochastic discrete

  14. Time_Limit_Extension_Form.docx | Revised: 10/13/2014 Time Limit Extension Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Time_Limit_Extension_Form.docx | Revised: 10/13/2014 Time Limit Extension Request Form OFFICE on your request. PURPOSE The Time Limit Extension may be filed when a student nears the end of the time limitation for completion of the requirements for their degree but needs more time to complete the degree

  15. A Linear-Time Approach for Static Timing Analysis Covering All Process Corners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    A Linear-Time Approach for Static Timing Analysis Covering All Process Corners Sari Onaissi into the timing analysis of a circuit. With the increase in the number of interesting process vari- ables process variations lead to circuit timing variability and a corresponding timing yield loss. Traditional

  16. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation. 8 figs.

  17. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation.

  18. Relativity theory in time-space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ákos G. Horváth

    2014-11-05

    The concept of time-space defined in an earlier paper of the author is certain generalization of the so-called space-time. In this paper we introduce the concept of time-space manifold. In the homogeneous case, the time-space manifold is a differentiable manifold with such tangent spaces which have certain fixed time-space structure. We redefine the fundamental concepts of global relativity theory with respect to this general situation. We study the concepts of affine connection, parallel transport, curvature tensor and Einstein equation, respectively.

  19. Spatial spread of farm animal diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernon, Matthew Christopher

    , Catriona Mackay, Peter Maydell, David McKnight, Janet McKnight, Owen McKnight, Sam Mold, Jess Monaghan, Pat Reynolds, Kat Richardson, Mark Simmonds, Philippa Steele, and Kate Stitt. Any remaining errors are my own responsibility, of course. Finally, I wish... (Wasserman and Faust, 1994; Carrington et al., 2005). In general, however, these studies have been interested in how the network features of an individual (typically its centrality in a net- work) may be used to assess that individual’s risk of contracting...

  20. stay healthy, my friends PREVENT THE SPREAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    secretions by close personal contact, such as coughing, sharing drinks, and kissing, or being in close NOT cough into anyone's face. Cough into your sleeve or tissue. Wash or sanitize hands frequently. drinking

  1. Cost and Sustainability Spread and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Based Services www.cs.cmu.edu/~Polly Farhan ul Haq, Zain Tariq, Umar Saif, LUMS, Lahore, Pakistan Agha Ali Raza, the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan and the United States Educational Foundation in Pakistan

  2. Income inequality, tax base and sovereign spreads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

    2011-01-01

    ROM JPN TUR QAT ZAF KOR KAZ HRV TUN LTU MAR CHL COL MEX MYSKAZ ZAF KOR MAR TUR QAT VNM HRV CHL TUN LTU MEX THA COL CHN

  3. Income inequality, tax base and sovereign spreads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

    2012-01-01

    ZAF TUR QAT KOR KAZ TUN MAR HRV LTU CHL COL MEX MYS CHN VNMTUR MAR QAT VNM CHL TUN LTU HRV MEX COL CHN THA LBN VEN PERFRA*), GREECE(GRC*), CROATIA(HRV), HUNGARY(HUN*), INDONESIA(

  4. Interstellar communication: The case for spread spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messerschmitt, David G

    2012-01-01

    D. G. Messerschmitt, Digital communication. Boston: KluwerDesign of interstellar digital communication links: Somein- sights from communication engineering,” Acta

  5. Ignition and spread of electrical wire fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xinyan

    2012-01-01

    1.1 Electrical Wire Fires 1.2 Literature Review . . 1.3d) Electrical fires. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the fire performance of electrical cables,” Fire Safety

  6. Modeling Malware Spreading Dynamics Michele Garetto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Torino Torino, Italy 10129 Email: garetto@polito.it Weibo Gong Department of Electrical and Computer. In particular, the Internet has become a powerful mechanism for propagating mali- cious software programs

  7. EcoCar Students Spread the Word

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An overview of the creative and engaging ways that teams participating in the EcoCar competition have worked to convey the benefits of advanced technology vehicles to policy makers and students across the U.S. and Canada.

  8. An interferometric study of spreading liquid films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavehpour, Hossein Pirouz

    2003-01-01

    Moving contact line problems involving polymeric materials and other complex fluids are encountered in many applications such as coating flows, gravity-driven drainage, and spin-coating operations. Viscous, capillary, ...

  9. Prevent the Spread of Zoonotic Diseases (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Josefa

    2008-11-10

    segundos para remover los ? g?rmenes. Cuando no dispone de agua tibia, l?vese las manos por m?s tiempo.? Cuando no dispone de jab?n y agua, use un desinfectante a base de ? alcohol. Practica la seguridad de alimento No consuma leche ni cualquier otro...

  10. Relationships between HIV spread and evolution examined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout UsRegional companies eye

  11. 3:2:1 Crack Spread

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotes &* j o n5 1:2:1 Crack

  12. page 40 Lab Times 6-2010 Journal Club Evolutionary Biology in Zrich, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Daniel

    genome. "The dis- ease agents harm the organism but before killing it, they spread to other organisms to understand the evolutionary dynamics of mobile DNA using epidemiological tools. Daniel Rankin, first author

  13. AN EFFECTIVE FRAMEWORK FOR THE MODELING OF SEASONAL PARAMETERS FOR MEASLES USING A CONTINUOUS TIME MODEL 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Halwagi, Ali

    2012-05-03

    City may be different than those in lesser-developed regions like Thailand. Estimation of model parameters provides us insight into the driving forces affecting the spread of the disease. _______________ This thesis follows the style of Chemical...

  14. Measuring journey time reliability in London using automated data collection systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schil, Mickaël (Mickaël René Jerôme)

    2012-01-01

    Service reliability is critical for both users and operators of transit systems. The rapid spread of Automated Data Collection Systems, such as Automated Fare Collection (AFC) and Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL), provides ...

  15. The Collapse of Time: Decennial Anniversaries and the Experience of Time in the German Democratic Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyberg, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    and Theory 19.2 (1980); David Carr, “Place and Time: On the19.2 (2005): 260-290. Carr, David. “Place and Time: On the

  16. Time-Energy Costs of Quantum Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau

    2014-05-08

    Time and energy of quantum processes are a tradeoff against each other. We propose to ascribe to any given quantum process a time-energy cost to quantify how much computation it performs. Here, we analyze the time-energy costs for general quantum measurements, along a similar line as our previous work for quantum channels, and prove exact and lower bound formulae for the costs. We use these formulae to evaluate the efficiencies of actual measurement implementations. We find that one implementation for a Bell measurement is optimal in time-energy. We also analyze the time-energy cost for unambiguous state discrimination and find evidence that only a finite time-energy cost is needed to distinguish any number of states.

  17. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  18. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  19. Time Reversal of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Toulouse III, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-08-15

    Using Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we study the time reversibility of Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in kicked optical lattices, showing that in the regime of quantum chaos, the dynamics can be inverted from explosion to collapse. The accuracy of time reversal decreases with the increase of atom interactions in BEC, until it is completely lost. Surprisingly, quantum chaos helps to restore time reversibility. These predictions can be tested with existing experimental setups.

  20. Halanay type inequalities on time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad\\ivar, Murat

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce Halanay type inequalities on time scales. By means of these inequalities we derive new global stability conditions for nonlinear dynamic equations on time scales. Giving several examples we show that beside generalization and extension to q-difference case, our results also provide improvements for the existing theory regarding differential and difference inequalites, which are the most important particular cases of dynamic inequalities on time scales.

  1. Gauge Gravity and Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu

    2012-07-11

    When we discuss problems on gravity, we can not avoid some fundamental physical problems, such as space-time, inertia, and inertial reference frame. The goal of this paper is to discuss the logic system of gravity theory and the problems of space-time, inertia, and inertial reference frame. The goal of this paper is to set up the theory on space-time in gauge theory of gravity. Based on this theory, it is possible for human kind to manipulate physical space-time on earth, and produce a machine which can physically prolong human's lifetime.

  2. Time-resolved photometry of cataclysmic variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Papadaki; H. M. J. Boffin; J. Cuypers; V. Stanishev; Z. Kraicheva; V. Genkov

    2003-12-18

    We present time-resolved photometry of two cataclysmic variables whose CCD photometric observations were obtained with the 1m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory in October 2002 and August 2003 and with the 1m telescope at Hoher List in Germany. Concerning MCT 2347-3144 we detect for the first time a period of 6.65h. For V1193 Ori the 3.96 h periodicity has for the first time been confirmed through time-resolved photometry.

  3. Hyperbolic statics in space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Pavlov; Sergey Kokarev

    2014-12-11

    Based on the concept of material event as an elementary material source that is concentrated on metric sphere of zero radius --- light-cone of Minkowski space-time, we deduce the analog of Coulomb's law for hyperbolic space-time field universally acting between the events of space-time. Collective field that enables interaction of world lines of a pair of particles at rest contains a standard 3-dimensional Coulomb's part and logarithmic addendum. We've found that the Coulomb's part depends on a fine balance between causal and geometric space-time characteristics (the two regularizations concordance).

  4. Time reversal symmetry and collapse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Bedingham; Owen Maroney

    2015-02-24

    Collapse models are modifications of quantum theory where the wave function is treated as physically real and the collapse of the wave function is a physical process. This appears to introduce a time reversal asymmetry into the dynamics of the wave function since the collapses affect only the future state. This paper challenges this conclusion, showing that in three different examples of time asymmetries associated with collapse models, if the physically real part of the model can be reduced to the locations in space and time about which collapses occur, then such a model works both forward and backward in time, in each case satisfying the Born rule. Despite the apparent asymmetry of the collapse process, these models in fact have time reversal symmetry. Any physically observed time asymmetries that arise in such models are due to the asymmetric imposition of initial or final time boundary conditions, rather than from an inherent asymmetry in the dynamical law. This is the standard explanation of time asymmetric behaviour resulting from time symmetric laws.

  5. Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Justin Coleman, P.E. Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014

  6. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Energy Management System (SCADA/EMS). In the long term, theadvanced real time control. SCADA is a category of softwareequipment and conditions. SCADA systems include hardware and

  7. Optimal timing problems in environmental economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the uncertainties and irreversibilities that are often inherent in environmental degradation, its prevention, and its economic consequences, environmental policy design can involve important problems of timing. ...

  8. Time & Fitness-Dependent Hamiltonian Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the time & fitness-dependent Hamiltonian form of human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. Starting with the Covariant Force Law, we first develop autonomous Hamiltonian biomechanics. Then we extend it using a powerful geometrical machinery consisting of fibre bundles, jet manifolds, polysymplectic geometry and Hamiltonian connections. In this way we derive time-dependent dissipative Hamiltonian equations and the fitness evolution equation for the general time & fitness-dependent human biomechanical system. Keywords: Human biomechanics, configuration bundle, Hamiltonian connections, jet manifolds, time & fitness-dependent dynamics

  9. San Pablo Avenue Pedestrian Signal Timing Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Ahn; Ragland, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Signals to Accommodate Pedestrian Travel. Road EngineeringM. Cynecki. A Review of Pedestrian Safety Research in theWalking Speeds for Pedestrian Clearance Timing Based on

  10. The Continuous Time Service Network Design Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-02

    ... School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA ... Fast shipping times (and low cost) are critical to the success of.

  11. Discrete-Time Scheduling under Real-Time Constraints Eduard Cerny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboulhamid, El Mostapha

    into a discrete- time relative schedule. Such a schedule serves as the basis for implementing a synchronous state-machine controller. Keywords: Timing diagrams, relative scheduling, real-time constraints, synchronous state machines that is suitable for synchronous system implementations. The input specification is in the form of timing diagrams

  12. A Real Time Operating System Survey What the heck is a Real Time system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    A Real Time Operating System Survey John Ford 1 #12; What the heck is a Real Time system anyway.'' From POSIX 1003.1: ``Realtime in operating systems: the ability of the operating system to pro­ vide­Time Operating System) has to have a real­time kernel ffl Good documentation ffl Good device support ffl Good

  13. On time-reversal and space-time harmonic processes for Markovian quantum channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Ticozzi; Michele Pavon

    2009-04-29

    The time reversal of a completely-positive, nonequilibrium discrete-time quantum Markov evolution is derived via a suitable adjointness relation. Space-time harmonic processes are introduced for the forward and reverse-time transition mechanisms, and their role for relative entropy dynamics is discussed.

  14. Real Time Voice Transmission Darshana Shah Real Time Voice transmission over Wireless medium using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    to 300+ MHz Receiver #12;Real Time Voice Transmission Darshana Shah - 3 - LFTX -- DC-30 MHz TransmitterReal Time Voice Transmission Darshana Shah - 1 - Real Time Voice transmission over Wireless medium Yu 06/07/2009 #12;Real Time Voice Transmission Darshana Shah - 2 - Abstract My project is to transmit

  15. Time-varying Spectral Analysis in Neurophysiological Time Series Using Hilbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcher, Brandon

    ability to detect time-varying coherence and phase properties. Key words: Coherence, electromyographic

  16. Capacity-Optimal Training for Space-Time Modulation over a Time-Varying Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    Capacity-Optimal Training for Space-Time Modulation over a Time-Varying Channel Christian B. Peel-autocorrelation function for time-varying MIMO channels, we find a lower bound on capacity for trained modulation, and find for differential unitary space-time modulation is discussed and compared with that for trained modulation. We

  17. Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jia

    Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Jia Li. Wang alipr.com #12;Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures How Visible Are Web Images? Keukenhof photos Jia Li, James Z. Wang alipr.com #12;Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures ALIPR: Automatic

  18. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ?10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  19. How Time Works in Quantum Systems: Overview of time ordering and time correlation in weakly perturbed atomic collisions and in strongly perturbed qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. McGuire; L. Kaplan; Kh. Kh. Shakov; A. Chalastaras; A. M. Smith; A. Godunov; H. Schmidt-Böcking; D. Uskov

    2005-12-29

    Time ordering may be defined by first defining the limit of no time ordering (NTO) in terms of a time average of an external interaction, V(t). Previously, time correlation was defined in terms of a similar limit called the independent time approximation (ITA). Experimental evidence for time correlation has not yet been distinguished from experimental evidence for time ordering.

  20. Continuous time random walk models for fractional space-time diffusion equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabir Umarov

    2014-09-14

    In this paper continuous time random walk models approximating fractional space-time diffusion processes are studied. Stochastic processes associated with the considered equations represent time-changed processes, where the time-change process is a L\\'evy's stable subordinator with the stability index $\\beta \\in (0,1).$ In the parer the convergence of constructed CTRWs to time-changed processes associated with the corresponding fractional diffusion equations are proved using a new analytic method.

  1. Gravity in Complex Hermitian Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali H. Chamseddine

    2006-10-09

    A generalized theory unifying gravity with electromagnetism was proposed by Einstein in 1945. He considered a Hermitian metric on a real space-time. In this work we review Einstein's idea and generalize it further to consider gravity in a complex Hermitian space-time.

  2. On the nature of cosmological time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magain, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Time is a parameter playing a central role in our most fundamental modeling of natural laws. Relativity theory shows that the comparison of times measured by different clocks depends on their relative motions and on the strength of the gravitational field in which they are embedded. In standard cosmology, the time parameter is the one measured by fundamental clocks, i.e. clocks at rest with respect to the expanding space. This proper time is assumed to flow at a constant rate throughout the whole history of the Universe. We make the alternative hypothesis that the rate at which cosmological time flows depends on the dynamical state of the Universe. In thermodynamics, the arrow of time is strongly related to the second law, which states that the entropy of an isolated system will always increase with time or, at best, stay constant. Hence, we assume that time measured by fundamental clocks is proportional to the entropy of the region of the Universe that is causally connected to them. Under that simple assumpt...

  3. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

    1998-09-29

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

  4. Time Fractional Formalism: Classical and Quantum Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosein Nasrolahpour

    2012-03-18

    In this review, we present some fundamental classical and quantum phenomena in view of time fractional formalism. Time fractional formalism is a very useful tool in describing systems with memory and delay. We hope that this study can provide a deeper understanding of the physical interpretations of fractional derivative.

  5. Response time distributions via reversed processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    Response time distributions via reversed processes Peter G. Harrison Maria G. Vigliotti Abstract in both the forward and reversed processes. There- fore if the reversed process is known, each node-sojourn time can be taken from either process. In particular, the reversed process can be used for the first

  6. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-06-09

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

  7. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laabs, Gary W. (Los Alamos, NM); Funk, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Asay, Blaine W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile.

  8. TimeVariable Photo-Evaporation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Throop, Henry

    TimeVariable Photo-Evaporation of Protoplanetary Disks Henry Throop (SwRI) John Bally (U. Colorado) #12;Takeaway: Photo-evaporation alters the disk structure in essentially unpredictable ways, because for disks formed at the same time in the same cluster. #12;30 Doradus: 100+ O/B stars Photo

  9. Automatic Verification of Multiqueue Discrete Timed Automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang, Zhe

    become a useful model to investigate the verification of real­ time systems and have been extensively studied. The expressive power of TA has many limitations in modeling, since many real­time systems. The MQDTA model can be used to specify and verify various systems with unbounded queues, such as a real

  10. Practical reporting times for environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

  11. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Ng, Esmond G. (Concord, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

  12. Multivariate Time Series Forecasting in Incomplete Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    Multivariate Time Series Forecasting in Incomplete Environments Technical Report PARG 08-03 Seung of Oxford December 2008 #12;Seung Min Lee and Stephen J. Roberts Technical Report PARG 08-03 Multivariate missing observations and forecasting future values in incomplete multivariate time series data. We study

  13. Compact discrete-time chaos generator circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Piotr

    Compact discrete-time chaos generator circuit P. Dudek and V.D. Juncu A three-transistor CMOS circuit is presented, with adjustable nonlinear characteristics, which can be used as a map that generates discrete-time chaotic signals. A method of constructing a chaos generator using two map circuits is also

  14. Count-doubling time safety circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rusch, Gordon K. (Downers Grove, IL); Keefe, Donald J. (Lemont, IL); McDowell, William P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a nuclear reactor count-factor-increase time monitoring circuit which includes a pulse-type neutron detector, and means for counting the number of detected pulses during specific time periods. Counts are compared and the comparison is utilized to develop a reactor scram signal, if necessary.

  15. Time-bin entangled photon holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Liang; J. D. Franson; T. B. Pittman

    2012-08-23

    The general concept of entangled photon holes is based on a correlated absence of photon pairs in an otherwise constant optical background. Here we consider the specialized case when this background is confined to two well-defined time bins, which allows the formation of time-bin entangled photon holes. We show that when the typical coherent state background is replaced by a true single-photon (Fock state) background, the basic time-bin entangled photon-hole state becomes equivalent to one of the time-bin entangled photon-pair states. We experimentally demonstrate these ideas using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source, linear optics, and post-selection to violate a Bell inequality with time-bin entangled photon holes.

  16. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore »simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  17. Relaxation times calculated from angular deflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Athanassoula; Ch. L. Vozikis; J. C. Lambert

    2001-08-21

    In this paper we measure the two-body relaxation time from the angular deflection of test particles launched in a rigid configuration of field particles. We find that centrally concentrated configurations have relaxation times that can be shorter than those of the corresponding homogeneous distributions by an order of magnitude or more. For homogeneous distributions we confirm that the relaxation time is proportional to the number of particles. On the other hand centrally concentrated configurations have a much shallower dependence, particularly for small values of the softening. The relaxation time increases with the inter-particle velocities and with softening. The latter dependence is not very strong, of the order of a factor of two when the softening is increased by an order of magnitude. Finally we show that relaxation times are the same on GRAPE-3 and GRAPE-4, dedicated computer boards with limited and high precision respectively.

  18. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  19. Constraints on Off-Axis GRB Jets in Type Ibc Supernovae From Late-Time Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Soderberg; D. A. Frail; M. H. Wieringa

    2005-12-06

    It has been suggested that the peculiar properties of the luminous Type Ic supernova SN 1998bw and its low-energy gamma-ray burst GRB 980425 may be understood if they originated in a standard gamma-ray burst explosion viewed far from the axis of the relativistic jet. In this scenario, strong radio emission is predicted from the jet on a timescale 1 to 10 years after the explosion as it decelerates and spreads into our line of sight. To test this hypothesis we have carried out late-time radio observations of SN 1998bw at $t=5.6$ years, yielding upper limits which are consistent with the continued fading of the supernova. We find these limits to be consistent with an off-axis jet only if the progenitor mass loss rate is $\\dot{M}\\lesssim 4 \\times 10^{-7}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ (for a wind velocity $v_w=1000$ km s$^{-1}$) or the fraction of the shock energy in magnetic fields is $\\epsilon_B \\lesssim 10^{-3}$. These values are low relative to those inferred for cosmological GRBs. We combine the SN 1998bw measurements with existing observations for a sample of 15 local Type Ibc supernovae to estimate that at most 6% produce collimated, relativistic outflows.

  20. Cherenkov radiation conversion and collection considerations for a gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostic for the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Mack, Joseph M.; Young, Carlton S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, Robert M. [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Stoeffl, Wolfgang [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Horsfield, Colin J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF system design requirements. A comprehensive, validated numerical study of candidate systems is providing essential information needed to make a down selection based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF logistics. This paper presents basic design considerations arising from the two-step conversion process from {gamma} rays to relativistic electrons to UV/visible Cherenkov radiation.

  1. Tunneling time calculations for general finite wavepackets based on the presence time formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. del Barco; M. Ortuño; V. Gasparian

    2015-05-31

    We analyze the tunneling time problem via the presence time formalism. With this method we reproduce previous results for very long wavepackets and we are able to calculate the tunneling time for general wavepackets of arbitrary shape and length. The tunneling time for a general wavepacket is equal to the average over the energy components of the standard phase time. With this approach we can also calculate the time uncertainty. We have checked that the results obtained with this approach agree extremely well with numerical simulations of the wavepacket evolution.

  2. Energy-time and frequency-time uncertainty relations: exact inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Dodonov; A. V. Dodonov

    2015-04-03

    We give a short review of known exact inequalities that can be interpreted as "energy-time" and "frequency-time" uncertainty relations. In particular we discuss a precise form of signals minimizing the physical frequency-time uncertainty product. Also, we calculate the "stationarity time" for mixed Gaussian states of a quantum harmonic oscillator, showing explicitly that pure quantum states are "more fragile" than mixed ones with the same value of the energy dispersion. The problems of quantum evolution speed limits, time operators and measurements of energy and time are briefly discussed, too.

  3. Narayanaswamy's 1971 aging theory and material time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeppe C. Dyre

    2015-08-23

    The Bochkov-Kuzovlev nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to derive Narayanaswamy's phenomenological theory of physical aging, in which this highly nonlinear phenomenon is described by a linear material-time convolution integral. A characteristic property of the Narayanaswamy aging description is material-time translational invariance, and this is here taken as a basic assumption of the derivation. It is shown that only one possible definition of the material time obeys this invariance, namely the square of the distance travelled from a configuration of the system far back in time. The paper concludes with suggestions for computer simulations that test for consequences of material-time translational invariance. One of these is a "unique-triangles property" according to which any three points on the system's path form a triangle such that two side lengths determine the third; this is analogous to the well-known triangular relation for time-autocorrelation functions of aging spin glasses [L. F. Cugliandolo and J. Kurchan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 27, 5749 (1994)]. The unique-triangles property implies a simple geometric interpretation of out-of-equilibrium time-autocorrelation functions, which extends to aging a previously proposed framework for such functions in equilibrium [J. C. Dyre, cond-mat/9712222].

  4. Improving Pulsar Timing Precision with Single Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The measurement error of pulse times of arrival (TOAs) in the high S/N limit is dominated by the quasi-random variation of a pulsar's emission profile from rotation to rotation. Like measurement noise, this noise is only reduced as the square root of observing time, posing a major challenge to future pulsar timing campaigns with large aperture telescopes, e.g. the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. We propose a new method of pulsar timing that attempts to approximate the pulse-to-pulse variability with a small family of 'basis' pulses. If pulsar data are integrated over many rotations, this basis can be used to measure sub-pulse structure. Or, if high-time resolution data are available, the basis can be used to 'tag' single pulses and produce an optimal timing template. With realistic simulations, we show that these applications can dramatically reduce the effect of pulse-to-pulse variability on TOAs. Using high-time resolution data taken from the bright PSR J0835-...

  5. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M.; Martínez, C.

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  6. Moving Forth And Back In Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otten, James

    MOVING FORTH AND BACK IN TIME James Otten Clearly objects do move forth and back in space. Thus, for instance, Jackson walks from home to the corner drugstore and then walks back home. But do objects also move forth and back in time? And if not..., would it be logically possible for them to do so? Indeed, what would even constitute a proper description of an object's moving forth and back in time? My aim in this paper is to answer these perplexing questions.1 Richard Taylor has developed a...

  7. Time as a parameter of statistical ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Viznyuk

    2011-11-26

    The notion of time is derived as a parameter of statistical ensemble representing the underlying system. Varying population numbers of microstates in statistical ensemble result in different expectation values corresponding to different times. We show a single parameter which equates to the notion of time is logarithm of the total number of microstates in statistical ensemble. We discuss the implications of proposed model for some topics of modern physics: Poincar\\'e recurrence theorem vs. Second Law of Thermodynamics, matter vs. anti-matter asymmetry of the universe, expansion of the universe, Big Bang.

  8. Part-Time Farming in Northeast Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, James R.; Southern, John H.

    1961-01-01

    days or more, includes 43 percent of all part-time operators. Part-time operators controlled 40 percent of the farm and land resources, marketed 28 percent of all farm products sold (in terms of value), but received only 16 percent of the net money...). The average value of farm resources was $16,024 with land $12,803, live- dock $1,846 and equipment $1,375. Part-time farmers controlled 29 percent of ie cropland and 33 percent of all idle crop- acres. However, they had relatively more ~~~~~dre, 42...

  9. Real time sensor for therapeutic radiation delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a real time sensor for therapeutic radiation. A probe is placed in or near the patient that senses in real time the dose at the location of the probe. The strength of the dose is determined by either an insertion or an exit probe. The location is determined by a series of vertical and horizontal sensing elements that gives the operator a real time read out dose location relative to placement of the patient. The increased accuracy prevents serious tissue damage to the patient by preventing overdose or delivery of a dose to a wrong location within the body.

  10. Nuclear dynamics in time-dependent picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Nakatsukasa; Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana

    2006-10-19

    Using the time-dependent theory of quantum mechanics, we investigate nuclear electric dipole responses. The time evolution of a wave function is explicitly calculated in the coordinate-space representation. The particle continuum is treated with the absorbing boundary condition. Calculated time-dependent quantities are transformed into those of familiar energy representation. We apply the method to a three-body model for 11Li and to the mean-field model for 22O, then discuss properties of E1 response.

  11. Real time sensor for therapeutic radiation delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.

    1998-01-06

    The invention is a real time sensor for therapeutic radiation. A probe is placed in or near the patient that senses in real time the dose at the location of the probe. The strength of the dose is determined by either an insertion or an exit probe. The location is determined by a series of vertical and horizontal sensing elements that gives the operator a real time read out dose location relative to placement of the patient. The increased accuracy prevents serious tissue damage to the patient by preventing overdose or delivery of a dose to a wrong location within the body. 14 figs.

  12. Time-aging time-stress superposition in soft glass under tensile deformation field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asima Shaukat; Ashutosh Sharma; Yogesh M. Joshi

    2010-06-10

    We have studied the tensile deformation behaviour of thin films of aging aqueous suspension of Laponite, a model soft glassy material, when subjected to a creep flow field generated by a constant engineering normal stress. Aqueous suspension of Laponite demonstrates aging behaviour wherein it undergoes time dependent enhancement of its elastic modulus as well as its characteristic relaxation time. However, under application of the normal stress, the rate of aging decreases and in the limit of high stress, the aging stops with the suspension now undergoing a plastic deformation. Overall, it is observed that the aging that occurs over short creep times at small normal stresses is same as the aging that occurs over long creep times at large normal stresses. This observation allows us to suggest an aging time - process time - normal stress superposition principle, which can predict rheological behaviour at longer times by carrying out short time tests.

  13. Space-Time Localization using Times of Arrival Sriram Venkateswaran and Upamanyu Madhow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhow, Upamanyu

    Space-Time Localization using Times of Arrival Sriram Venkateswaran and Upamanyu Madhow Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA Email: {sriram

  14. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: An Exact Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pulse to create a nonstationary state, which is then monitored in time by a probe pulse, is a central generation, and exploring photovoltaic materials, to name a few. At the same time, however, recent work

  15. Chinook Timing 1 October 11, 2007 Run timing of adult Chinook salmon passing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Chinook Timing 1 October 11, 2007 Run timing of adult Chinook salmon passing Bonneville dam on the Columbia River White Paper Prepared by: W. Nicholas Beer Columbia Basin Research School of Aquatic....................................................................................................................... 8 In-River Conditions

  16. Development of a Time Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy System for Near Real-Time Clinical Diagnostic Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trivedi, Chintan A.

    2010-07-14

    The design and development of a versatile time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) system capable of near real time data acquisition and processing for potential clinical diagnostic applications is reported. The TRFS apparatus is portable...

  17. MAKING THE TIME TO FIND THE TIME Many students struggle to find a way to organise their time around all the things

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    MAKING THE TIME TO FIND THE TIME Many students struggle to find a way to organise their time around all the things they have to do and all the things they want to do ... and to use the time into your approach to study. Where does your time go?? It is very difficult to make a time management plan

  18. Neuropsychological mechanisms of interval timing behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    perceiving a beat in a musical composition to returning to the stove just prior to the tea kettle whistling to expecting a traffic light to change from red to green. Furthermore, interval timing is exhibited in a wide

  19. Electron Waiting Times in Mesoscopic Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Albert; Géraldine Haack; Christian Flindt; Markus Büttiker

    2012-02-14

    Electron transport in mesoscopic conductors has traditionally involved investigations of the mean current and the fluctuations of the current. A complementary view on charge transport is provided by the distribution of waiting times between charge carriers, but a proper theoretical framework for coherent electronic systems has so far been lacking. Here we develop a quantum theory of electron waiting times in mesoscopic conductors expressed by a compact determinant formula. We illustrate our methodology by calculating the waiting time distribution for a quantum point contact and find a cross-over from Wigner-Dyson statistics at full transmission to Poisson statistics close to pinch-off. Even when the low-frequency transport is noiseless, the electrons are not equally spaced in time due to their inherent wave nature. We discuss the implications for renewal theory in mesoscopic systems and point out several analogies with energy level statistics and random matrix theory.

  20. Real time PCR measurement by fluorescence anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, Bryan Lee, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the gold-standard for quantitation in both mutation and gene expression analyses. Already this technique has found valuable clinical application in disease diagnosis and progression ...