National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for time spread wti

  1. A technical look at the WTI incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-11-01

    EPA has granted Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) temporary authorization to burn hazardous waste in its new incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. The approval is based on preliminary data showing that the incinerator was able to meet EPA`s emission standards for dioxins and furans in tests run this summer. WTI is allowed to continue burning waste pending final evaluation of its March 1993 performance tests. The action marks yet another hurdle cleared by WTI in its 11-year effort to construct and operate a commercial hazardous waste incinerator. The facility`s long-standing predicament as a target for environmental and public interest groups has made it the subject of numerous lawsuits and many legal reviews. In this article, however, we focus on the technical aspects of the system. The WTI incinerator is described in {open_quotes}Performance Testing of a Rotary Kiln Incinerator,{close_quotes} a paper by Alfred Sigg of Von Roll, Incorporated (Norcross, Georgia). The paper was presented at the 1993 Incineration Conference, which was held in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 3-7, 1993. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Epidemic spreading in time-varying community networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Guangming E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com; Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Wang, Xingyuan E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com

    2014-06-15

    The spreading processes of many infectious diseases have comparable time scale as the network evolution. Here, we present a simple networks model with time-varying community structure, and investigate susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic spreading processes in this model. By both theoretic analysis and numerical simulations, we show that the efficiency of epidemic spreading in this model depends intensively on the mobility rate q of the individuals among communities. We also find that there exists a mobility rate threshold q{sub c}. The epidemic will survive when q?>?q{sub c} and die when q?spreading in complex networks with community structure.

  3. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_past_wti.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 - September 2016 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2015 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 Jan 2016 Jul 2016 Jan 2017 Jul 2017 2 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2015 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 Jan 2016 Jul 2016 Jan 2017 Jul 2017 3 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2015

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2009_2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    09 - December 2010 January 2009 December 2010 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2011_2012.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 - December 2012 January 2011 December 2012 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2013_2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 - December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2013 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2012 Jul 2012 Jan 2013 Jul 2013 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 2 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2013 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2012 Jul 2012 Jan 2013 Jul 2013 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 3 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2013 $0

  8. Influence of target structure on film stress in WTi sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C.F.; Wang, H.; Gilman, P.

    1998-12-31

    In this report, the effect of sputtering target microstructure on the deposited film stress was investigated. By controlling the metallurgical process, two types of W-10wt%Ti target constituents, namely single-phase and multiple-phase WTi, were prepared. The former one was composed of W-rich ({beta}Ti,W) phase only, the latter one was with W, W-rich ({beta}Ti,W) and Ti-rich ({beta}Ti,W) phases. The stress of the films deposited on 12.7 cm diameter silicon oxide wafers from the single-phase target tends to be more compressive than that from the multiple-phase target. By increasing wafer temperature, the compressive stress was linearly decreased. In addition, the level of film stress was also affected by the film thickness and other sputtering parameters. To understand the causes for the differences in film stress between the multiple-phase and single-phase derived films, an evaluation of the film structure using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and mechanical testing using a nano-indentation instrument were performed. Finer domains with denser laminar structure were observed on the films deposited from the single-phase target. However, no significant difference in mechanical properties was found between these two from the nano-indentation measurements. It is envisioned that the more uniform solid solution between the W and Ti in the films obtained by sputtering the single-phase targets generates a higher compressive stress when deposited on the silicon oxide wafers resulting in a higher compressive stress.

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  10. Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility James Preciado October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES October 2012 James

  11. Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

  12. Energy spread and time structure of ion beams extracted from the ReA-EBIT rare isotope charge breeder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Thomas M.; Lapierre, Alain; Schwarz, Stefan; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Bollen, Georg

    2015-01-09

    The ReA re-accelerator of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University utilizes an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) for charge breeding thermalized rare isotope beams. Recent commissioning measurements have been performed to characterize the performance of this EBIT. The energy spread of extracted highly charged ion beams was measured to be about 0.3% of the total beam energy. From this, the temperature of the ion ensemble in the trap is calculated to be kT{sub q}/q?=?31eV for O{sup 7+}, while it is kT{sub q}/q?=?25eV for K{sup 15+}. In addition initial results are presented for two extraction schemes developed to spread highly charged ion pulses in time.

  13. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

  14. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

  15. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  16. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. [London, TN; Dress, William B. [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  17. Report on the US EPA technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk assessment issues. Held in Washington, DC on January 11, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This report presents information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA`s Risk Assessment Forum for Region 5 and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The subject of the peer review was a draft document prepared by Region 5 assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. This report summarizes the discussions that took place at the peer review workshop. The report opens with an overview of the workshop and a history of EPA`s WTI incinerator risk assessment activities (section 1), then presents the chairperson`s summary (section 2) and the five work group chairs` summaries (section 3). The body of the report ends with highlights of the peer reviewers` preliminary comments and of the comments offered by workshop observers (section 4).

  18. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

  19. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

  20. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

  1. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  2. Spreading of oil spilled under ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Chowdhury, T. )

    1990-12-01

    A new set of equations is presented to describe the process of oil spreading under ice in clam waters. These equations consider the gravity (buoyancy)-inertia phase, the gravity (buoyancy)-viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy-surface-tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to the termination of spreading is presented. Laboratory experiments were conducted using both real ice covers in a cold room and artificial ice covers. The experiments included different ice-cover roughnesses from smooth to rough, oils of different viscosities, and a variety of discharge conditions. The experimental data show close agreement with the theory. These equations can be used during cleanup or environmental impact assessment to estimate the area of an oil slick with respect to time.

  3. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Dress, William B.

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  4. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    per barrel cost of transportation by rail and truck has been cited by some analysts as a floor for the Brent-WTI spread. With the large gap between Brent and WTI prices, WTI is no...

  5. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  6. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  7. Comparison of Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Rake Receiver with a Maximum Ratio Combining Multicarrier Spread Spectrum Receiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryl Leon Wasden; Hussein Moradi; Behrouz Farhang-Broujeny

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the performance of a filter bank-based multicarrier spread spectrum (FB-MC-SS) system. We consider an FB-MC-SS setup where each data symbol is spread across multiple subcarriers, but there is no spreading in time. The results are then compared with those of the well-known direct sequence spread spectrum (DS-SS) system with a rake receiver for its best performance. We compare the two systems when the channel noise is white. We prove that as the processing gains of the two systems tend to infinity both approach the same performance. However, numerical simulations show that, in practice, where processing gain is limited, FB-MC-SS outperforms DS-SS.

  8. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  9. FRAGMENTATION AND SPREADING OF A METEOR-LIKE OBJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Chul; Brown, Jeffrey D.

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of fragmentation and spreading of a high-speed flying object resembling a meteorite is studied experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, a model made of graphite is launched in a ballistic range and is made to fragment and spread. The flow field produced by the cloud of the fragments is observed optically. The observed deceleration and spreading behavior is numerically reconstructed using computational-fluid-dynamic calculations, applying an improved meteoroid fragmentation theory. The existing meteoroid fragmentation theory is improved by introducing the hypothesis that the incubation process of the pressurized fluid permeating through the fragment precedes the splitting process. The incubation time is determined by the ratio of permeability of the fragment to the fluid's viscosity and is much longer than the time for splitting given by the existing theory. Agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated behavior of the fragment cloud by appropriately choosing this ratio.

  10. Relationships between HIV spread and evolution examined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material of the virus. The researchers aim to utilize the HIV genetic footprint in mathematical models to reconstruct accurately how epidemics spread. The model systems could be...

  11. EECBG Success Story: Cincinnati Canvassing Spreads Retrofitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cincinnati Canvassing Spreads Retrofitting Message EECBG Success Story: Cincinnati ... Learn more. Addthis Related Articles EECBG Success Story: Another Door Opens: Marion ...

  12. Dynamics of turbulence spreading in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guercan, Oe.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.

    2005-03-01

    A dynamical theory of turbulence spreading and nonlocal interaction phenomena is presented. The basic model is derived using Fokker-Planck theory, and supported by wave-kinetic and K-{epsilon} type closures. In the absence of local growth, the model predicts subdiffusive spreading of turbulence. With local growth and saturation via nonlinear damping, ballistic propagation of turbulence intensity fronts is possible. The time asymptotic front speed is set by the geometric mean of local growth and turbulent diffusion. The leading edge of the front progresses as the turbulence comes to local saturation. Studies indicate that turbulence can jump gaps in the local growth rate profile and can penetrate locally marginal or stable regions. In particular, significant fluctuation energy from a turbulent edge can easily spread into the marginally stable core, thus creating an intermediate zone of strong turbulence. This suggests that the traditional distinction between core and edge should be reconsidered.

  13. Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Time with respect to the BNB Trigger Time [µs] 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Fractional Flash Count per 0.15 µs with respect to Cosmic Background Measured Cosmic Rate (Beam-Off) BNB Trigger Data (Beam-On) [4.51E18 POT]

  14. Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 15 20 Time with respect to the NuMI Trigger Time [µs] 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Fractional Flash Count per 0.5 µs with respect to Cosmic Background Measured Cosmic Rate (Beam-Off) NuMI Trigger Data (Beam-On) [4.83E18 POT]

  15. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Increases in both the Brent-Louisiana Light Sweet (LLS) and LLS-WTI contributed to the wider Brent-WTI differential. These spread movements should encourage incremental movements ...

  16. 3:2:1 Crack Spread

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    To calculate the 3:2:1 crack spread for a Gulf Coast refinery that processes Louisiana Light Sweet (LLS) crude oil, add the spot price for two barrels of Gulf Coast conventional ...

  17. Effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading: A fluctuation intensity transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2014-09-15

    This paper studies effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading. It reports results of numerical experiments using global gyrokinetic simulations. We examine propagation of turbulence, triggered by an identical linear instability in a source region, into an adjacent, linearly stable region with variable q-profile. The numerical experiments are designed so as to separate the physics of turbulence spreading from that of linear stability. The strength of turbulence spreading is measured by the penetration depth of turbulence. Dynamics of spreading are elucidated by fluctuation intensity balance analysis, using a model intensity evolution equation which retains nonlinear diffusion and damping, and linear growth. It is found that turbulence spreading is strongly affected by magnetic shear s, but is hardly altered by the safety factor q itself. There is an optimal range of modest magnetic shear which maximizes turbulence spreading. For high to modest shear values, the spreading is enhanced by the increase of the mode correlation length with decreasing magnetic shear. However, the efficiency of spreading drops for sufficiently low magnetic shear even though the mode correlation length is comparable to that for the case of optimal magnetic shear. The reduction of spreading is attributed to the increase in time required for the requisite nonlinear mode-mode interactions. The effect of increased interaction time dominates that of increased mode correlation length. Our findings of the reduction of spreading and the increase in interaction time at weak magnetic shear are consistent with the well-known benefit of weak or reversed magnetic shear for core confinement enhancement. Weak shear is shown to promote locality, as well as stability.

  18. Golden Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Developer Cielo Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Wildarado TX Coordinates...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: EV Charging Stations Spread Through Philly

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    EV Charging Stations Spread Through Philly to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: EV Charging Stations Spread Through Philly on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: EV Charging Stations Spread Through Philly on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: EV Charging Stations Spread Through Philly on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: EV Charging Stations Spread Through Philly on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: EV Charging Stations

  20. Microsoft Word - MPUR_May2012_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 Crude Oil Prices: Front month futures prices for Brent and WTI settled at $113.18 and $98.49 per barrel, respectively, on May 4 (Figure 1). Brent is now $13 per barrel lower compared to its 2012 high reached on March 13 and WTI is $9 per barrel off its 2012 high on February 24. Brent time spreads continued their decline in April from a peak on March 1, supporting estimates that crude oil inventories are building and suggesting that crude oil markets may be

  1. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  2. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  3. Cincinnati Canvassing Spreads Retrofitting Message | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cincinnati Canvassing Spreads Retrofitting Message Cincinnati Canvassing Spreads Retrofitting Message May 28, 2010 - 3:07pm Addthis A volunteer canvasses the Mt. Washington neighborhood to spread awareness about home energy audits in the area. | Photo Courtesy GCEA A volunteer canvasses the Mt. Washington neighborhood to spread awareness about home energy audits in the area. | Photo Courtesy GCEA Lindsay Gsell What are the key facts? With help from the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA),

  4. Multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Dress, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communication. A method includes individually spread-spectrum modulating at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers, wherein the resulting individually spread-spectrum modulated at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers are substantially mutually orthogonal with respect to both frequency division multiplexing and spread-spectrum modulation.

  5. Spreading of energy in the Ding-Dong model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Pikovsky, A.

    2012-06-15

    We study the properties of energy spreading in a lattice of elastically colliding harmonic oscillators (Ding-Dong model). We demonstrate that in the regular lattice the spreading from a localized initial state is mediated by compactons and chaotic breathers. In a disordered lattice, the compactons do not exist, and the spreading eventually stops, resulting in a finite configuration with a few chaotic spots.

  6. Precursor to equatorial spread-F in OI 630.0 nm dayglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, R.; Raju, D.P.; Raghavarao, R.; Ramarao, P.V.S.

    1994-12-15

    The authors report a correlation between 630 nm O sdayglow measurements made from India and the occurance of equatorial spread F (ESF). They observe that features of the dayglow can serve as a precursor for the appearance of ESF phenomena, with a lead time of up to 3 hours.

  7. A Gravitational Spreading Origin For The Socompa Debris Avalanche...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of similar behaviour underlie many other volcanoes. Identification of spreading at other sites could therefore be a first step towards assessment of the potential for this...

  8. An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high-contrast imaging: a ... This image is built as a linear combination of all available images and is optimized ...

  9. Multi-gigaelectronvolt, low-energy spread acceleration of positrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multi-gigaelectronvolt, low-energy spread acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  10. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  11. One-dimensional numerical fluid dynamics model of the spreading of liquefied gaseous fuel (LGF) on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.; Ermak, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the spreading of an evaporating liquefied gaseous fuel that has been spilled on the surface of a denser liquid. This would correspond, for example, to the spreading of liquefied natural gas spilled onto water. The model is based on the one-dimensional, time-dependent equations of conservation of mass and momentum, with the assumption that the pool of liquid fuel spreads in a radially symmetric manner. It includes the effects of vaporization, shear at the fuel-liquid interface, and buoyancy due to the density difference between the fuel and the liquid onto which it is spilled. Both instantaneous and continuous spills of finite volume are treated. The height and spreading velocity of the pool of spilled fuel are calculated as functions of time and radius by numerically solving the conservation equations with a finite difference method. Output of the calculations is presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  12. One-dimensional numerical fluid dynamics model of the spreading of liquefied gaseous fuel (LGF) on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.; Ermak, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the spreading of an evaporating liquefied gaseous fuel that has been spilled on the surface of a denser liquid. This would correspond, for example, to the spreading of liquefied natural gas spilled onto water. The model is based on the one-dimensional, time-dependent equations of conservation of mass and momentum, with the assumption that the pool of liquid fuel spreads in a radially symmetric manner. It includes the effects of vaporization, shear at the fuel-liquid interface, and buoyancy due to the density difference between the fuel and the liquid onto which it is spilled. Both instantaneous and continuous spills of finite volume are treated. The height and spreading velocity of the pool of spilled fuel are calculated as functions of time and radius by numerically solving the conservation equations with a finite difference method.Output of the calculations is presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  13. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  14. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted

  15. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  16. Microsoft Word - kiliandiscussion.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity and the WTI-Brent Spread Discussion by: Lutz Kilian University of Michigan Crude Oil is Not Perfectly Homogeneous ● Differences in: - Composition - Location ● Traditional approach: Use of Benchmarks (WTI, Brent) ● What explains the growing spread of Brent over WTI crude oil? ● Is the WTI price unusually low or the Brent price unusually high? 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 U.S. Real RAC for

  17. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 011999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999redalert.pdf Lessons Learned Type: Red

  18. The Power of a Good Idea: Quantitative Modeling of the Spread of Ideas from Epidemiological Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A.; Cintron-Arias, A.; Kaiser, D. I.; Castillo-Chavez, C.

    2005-05-05

    The population dynamics underlying the diffusion of ideas hold many qualitative similarities to those involved in the spread of infections. In spite of much suggestive evidence this analogy is hardly ever quantified in useful ways. The standard benefit of modeling epidemics is the ability to estimate quantitatively population average parameters, such as interpersonal contact rates, incubation times, duration of infectious periods, etc. In most cases such quantities generalize naturally to the spread of ideas and provide a simple means of quantifying sociological and behavioral patterns. Here we apply several paradigmatic models of epidemics to empirical data on the advent and spread of Feynman diagrams through the theoretical physics communities of the USA, Japan, and the USSR in the period immediately after World War II. This test case has the advantage of having been studied historically in great detail, which allows validation of our results. We estimate the effectiveness of adoption of the idea in the three communities and find values for parameters reflecting both intentional social organization and long lifetimes for the idea. These features are probably general characteristics of the spread of ideas, but not of common epidemics.

  19. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  20. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Xia, T. Y.; Snyder, P. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-05-15

    Nonlinear two-fluid and gyrofluid simulations show that an edge localized modes (ELM) crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfvén time scale and slow turbulence spreading. The turbulence transport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region. Because of the inward turbulence spreading effect, the energy loss of an ELM decreases when density pedestal height increases. The Landau resonance yields the different cross phase-shift of ions and electrons. A 3 + 1 gyro-Landau-fluid model is implemented in BOUT++ framework. The gyrofluid simulations show that the kinetic effects have stabilizing effects on the ideal ballooning mode and the energy loss increases with the pedestal height.

  1. Credit-Based Interest Rate Spread for Title XVII

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Credit-Based Interest Rate Spread for Title XVII The Loan Programs Office (LPO) is announcing that a credit-based interest rate spread will be added to certain loans that are issued by the Federal Financing Bank (FFB) and backed by a 100 percent loan guarantee issued by the Department of Energy. Loans issued by the FFB will carry an interest rate calculated by the following formula: Interest Rate = Applicable U.S. Treasury Rate for the tenor of the loan + 37.5 basis points (bps) FFB liquidity

  2. Wireless spread-spectrum telesensor chip with synchronous digital architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Emery, Michael Steven

    2005-03-08

    A fully integrated wireless spread-spectrum sensor incorporating all elements of an "intelligent" sensor on a single circuit chip is capable of telemetering data to a receiver. Synchronous control of all elements of the chip provides low-cost, low-noise, and highly robust data transmission, in turn enabling the use of low-cost monolithic receivers.

  3. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  4. Isopin dependence of the Δ-spreading potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karaoglu, B.; Karapiperis, T.; Moniz, Ernest J.

    1980-10-01

    The ratio of near-resonance inclusive π±scattering cross sections from the isotopic pair 16,18O is shown to be consistent with an isospin dependence of the Δ-spreading potential determined by intermediate coupling to the pion absorption channel.

  5. Short range spread-spectrum radiolocation system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-04-29

    A short range radiolocation system and associated methods that allow the location of an item, such as equipment, containers, pallets, vehicles, or personnel, within a defined area. A small, battery powered, self-contained tag is provided to an item to be located. The tag includes a spread-spectrum transmitter that transmits a spread-spectrum code and identification information. A plurality of receivers positioned about the area receive signals from a transmitting tag. The position of the tag, and hence the item, is located by triangulation. The system employs three different ranging techniques for providing coarse, intermediate, and fine spatial position resolution. Coarse positioning information is provided by use of direct-sequence code phase transmitted as a spread-spectrum signal. Intermediate positioning information is provided by the use of a difference signal transmitted with the direct-sequence spread-spectrum code. Fine positioning information is provided by use of carrier phase measurements. An algorithm is employed to combine the three data sets to provide accurate location measurements.

  6. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum Radio Transceiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Killough, Stephen M.; Kuruganti, Teja; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2014-10-06

    In recent years there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct-sequence modulation with "fast" frequency-hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, we present the efforts carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hardware prototypic hybrid DS/FFH spread-spectrum radio transceiver using a single Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The high integration within a single FPGA allows the various subsystems to easily communicate with each other and thereby maintain tight synchronization. We investigate various hopping sequences against robustness to interference and jamming. Experimental results are presented to show the receiver sensitivity, radio data rate evaluation, and jamming-rejection capability of the implemented hybrid DS/FFH spread-spectrum system under widely varying design parameters.

  7. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum Radio Transceiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Killough, Stephen M; Kuruganti, Teja; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct-sequence modulation with "fast" frequency-hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, we present the efforts carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid DS/FFH spread-spectrum radio transceiver using a single Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA allows the various subsystems to quickly communicate with each other and thereby maintain tight synchronization. We also investigate various hopping sequences against robustness to interference and jamming. Experimental results are presented that show the receiver sensitivity, radio data-rate/bit-error evaluations, and jamming and interference rejection capabilities of the implemented hybrid DS/FFH spread-spectrum system under widely varying design parameters.

  8. Energy Spread of the Proton Beam in the Fermilab Booster at its Injection Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C. M.; Chase, B. E.; Chaurize, S. J.; Garcia, F. G.; Seiya, K.; Pellico, W. A.; Sullivan, T. M.; Triplett, A. K.

    2015-04-27

    We have measured the energy spread of the Booster beam at its injection energy of 400 MeV by three different methods: (1) creating a notch of about 40 nsec wide in the beam immediately after multiple turn injection and measuring the slippage time required for high and low momentum particles for a grazing touch in line-charge distribution, (2) injecting partial turn beam and letting it to debunch, and (3) comparing the beam profile monitor data with predictions from MAD simulations for the 400 MeV injection beam line. The measurements are repeated under varieties of conditions of rf systems in the ring and in the beam transfer line.

  9. HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV and evolution studied through computer modeling HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling This approach distinguishes between susceptible and infected individuals to capture the full infection history, including contact tracing data for infected individuals. November 19, 2013 Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in green) from cultured lymphocytes. The image has been colored to highlight important features. Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in

  10. Self-registering spread-spectrum barcode method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cummings, Eric B.; Even Jr., William R.

    2004-11-09

    A novel spread spectrum barcode methodology is disclosed that allows a barcode to be read in its entirety even when a significant fraction or majority of the barcode is obscured. The barcode methodology makes use of registration or clocking information that is distributed along with the encoded user data across the barcode image. This registration information allows for the barcode image to be corrected for imaging distortion such as zoom, rotation, tilt, curvature, and perspective.

  11. Stellar age spreads in clusters as imprints of cluster-parent clump densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmentier, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Pfalzner, S.

    2014-08-20

    It has recently been suggested that high-density star clusters have stellar age distributions much narrower than that of the Orion Nebula Cluster, indicating a possible trend of narrower age distributions for denser clusters. We show this effect to likely arise from star formation being faster in gas with a higher density. We model the star formation history of molecular clumps in equilibrium by associating a star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ?{sub ff}, to their volume density profile. We focus on the case of isothermal spheres and we obtain the evolution with time of their star formation rate. Our model predicts a steady decline of the star formation rate, which we quantify with its half-life time, namely, the time needed for the star formation rate to drop to half its initial value. Given the uncertainties affecting the star formation efficiency per free-fall time, we consider two distinct values: ?{sub ff} = 0.1 and ?{sub ff} = 0.01. When ?{sub ff} = 0.1, the half-life time is of the order of the clump free-fall time, ?{sub ff}. As a result, the age distributions of stars formed in high-density clumps have smaller full-widths at half-maximum than those of stars formed in low-density clumps. When the star formation efficiency per free-fall time is 0.01, the half-life time is 10 times longer, i.e., 10 clump free-fall times. We explore what happens if the duration of star formation is shorter than 10?{sub ff}, that is, if the half-life time of the star formation rate cannot be defined. There, we build on the invariance of the shape of the young cluster mass function to show that an anti-correlation between the clump density and the duration of star formation is expected. We therefore conclude that, regardless of whether the duration of star formation is longer than the star formation rate half-life time, denser molecular clumps yield narrower star age distributions in clusters. Published densities and stellar age spreads of young clusters and star

  12. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  13. Over-compression, a method to shape the longitudinal bunch distribution for a reduced energy spread

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.J.; Holtzapple, R.; Raubenheimer, T.

    1994-07-01

    In the Stanford Linear Collider the energy spread of the bunches at the end of the linac is dominated by longitudinal wakefields. A short, high current bunch with a Gaussian shape will produce a double-horned energy distribution. It can be shown that certain charge distributions with a sharp rise time (about rectangular or half-Gaussian) will give no additional energy spread due to the linac, since the generated wakefield and the rf-curvature cancel each other exactly. In this paper different methods are presented on how to achieve such distributions by using non-linear dependences in the RTL (Ring-To-Linac) compression region. A simple and effective method to achieve such a distribution is by over-compression. When not fully compressing the bunch, there are two settings of the compressor voltage, under and over-compression, which give the same core bunch length in the linac. By switching from the under to the over-compressed setting, the tails are reduced from more than Gaussian to less than Gaussian beam tails. This results in a roughly rectangular shape which will give the wakefield-rf cancellation. Simulations, measurements and their implications are discussed.

  14. Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price.

  15. Low-Power Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum Modem Architecture for Distributed Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chien, C; Elgorriaga, I; McConaghy, C

    2001-07-03

    Emerging CMOS and MEMS technologies enable the implementation of a large number of wireless distributed microsensors that can be easily and rapidly deployed to form highly redundant, self-configuring, and ad hoc sensor networks. To facilitate ease of deployment, these sensors should operate on battery for extended periods of time. A particular challenge in maintaining extended battery lifetime lies in achieving communications with low power. This paper presents a direct-sequence spread-spectrum modem architecture that provides robust communications for wireless sensor networks while dissipating very low power. The modem architecture has been verified in an FPGA implementation that dissipates only 33 mW for both transmission and reception. The implementation can be easily mapped to an ASIC technology, with an estimated power performance of less than 1 mW.

  16. Physical Sciences Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity, and the WTI-Brent Spread Bahattin Büyükşahin Thomas K. Lee James T. Moser Michel A. Robe* Abstract We document that, starting in the Fall of 2008, the benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil has periodically traded at unheard of discounts to the corresponding Brent benchmark. We further document that this discount is not reflected in spreads between Brent and other benchmarks that are directly comparable to WTI. Drawing on extant

  17. Current disruption and its spreading in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg; Ji, Hantao

    2013-11-15

    Recent magnetic reconnection experiments (MRX) [Dorfman et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 233 (2013)] have disclosed current disruption in the absence of an externally imposed guide field. During current disruption in MRX, both the current density and the total observed out-of-reconnection-plane current drop simultaneous with a rise in out-of-reconnection-plane electric field. Here, we show that current disruption is an intrinsic property of the dynamic formation of an X-point configuration of magnetic field in magnetic reconnection, independent of the model used for plasma description and of the dimensionality (2D or 3D) of reconnection. An analytic expression for the current drop is derived from Ampere's Law. Its predictions are verified by 2D and 3D electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations. Three dimensional EMHD simulations show that the current disruption due to localized magnetic reconnection spreads along the direction of the electron drift velocity with a speed which depends on the wave number of the perturbation. The implications of these results for MRX are discussed.

  18. Robust pipeline construction plans threatened by spreading Asian crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-09

    Prospects for worldwide pipeline construction, viewed by operators as 1998 began, were very bright. But as the Asian financial crisis spreads and becomes more entrenched, it casts doubts on previously bullish petroleum and natural gas demand forecasts. These forecasts underpin pipeline operators` plans for new construction. Plans for petroleum (oil, condensate, and NGL) and natural gas pipeline installation during the year show a 27% jump over those announced a year ago for 1997 alone. Plans for construction beyond 1998, however, are off from what was envisioned a year ago, by nearly 17%. More than 67,000 miles of crude oil, product, and natural gas pipeline are planned for 1998 and beyond. The latest Oil and Gas Journal pipeline construction data indicate these trends. The data are derived from a survey of world pipeline operators, industry sources, and published information. But the data behind these trends were submitted before the full effects of the Asian financial crisis had begun to emerge. And, at presstime, industry forecasts for oil and gas demand among formerly booming Asian economies were being trimmed.

  19. Continuous sea-floor spreading in Red Sea: an alternative interpretation of magnetic anomaly pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Brecque, J.L.; Zitellini

    1985-04-01

    The magnetic anomaly pattern over the Red Sea can be modeled as a continuous system of sea-floor spreading from the early Miocene to the present by using a timevarying process filter. The half spreading rate is approximately 1 cm/yr (0.4 in./yr) since initial rifting. The parameters that determine the process filter and development of the transition zone are the intrusion parameter (a measure of the dispersion of feeder dikes or horizontal strain about the rift axis), a flow parameter (a measure of the average flow width), and the effusion parameter (a measure of the volcanic effusion and thickness of layer 2). The authors estimate the flow parameter to be 2.7km(1.7 mi) and the intrusion parameter to be 7.5km(4.7 mi) at early rifting. These values suggest that a wide distribution of axial dikes or horizontal strain is the dominant factor in forming the magnetic anomaly pattern. Reduction in the width of the intrusion parameter and the effusion rate as rifting proceeded resulted in focusing of the strain, thinning of layer 2, and formation of the Red Sea deeps. Their modeling suggests that phase 2, or the stratoid phase, began about the time of anomaly 5C or chron C5C approximately 16 Ma. This age is compatible with geologic estimates of the initial rifting at the late Oligocene to early Miocene (Coleman, 1974; Gass, 1977). The opening rate for Africa-Arabia plate motion has remained relatively constant since early rifting although the African margin appears to be accreting faster than the Arabian plate.

  20. Workshop Panel Report on Accelerating the Spread of Knowledge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. February ... International Science & Technology Information Programs, ... Scientists and science-attentive citizens need time-saving, ...

  1. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Moore, James A.

    2012-01-03

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  2. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F; Moore, James A

    2012-10-30

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  3. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Moore, James A.

    2011-01-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  4. Robust low-frequency spread-spectrum navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F [Loudon, TN; Moore, James A [Powell, TN

    2009-12-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for a navigation system. A process includes providing a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; locking the plurality of transmitters to a common timing reference; transmitting a signal from each of the plurality of transmitters. An apparatus includes a plurality of transmitters distributed throughout a desired coverage area; wherein each of the plurality of transmitters comprises a packet generator; and wherein the plurality of transmitters are locked to a common timing reference.

  5. PHY and MAC Layer Design of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Based Smart Meter Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The smart grid is a combined process of revitalizing the traditional power grid applications and introducing new applications to improve the efficiency of power generation, transmission and distribution. This can be achieved by leveraging advanced communication and networking technologies. Therefore the selection of the appropriate communication technology for different smart grid applications has been debated a lot in the recent past. After comparing different possible technologies, a recent research study has arrived at a conclusion that the 3G cellular technology is the right choice for distribution side smart grid applications like smart metering, advanced distribution automation and demand response management system. In this paper, we argue that the current 3G/4G cellular technologies are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications and propose a Hybrid Spread Spectrum (HSS) based Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as one of the alternatives to 3G/4G technologies. We present a preliminary PHY and MAC layer design of a HSS based AMI network and evaluate their performance using matlab and NS2 simulations. Also, we propose a time hierarchical scheme that can significantly reduce the volume of random access traffic generated during blackouts and the delay in power outage reporting.

  6. Determining System Parameters for Optimal Performance of Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Xiao [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their use in military communications because they accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence (DS) modulation with "fast" frequency hopping (FFH), denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, an optimization problem is formulated that maximizes the DS/FFH communication system performance in terms of probability of bit error and solves for the system design parameters. The objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. System design parameters of interest are the length of the DS code sequence, number of frequency hopping channels, number of channels corrupted by wide-band jamming, and number of hops per bit. The proposed formulation takes into account the effects from wide-band and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference and/or varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician multipath fading. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the method s viability.

  7. Landau damping effects and evolutions of energy spread in small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yingjie; Wang, Langfa; Lin, Fanglei

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the Landau damping effects on the microwave instability of a coasting long bunch in an isochronous ring due to finite energy spread and emittance. Our two-dimensional (2D) dispersion relation gives more accurate predictions of the microwave instability growth rates of short-wavelength perturbations than the conventional 1D formula. The long-term evolution of energy spread is also studied by measurements and simulations.

  8. Point spread function of the optical needle super-oscillatory lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Yuan, Guanghui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-06-09

    Super-oscillatory optical lenses are known to achieve sub-wavelength focusing. In this paper, we analyse the imaging capabilities of a super-oscillatory lens by studying its point spread function. We experimentally demonstrate that a super-oscillatory lens can generate a point spread function 24% smaller than that dictated by the diffraction limit and has an effective numerical aperture of 1.31 in air. The object-image linear displacement property of these lenses is also investigated.

  9. Hedge Fund, Financial Stress, and Cross-Market Linkages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity & the WTI-Brent Spread Bahattin Büyükşahin Thomas Lee Jim Moser Michel Robe * 1 Brent WTI - Büyükşahin, Lee, Moser & Robe 2012 Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity & the WTI-Brent Spread Bahattin Büyükşahin Thomas Lee Jim Moser Michel Robe * 2 Brent WTI - Büyükşahin, Lee, Moser & Robe 2012 * T H I S P R E S E N T A T I O N R E F L E C T S T H E O P I N I O N S O F I T S A U T H O R S O N L Y A N D N O T T

  10. Calculation of axial charge spreading in carbon nanotubes and nanotube Y junctions during STM measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark, Geza I.; Biro, Laszlo P.; Lambin, Philippe

    2004-09-15

    Distribution of the probability current and the probability density of wave packets was calculated for nanotubes and nanotube Y junctions by solving the three dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a jellium potential model of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip-nanotube-support system. Four systems were investigated: an infinite single wall nanotube (SWNT) as reference case, a capped SWNT protruding a step of the support surface, a quantum dot (finite tube without support), and a SWNT Y junction. It is found that the spatial distribution of the probability current flowing into the sample is decided by the electron probability density of the tube and by the oscillation in time of the probability current, which in turn is governed by the quasibound states on the tube. For the infinite tube the width of the axial spreading of the wave packet during tunneling is about 5 nm. When the STM tip is above that part of the tube which protrudes from the atomic scale step of the support surface it is found that the current flows ballistically along the tube and the total transmission is the same as for the infinite tube. In the case of quantum dot, however, the finite tube is first charged in a short time then it is discharged very slowly through the tip-nanotube tunnel junction. In the Y junction both the above the junction and off the junction tip positions were investigated. For a 1.2 nm displacement of the tip from the junction the wave packet still 'samples' the junction point which means that in STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy experiments the signature of the junction should be still present for such tip displacement. For all tunneling situations analyzed the tunnel current is mainly determined by the tip-nanotube junction owing to its large resistance. The tunneling event through the STM model is characterized by two time scales, the nanotube is quickly 'charged' with the wave packet coming from the tip then this 'charge' flows into the

  11. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  12. Production of low axial energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.H.Y.

    1998-05-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as: ion projection lithography (IPL) and focused ion beams for the next generation lithographic tools and nuclear science experiments such as radioactive ion beam production. The axial ion energy spread for multicusp source is approximately 6 eV which is too large for IPL and radioactive ion beam applications. The addition of a magnetic filter which consists of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably. The reduction is due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. Axial ion energy spread of the filament driven ion source has been measured using three different techniques. In all cases, it was found to be less than 2 eV. Energy spread of the radio frequency (RF) driven source has also been explored, and it was found to be less than 3 eV with the proper RF-shielding. A new multicusp source configuration has been designed and constructed to further reduce the energy spread. To achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution, a cylindrical magnetic filter has been designed and constructed for a 2-cm-diameter source. This new source configuration, the co-axial source, is new in its kind. The energy spread in this source has been measured to be a record low of 0.6 eV. Because of the novelty of this device, some plasma parameters inside the source have been studied. Langmuir probe has been used to measure the plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density distribution.

  13. Spreading of crude petroleum in brash ice; Effects of oil`s physical properties and water current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayed, M.; Kotlyar, L.S.; Sparks, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    Experiments were conducted in a refrigerated, circulating current flume to examine crude oil spreading in brash ice. Amauligak, Hibernia and Norman Wells crudes were tested. Measurements of the physical properties of the oils were also conducted, including: surface and interfacial tensions as well as viscosities. Spreading coefficients were calculated from measured surface and interfacial tensions. Results were obtained for original and weathered oils. For the spreading tests, spill volumes up to 3 liters and water currents up to 0.55 m/s were used. Tests were done using both fresh water ice and saline ice. Slick dimensions were measured, and modes of oil spreading were observed. Slick dimensions depended on oil type, but were not influenced by water current. Oils of high spreading coefficient and low viscosity spread over larger areas than those with low spreading coefficient and high viscosity.

  14. Spreading dynamics of a partially wetting water film atop a MHz substrate vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altshuler, Gennady; Manor, Ofer

    2015-10-15

    A MHz vibration, or an acoustic wave, propagating in a solid substrate may support the convective spreading of a liquid film. Previous studies uncovered this ability for fully wetting silicon oil films under the excitation of a MHz Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), propagating in a lithium niobate substrate. Partially wetting de-ionized water films, however, appeared immune to this spreading mechanism. Here, we use both theory and experiment to reconsider this situation and show partially wetting water films may spread under the influence of a propagating MHz vibration. We demonstrate distinct capillary and convective (vibrational/acoustic) spreading regimes that are governed by a balance between convective and capillary mechanisms, manifested in the non-dimensional number θ{sup 3}/We, where θ is the three phase contact angle of the liquid with the solid substrate and We ≡ ρU{sup 2}H/γ; ρ, γ, H, and U are the liquid density, liquid/vapour surface tension, characteristic film thickness, and the characteristic velocity amplitude of the propagating vibration on the solid surface, respectively. Our main finding is that the vibration will support a continuous spreading motion of the liquid film out of a large reservoir if the convective mechanism prevails (θ{sup 3}/We < 1); otherwise (θ{sup 3}/We > 1), the dynamics of the film is governed by the capillary mechanism.

  15. Using convolutional decoding to improve time delay and phase estimation in digital communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Mason, John J.

    2010-01-26

    The time delay and/or phase of a communication signal received by a digital communication receiver can be estimated based on a convolutional decoding operation that the communication receiver performs on the received communication signal. If the original transmitted communication signal has been spread according to a spreading operation, a corresponding despreading operation can be integrated into the convolutional decoding operation.

  16. Methods and apparatuses for self-generating fault-tolerant keys in spread-spectrum systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Subramanian, Vijayarangam

    2015-12-15

    Self-generating fault-tolerant keys for use in spread-spectrum systems are disclosed. At a communication device, beacon signals are received from another communication device and impulse responses are determined from the beacon signals. The impulse responses are circularly shifted to place a largest sample at a predefined position. The impulse responses are converted to a set of frequency responses in a frequency domain. The frequency responses are shuffled with a predetermined shuffle scheme to develop a set of shuffled frequency responses. A set of phase differences is determined as a difference between an angle of the frequency response and an angle of the shuffled frequency response at each element of the corresponding sets. Each phase difference is quantized to develop a set of secret-key quantized phases and a set of spreading codes is developed wherein each spreading code includes a corresponding phase of the set of secret-key quantized phases.

  17. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-10-14

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  18. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A.

    2016-06-14

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  19. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-05-20

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  20. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R.; Benson, Stephen V.

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  1. Methods and apparatuses for self-generating fault-tolerant keys in spread-spectrum systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Subramanian, Vijayarangam

    2015-12-22

    Self-generating fault-tolerant keys for use in spread-spectrum systems are disclosed. At a communication device, beacon signals are received from another communication device and impulse responses are determined from the beacon signals. The impulse responses are circularly shifted to place a largest sample at a predefined position. The impulse responses are converted to a set of frequency responses in a frequency domain. The frequency responses are shuffled with a predetermined shuffle scheme to develop a set of shuffled frequency responses. A set of phase differences is determined as a difference between an angle of the frequency response and an angle of the shuffled frequency response at each element of the corresponding sets. Each phase difference is quantized to develop a set of secret-key quantized phases and a set of spreading codes is developed wherein each spreading code includes a corresponding phase of the set of secret-key quantized phases.

  2. Simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas on water. Final report, December 12, 1978-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.R.; Reid, R.C.

    1981-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the boiling and spreading of liquid nitrogen, liquid methane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water in a one-dimensional configuration. Primary emphasis was placed on the LPG studies. Experimental work involved the design and construction of a spill/spread/boil apparatus which permitted the measurement of spreading and local boil-off rates. With the equations of continuity and momentum transfer, a mathematical model was developed to describe the boiling-spreading phenomena of cryogens spilled on water. The model accounted for a decrease in the density of the cryogenic liquid due to bubble formation. The boiling and spreading rates of LPG were found to be the same as those of pure propane. An LPG spill was characterized by the very rapid and violent boiling initially and highly irregular ice formation on the water surface. The measured local boil-off rates of LPG agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions from a moving boundary heat transfer model. The spreading velocity of an LPG spill was found to be constant and determined by the size of the distributor opening. The maximum spreading distance was found to be unaffected by the spilling rate. These observations can be explained by assuming that the ice formation on the water surface controls the spreading of LPG spills. While the mathematical model did not predict the spreading front adequately, it predicted the maximum spreading distance reasonably well.

  3. Predictive study on the risk of malaria spreading due to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Masaji

    1996-12-31

    Global warming will bring about a temperature elevation, and the habitat of vectors of infectious diseases, such as malaria and dengue fever, will spread into subtropical or temperate zone. The purpose of this study is to simulate the spreading of these diseases through reexamination of existing data and collection of some additional information by field survey. From these data, the author will establish the relationship between meteorological conditions, vector density and malaria occurrence. And then he will simulate and predict the malaria epidemics in case of temperature elevation in southeast Asia and Japan.

  4. Graphene as transparent and current spreading electrode in silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behura, Sanjay K. Nayak, Sasmita; Jani, Omkar; Mahala, Pramila

    2014-11-15

    Fabricated bi-layer graphene (BLG) has been studied as transparent and current spreading electrode (TCSE) for silicon solar cell, using TCAD-Silvaco 2D simulation. We have carried out comparative study using both Ag grids and BLG as current spreading electrode (CSE) and TCSE, respectively. Our study reveals that BLG based solar cell shows better efficiency of 24.85% than Ag-based cell (21.44%), in all of the critical aspects, including generation rate, recombination rate, electric field, potential and quantum efficiency. Further BLG based cell exhibits pronounce rectifying behavior, low saturation current, and good turn-on voltage while studying in dark.

  5. Spark Spread

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  6. Determination of lateral spread of nuclear-fallout patterns. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    This report develops an improved method of determining the lateral spread of nuclear fallout. A full physics model of pattern development based on particle mass is analyzed. A rapid, simplified method for the prediction of nuclear-fallout patterns is developed for the case of a 1-Mt weapon based on empirical data from WSEG-10. This model is extended to other weapon sizes.

  7. Energy Loss and Energy Spread Growth in a Planar Undulator(LCC-0086)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J

    2003-10-07

    The change in beam energy spread due to transmission through a long, planar undulator is calculated. This change is shown to be gaussian as expected from the central limit theorem and large number of photons emitted per electron. These results are compared with Saldin et al. [2] expressions. Numerical results for the case of the TESLA beam and for an NLC beam are given.

  8. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fruit Flies | The Ames Laboratory 9 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/1999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999_red_alert.pdf Lessons Learned Type: Red

  9. Robust Low-Frequency Spread-Spectrum Navigation System - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Robust Low-Frequency Spread-Spectrum Navigation System Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00238_ID1614_1627 (2)_1.pdf (566 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryThe Triply Redundant Integrated Navigation and Asset Visibility System (TRI*NAV) developed by researchers at ORNL expands the

  10. Los Alamos using NIH grant to study how social behaviors affect spread of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease Can social media messaging impact epidemics? Los Alamos using NIH grant to study how social behaviors affect spread of disease Connecting social media and epidemiological research will attempt to predict the future, i.e. people's social behavior during an epidemic, using Twitter. August 15, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from

  11. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  12. TIMING APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

    1956-04-17

    The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

  13. OBSERVED LUMINOSITY SPREAD IN YOUNG CLUSTERS AND FU Ori STARS: A UNIFIED PICTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Vorobyov, E. E-mail: eduard.vorobiev@univie.ac.at

    2012-09-10

    The idea that non-steady accretion during the embedded phase of protostar evolution can produce the observed luminosity spread in the Herzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) of young clusters has recently been called into question. Observations of FU Ori, for instance, suggest an expansion of the star during strong accretion events, whereas the luminosity spread implies a contraction of the accreting objects, decreasing their radiating surface. In this paper, we present a global scenario based on calculations coupling episodic accretion histories derived from numerical simulations of collapsing cloud prestellar cores of various masses and subsequent protostar evolution. Our calculations show that, assuming an initial protostar mass M{sub i} {approx} 1 M{sub Jup}, typical of the second Larson's core, both the luminosity spread in the HRD and the inferred properties of FU Ori events (mass, radius, accretion rate) can be explained by this scenario, providing two conditions. First, there must be some variation within the fraction of accretion energy absorbed by the protostar during the accretion process. Second, the range of this variation should increase with increasing accretion burst intensity and thus with the initial core mass and final star mass. The numerical hydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cloud prestellar cores indeed show that the intensity of the accretion bursts correlates with the mass and initial angular momentum of the prestellar core. Massive prestellar cores with high initial angular momentum are found to produce intense bursts characteristic of FU Ori-like events. Our results thus suggest a link between the burst intensities and the fraction of accretion energy absorbed by the protostar, with some threshold in the accretion rate, of the order of 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, delimitating the transition from 'cold' to 'hot' accretion. Such a transition might reflect a change in the accretion geometry with increasing accretion rate, i.e., a

  14. Time Off

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Off Time Off A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Time Off Work schedules A variety of work schedules are available that allow flexibility for workers and Laboratory programs. The most popular work schedule is the 9/80-employees work 80 hours over a 9 workday (two week) period, with a Friday off every other week. Holidays The Lab recognizes these 12

  15. The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Wang, Hong-Yu; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Jin, Hai-Bo; Du, Chao-Hai

    2013-12-15

    The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

  16. Spread of an introduced parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago independent of its introduced host

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gagne, Roderick B.; Hogan, J. Derek; McIntyre, Peter B.; Hain, Ernie F.; Gilliam, James F.; Pracheil, Brenda M.; Blum, Michael J.

    2014-11-11

    1. Co-introductions of non-native parasites with non-native hosts can be a major driver of disease emergence in native species, but the conditions that promote the establishment and spread of nonnative parasites remain poorly understood. Here, we characterise the infection of a native host species by a non-native parasite relative to the distribution and density of the original non-native host species and a suite of organismal and environmental factors that have been associated with parasitism, but not commonly considered within a single system. 2. We examined the native Hawaiian goby Awaous stamineus across 23 catchments on five islands for infection bymore » the non-native nematode parasite Camallanus cotti. We used model selection to test whether parasite infection was associated with the genetic diversity, size and population density of native hosts, the distribution and density of non-native hosts, land use and water quality. 3. We found that the distribution of non-native C. cotti parasites has become decoupled from the non-native hosts that were primary vectors of introduction to the Hawaiian Islands. Although no single intrinsic or extrinsic factor was identified that best explains parasitism of A. stamineus by C. cotti, native host size, population density and water quality were consistently identified as influencing parasite intensity and prevalence. 4. The introduction of non-native species can indirectly influence native species through infection of co-introduced parasites. Here, we show that the effects of enemy addition can extend beyond the range of non-native hosts through the independent spread of non-native parasites. This suggests that control of non-native hosts is not sufficient to halt the spread of introduced parasites. Furthermore, designing importation regulations to prevent host parasite co-introductions can promote native species conservation, even in remote areas that may not seem susceptible to human influence.« less

  17. Calculating survival curves in spread-peaks of heavy ion beams and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, S.B.; Chu, W.T.; Llacer, J.; Renner, T.R.; Rodriguez, A.; Yang, T.C.H.

    1995-08-01

    In preparing for treating patients with high-energy ion beams, it is important first to determine the composition of the beam, that is, the relative mixes of the various primary and secondary particles and their LET spectra, and secondly to estimate the cell killing expected during a treatment schedule. This requires measurements of the beam composition at various depths through the spread-peak region, and a calculation of cell survival using a cell-killing model designed to accommodate the mixed LET nature of the beam in the spread-peak region. This talk presents results of an experiment in which a particle identification telescope, the BEPKLET, was used to measure the LET spectra of the primary and secondary particles at two positions in a 12-cm-spread-peak of a 585 MeV/amu neon ion beam at the Bevalac. Cell survival measurements were made at the same positions at which the LET-spectra were measured. The survival curves obtained were compared with calculations using the LPL (Lethal, Potentially Lethal) model of cell-killing. Results agree quite well at doses up to about 4 Gy. A quantity proportional to the RBE at 10% survival, when plotted against dose-averaged LET for a number of different beams and energies, appears to be a fairly good predictor of biological effect. This would not be expected if the difference in biological effect due to differences in track structure between various ions at the same LET played a significant role in modifying cell-killing in the range of LETs covered by this experiment.

  18. Analysis, optimization, and implementation of a hybrid DS/FFH spread-spectrum technique for smart grid communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Ma, Xiao; Killough, Stephen M.; Kuruganti, Teja; Smith, Stephen F.; Djouadi, Seddik M.

    2015-03-12

    In recent years, there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence modulation with fast frequency hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, error-probability analyses are performed for a hybrid DS/FFH system over standard Gaussian and fading-type channels, progressively including the effects from wide- and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference, and varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician fading. In addition, an optimization approach is formulated that minimizes the bit-error performance of a hybrid DS/FFH communication system and solves for the resulting system design parameters. The optimization objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. We also present our efforts toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid DS/FFH radio transceiver using a single FPGA. Numerical and experimental results are presented under widely varying design parameters to demonstrate the adaptability of the waveform for varied harsh smart grid RF signal environments.

  19. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. The spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 mu m/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (E-des = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (E-des = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. The spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 mu m/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separatemore » experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (E-des = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (E-des = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  1. Generation of very low energy-spread electron beams using low-intensity laser pulses in a low-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Samant, Sushil Arun; Sarkar, Deepangkar; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Jha, Pallavi

    2011-03-15

    The possibility of obtaining high-energy electron beams of high quality by using a low-density homogeneous plasma and a low-intensity laser (just above the self-injection threshold in the bubble regime) has been explored. Three-dimensional simulations are used to demonstrate, for the first time, an energy-spread of less than 1%, from self-trapping. More specifically, for a plasma density of 2x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a laser intensity of a{sub 0}=2, a high-energy (0.55 GeV), ultrashort (1.4 fs) electron beam with very low energy-spread (0.55%) and high current (3 kA) is obtained. These parameters satisfy the requirements for drivers of short-wavelength free-electron lasers. It is also found that the quality of the electron beam depends strongly on the plasma length, which therefore needs to be optimized carefully to get the best performance in the experiments.

  2. Global warming and the potential spread of vector-borne diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patz, J.

    1996-12-31

    Climatic factors influence many vector-borne infectious diseases, in addition to demographic, biological, and ecological determinants. The United Nation`s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates an unprecedented global rise of 2.0 C by the year 2100. Of major concern is that these changes can affect the spread of many serious infectious diseases, including malaria and dengue fever. Global warming would directly affect disease transmission by shifting the mosquito`s geographic range, increasing reproductive and biting rates, and shortening pathogen incubation period. Human migration and damage to health infrastructures from the projected increase in climate variability and sea level rise could indirectly contribute to disease transmission. A review of this literature, as well as preliminary data from ongoing studies will be presented.

  3. Radial Spreading of Drift-Wave-Zonal-Flow Turbulence via Soliton Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Zehua; Chen Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2009-07-31

    The self-consistent spatiotemporal evolution of a drift-wave (DW) radial envelope and a zonal-flow (ZF) amplitude is investigated in a slab model. The stationary solution of the coupled partial differential equations in a simple limit yields the formation of DW-ZF soliton structures, which propagate radially with speed depending on the envelope peak amplitude. Additional interesting physics, e.g., the generation, destruction, collision, and reflection of solitons, as well as turbulence bursting can also be observed due to the effects of linear growth or damping, dissipation, equilibrium nonuniformities and soliton dynamics. The propagation of soliton causes significant radial spreading of DW turbulence and therefore can affect transport scaling with the system size by broadening of the turbulent region. The correspondence of the present analysis with the description of DW-ZF interactions in toroidal geometry is also discussed.

  4. Exploring the plutonic crust at a fast-spreading ridge:new drilling at Hess Deep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam; Guerin, Gilles; Abe, Natsue; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J.; Adriao, Alden de Brito; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J.; Friedman, Sarah A.; Godard, Marguerite M.; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J.; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M.; John, Barbara E.; Koepke, Juergen H.; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E.; McCaig, Andrew M.; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2013-02-28

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hess Deep Expedition 345 was designed to sample lower crustal primitive gabbroic rocks that formed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) in order to test models of magmatic accretion and the intensity of hydrothermal cooling at depth. The Hess Deep Rift was selected to exploit tectonic exposures of young EPR plutonic crust, building upon results from ODP Leg 147 as well as more recent submersible, remotely operated vehicle, and near-bottom surveys. The primary goal was to acquire the observations required to test end-member crustal accretion models that were in large part based on relationships from ophiolites, in combination with mid-ocean ridge geophysical studies. This goal was achieved with the recovery of primitive layered olivine gabbros and troctolites with many unexpected mineralogical and textural relationships, such as the abundance of orthopyroxene and the preservation of delicate skeletal olivine textures.

  5. Effect of ignition conditions on upward flame spread on a composite material in a corner configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlemiller, T.; Cleary, T.; Shields, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper focuses on the issue of fire growth on composite materials beyond the region immediately subjected to an ignition source. Suppression of this growth is one of the key issues in realizing the safe usage of composite structural materials. A vinyl ester/glass composite was tested in the form of a 90{degrees} comer configuration with an inert ceiling segment 2.44 m above the top of the fire source. The igniter was a propane burner, either 23 or 38 cm in width with power output varied from 30 to 150 Kw. Upward flame spread rate and heat release rate were measured mainly for a brominated vinyl ester resin but limited results were also obtained for a non-flame retarded vinyl ester and a similar composite coated with an intumescent paint. Rapid fire growth beyond the igniter region was seen for the largest igniter power case; the intumescent coating successfully prevented fire growth for this case.

  6. Analysis, optimization, and implementation of a hybrid DS/FFH spread-spectrum technique for smart grid communications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Ma, Xiao; Killough, Stephen M.; Kuruganti, Teja; Smith, Stephen F.; Djouadi, Seddik M.

    2015-03-12

    In recent years, there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence modulation with fast frequency hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. Inmore » this paper, error-probability analyses are performed for a hybrid DS/FFH system over standard Gaussian and fading-type channels, progressively including the effects from wide- and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference, and varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician fading. In addition, an optimization approach is formulated that minimizes the bit-error performance of a hybrid DS/FFH communication system and solves for the resulting system design parameters. The optimization objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. We also present our efforts toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid DS/FFH radio transceiver using a single FPGA. Numerical and experimental results are presented under widely varying design parameters to demonstrate the adaptability of the waveform for varied harsh smart grid RF signal environments.« less

  7. Analysis, Optimization, and Implementation of a Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum Technique for Smart Grid Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Ma, Xiao; Killough, Stephen M; Kuruganti, Teja; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence modulation with fast frequency hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, error-probability analyses are performed for a hybrid DS/FFH system over standard Gaussian and fading-type channels, progressively including the effects from wide- and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference, and varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician fading. In addition, an optimization approach is formulated that minimizes the bit-error performance of a hybrid DS/FFH communication system and solves for the resulting system design parameters. The optimization objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. We also present our efforts toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid DS/FFH radio transceiver using a single field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Numerical and experimental results are presented under widely varying design parameters to demonstrate the adaptability of the waveform for varied harsh smart grid RF signal environments.

  8. Integrating knowledge-based techniques into well-test interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, I.W.; Fraser, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of the Spirit Project was to develop a prototype of next-generation well-test-interpretation (WTI) software that would include knowledge-based decision support for the WTI model selection task. This paper describes how Spirit makes use of several different types of information (pressure, seismic, petrophysical, geological, and engineering) to support the user in identifying the most appropriate WTI model. Spirit`s knowledge-based approach to type-curve matching is to generate several different feasible interpretations by making assumptions about the possible presence of both wellbore storage and late-time boundary effects. Spirit fuses information from type-curve matching and other data sources by use of a knowledge-based decision model developed in collaboration with a WTI expert. The sponsors of the work have judged the resulting prototype system a success.

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

  10. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

  11. Can we stop the spread of influenza in schools with face masks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Valle, Sara Y; Tellier, Raymond; Settles, Gary; Tang, Julian

    2009-01-01

    In the absence of a strain-specific vaccine and the potential resistance to antiviral medication, nonpharmaceutical interventions can be used to reduce the spread of an infectious disease such as influenza. The most common non-pharmaceutical interventions include school closures, travel restrictions, social distancing, enforced or volunteer home isolation and quarantine, improved hand hygiene, and the appropriate wearing of face masks. However, for some of these interventions, there are some unavoidable economic costs to both employees and employers, as well as possible additional detriment to society as a whole. For example, it has been shown that school-age children are most likely to be infected and act as sources of infection for others, due to their greater societal interaction and increased susceptibility. Therefore, preventing or at least reducing infections in children is a logical first-line of defense. For this reason, school closures have been widely investigated and recommended as part of pandemic influenza preparedness, and some studies support this conclusion. Yet, school closures would result in lost work days if at least one parent must be absent from work to care for children who would otherwise be at school. In addition, the delay in-academic progress may be detrimental due to mass school absenteeism. In particular, the pandemic influenza guidance by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends school closures for less than four weeks for Category 2 and 3 pandemics (i.e., similar to the milder 1957 and 1968 pandemics) and one to three months for Category 4 and 5 pandemics (i .e., similar to the 1918 pandemic ). Yet, given the above, it is clear that closing schools for up to three months is unlikely to be a practical mitigation strategy for many families and society. Thus modelers and policy makers need to weigh all factors before recommending such drastic measures, particularly if the agent under consideration typically has low

  12. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  13. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  14. AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2011-09-30

    While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

  15. Daylight Savings Time Starts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daylight Savings Time Starts Daylight Savings Time Starts WHEN: Mar 08, 2015 3:00 AM - 11:59 PM WHERE: World Time Zones CATEGORY: Holiday INTERNAL: Calendar Login Daylight Savings...

  16. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Jobs Dispatched / Hour What is the Scheduler Cycle? The Univa Grid Engine Scheduler cycle performs a number of important tasks, including: Prioritizing Jobs Reserving Resources for jobs requesting more resources (slots / memory) Dispatching jobs or tasks to the compute nodes Evaluating job dependencies The "cycle time" is the length of time it takes the scheduler to complete all

  17. A LARGE C+N+O ABUNDANCE SPREAD IN GIANT STARS OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 1851

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, David; Karakas, Amanda I.; Norris, John E.; Grundahl, Frank; D'Antona, Francesca; Lattanzio, John C. E-mail: akarakas@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: fgj@phys.au.dk E-mail: John.Lattanzio@sci.monash.edu.au

    2009-04-10

    Abundances of C, N, and O are determined in four bright red giants that span the known abundance range for light (Na and Al) and s-process (Zr and La) elements in the globular cluster NGC 1851. The abundance sum C+N+O exhibits a range of 0.6 dex, a factor of 4, in contrast to other clusters in which no significant C+N+O spread is found. Such an abundance range offers support for the Cassisi et al. scenario in which the double subgiant branch populations are coeval but with different mixtures of C+N+O abundances. Further, the Na, Al, Zr, and La abundances are correlated with C+N+O, and therefore NGC 1851 is the first cluster to provide strong support for the scenario in which asymptotic giant branch stars are responsible for the globular cluster light element abundance variations.

  18. The Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gail Powell Elaine Ruth Ray Smith Donna Watson Lisa Xiques times times the B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. ...

  19. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and time) three correspond to the three broad categories of synchrotron experimental measurement techniques: spectroscopy (energy), scattering (momentum), and imaging...

  20. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  1. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  2. ZERO-TIME INDICATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sander, H.H.

    1960-08-30

    The travel time of a nuclear shock wave from its point of origin to a location can be determined accurately by an apparatus for noting and comparably recording both zerotime, as indicated by the electromagnetic transient associated with the nuclear detonation, and shock wave arrival time.

  3. Task Time Tracker

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    This client-side web app tracks the amount of time spent on arbitrary tasks. It allosw the creation of an unlimited number of arbitrarily named tasks ans via simple interactions, tracks the amount of time spent working on the drfined tasks.

  4. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  5. An investigation of the effect of diffusivity on the transport and spread of contaminants in groundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, D.; Stewart, M.; Muyshondt, A.

    1997-07-01

    Contaminant transport in groundwater is modeled using an advection diffusion equation. The diffusion component of the model is due to molecular diffusion and advection through the flow passages in the soil matrix which are smaller than the resolvable length scales. In addition to the physical diffusion, the advection/diffusion equation requires a certain amount of diffusion for the governing equations to be stable. If there is insufficient physical diffusion the cell Peclet number is less than 2 and oscillations in the solution occur. Balance numerical diffusion must be supplied for a stable solution. Numerical simulations of contaminant transport in groundwater flows must therefore include accurate models of as many of three forms of diffusion. One represents the subscale fluid path diffusion (either tensor, vector, or scalar in form), another is the scalar molecular diffusion (scalar), and the numerical stabilizing diffusion (again either tensor, vector, or scalar in form). The final result must reasonably model contaminant spread and transport for the predictions to be useful. In the literature, measurements of contaminant diffusivity are usually made using one dimensional experiments. Because of the dependence on higher level models to capture all of the physics in contaminant transport, it is to validate these models using realistic multidimensional geometries with comparisons to experimental data. Here, the effects of different diffusion models are examined and compared for two important cases. The first is a contaminant plume originating at the surface and extracted at a drain. The second case is an isolated region of contamination which is advected and diffused towards the drain. In the second case, qualitative comparisons can be made with limited visualization data. These results will eventually be used with a comprehensive experimental program to validate models of diffusion transport.

  6. Pulse transmission receiver with higher-order time derivative pulse correlator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-16

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission receiver includes: a higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a demodulation decoder coupled to the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a clock coupled to the demodulation decoder; and a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to both the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator and the clock. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  7. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  8. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  9. Parallel time integration software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    This package implements an optimal-scaling multigrid solver for the (non) linear systems that arise from the discretization of problems with evolutionary behavior. Typically, solution algorithms for evolution equations are based on a time-marching approach, solving sequentially for one time step after the other. Parallelism in these traditional time-integrarion techniques is limited to spatial parallelism. However, current trends in computer architectures are leading twards system with more, but not faster. processors. Therefore, faster compute speeds mustmore » come from greater parallelism. One approach to achieve parallelism in time is with multigrid, but extending classical multigrid methods for elliptic poerators to this setting is a significant achievement. In this software, we implement a non-intrusive, optimal-scaling time-parallel method based on multigrid reduction techniques. The examples in the package demonstrate optimality of our multigrid-reduction-in-time algorithm (MGRIT) for solving a variety of parabolic equations in two and three sparial dimensions. These examples can also be used to show that MGRIT can achieve significant speedup in comparison to sequential time marching on modern architectures.« less

  10. Time of Flight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Flight Techniques Since the LANSCE proton beam is pulsed, the energy of the neutrons that are produced can be determined by Time-of-Flight (TOF) techniques. Neutron Time-of-Flight Since the LANSCE proton beam is pulsed, the energy of the neutrons that are produced can be determined by Time-of-Flight (TOF) techniques. The proton beam pulse strikes the tungsten neutron production target and neutrons, gamma rays and charged particles are produced. The charged particles are removed from the beam

  11. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  12. Notice - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop Summary Notes Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages II September 27, 2012 Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Session 1: 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Paper Title: Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity, and the Brent-WTI Spread Presenter: Michel Robe, American University Discussant: Lutz Kilian, University of Michigan Presentation: [Presentation materials link in here] Paper Abstract We document that, starting in the Fall of 2008, the

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Charts Selected Charts Figure 1: Historical crude oil front month futures prices Figure 7: Probability of the January 2016 WTI contract expiring above price levels Figure 8: Historical RBOB futures prices and crack spreads Figure 12: Probability of January 2016 retail gasoline exceeding different prices levels at expiration Figure 14: U.S. natural gas prices and storage Figure 16: Probability of the January 2016 Henry Hub contract expiring above price levels

  14. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  15. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter X-Ray Imaging of...

  16. Time Card Entry System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montierth, B. S.

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.

  17. Time Card Entry System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two weekmore » payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.« less

  18. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Dec2011_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration December 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 December 6, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. Prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved higher at the end of November with West Texas Intermediate (WTI) closing at $100.20 on November 30; near its highest price since June 9 and only the second time the benchmark has settled over $100 since then (Figure 1). Brent prices

  19. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Feb2012_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    February 2012 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration February 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 February 7, 2012 Release Crude Oil Prices: On February 2, Brent settled at $112.07 per barrel, unchanged from its closing price on January 3, and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) settled at $96.36 per barrel, a decrease of $6.30 per barrel over the same time period. Both Brent and WTI traded in narrow ranges of $4 and $7 per

  20. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Jun2012_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil futures prices decreased in the month of May with both Brent and WTI currently more than 20 percent below their year to date 2012 peaks. Brent settled at $99.93 per barrel and WTI settled at $84.82 per barrel on June 7 (Figure 1). The Brent front month contract fell below $100 per barrel on June 1 for the first time since October 2011. June 1 was only the second trading day that the front Brent month contract settled below $100

  1. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

  2. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory's Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

  3. Climate Time-Machine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Time-Machine Climate Time-Machine 20th Century Reanalysis Project Explores Earth's Past and Future Climate January 25, 2011 Berkeley Lab Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 Wiley-Blackwell Contact: Ben Norman, lifesciencenews@wiley.com,+44(0)1243 770 375 Science Contact: Jeffrey Whitaker, Jeffrey.S.Whitaker@noaa.gov, +1 303 497 6313 2011-01-25-20C-Climate.jpg A dust storm approaching Stratford, TX on April 18, 1935. The 20th Century Reanalysis Project will provide

  4. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) Hazardous Waste Incineration Facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction; Data Used in Characterizing Emissions; Incinerator Stack Emissions; Fugitive Emissions; Uncertainty in Emissions Characterization; and References.

  5. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis; selection and assessment of potential release scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    In this part of the assessment, several accident scenarios are identified that could result in significant releases of chemicals into the environment. These scenarios include ruptures of storage tanks, large magnitude on-site spills, mixing of incompatible wastes, and off-site releases caused by tranpsortation accidents. In evaluating these scenarios, both probability and consequence are assessed, so that likelihood of occurrence is coupled with magnitude of effect in characterizing short term risks.

  6. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

  7. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction; Technical Description of ISC-COMPDEP; Modeling Input Parameters; Discussion of Modeling Results; Summary and Major Assumptions; and References.

  8. Genepool Time Heatmaps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genepool Time Heatmaps Heatmap of Time and Slots Requested vs Time Waited (in hours) | Queue: All | Last 7 Days Time Requested Slots <1h 1-2h 2-6h 6-12h 12-24h 24-36h 36-48h 48h-1wk >1wk Job Count Longest Wait 1 23.0 (233) 0.37 (1819) 27.54 (49888) 5.85 (124593) 1.23 (39835) 0.34 (732) 0 0.4 (224) 0.02 (1) 217325 538.96 2 0 0.01 (19) 2.54 (78) 0.2 (140) 0.99 (2683) 0 0 0 0 2920 9.1 4 0.08 (1) 0 2.82 (141) 0.36 (143) 1.07 (12) 0.06 (5) 0.01 (5) 0.06 (1) 1.3 (5) 313 20.48 6 0.01 (2) 0 0.09

  9. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  10. Time Series Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-11-02

    TSDB is a Python module for storing large volumes of time series data. TSDB stores data in binary files indexed by a timestamp. Aggregation functions (such as rate, sum, avg, etc.) can be performed on the data, but data is never discarded. TSDB is presently best suited for SNMP data but new data types are easily added.

  11. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  12. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  13. Efficient Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficient Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Method and its Application to a Collision of an Ion with a 2D Material Title: Efficient Real-Time Time-Dependent ...

  14. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  15. Real time bunch length measurements in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; James, M.B.; Miller, R.H.; Ross, M.C.

    1985-02-01

    The longitudinal charge distribution of bunches accelerated in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) linac will strongly affect the performance of the Collider. Bunch lengths are chosen in a balance between the deleterious effects of longitudinal and transverse wakefields. The former impacts on the beam energy spread whereas the latter is important to the transverse emittance. Two bunch length measurement ports have been installed in the SLC linac: one in the injector region and one after the emittance damping ring to linac reinjection point. These ports utilize a fused quartz Cerenkov radiator in conjunction with an electrooptic streak camera to permit real time monitoring of single s-band buckets with a resolution of several picoseconds. The design of the radiators and light collection optics is discussed with an emphasis on those issues important to high resolution. Experimental results are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  17. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E. (Fremont, CA); Struve, Kenneth W. (Albuquerque, NM); Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  18. SPECIAL DATE AND TIME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPECIAL DATE AND TIME Evolving views of the outer solar system: new insights from NASA's New Horizons mission's historic first Pluto fly-by Dr. Kimberly Ennico Smith NASA Ames Research Center, Astrophysics Branch April 11, 2016 2:00 p.m. - Wilson Hall, One West On July 14, 2015, after a 9.5 year trek across the solar system, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft successfully flew by Pluto and its system of moons, taking imagery, spectra and in-situ particle data. In this internet- information age, this

  19. Aug 2010 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 August 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 ARRA work continues Page 4 Sharing secrets with the public Page 5 Apprentices are a sure bet Page 6 Need a yo-yo? Stop by JA BizTown's Y-12 booth Page 8 Employees drop the pounds B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for

  20. SU-E-J-115: Using Markov Chain Modeling to Elucidate Patterns in Breast Cancer Metastasis Over Time and Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comen, E; Mason, J; Kuhn, P; Nieva, J; Newton, P; Norton, L; Venkatappa, N; Jochelson, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, breast cancer metastasis is described as a process wherein cancer cells spread from the breast to multiple organ systems via hematogenous and lymphatic routes. Mapping organ specific patterns of cancer spread over time is essential to understanding metastatic progression. In order to better predict sites of metastases, here we demonstrate modeling of the patterned migration of metastasis. Methods: We reviewed the clinical history of 453 breast cancer patients from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center who were non-metastatic at diagnosis but developed metastasis over time. We used the variables of organ site of metastases as well as time to create a Markov chain model of metastasis. We illustrate the probabilities of metastasis occurring at a given anatomic site together with the probability of spread to additional sites. Results: Based on the clinical histories of 453 breast cancer patients who developed metastasis, we have learned (i) how to create the Markov transition matrix governing the probabilities of cancer progression from site to site; (ii) how to create a systemic network diagram governing disease progression modeled as a random walk on a directed graph; (iii) how to classify metastatic sites as sponges that tend to only receive cancer cells or spreaders that receive and release them; (iv) how to model the time-scales of disease progression as a Weibull probability distribution function; (v) how to perform Monte Carlo simulations of disease progression; and (vi) how to interpret disease progression as an entropy-increasing stochastic process. Conclusion: Based on our modeling, metastatic spread may follow predictable pathways. Mapping metastasis not simply by organ site, but by function as either a spreader or sponge fundamentally reframes our understanding of metastatic processes. This model serves as a novel platform from which we may integrate the evolving genomic landscape that drives cancer metastasis. PS-OC Trans

  1. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  2. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, Karl M.; Fundakowski, Richard A.; Levitt, Tod S.; Overland, John E.; Suresh, Bindinganavle R.; Ulrich, Franz W.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges are segmented out by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections.

  3. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  4. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon- fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning

  5. Real-Time Benchmark Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-17

    This software provides a portable benchmark suite for real time kernels. It tests the performance of many of the system calls, as well as the interrupt response time and task response time to interrupts. These numbers provide a baseline for comparing various real-time kernels and hardware platforms.

  6. Nagios Down-Time scripts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddeberg, Patrick

    2014-11-11

    The Nagios Down-Time scripts are a set of Python scripts that create a commandline interface to Nagios' scheduled down-times. This allows for large-scale management of down-times, beyond what is feasible with the default web interface. Additionally, one of the scripts can be setup to periodically send emails of down-times that are scheduled to end within a specified amount of time after the script has been run; for example, it could run once a day and send an email including down-times ending within the next 24 hours.

  7. Nagios Down-Time scripts

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-11-11

    The Nagios Down-Time scripts are a set of Python scripts that create a commandline interface to Nagios' scheduled down-times. This allows for large-scale management of down-times, beyond what is feasible with the default web interface. Additionally, one of the scripts can be setup to periodically send emails of down-times that are scheduled to end within a specified amount of time after the script has been run; for example, it could run once a day andmore » send an email including down-times ending within the next 24 hours.« less

  8. October 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ray Smith Donna Watson Lisa Xiques times times the B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., ...

  9. Charging Your Time - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health & Safety Exposition Charging Your Time About Us Hanford Cultural Resources Charging Your Time Committee Members Contact Us Electronic Registration Form Exhibitor and Vendor Information EXPO 2016 Sponsors EXPO Award Criteria How to Get to TRAC Special Events What is EXPO Why Should I Participate in EXPO Charging Your Time Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size How Do I Charge My Time Spent at EXPO? Each Hanford Prime Contractor may have

  10. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into amore » time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.« less

  11. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  12. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT IN THE FAINTEST GALAXIES: THE CARBON AND IRON ABUNDANCE SPREADS IN THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY AND THE SEGUE 1 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard; Belokurov, V.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Frebel, Anna; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2010-11-10

    We present an AAOmega spectroscopic study of red giants in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Booetes I (M{sub V} {approx} -6) and the Segue 1 system (M{sub V} {approx} -1.5), either an extremely low luminosity dwarf galaxy or an unusually extended globular cluster. Both Booetes I and Segue 1 have significant abundance dispersions in iron and carbon. Booetes I has a mean abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.55 {+-} 0.11 with an [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.37 {+-} 0.08, and abundance spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.7 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.5. Segue 1 has a mean of [Fe/H] = -2.7 {+-} 0.4 with [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.7 {+-} 0.3, and abundances spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.6 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.2. Moreover, Segue 1 has a radial-velocity member at four half-light radii that is extremely metal-poor and carbon-rich, with [Fe/H] = -3.5, and [C/Fe] = +2.3. Modulo an unlikely non-member contamination, the [Fe/H] abundance dispersion confirms Segue 1 as the least-luminous ultra-faint dwarf galaxy known. For [Fe/H] < -3.0, stars in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites exhibit a dependence of [C/Fe] on [Fe/H] similar to that in Galactic field halo stars. Thus, chemical evolution proceeded similarly in the formation sites of the Galaxy's extremely metal-poor halo stars and in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm the correlation between (decreasing) luminosity and both (decreasing) mean metallicity and (increasing) abundance dispersion in the Milky Way dwarf galaxies at least as faint as M{sub V} = -5. The very low mean iron abundances and the high carbon and iron abundance dispersions in Segue 1 and Booetes I are consistent with highly inhomogeneous chemical evolution starting in near zero-abundance gas. These ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are apparently surviving examples of the very first bound systems.

  13. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  14. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  15. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  16. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  17. Campos fever may be spreading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-20

    Hoping to maintain its working relationship with disappointed risk contract companies, Petrobras may loosen its exclusive reins on the Compos field in the future.

  18. spread_comp_02 TOC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Any location that has a connection to the SCADA network is a target, especially unmanned or unguarded remote sites. Conduct a physical security survey and inventory access points ...

  19. Quantifying groundwater travel time near managed recharge operations using 35S as an intrinsic tracer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Urióstegui, Stephanie H.; Bibby, Richard K.; Esser, Bradley K.; Clark, Jordan F.

    2016-04-23

    By identifying groundwater retention times near managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facilities is a high priority for managing water quality, especially for operations that incorporate recycled wastewater. In order to protect public health, California guidelines for Groundwater Replenishment Reuse Projects require a minimum 2–6 month subsurface retention time for recycled water depending on the level of disinfection, which highlights the importance of quantifying groundwater travel times on short time scales. This study developed and evaluated a new intrinsic tracer method using the naturally occurring radioisotope sulfur-35 (35S). The 87.5 day half-life of 35S is ideal for investigating groundwater travel times onmore » the <1 year timescale of interest to MAR managers. Natural concentrations of 35S found in water as dissolved sulfate (35SO4) were measured in source waters and groundwater at the Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Los Angeles County, CA, and Orange County Groundwater Recharge Facilities in Orange County, CA. 35SO4 travel times are comparable to travel times determined by well-established deliberate tracer studies. The study also revealed that 35SO4 in MAR source water can vary seasonally and therefore careful characterization of 35SO4 is needed to accurately quantify groundwater travel time. But, more data is needed to fully assess whether or not this tracer could become a valuable tool for managers.« less

  20. Real-time vision systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; Hernandez, J.E.; Lu, Shin-yee

    1994-11-15

    Many industrial and defence applications require an ability to make instantaneous decisions based on sensor input of a time varying process. Such systems are referred to as `real-time systems` because they process and act on data as it occurs in time. When a vision sensor is used in a real-time system, the processing demands can be quite substantial, with typical data rates of 10-20 million samples per second. A real-time Machine Vision Laboratory (MVL) was established in FY94 to extend our years of experience in developing computer vision algorithms to include the development and implementation of real-time vision systems. The laboratory is equipped with a variety of hardware components, including Datacube image acquisition and processing boards, a Sun workstation, and several different types of CCD cameras, including monochrome and color area cameras and analog and digital line-scan cameras. The equipment is reconfigurable for prototyping different applications. This facility has been used to support several programs at LLNL, including O Division`s Peacemaker and Deadeye Projects as well as the CRADA with the U.S. Textile Industry, CAFE (Computer Aided Fabric Inspection). To date, we have successfully demonstrated several real-time applications: bullet tracking, stereo tracking and ranging, and web inspection. This work has been documented in the ongoing development of a real-time software library.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Extreme event time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsExtreme event time ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Extreme event time The time of extreme meteorological events such as min/max temperature and wind gusts. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  2. TIME-INTERVAL MEASURING DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, J.E.

    1958-04-15

    An electronic device for measuring the time interval between two control pulses is presented. The device incorporates part of a previous approach for time measurement, in that pulses from a constant-frequency oscillator are counted during the interval between the control pulses. To reduce the possible error in counting caused by the operation of the counter gating circuit at various points in the pulse cycle, the described device provides means for successively delaying the pulses for a fraction of the pulse period so that a final delay of one period is obtained and means for counting the pulses before and after each stage of delay during the time interval whereby a plurality of totals is obtained which may be averaged and multplied by the pulse period to obtain an accurate time- Interval measurement.

  3. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  4. TCES. Time Card Entry System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montierth, B.

    1996-05-01

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual`s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.

  5. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  6. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E.; Dawson, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  7. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  8. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-06-14

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  9. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  10. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H.

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  11. Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-02-17

    This program is used to compute the predicted normalized elution time (NET) for a list of peptide sequences. It includes the Kangas/Petritis neural network trained model, the Krokhin hydrophobicity model, and the Mant hydrophobicity model. In addition, it can compute the predicted strong cation exchange (SCX) fraction (on a 0 to 1 scale) in which a given peptide will appear.

  12. Time-Dependent Reliability Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-10-27

    FRANTIC-3 was developed to evaluate system unreliability using time-dependent techniques. The code provides two major options: to evaluate standby system unavailability or, in addition to the unavailability to calculate the total system failure probability by including both the unavailability of the system on demand as well as the probability that it will operate for an arbitrary time period following the demand. The FRANTIC-3 time dependent reliability models provide a large selection of repair and testingmore » policies applicable to standby or continously operating systems consisting of periodically tested, monitored, and non-repairable (non-testable) components. Time-dependent and test frequency dependent failures, as well as demand stress related failure, test-caused degradation and wear-out, test associated human errors, test deficiencies, test override, unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, component renewal and replacement policies, and test strategies can be prescribed. The conditional system unavailabilities associated with the downtimes of the user specified failed component are also evaluated. Optionally, the code can perform a sensitivity study for system unavailability or total failure probability to the failure characteristics of the standby components.« less

  13. Time Ordered Astrophysics Scalable Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-12-14

    This software package provides tools for astrophysical experiments which record data in the form of individual time streams from discrete detectors. TOAST provides tools from meta-data manipulation and job set up, I/O operation, telescope pointing reconstruction, and map-making. It also provides tools for constructing simulated observations.

  14. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  15. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  16. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  17. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  18. Time and Resource Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-08

    RESTORE is a computer software tool that allows one to model a complex set of steps required to accomplish a goal (e.g., repair a ruptured natural gas pipeline and restore service to customers). However, the time necessary to complete step may be uncertain and may be affected by conditions, such as the weather, the time of day, the day of the week. Therefore, "nature" can influence which steps are taken and the time needed tomore » complete each step. In addition, the tool allows one to model the costs for each step, which also may be uncertain. RESTORE allows the user to estimate the time and cost, both of which may be uncertain, to achieve an intermediate stage of completion, as well as overall completion. The software also makes it possible to model parallel, competing groups of activities (i.e., parallel paths) so that progreSs at a ‘merge point’ can proceed before other competing activities are completed. For example, RESTORE permits one to model a workaround and a simultaneous complete repair to determine a probability distribution for the earliest time service can be restored to a critical customer. The tool identifies the ‘most active path’ through the network of tasks, which is extremely important information for assessing the most effective way to speed-up or slow-down progress. Unlike other project planning and risk analysis tools, RESTORE provides an intuitive, graphical, and object-oriented environment for structuring a model and setting its parameters.« less

  19. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  20. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  1. Magnetic transit-time flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forster, George A.

    1976-07-06

    The flow rate of a conducting fluid in a stream is determined by disposing two permanent-magnet flowmeters in the stream, one downstream of the other. Flow of the conducting fluid causes the generation of both d-c and a-c electrical signals, the a-c comprising flow noise. Measurement of the time delay between similarities in the a-c signals by cross-correlation methods provides a measure of the rate of flow of the fluid.

  2. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That! Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the cell phone application EcoData: Radiation are expanding their global network of radiation monitoring stations to include up-to-date readings from the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) based out of southern Nevada. The CEMP was established in 1981 to monitor manmade and natural radiation levels surrounding

  3. Quantum superposition principle and gravitational collapse: Scattering times for spherical shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrus, M.; Hajicek, P.

    2005-09-15

    A quantum theory of spherically symmetric thin shells of null dust and their gravitational field is studied. In Nucl. Phys. B603, 555 (2001), it has been shown how superpositions of quantum states with different geometries can lead to a solution of the singularity problem and black hole information paradox: the shells bounce and re-expand and the evolution is unitary. The corresponding scattering times will be defined in the present paper. To this aim, a spherical mirror of radius R{sub m} is introduced. The classical formula for scattering times of the shell reflected from the mirror is extended to quantum theory. The scattering times and their spreads are calculated. They have a regular limit for R{sub m}{yields}0 and they reveal a resonance at E{sub m}=c{sup 4}R{sub m}/2G. Except for the resonance, they are roughly of the order of the time the light needs to cross the flat space distance between the observer and the mirror. Some ideas are discussed of how the construction of the quantum theory could be changed so that the scattering times become considerably longer.

  4. Time-Domain Reflectometry for Tamper Indication in Unattended Monitoring Systems for Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Smith, Leon E.; Moore, David E.; Sheen, David M.; Conrad, Ryan C.

    2014-12-17

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended, remotely monitored measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) leads a collaboration that is exploring various tamper-indicating (TI) measures that could help to address some of the long-standing detector and data-transmission authentication challenges with IAEA’s unattended systems. PNNL is investigating the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This report describes PNNL’s progress and preliminary findings from the first year of the study, and describes the path forward.

  5. Pulse transmission receiver with higher-order time derivative pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-08-12

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission receiver includes: a front-end amplification/processing circuit; a synchronization circuit coupled to the front-end amplification/processing circuit; a clock coupled to the synchronization circuit; a trigger signal generator coupled to the clock; and at least one higher-order time derivative pulse generator coupled to the trigger signal generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  6. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A.; Reedy, Gerald T.; Kumar, Romesh

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  7. May 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Stuart Hames Sharon McConathy Patrick McCoy I N S I D E Page 3 Fire department members come to the rescue Page 4 Driving green to protect our natural resources Page 5 73s: Best regards from Y-12's hams Page8 What's the secret? Mary Murray Brett Pate

  8. jul10_Times.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2001) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2001 Overview OPEC and World Oil Prices Since it is clear that OPEC does not intend to increase production quotas at this time, we presume that the weakening in oil prices that has developed since mid-June is likely to diminish and that prices may strengthen over the course of the rest of the summer. Such a development seems likely even though Iraq has agreed to resume U.N.-supervised exports. We assume for the base case projection that total OPEC

  9. January 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/y12times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Campbell Cloar Ken Davis Kathy Fahey John Holbrook Jamie Loveday Brett Pate Cindy Robinson Ray Smith Donna Watson I N S I D E Page 2 Angels in our midst Page 3 Preparing for a widespread fl u outbreak Page 3 10 tips to help you say what you mean Pages 4 and 5 Bunton, Domm and

  10. PRECISION TIME-DELAY GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, B.J.; Peckham, V.D.

    1959-06-16

    A precision time-delay generator circuit with low jitter is described. The first thyratron has a series resonant circuit and a diode which is connected to the second thyratron. The first thyratron is triggered at the begin-ning of a time delay and a capacitor is discharged through the first thyratron and the diode, thereby, triggering the second thyratron. (T.R.H.) l6l9O The instrument described can measure pressures between sea level and 300,000 ft. The pressure- sensing transducer of the instrument is a small cylindrical tube with a thin foil of titanium-tritium fastened around the inside of the tube. Output is a digital signal which can be used for storage or telemetering more conveniently than an analog signal. (W.D.M.) l6l9l An experimental study was made on rolling contacts in the temperature range of 550 to 1000 deg F. Variables such as material composition, hardness, and operating conditions were investigated in a rolling test stand. Ball bearing tests were run to determine the effect of design parameters, bearing materials, lubricants, and operating conditions. (auth)

  11. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  12. Real time analysis under EDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  13. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  14. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  15. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  16. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  17. Y-12 Times, February 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 February 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Amanda Byrge Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Stuart Hames Jamie Loveday Jane Miller Kathryn King-Jones W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 Building steam on schedule Page 3 Page 3 Being 'Rich' helps Y-12 taxes Page 4 Page 4 Social networking: Is it safe?

  18. March 2009 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 March 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Mary Murray W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 New UPF room is out of sight Page 3 Page 3 Training simulates terrorist attack, prepares fi rst responders Page 3 Page 3 Tanker cars on the right track

  19. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  20. Space-Time Insight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space-Time Insight Jump to: navigation, search Name: Space-Time Insight Address: 45680 Northport Loop East Place: Fremont, California Zip: 94538 Region: Bay Area Sector: Efficiency...

  1. Timing Carbon Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Timing Carbon Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Timing Carbon Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100022 Product: UK registered, China based CDM and voluntary...

  2. ATLAS: A Small, Light Weight, Time-Synchronized Wind-Turbine Data Acquistion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, D.E.; Robertson, P.; Zayas, J.

    1998-11-09

    Wind energy researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a small, lightweight, time- synchronized, robust data acquisition system to acquire long-term time-series data on a wind turbine rotor. A commercial data acquisition module is utilized to acquire data simultaneously from multip!e strain-gauge, analog, and digital channels. Acquisition of rotor data at precisely the same times as acquisition of ground data is ensured by slaving the acquisition clocks on the rotor- based data unit and ground-based units to the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system with commercial GPS receiver units and custom-built and programmed programmable logic devices. The acquisition clocks will remain synchronized within two microseconds indefinitely. Field tests have confirmed that synchronization can be maintained at rotation rates in excess of 350 rpm, Commercial spread-spectrum radio modems are used to transfer the rotor data to a ground- based computer concurrently with data acquisition, permitting continuous acquisition of data over a period of several hours, days or even weeks.

  3. Aeromagnetic anomalies and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta: Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor spreading directions in the meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babalola, O.O.; Gipson, M. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    An aeromagnetic contour map compiled over shallow water and onshore portions of the Nigerian continental margin, shows several elongate, long-wavelength anomaly closures with some alternating polarity, separated by steep gradient, NE lineations. The lineations are interpreted as new fracture zones or extensions of previously mapped ones. The NE trend in the western delta region is concordant with the fracture zone trends of the deeper Gulf of Guinea. Aeromagnetic lineations of the SE Niger Delta Basin however, discordantly trend ENE. Their termination against the former, is interpreted as evidence of early sea-floor spreading in a ENE-WSW direction in addition to the well documented NE-SW spreading of the Gulf of Guinea and the rest of the meso-Atlantic sea-floor; The geophysical crustal structure indicate the existence of two Early Cretaceous triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin. The two triple-junctions further support the hypothesis that the African continent was a multi-plate system (in the Niger Delta region) during the early opening of the Atlantic.

  4. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  5. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  6. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-23

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

  7. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

  8. How many times can LANL reuse water?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How many times can LANL reuse water? How many times can LANL reuse water? LANL reuses the same water up to 8 times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. August 1, 2013 LANL reuses water up to 8 times. How many times can LANL reuse water? LANL reuses the same water up to 8 times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. These uses are in place, not theoretical. Most systems in New Mexico mine water from the aquifer, use

  9. Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All About Proposals Users Home Apply for Beam Time Deadlines Proposal Types Concepts, Definitions, and Help My APS Portal My APS Portal Apply for Beam Time Next Proposal Deadline...

  10. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...