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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Interscan 4160-500B Portable Monitor Title Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Interscan 4160-500B Portable Monitor Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6357E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Lara A. Gundel Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Executive Summary Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in buildings is a health hazard. Of particular concern is formaldehyde, a ubiquitous carcinogen emitted from furnishings and adhesives in homes and offices. Practitioners and researchers in the area of building performance are very interested in measuring formaldehyde in homes, and they need instrumentation that responds immediately. Current formaldehyde monitoring techniques are hampered by interfering substances in the sample airstream, compromising measurement accuracy and leading to drift. Many experts are now using a tabletop real-time formaldehyde instrument, the Interscan 4160-2, that LBNL researchers have found to be very sensitive to water vapor and low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Unless ways are found to remove these interferences, relying on the Interscan's readings in buildings will lead to the wrong conclusions about formaldehyde levels and could trigger subsequent unnecessary expense and/or inappropriate responses.

2

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Real time monitoring in web telerobotics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing need for humans to perform complex remote operations and to extend the intelligence and experience of experts to distant applications. A blending of human intelligence, modern information technology, remote control, and intelligent ... Keywords: TCP/IP, UDP, control, internet, monitoring, real-time, telerobotics, web

Ionut Resceanu; Marius Niculescu; Cristina Pana

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

Pekala, R.W.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system  

SciTech Connect

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Real-time performance monitoring and management system  

SciTech Connect

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

CGLive - A Real Time Power Monitoring Solution for Enterprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CGLive is a real time energy monitoring software tool that could be used to monitor and reduce energy consumption of PC's in a enterprise network environment. Working of CGLive has been tested in a lab environment and was found to be successful. Dashboard ... Keywords: Green IT, Intelligent Green IT Management, Energy audit, M2M technology, Sensor Networks, Performance Optimization, Remote monitoring

Subrahmanya VRK Rao; S. Ramesh; V. Arun Muthuraj; Karthik Sundararaman; Jinka Parthasarathi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sensor Technology for Real Time Monitoring of Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Sensor Technology for Real Time Monitoring of Molten Salt Electrolytes During Nuclear Fuel Electrorefining. Author(s), Michael F. Simpson, ...

12

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis The invention apparatus can also be used to monitor for the presence of halogens, sulfur and silicon. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis There has been invented a process for analyzing ambient air in a microwave induced plasma without use of an additional carrier gas. There has also been invented an apparatus for analyzing ambient air, other sample gas, or nebulized and desolvated liquids wherein a novel arrangement of plasma gas and sample gas conduits is used to enhance dependability of the plasma. This apparatus embodiment of the invention has a concentric arrangement of

13

Real-time alkali monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected emission lines, such as the sodium emission line, may be detected in the presence of interfering background radiation. A combustion flame is fed by a diverted portion of a process stream and the common end of a bifurcated or quadfurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted to collect light from the flame. The light is guided through the branches of the fiber optic cable to bandpass filters, one of which is adapted to each of the branches of the fiber optic light guide. The bandpass filters are centered at wavelengths corresponding to the emission lines to be detected and two separate filters are required for each species being detected. The first filter has a bandwidth of about 3 nms and the second filter has a bandwidth of about 10 nms. Light detectors are located to view the light passing through the bandpass filters and amplifiers are connected to receive signals from the light detectors. The amplifier corresponding to the bandpass filter having the narrower bandwidth is preset to scale the signal by a factor equal to the ratio of the wide and narrow bandwidths of the bandpass filters. This scaling produces a scaled signal from which the difference between the scaled signal on the other signal can be calculated to produce a signal having an amplitude directly proportional to the concentration of the species of interest and independent of background radiation. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Goff, D.R.; Romanosky, R.R.; Hensel, P.

1988-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Real-time alkali monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium emission line, may be detected in the presence of interfering background radiation. A combustion flame is fed by a diverted portion of a process stream and the common end of a bifurcated or quadfurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted to collect light from the flame. The light is guided through the branches of the fiber optic cable to bandpass filters, one of which is adapted to each of the branches of the fiber optic light guide. The bandpass filters are centered at wavelengths corresponding to the emission lines to be detected and two separate filters are required for each species being detected. The first filter has a bandwidth of about 3 nms and the second filter has a bandwidth of about 10 nms. Light detectors are located to view the light passing through the bandpass filters and amplifiers are connected to receive signals from the light detectors. The amplifier corresponding to the bandpass filter having the narrower bandwidth is preset to scale the signal by a factor equal to the ratio of the wide and narrow bandwidths of the bandpass filters. This scaling produces a scaled signal from which the difference between the scaled signal on the other signal can be calculated to produce a signal having an amplitude directly proportional to the concentration of the species of interest and independent of background radiation.

Goff, David R. (Christiansburg, VA); Romanosky, Robert R. (Prosperity, PA); Hensel, Peter (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Real-time human collaboration monitoring and intervention  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and apparatus for monitoring and intervening in, in real time, a collaboration between a plurality of subjects comprising measuring indicia of physiological and cognitive states of each of the plurality of subjects, communicating the indicia to a monitoring computer system, with the monitoring computer system, comparing the indicia with one or more models of previous collaborative performance of one or more of the plurality of subjects, and with the monitoring computer system, employing the results of the comparison to communicate commands or suggestions to one or more of the plurality of subjects.

Merkle, Peter B. (Sandia Park, NM); Johnson, Curtis M. (Sandia Park, NM); Jones, Wendell B. (Albuquerque, NM); Yonas, Gerold (Albuquerque, NM); Doser, Adele B. (Albuquerque, NM); Warner, David J. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Device Specific Real-time Energy Monitoring, Control, and Dynamic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device Specific Real-time Energy Monitoring, Control, and Dynamic Demand Response Solutions Speaker(s): Jake Masters Olcay Ungun Date: February 23, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

17

NETL: Gasification Systems - Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors Project No.: DE-FC26-02NT41585 Gas Technology Institute is developing a reliable, practical, and cost effective means to...

18

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors Background The Gasification Technologies Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supports research and development (R&D) in the area of gasification-a process whereby carbon-based materials (feedstocks) such as coal are converted into synthesis gas (syngas), which is separated into hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas streams in a combustion turbine-generator as a way to generate clean electricity while

19

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications to Atmospheric Organic Surfaces Speaker(s): Yael Dubowski Date: December 10, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Most studies of heterogeneous reactions on aerosols have focused on their implications for gas phase species. Less attention, however, has been given to the modification of aerosol surfaces during such reactions. Alteration of aerosol surface species may affect their hygroscopic and radiative properties as well as their reactivity toward other atmospheric trace species. In the present study, we use self-assembled organic monolayers (SAM) as proxies for atmospheric organic aerosols. Detection of even very short carbon chains (i.e., C3) as well as continuous monitoring of the SAMs

20

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Title Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Density Functional Theory Study of Formaldehyde Adsorption on Ceria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular adsorption of formaldehyde on the stoichiometric CeO2(111) and CeO2(110) surfaces was studied using periodic density functional theory. Two adsorption modes (strong chemisorbed and weak physisorbed) were identified on both surfaces. This is consistent with recent experimental observations. On the (111) surface, formaldehyde strongly chemisorbs with an adsorption energy of 0.86 eV to form a dioxymethylene-like structure, in which a surface O lifts from the surface to bind with the C of formaldehyde. A weak physisorbed state with adsorption energy of 0.28 eV was found with the O of formaldehyde interacting with a surface Ce. On the (110) surface, dioxymethyelene formation was also observed, with an adsorption energy of 1.31 eV. The weakly adsorbed state of formaldehyde on the (110) surface was energetically comparable to the weak adsorption state on the (111) surface, but adsorption occurred through a formaldehyde C and surface O interaction. Analysis of the local density of states and charge density differences after adsorption shows that strong covalent bonding occurs between the C of formaldehyde and surface O when dioxymethylene forms. Calculated vibrational frequencies also confirm dioxymethylene formation. Our results also show that as the coverage increases, the adsorption of formaldehyde on the (111) surface becomes weak, but is nearly unaffected on the (110) surface. This work was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The computations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at PNNL in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. Part of the computing time was also granted by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Runtime Monitoring of Timing Constraints in Distributed Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Embedded real-time systems often operate under strict timing and dependability constraints. To ensure responsiveness, these systems must be able to provide the expected services in a timely manner even in the presence of faults. In this paper, we describe a run-time environment for monitoring of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems. In particular, we focus on the problem of detecting violations of timing assertions in an environment in which the real-time tasks run on multiple processors, and timing constraints can be either inter-processor or intra-processor constraints. Constraint violations are detected at the earliest possible time by deriving and checking intermediate constraints from the user-specified constraints. If the violations must be detected as early as possible, then the problem of minimizing the number of messages to be exchanged between the processors becomes intractable. We characterize a sub-class of timing constraints that occur commonly in distribu...

Farnam Jahanian; Ragunathan Rajkumar; Sitaram C. V. Raju

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many construction companies today utilize webcams on their jobsites to monitor and record construction operations. Jobsite monitoring is often limited to outdoor construction operations due to lack of mobility of wired webcams. A wireless webcam may help monitor indoor construction operations with enhanced mobility. The transfer time of sending a photograph from the wireless webcam, however, is slower than that of a wired webcam. It is expected that professionals may have to analyze indoor construction operations with longer interval time-lapse photographs if they want to use a wireless webcam. This research aimed to determine the maximum time interval for time-lapse photos that enables professionals to interpret construction operations and productivity. In order to accomplish the research goal, brickwork of five different construction sites was videotaped. Various interval time-lapse photographs were generated from each video. Worker?s activity in these photographs was examined and graded. The grades in one-second interval photographs were compared with the grades of the same in longer time interval photographs. Error rates in observing longer time-lapse photographs were then obtained and analyzed to find the maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations. Research has discovered that the observation error rate increased rapidly until the 60-second interval and its increasing ratio remained constant. This finding can be used to predict a reasonable amount of error rate when observing time-lapse photographs less than 60-second interval. The observation error rate with longer than 60-second interval did not show a constant trend. Thus, the 60-second interval could be considered as the maximum time interval for professionals to interpret construction operations and productivity.

Choi, Ji Won

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sampling apparatus for real-time alkali monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a sampling apparatus which provides representatives samples of high-temperature, high-pressure coal- derived process gases for analysis of alkali concentrations in either a gaseous phase or in a particulate-bearing gaseous phase by a real-time alkali monitor. The apparatus includes a sampling probe in the form of a ceramic tube that is inserted in the stream of combustion products for gathering a representative stream of gaseous products. Critical flow orifices are connected in series between the probe and an alkali monitor burner. A valved vent line connected in-line between the critical flow orifices is used to vent a significant percentage of the flow from the first critical flow orifice device to maintain the upstream pressure required to provide the desired flow rate through the second critical orifice to the alkali monitor burner. The gaseous products in the system between the probe and the burner is heated to inhibit condensation of alkali species. 2 figs.

French, W.E.; Logan, R.G.; Pineault, R.L.

1989-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

The New York Times Headquarters Daylighting Mockup: Monitored Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The New York Times Headquarters Daylighting Mockup: Monitored Performance The New York Times Headquarters Daylighting Mockup: Monitored Performance of the Daylighting Control System Title The New York Times Headquarters Daylighting Mockup: Monitored Performance of the Daylighting Control System Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-56979 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., and Stephen E. Selkowitz Journal Energy & Buildings Volume 38 Pagination 914-929 Call Number LBNL-56979 Abstract A nine-month monitored field study of the performance of automated roller shades and daylighting controls was conducted in a 401 m2 unoccupied, furnished daylighting mockup. The mockup mimicked the southwest corner of a new 110 km2 commercial building in New York, New York, where The New York Times will be the major tenant. This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of two daylighting control systems installed in separate areas of an open plan office with 1.2-m high workstation partitions: 1) Area A had 0-10 V dimmable ballasts with an open-loop proportional control system and an automated shade controlled to reduce window glare and increase daylight, and 2) Area B had digital addressable lighting interface (DALI) ballasts with a closed-loop integral reset control system and an automated shade controlled to block direct sun. Daylighting control system performance and lighting energy use were monitored. The daylighting control systems demonstrated very reliable performance after they were commissioned properly. Work plane illuminance levels were maintained above 90% of the maximum fluorescent illuminance level for 99.9+/-0.5% and 97.9+/-6.1% of the day on average over the monitored period, respectively, in Areas A and B. Daily lighting energy use savings were significant in both Areas over the equinox-to-equinox period compared to a non-daylit reference case. At 3.35 m from the window, 30% average savings were achieved with a sidelit west-facing condition in Area A while 50-60% were achieved with a bilateral daylit south-facing condition in Area B. At 4.57-9.14 m from the window, 5-10% and 25-40% savings were achieved in Areas A and B, respectively. Average savings for the 7-m deep dimming zone were 20-23% and 52-59% for Areas A and B, respectively, depending on the lighting schedule. The large savings and good reliability can be attributed to the automatic management of the interior shades. The DALI-based system exhibited faulty behavior that remains unexplained, but operational errors are expected to be resolved as DALI products reach full maturity. The building owner received very competitive bids ($30-75 US/DALI ballast) and was able to justify use of the daylighting control system based on operational cost savings and increased amenity. Additional energy savings due to reduced solar and lighting heat gains were not quantified but will add to the total operational cost savings.

26

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Jenny tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov David Rue Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plaines, IL 60018 847-768-0508 david.rue@gastechnology.org Real Time Flame moniToRing oF gasiFieR BuRneR and injecToRs Description Combustion scientists and engineers have studied radiant emissions of various flames for many years. For some time, technologists have understood the rich potential for

27

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Title Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 80 Pagination 184-189 Date Published 12/2013 Keywords aldehyde; exposure; indoor air quality; passive sampler; residential Abstract This study investigated formaldehyde and acetaldehyde passive sampling rates and ozone interference for the DNPH-based Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure sampler. Previous studies have shown that ozone interferes with active sampling by this cartridge. Our study included one laboratory and six field experiments conducted in Northern California homes. Passive sampling rates of 1.10 ± 0.09 and 0.86 ± 0.10 mL/min determined for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are lower than previously reported. In a controlled laboratory experiment there were small, statistically insignificant impacts of subsequent ozone exposure on formaldehyde and acetaldehyde mass passively collected on the samplers. This sampler is inexpensive, easy to deploy and to transport by mail, and has a high sampling capacity when used passively; it is suitable for a wide-range of monitoring applications. However, the passive sampling rate remains in question given the internally consistent, but different results obtained in our study and the previous study.

28

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Distribution of formaldehyde emission in particleboards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to study the distribution of formaldehyde emission determined by the flask method as a function of the samples pack configuration. The formaldehyde emission was determined on particleboards with the thicknesses of 8, 12 ... Keywords: distribution, flask method, formaldehyde emission, particleboards

Judith Kinga David; Valeriu Petrovici; Octavia Zeleniuc; Anne-Marie Loredana Badescu; Simona Nicoleta Urdea; Livia Sangeorzan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Real-time monitoring of the TVA power system  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is experimenting with one of the many concepts for the uses of phasor measurements, that of utilizing phasor measurement units (PMUs) as a state estimation system. However, the term state estimation no longer applies; what is being performed is a state determination in near real-time. The PMU is a transducer that can measure voltage and current with very high accuracy. It has the ability to calculate watts, vars, frequency, and phase angle twelve times per power line cycle. The PMU can be placed in the power system so as to provide time-stamped voltage and current phasors that can be used as state variables. Input from other PMUs throughout the power system can be synchronized to within 1 microsecond via the Global Positioning System (GPS). These real-time state variables provided by the PMUs allow state estimation to be replaced by state determination. The PMUs monitoring the power system can also provide the necessary data to accurately depict events and disturbances. The PMU can be set to be triggered by an event or disturbance. A user-defined table of data, including pretrigger data, which is the sampled data for a specified interval, is stored in the PMU. The data from a single PMU can be retrieved and analyzed by popular data analysis packages to show the performance of control and protection equipment. The tables retrieved from a network of PMUs can be used to determine the system response to these events and disturbances.

Cease, T.W.; Feldhaus, B. (Univ. of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN (United States))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Real-Time System Log Monitoring/Analytics Framework  

SciTech Connect

Analyzing system logs provides useful insights for identifying system/application anomalies and helps in better usage of system resources. Nevertheless, it is simply not practical to scan through the raw log messages on a regular basis for large-scale systems. First, the sheer volume of unstructured log messages affects the readability, and secondly correlating the log messages to system events is a daunting task. These factors limit large-scale system logs primarily for generating alerts on known system events, and post-mortem diagnosis for identifying previously unknown system events that impacted the systems performance. In this paper, we describe a log monitoring framework that enables prompt analysis of system events in real-time. Our web-based framework provides a summarized view of console, netwatch, consumer, and apsched logs in real- time. The logs are parsed and processed to generate views of applications, message types, individual/group of compute nodes, and in sections of the compute platform. Also from past application runs we build a statistical profile of user/application characteristics with respect to known system events, recoverable/non-recoverable error messages and resources utilized. The web-based tool is being developed for Jaguar XT5 at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing facility.

Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Geist, Al [ORNL; Gunasekaran, Raghul [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Title Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Wenhao Chen, Agatha Chang, Robert Miller, Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, William J. Fisk, Kazukiyo Kumagai, and Hugo Destaillats Journal Environmental Science and Technology Date Published 04/18/2013 Abstract A method combining life cycle assessment (LCA) and real options analyses is developed to predict project environmental and financial performance over time, under market uncertainties and decision-making flexibility. The method is applied to examine alternative uses for oil sands coke, a carbonaceous byproduct of processing the unconventional petroleum found in northern Alberta, Canada. Under uncertainties in natural gas price and the imposition of a carbon price, our method identifies that selling the coke to China for electricity generation by integrated gasification combined cycle is

33

Real-Time In-Situ Water (& Air) Field Monitor  

2 Managed by UT-Battelle Presentation_namefor the U.S. Department of Energy The Problem: Environmental impact of VOCs and high cost of monitoring

34

REAL TIME MONITORING OF INFRASTRUCTURE USING TDR TECHNOLOGY: CASE HISTORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Remote system installed to monitor subsidence along a highway over an active coal mine. #12;Figure 5 abandoned coal mine. In spite of periodic visual monitoring, a 5 m diameter hole, 3 m deep suddenly opened experiencing active subsidence over an abandoned coal mine (O'Connor and Murphy, 1997). #12;At this site

35

Real-time automatic interpolation of ambient gamma dose rates from the Dutch radioactivity monitoring network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of radiological accidents and monitoring the spread of the contamination is of great importance. Following the Chernobyl accident many European countries have installed monitoring networks to perform this task. Real-time availability of automatically ... Keywords: Automatic interpolation, Interoperability, Kriging, Monitoring networks, Web services

Paul H. Hiemstra; Edzer J. Pebesma; Chris J. W. Twenhöfel; Gerard B. M. Heuvelink

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Active and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination Title Active and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication...

37

Mining pixel evolutions in satellite image time series for agricultural monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a technique to help the experts in agricultural monitoring, by mining Satellite Image Time Series over cultivated areas. We use frequent sequential patterns extended to this spatiotemporal context in order to extract sets of ... Keywords: agricultural monitoring, constraints, satellite image time series, spatiotemporal patterns

Andreea Julea; Nicolas Méger; Christophe Rigotti; Emmanuel Trouvé; Philippe Bolon; Vasile L?z?rescu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The design and implementation of real-time environment monitoring systems based on wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research focuses on the implementation of a real-time environment monitoring system for environment detection using wireless sensor networks. The purpose of our research is to construct the system on the real-time environment with the technology ...

Kyung-Hoon Jung; Seok-Cheol Lee; Hyun-Suk Hwang; Chang-Soo Kim

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Environmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other construction components. In the past, formaldehyde was also used in insulation of many homes formaldehyde insulation (UFFI). (US Consumer Product Safety Commission, March 1982, Release # 82-005) While carpets and other building materials, UFFI use had dropped precipitously by the mid 1980's. However, homes

40

Recent Developments in the Real-time Monitoring of Austenite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand Delta-shaped Tundish Operating Under Isothermal and Non-isothermal ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier and Injectors  

SciTech Connect

This project is a multistage effort with the final goal to develop a practical and reliable nonintrusive gasifier injector monitor to assess burner wear and need for replacement. The project team included the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Gas Technology Institute (GTI), North Carolina State University, and ConocoPhillips. This report presents the results of the sensor development and testing initially at GTI combustion laboratory with natural gas flames, then at the Canada Energy Technology Center (CANMET), Canada in the atmospheric coal combustor as well as in the pilot scale pressurized entrained flow gasifier, and finally the sensor capabilities were demonstrated at the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Gasifier and the Wabash River Repowering plant located in West Terre Haute, IN. The initial tests demonstrated that GTI gasifier sensor technology was capable of detecting shape and rich/lean properties of natural gas air/oxygen enriched air flames. The following testing at the Vertical Combustor Research Facility (VCRF) was a logical transition step from the atmospheric natural gas flames to pressurized coal gasification environment. The results of testing with atmospheric coal flames showed that light emitted by excited OH* and CH* radicals in coal/air flames can be detected and quantified. The maximum emission intensities of OH*, CH*, and black body (char combustion) occur at different axial positions along the flame length. Therefore, the excitation rates of CH* and OH* are distinct at different stages of coal combustion and can be utilized to identify and characterize processes which occur during coal combustion such as devolatilization, char heating and burning. To accomplish the goals set for Tasks 4 and 5, GTI utilized the CANMET Pressurized Entrained Flow Gasifier (PEFG). The testing parameters of the PEFG were selected to simulate optimum gasifier operation as well as gasifier conditions normally resulting from improper operation or failed gasifier injectors. The sensor developed under previous tasks was used to assess the spectroscopic characteristics of the gasifier flame. The obtained spectral data were successfully translated into flame temperature measurements. It was also demonstrated that the reduced spectral data could be very well correlated with very important gasification process parameters such as the air/fuel and water/fuel ratio. Any of these parameters (temperature, air/fuel, and water/fuel) is sufficient to assess burner wear; however, the tested sensor was capable of monitoring all three of them plus the flame shape as functions of burner wear. This will likely be a very powerful tool which should enable significant improvements in gasifier efficiency, reliability, and availability. The sensor technology was presented to the projectâ??s industrial partner (ConocoPhillips). The partner expressed its strong interest in continuing to participate in the field validation phase of GTI's Flame Monitor Project. Finally the sensor was tested in the PWR (Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne) gasification plant located at GTIâ??s research campus and at the ConocoPhillips industrial scale gasifier at Wabash River Indiana. The field trials of the GTI Gasifier sensor modified to withstand high temperature and pressure corrosive atmosphere of the industrial entrain flow gasifier. The project team successfully demonstrated the Gasifier Sensor system ability to monitor gasifier interior temperature maintaining unobstructed optical access for in excess of six week without any maintenance. The sensor examination upon completion of the trial revealed that the system did not sustain any damage and required minor cleanup of the optics.

Zelepouga, Serguei; Saveliev, Alexei

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Available Technologies: Real-Time Monitoring of Plant ...  

... which act as common building blocks of plant ... the gases emitted by the living plant tissue are analyzed in real-time for emissions of 13C in both organic ...

43

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units ...

44

Integrated system for control and monitoring in real time of efficient electrical and thermal energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated monitoring and driving system is made of main distributed components: - first level:_one or two computers placed in the control room which monitors the thermal and electrical processes based on the datas provided by the second level via ... Keywords: cogenerative gas power plant, control of distributed parameter systems, distribution management system, electric power systems, optimization, process control, real time systems, simulation

Ion Miciu; Florin Hartescu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sensing Requirements for Real-Time Monitoring and Control in Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal (syngas), requires physical and chemical sensors for exhaust gas monitoring as well as real-time control of the combustion process. Following a description of syngas production from coal, we outline species at 630 °C. Our SiC sensor can monitor the hydrogen concentration in a 350 °C simulated syngas

Ghosh, Ruby N.

46

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing Phase 2 work comprises the development and field-testing of a real-time reservoir stimulation diagnostic system. Phase 3 work commenced in June 2001, and involved conducting research, development and field-testing of real-time enhanced dual-fluid stimulation processes. Experimental field-testing to date includes three well tests. Application of these real-time stimulation processes and diagnostic technologies has been technically successful with commercial production from the ''marginal'' reservoirs in the first two well tests. The third well test proved downhole-mixing is an efficient process for acid stimulation of a carbonate reservoir that produced oil and gas with 2200 psi bottomhole reservoir pressure, however, subsequent shut-in pressure testing indicated the reservoir was characterized by low-permeability. Realtimezone continues to seek patent protection in foreign markets to the benefit of both RTZ and NETL. Realtimezone and the NETL have licensed the United States patented to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies, from well testing conducted over the last 12-month work period and including well test scheduled for year-end of 2002. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer, public presentations and industry publications. Final Phase 3 test work will be focused on further field-testing the innovational process of blending stimulation fluids downhole. This system provides a number of advantages in comparison to older industry fracturing techniques and allows the operator to control reservoir fracture propagation and concentrations of proppant placed in the reservoir, in real-time. Another observed advantage is that lower friction pressures result, which results in lower pump treating pressures and safer reservoir hydraulic fracturing jobs.

George Scott III

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for Transmission Owners and Operators within the Eastern and Western Interconnections Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for Transmission Owners and Operators within the Eastern and Western Interconnections Steps to establish a real-time transmission monitoring system for transmission owners and operators within the Eastern and Western interconnections: a report to congress pursuant to section 1839 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1839 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Secretary of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) to study and report to Congress on the steps that must be taken to establish a system to make available to all transmission owners

48

System for remote multichannel real-time monitoring of mouse ECG via the Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hardware/software system was developed to allow real-time monitoring of multiple physiological signals simultaneously via the Internet. The hardware is specifically designed for measuring ECG signals from mice, while the ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Real-Time Monitoring and Prediction of Modes of Coherent Synoptic to Intraseasonal Tropical Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique of near-real-time monitoring and prediction of various modes of coherent synoptic to intraseasonal zonally propagating tropical variability is developed. It involves Fourier filtering of a daily updated global dataset for the specific ...

Matthew Wheeler; Klaus M. Weickmann

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Real Time Quantitative Radiological Monitoring Equipment for Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, analyze, and characterize radiological contamination in soil. These systems have been successfully deployed at several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and Cold War Legacy closure sites. Traditionally, these systems have been used during the characterization and remediation of radiologically contaminated soils and surfaces; however, subsequent to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the applications of these systems have expanded to include homeland security operations for first response, continuing assessment and verification of cleanup activities in the event of the detonation of a radiological dispersal device. The core system components are a detector, a spectral analyzer, and a global positioning system (GPS). The system is computer controlled by menu-driven, user-friendly custom software designed for a technician-level operator. A wide variety of detectors have been used including several configurations of sodium iodide (NaI) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, and a large area proportional counter designed for the detection of x-rays from actinides such as Am-241 and Pu-238. Systems have been deployed from several platforms including a small all-terrain vehicle (ATV), hand-pushed carts, a backpack mounted unit, and an excavator mounted unit used where personnel safety considerations are paramount. The INL has advanced this concept, and expanded the system functionality to create an integrated, field-deployed analytical system through the use of tailored analysis and operations software. Customized, site specific software is assembled from a supporting toolbox of algorithms that streamline the data acquisition, analysis and reporting process. These algorithms include region specific spectral stripping, automated energy calibration, background subtraction, activity calculations based on measured detector efficiencies, and on-line data quality checks and measures. These analyses are combined to provide real-time areal activity and coverage maps that are displayed to the operator as the survey progresses. The flexible functionality of the INL systems are well suited to multiple roles supporting homeland security needs.

John R. Giles; Lyle G. Roybal; Michael V. Carpenter

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Urea formaldehyde foam insulation: defusing a timebomb  

SciTech Connect

With the onset of the energy crisis in the 1970's, thousands of homeowners insulated their homes with Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation (UFFI). The discovery that UFFI releases formaldehyde, a carcinogen and irritant, prompted various state and federal responses to this problem. This Note reviews those responses and concludes that a ban on the sale of UFFI, coupled with a removal and repurchase program, is the most effective solution from the standpoint of consumer health.

Fox, E.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect

An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing the oxygenated simulant into the feed tank. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the recirculating simulant was monitored, and the amount of oxygen that reacted with the resin was determined from the change in the DO concentration of the recirculating simulant solution. Prior to hydraulic testing the resin for runs 2 and 3 was covered with the simulant solution and irradiated in a spent fuel element at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Both batches of resin were irradiated to a total gamma dose of 177 Mrad, but the resin for run 2 reached a maximum temperature during irradiation of 51 C, while the resin for run 3 reached a temperature of 38 C. The different temperatures were the result of the operating status of HFIR at the time of the irradiation and were not part of the test plan; however, the results clearly show the impact of the higher-temperature exposure during irradiation. The flow rate and pressure drop data from the test loop runs show that irradiating the RF resin reduces both the void fraction and the permeability of the resin bed. The mechanism for the reduction in permeability is not clear because irradiation increases the particle size of the resin beads and makes them deform less under pressure. Microscopic examination of the resin beads shows that they are all smooth regular spheres and that irradiation or oxygen uptake did not change the shape of the beads. The resin reacts rapidly with DO in the simulant solution, and the reaction with oxygen reduces the permeability of a bed of new resin by about 10% but has less impact on the permeability of irradiated resin. Irradiation increases the toughness of the resin beads, probably by initiating cross-linking reactions in them. Oxygen uptake reduces the crush strength of both new and irradiated resin; however, the pressures that caused the beads to crush are much higher than would be expected during the operation of an ion exchange column. There was no visible evidence of broken beads in any of the resin samples taken from the test loop. Reaction with oxygen red

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Real-time Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor-Pressure Oscillation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Control and Diagnostics Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor-Pressure Oscillation Monitor Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing its patented "Real-Time Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor-Pressure Oscillation Monitor" technology. Disclosed is NETL's sensor system and process for monitoring and controlling the amplitude and/or frequencies of dynamic pressure oscillations in combustion systems during active combustion processes. The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) is designed for gas turbine combustors that are operated near the fuel-lean flame extinction limit to minimize production of the atmospheric pollutant NOx. CCADS eliminates the problems of flashback,

54

Real-time control and monitoring system for LIPI's Public Cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a monitoring and control system for LIPI's Public Cluster. The system consists of microcontrollers and full web-based user interfaces for daily operation. It is argued that, due to its special natures, the cluster requires fully dedicated and self developed control and monitoring system. We discuss the implementation of using parallel port and dedicated micro-controller for this purpose. We also show that integrating such systems enables an autonomous control system based on the real time monitoring, for instance an autonomous power supply control based on the actual temperature, etc.

Firmansyah, I; Hadiyanto,; Handoko, L T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Environmental radiation real-time monitoring system permanently installed near Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

An environmental radiation real-time monitoring system with high pressure ionization chamber was developed. It has been installed permanently in the vicinity of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the first built in mainland China. The system consists of four basic components: environmental radiation monitors; data communication network; a data processing center; and a remote terminal computer situated in Hangzhou. It has provided five million readings of environmental radiation levels as of January 1993. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Minde Ding; Peiru Sheng; Zhangji Zhi [Suzhou Nuclear Research Institute, Jiangsu (China)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the direction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies EGS Program is installing, operating, and/or interfacing seismic arrays at multiple Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites. The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality

57

New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

NETL: News Release - DOE-Online Monitor Snaps Real-Time Photos for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 6, 2005 June 6, 2005 DOE-Online Monitor Snaps Real-Time Photos for Real-Life Savings Turbine Technology Could Save Millions in Maintenance and Replacement Costs ORLANDO, FL - An innovative new system that continuously monitors operating blades in gas turbines has surpassed 5,000 hours of operation, confirming that the technology is ready for commercialization. Developed by Siemens Power Generation, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the online monitor makes it possible for operators to replace turbine blades based on their actual condition, when the thermal barrier coating is worn or damaged. This capability optimizes the life of the blades, avoids the high cost of unscheduled replacement, and extends the time between preventative maintenance periods, increasing the availability of the plant.

59

Real-Time Tool Condition Monitoring Using Wavelet Transforms and Fuzzy Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, wavelet transforms and fuzzy techniques are used to monitor tool breakage and wear conditions in real time according to the measured spindle and feed motor currents, respectively. First, the continuous and discrete wavelet transforms are used to decompose the spindle and feed ac servo motor current signals to extract signal features so as to detect the breakage of drills successfully. Next, the models of the relationships between the current signals and the cutting parameters are established under different tool wear states. Subsequently, fuzzy classification methods are used to detect tool wear states based on the above models. Finally, the two methods above are integrated to establish an intelligent tool condition monitoring system for drilling operations. The monitoring system can detect tool breakage and tool wear conditions using very simple current sensors. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably detect tool conditions in drilling operations in real time and is viable for industrial applications.

Xiaoli Li; Shiu Kit Tso; Jun Wang; Senior Member; Senior Member

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Monitoring of Power System Topology in Real-Time Mladen Kezunovic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

components such as generators, power transformers, transmission lines, loads, etc. The knowledge about components such as generators, power transformers, busbars, transmission lines and loads. The interconnectedMonitoring of Power System Topology in Real-Time Mladen Kezunovic Texas A&M University Email

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Unified Framework for Monitoring Data Streams in Real Time Ahmet Bulut and Ambuj K. Singh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-energy photons) over a certain time period, which indicates the existence of a Gamma Ray Burst. If we know monitoring queries, such as finding surprising levels of a data stream, detecting bursts, and to (2- priate lengths a priori. For example, bursts of events can occur at variable temporal modalities from

California at Santa Barbara, University of

62

A real time status monitor for transistor bank driver power limit resistor in boost injection kicker power supply  

SciTech Connect

For years suffering of Booster Injection Kicker transistor bank driver regulator troubleshooting, a new real time monitor system has been developed. A simple and floating circuit has been designed and tested. This circuit monitor system can monitor the driver regulator power limit resistor status in real time and warn machine operator if the power limit resistor changes values. This paper will mainly introduce the power supply and the new designed monitoring system. This real time resistor monitor circuit shows a useful method to monitor some critical parts in the booster pulse power supply. After two years accelerator operation, it shows that this monitor works well. Previously, we spent a lot of time in booster machine trouble shooting. We will reinstall all 4 PCB into Euro Card Standard Chassis when the power supply system will be updated.

Mi, J.; Tan, Y.; Zhang, W.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt  

SciTech Connect

Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-ß?-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-ß?-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in mixtures of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) in LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salts through measurement of the potential difference between a reference and working electrode.

Peter A. Zink; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson; Ben F. Cowan; Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

Frank F. Roberto

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Technologies for Real-Time Monitoring and Surveillance of High-Valued Assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working on technologies that can provide real-time monitoring and surveillance of high-valued assets. It is hoped through effective system design that some of these technologies can be utilized as the technical equivalent for the "two person rule" (required for many domestic safeguards operations). The major efforts associated with this work to date involve the integration and adaptation of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency-based technologies into basic system elements that can be effectively layered into integrated unobtrusive monitoring systems that are specifically designed to detect unauthorized asset movements. Each system element is designed to provide real-time monitoring and surveillance of both protected assets and the people who have access to them. The goal is to accomplish up-to-the-minute status of monitored assets using site-specific, rules-based algorithms. The overall system concepts focus on early detection (of theft or diversion) at the asset, followed by appropriate alarms or notifications that can be used to initiate appropriate response(s).

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Prototype Phasor-Based Real-Time Monitoring Software Tool - Training Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Phasor-Based Real-Time Monitoring Prototype Phasor-Based Real-Time Monitoring Software Tool - Training Presentation Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions APPENDIX E October 2008 CEC-500-2008-049-APE Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joe Eto, Manu Parashar, Bernard Lesieutre, and Nancy Jo Lewis Berkeley, CA Administered by University of California, California Institute for Energy and Environment under 500-99-013, BOA-138. Jim Cole, Larry Miller Oakland, California 94612 Commission Contract No. 500-02-004 Commission Work Authorization No: MR-036 Prepared For: Public Interest Energy Research (PIER)

67

Broadband spectroscopic sensor for real-time monitoring of industrial SO{sub 2} emissions  

SciTech Connect

A spectroscopic system for continuous real-time monitoring of SO{sub 2}, concentrations in industrial emissions was developed. The sensor is well suited for field applications due to simple and compact instrumental design, and robust data evaluation based on ultraviolet broadband absorption without the use of any calibration cell. The sensor has a detection limit of 1 ppm, and was employed both for gas-flow simulations with and without suspended particles, and for in situ measurement of SO{sub 2} concentrations in the flue gas emitted from an industrial coal-fired boiler. The price/performance ratio of the instrument is expected to be superior to other comparable real-time monitoring systems.

Xu, F.; Zhang, Y.G.; Somesfalean, G.; Wang, H.S.; Wu, S.H.; Zhang, Z.G. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). Dept, of Physics

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Real-Time Monitoring and Assessment of Circuit Breaker Operations for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circuit breakers (CBs) are very important elements in the power system. They are used to switch other equipment in and out of service. Circuit breakers need to be reliable since their incorrect operation can cause major issues with power system protection and control. Today’s practice in monitoring circuit breaker operation and status in real time is reduced to the use of Remote Terminal Units (RTUs) of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system to assess CB status. More detailed information about the control circuit performance may be obtained by CB test equipment typically used for maintenance diagnostics [1]. This paper addresses two important issues: a) how improved CB monitoring may be implemented in real-time, and b) what would be the benefits of such an implementation. The results reported in this paper are coming from two research projects, conducted using funding from CenterPoint Energy and DOE-CERTS aimed at development of software for automated analysis of CB data and the other covering development of the CB data acquisition unit respectively. The paper is devoted to description of a prototype implementation of a real-time CB monitoring system. The system consists of a new CB monitoring data acquisition IED that is located at circuit breaker and captures detailed information about its operation in real-time. The CB files are transferred to the concentrator PC where the application software performs automated analysis and makes an assessment about the operational status of the breaker. The software is based on signal processing and expert system processing. Application example using actual field data is discussed. The paper ends with some conclusions, acknowledgments and a list of references.

M. Kezunovic; G. Latisko; N. Ved

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiotherapy beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiation therapy beams is designed to preferentially distinguish and image low energy radiation from high energy secondary radiation emitted from a target as the result of therapeutic beam deposition. A detector having low sensitivity to high energy photons combined with a collimator designed to dynamically image in the region of the therapeutic beam target is used.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA); Macey, Daniel J. (Birmingham, AL); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Yorktown, VA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Real Time Runoff Forecasts for Two Hydroelectric Stations Based on Satellite Snow Cover Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal and short-term runoff forecasts for two hydroelectric stations in the upper Rhine basin are carried out in real time based on snow cover monitoring by Landsat and SPOT satellites. Evaluation of snow reserves on 1 April 1993 from satellite data reveals uncertainties in estimates using point measurements on the ground as index. Runoff is computed by the SRM model with snow covered areas as well as temperature and precipitation forecasts as input variables. A SRM menu system has been installed for operational data acquisition and management. The runoff forecasts can be exploited, among other purposes, for optimizing the hydropower production and for timely decisions on the electricity market.

Klaus Seidel; Walter Brüsch; Charlotte Steinmeier; Jaroslav Martinec; Jürg Wiedemeier; Klaus Seidel Walter Br Usch; J Urg Wiedemeier

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

72

Vision-based Real-time Monitoring on the Behavior of Fish School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a technique which can automatically monitor the behavior of fish school in images in real-time. Results on the activity level, distribution and social interaction within the school are generated based on the spatial information extracted from captured images. The fish behaviors we observe here are selected based on a list of responses which fish exhibit when they are in distress. As it is a very challenging task to perform manual observations on fish, this technique creates a convenient alternative for researchers who need to study the behavior of fish. Instead, monitoring can be done effortlessly as images are translated to statistical results which can be used to describe the behavior of fish in the school. On top of this, the results can also detect any change to the water quality. 1.

Boon Fong Chew; How-lung Eng; Myo Thida

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Study of Publish/Subscribe Systems for Real-Time Grid Monitoring Chenxi Huang, Peter R. Hobson, Gareth A. Taylor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a possible future Electrical Power Grid based on real-time extensions to Grid computing. We examine several terms ­ monitoring, real time systems, distributed computing, grid computing, publish/subscribe system I monitoring is a distributed soft real-time monitoring system. Most of the data for monitoring should

Taylor, Gary

74

In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ... ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHENOL; PLASTICIZERS; ... of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl . ...

76

A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project.

Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Baskett, R.L. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Novel Routes to Ethylene Glycol Synthesis via Acid-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Formaldehyde and Dimethoxymethane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheme for producing MEG from syngas via formaldehyde or DMMScheme for producing MEG from syngas via formaldehyde or DMMto generate synthesis gas (syngas), a reactive mixture of

Celik, Fuat Emin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Urban emissions of CO2 from Davos, Switzerland: the first real-time monitoring system using an atmospheric inversion technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions from urban areas represent 70% of the fossil fuel carbon emitted globally according to carbon emission inventories. We present here the first operational system able to monitor in near real-time daily emission estimates, ...

Thomas Lauvaux; Natasha L. Miles; Scott J. Richardson; Aijun Deng; Dave Stauffer; Kenneth J. Davis; Gloria Jacobson; Chris Rella; Gian-Paul Calonder; Philip L. DeCola

80

Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density [<=]100 mg/cc; cell size [<=]0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 [angstrom]. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

Pekala, R.W.

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density {le}100 mg/cc; cell size {le}0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A{degrees}. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 ref., 1 tab.

Pekala, R.W.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density .ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 .ANG.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "Clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density.ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100.circle.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land -based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems; a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 ina brine aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Seismic surveys successfully imaged a small scale C02injection (1,600 tons) conducted in a brine aquifer of the Frio Formationnear Houston, Texas. These time-lapse bore-hole seismic surveys,crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP), were acquired to monitorthe C02 distribution using two boreholes (the new injection well and apre-existing well used for monitoring) which are 30 m apart at a depth of1500 m. The crosswell survey provided a high-resolution image of the C02distribution between the wells via tomographic imaging of the P-wavevelocity decrease (up to 500 mls). The simultaneously acquired S-wavetomography showed little change in S-wave velocity, as expected for fluidsubstitution. A rock physics model was used to estimate C02 saturationsof 10-20 percent from the P-wave velocity change. The VSP survey resolveda large (-70 percent) change in reflection amplitude for the Friohorizon. This C02 induced reflection amplitude change allowed estimationof the C02 extent beyond the monitor well and on 3 azimuths. The VSPresult is compared with numerical modeling of C02 saturations and isseismically modeled using the velocity change estimated in the crosswellsurvey.

Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten,G.M.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of Body Mass Index on Intrafraction Prostate Displacement Monitored by Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate, using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafraction prostate displacement of patients as a function of body mass index (BMI). Methods and Materials: The motions of Beacon radiofrequency transponders (Calypso Medical Technologies, Seattle, WA) implanted in the prostate glands of 66 men were monitored throughout the course of intensity modulated radiation therapy. Data were acquired at 10 Hz from setup to the end of treatment, but only the 1.7 million data points with a 'beam on' tag were used in the analysis. There were 21 obese patients, with BMI {>=}30 and 45 nonobese patients in the study. Results: Mean displacements were least in the left-right lateral direction (0.56 {+-} 0.24 mm) and approximately twice that magnitude in the superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions. The net vector displacement was larger still, 1.95 {+-} 0.47 mm. Stratified by BMI cohort, the mean displacements per patient in the 3 Cartesian axes as well as the net vector for patients with BMI {>=}30 were slightly less (<0.2 mm) but not significantly different than the corresponding values for patients with lower BMIs. As a surrogate for the magnitude of oscillatory noise, the standard deviation for displacements in all measured planes showed no significant differences in the prostate positional variability between the lower and higher BMI groups. Histograms of prostate displacements showed a lower frequency of large displacements in obese patients, and there were no significant differences in short-term and long-term velocity distributions. Conclusions: After patients were positioned accurately using implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafractional displacements in the lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions as well as the net vector displacements were smaller, but not significantly so, for obese men than for those with lower BMI.

Butler, Wayne M., E-mail: wbutler@wheelinghospital.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Morris, Mallory N. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States) [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Kurko, Brian S.; Murray, Brian C. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

94

Extending the Battery-Powered Operating Time of a Wireless Environmental Monitoring System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advances in low-power microelectronics and sensor technologies have enabled the creation of sophisticated environmental monitoring systems capable of operating on battery power. Independence from a… (more)

Butler, Ross Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Pekala, R.W.

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

STEPS TO ESTABLISH A REAL-TIME TRANSMISSION MONITORING SYSTEM FOR TRANSMISSION OWNERS AND OPERATORS WITHIN THE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STEPS TO ESTABLISH A REAL-TIME TRANSMISSION MONITORING STEPS TO ESTABLISH A REAL-TIME TRANSMISSION MONITORING SYSTEM FOR TRANSMISSION OWNERS AND OPERATORS WITHIN THE EASTERN AND WESTERN INTERCONNECTIONS A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1839 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Prepared by United States Department of Energy & Federal Energy Regulatory Commission February 3, 2006 Report to Congress Joint Report by the Department of Energy and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for Transmission Owners and Operators within the Eastern and Western Interconnections February 2006 Executive Summary In August 2003, an electrical outage in one state precipitated a cascading blackout across seven other states and as far north as a province in Canada, leaving more than 50 million

98

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finalized Phase 2-3 project work has field-proven two separate real-time reservoir processes that were co-developed via funding by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Both technologies are presently patented in the United States and select foreign markets; a downhole-commingled reservoir stimulation procedure and a real-time tracer-logged fracturing diagnostic system. Phase 2 and early Phase 3 project work included the research, development and well testing of a U.S. patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This stimulation logging process was successfully field-demonstrated; real-time tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing was accomplished and proven technically possible. However, after the initial well tests, there were several licensing issues that developed between service providers that restricted and minimized Realtimezone's (RTZ) ability to field-test the real-time gamma diagnostic system as was originally outlined for this project. Said restrictions were encountered after when one major provider agreed to license their gamma logging tools to another. Both of these companies previously promised contributory support toward Realtimezone's DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work, however, actual support was less than desired when newly-licensed wireline gamma logging tools from one company were converted by the other from electric wireline into slickline, batter-powered ''memory'' tools for post-stimulation logging purposes. Unfortunately, the converted post-fracture measurement memory tools have no applications in experimentally monitoring real-time movement of tracers in the reservoir concurrent with the fracturing treatment. RTZ subsequently worked with other tracer gamma-logging tool companies for basic gamma logging services, but with lessened results due to lack of multiple-isotope detection capability. In addition to real-time logging system development and well testing, final Phase 2 and Phase 3 project work included the development of a real-time reservoir stimulation procedure, which was successfully field-demonstrated and is presently patented in the U.S. and select foreign countries, including Venezuela, Brazil and Canada. Said patents are co-owned by RTZ and the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL). In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed said patents to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing agreements (LA) are anticipated with other service industry companies in 2005. Final Phase 3 work has led to commercial applications of the real-time reservoir stimulation procedure. Four successfully downhole-mixed well tests were conducted with commercially expected production results. The most recent, fourth field test was a downhole-mixed stimulated well completed in June, 2004, which currently produces 11 BOPD with 90 barrels of water per day. Conducted Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-test work to date has resulted in the fine-tuning of a real-time enhanced stimulation system that will significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States and foreign petroleum fields, both onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George L. Scott III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surface plasmon resonance label-free monitoring of antibody antigen interactions in real time  

SciTech Connect

Detection of biologically active compounds is one of the most important topics in molecular biology and biochemistry. One of the most promising detection methods is based on the application of surface plasmon resonance for label-free detection of biologically active compounds. This method allows one to monitor binding events in real time without labeling. The system can therefore be used to determine both affinity and rate constants for interactions between various types of molecules. Here, we describe the application of a surface plasmon resonance biosensor for label-free investigation of the interaction between an immobilized antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA) and antibody rabbit anti-cow albumin IgG1 (anti-BSA). The formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) over a gold surface is introduced into this laboratory training protocol as an effective immobilization method, which is very promising in biosensing systems based on detection of affinity interactions. In the next step, covalent attachment via artificially formed amide bonds is applied for the immobilization of proteins on the formed SAM surface. These experiments provide suitable experience for postgraduate students to help them understand immobilization of biologically active materials via SAMs, fundamentals of surface plasmon resonance biosensor applications, and determination of non-covalent biomolecular interactions. The experiment is designed for master and/or Ph.D. students. In some particular cases, this protocol might be adoptable for bachelor students that already have completed an extended biochemistry program that included a background in immunology.

Kausaite, A. (Vilnius Univ., Lithuania); van Dijk, M. (Eco Chemie B.V., Utrecht, The Netherlands); Castrop, J. (Eco Chemie B.V., Utrecht, The Netherlands); Ramanaviciene, A. (Vilnius Univ., Lithuania); Baltrus, J.P.; Acaite, J. (Vilnius Univ., Lithuania); Ramanavicius, A. (Vilnius Univ., Lithuania)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Profiling Real-Time Electricity Consumption Data for Process Monitoring and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, smart meters serve as key assets to utilities and their customers because they are capable of recording and communicating real-time energy usage data; thus, enabling better understanding of energy usage patterns. Other potential benefits of smart meters data include the ability to improve customer experience, grid reliability, outage management, and operational efficiency. Despite these tangible benefits, many utilities are inundated by data and remain uncertain about how to extract additional value from these deployed assets outside of billing operations. One way to overcome this challenge is the development of new metrics for classifying utility customers. Traditionally, utilities classified their customers based on their business nature (residential, commercial, and industrial) and/or their total annual consumption. While this classification is useful for some operational functions, it is too limited for designing effective monitoring and control strategies. In this paper, a data mining methodology is proposed for clustering and profiling smart meters data in order to form unique classes of customers exhibiting similar usage patterns. The developed clusters could help utilities in identifying opportunities for achieving some of the benefits of smart meters data.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An application of the wireless sensor network technology for foehn monitoring in real time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foehn is one of the common climate phenomena in Taiwan because of geographical factors. The foehn is associated with high temperature and low humidity, which often leads to plant death and even causes serious forest fires. The natural disaster relief ... Keywords: environmental parameter monitoring, foehn monitoring, wireless communication

Chih-Yang Tsai; Yu-Fan Chen; Hsu-Cheng Lu; Chi-Hung Lin; Jyh-Cherng Shieh; Chung-Wei Yen; Jeng-Lung Huang; Yung-Shun Lin; Ching-Lu Hsieh; Joe-Air Jiang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

103

Radiological Monitoring Equipment For Real-Time Quantification Of Area Contamination In Soils And Facility Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The environmental restoration industry offers several sys¬tems that perform scan-type characterization of radiologically contaminated areas. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of field systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyse radiological contamination in surface soils. The base system consists of a detector, such as sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometers, a global positioning system (GPS), and an integrated user-friendly computer interface. This mobile concept was initially developed to provide precertifica¬tion analyses of soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium at the Fernald Closure Project, near Cincinnati, Ohio. INL has expanded the functionality of this basic system to create a suite of integrated field-deployable analytical systems. Using its engineering and radiation measurement expertise, aided by computer hardware and software support, INL has streamlined the data acquisition and analysis process to provide real-time information presented on wireless screens and in the form of coverage maps immediately available to field technicians. In addition, custom software offers a user-friendly interface with user-selectable alarm levels and automated data quality monitoring functions that validate the data. This system is deployed from various platforms, depending on the nature of the survey. The deployment platforms include a small all-terrain vehicle used to survey large, relatively flat areas, a hand-pushed unit for areas where manoeuvrability is important, an excavator-mounted system used to scan pits and trenches where personnel access is restricted, and backpack- mounted systems to survey rocky shoreline features and other physical settings that preclude vehicle-based deployment. Variants of the base system include sealed proportional counters for measuring actinides (i.e., plutonium-238 and americium-241) in building demolitions, soil areas, roadbeds, and process line routes at the Miamisburg Closure Project near Dayton, Ohio. In addition, INL supports decontamination operations at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

M. V. Carpenter; Jay A. Roach; John R Giles; Lyle G. Roybal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A multiprocessor system-on-chip for real-time biomedical monitoring and analysis: architectural design space exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we focus on MPSoC architectures for human heart ECG real-time monitoring and analysis. This is a very relevant bio-medical application, with a huge potential market, hence it is an ideal target for an application-specific SoC implementation. ... Keywords: electrocardiogram algorithms, embedded system design, hardware space exploration, multiprocessor system-on-chip, real-time analysis

Iyad Al Khatib; Francesco Poletti; Davide Bertozzi; Luca Benini; Mohamed Bechara; Hasan Khalifeh; Axel Jantsch; Rustam Nabiev

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres  

SciTech Connect

Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (<100nm), high surface area (400--1100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10nm. Although monolithic aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we report a detailed study of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different processing conditions, [resorcinol]/[catalyst] (R/C) ratios in the starting sol-gel solutions, using continuous flow hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR in combination with solid-state 13C and two-dimensional wide-line separation (2D-WISE) NMR techniques. The degree of polymerization and the mobility of the cross-linking functional groups in RF aerogels are examined and correlated with the R/C ratios. The origin of different adsorption regions is evaluated using both co-adsorption of chloroform and 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. A hierarchical set of Xe exchange processes in RF aerogels is found using 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. The exchange of Xe gas follows the sequence (from fastest to slowest): mesopores with free gas, gas in meso- and micro-pores, free gas with micropores, and, finally, among micropore sites. The volume-to-surface-area (Vg/S) ratios for aerogels are measured for the first time without the use of geometric models. The Vg/S parameter, which is related both to the geometry and the interconnectivity of the pore space, has been found to correlate strongly with the R/C ratio and exhibits an unusually large span: an increase in the R/C ratio from 50 to 500 results in about a 5-fold rise in Vg/S.

Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, C I.; Ripmeester, J A.; Wang, Li Q.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Baumann, T; Satcher, J H.

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Using the transverse digital damper as a real-time tune monitor for the Booster synchrotron at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fermilab Booster is a fast ramping (15Hz) synchrotron which accelerates protons from 400MeV to 8GeV. During commissioning of a transverse digital damper system, it was shown that the damper could provide a measurement of the machine tune throughout the cycle by exciting just 1 of the 84 bunches with minimal impact on the machine operation. The algorithms used to make the measurement have been incorporated into the damper FPGA firmware allowing for real-time tune monitoring of all Booster cycles. A new Booster tune monitor was implemented in the digital damper which has minimal impact on the Booster operation. The tune measures the tunes in two planes over the energy ramping cycle with an accuracy of 0.01 in real time.

Eddy, N.; Lysenko, O.; /FERMILAB

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A New Portable Instrument for Continuous Measurement of Formaldehyde in Ambient Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for ...

W. Junkermann; J. M. Burger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Program on Technology Innovation: Laser Absorption Sensors for in situ Real-time Monitoring of Syngas Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) sensors have a long history for real-time, non-intrusive in situ monitoring of combustion systems with sensitive species-specific detection capability, and Stanford University has been a leader in sensor development for practical combustion systems. Most previous sensing has been limited to gas streams near atmospheric pressure that are free of significant opacity from particulate loading. Recently, with the assistance of Electric Power ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Getting the Point: Real-Time Monitoring of Atomic-Microscope ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... done with atomic force microscopy (AFM). ... small scales, so researchers use atomic force microscopes. ... of the tip with an electron microscope, a time ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the Syracuse Athena Temple: Scale Invariance in the Timing of Ruptures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

Niccolini, G.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)] [Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of a Real-Time Interactive Storm-Monitoring Program in Phoenix, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arizona Thunderstorm Chase (AZTC) program, a cooperative project between the National Weather Service (NWS) in Phoenix and Arizona State University (ASU), uses trained ASU students as mobile observers with real-time communications ability to ...

Randall S. Cerveny; Steven M. Calderon; Michael W. Franjevic; Norman C. Hoffmann

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time period. Table 4.2 Distribution of ground truth points2005 Table 4.2 shows the distribution of ground truth pointstruth points were not included in the totals listed in Table

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Night-time naturally ventilated offices: Statistical simulations of window-use patterns from field monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates occupant behaviour of window-use in night-time naturally ventilated offices on the basis of a pilot field study, conducted during the summers of 2006 and 2007 in Cambridge, UK, and then demonstrates the effects of employing night-time ventilation on indoor thermal conditions using predictive models of occupant window-use. A longitudinal field study shows that occupants make good use of night-time natural ventilation strategies when provided with openings that allow secure ventilation, and that there is a noticeable time of day effect in window-use patterns (i.e. increased probability of action on arrival and departure). We develop logistic models of window-use for night-time naturally ventilated offices, which are subsequently applied to a behaviour algorithm, including Markov chains and Monte Carlo methods. The simulations using the behaviour algorithm demonstrate a good agreement with the observational data of window-use, and reveal how building design and occupant behaviour collectively affect the thermal performance of offices. They illustrate that the provision of secure ventilation leads to more frequent use of the window, and thus contributes significantly to the achievement of a comfortable indoor environment during the daytime occupied period. For example, the maximum temperature for a night-time ventilated office is found to be 3 C below the predicted value for a daytime-only ventilated office. (author)

Yun, Geun Young [Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea); Steemers, Koen [Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge, 1-5 Scroope Terrace, Cambridge CB2 1PX (United Kingdom)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Michael G. Apte Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 43 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5626-5632 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THUVOC and aldehyde emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehydeconcentrations ranged from 378 µg m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 µg m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 µg m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 µg m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and materialspecific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was theonly one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 µg m-2 h-1 in the morning and 257 to 347 µg m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 µg m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 µg/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 µg/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (materialsurface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde

117

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

They provide a way to monitor the current energy usage.addition to monitoring the energy usage, companies provideenable summarizing the energy usage in quarterly or seasonal

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

2012 SG Peer Review - Real-Time Distribution Feed Performance Monitoring, Advisory Control, and Health Management System - James Stoupis, ABB Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Real-Time Distribution Feeder Performance Real-Time Distribution Feeder Performance Monitoring, Advisory Control, and Health Management System James Stoupis ABB Inc., US Corporate Research Center June 7, 2012 December 2008 Real-Time Distribution Feeder Performance Monitoring Objective Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY 12 FY12, authorized FY13, requested Out-year(s) $200 k $1.1 M $1.3 M $400k Technical Scope To innovatively leverage advanced sensing, monitoring, and control technologies to enhance asset utilization and grid reliability Install state-of-the-art data collection, monitoring, and sensing equipment in distribution substations and on distribution feeders Develop new feeder monitoring, advisory control, and asset health applications deployed on current circuits, and future circuits with DERs

119

Time Stamp Attack on Wide Area Monitoring System in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security becomes an extremely important issue in smart grid. To maintain the steady operation for smart power grid, massive measurement devices must be allocated widely among the power grid. Previous studies are focused on false data injection attack to the smart grid system. In practice, false data injection attack is not easy to implement, since it is not easy to hack the power grid data communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate that a novel time stamp attack is a practical and dangerous attack scheme for smart grid. Since most of measurement devices are equipped with global positioning system (GPS) to provide the time information of measurements, it is highly probable to attack the measurement system by spoofing the GPS. By employing the real measurement data in North American Power Grid, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the time stamp attack on smart grid.

Zhang, Zhenghao; Li, Husheng; Pei, Changxing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Method and Apparatus for Monitoring the Integrity of a Geomembrane Liner using time Domain Reflectometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

Morris, John L.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method and apparatus for monitoring the integrity of a geomembrane liner using time domain reflectometry  

SciTech Connect

Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

Morrison, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing Phase 2-3 work comprises the final development and field-testing of two complementary real-time reservoir technologies; a stimulation process and a tracer fracturing diagnostic system. Initial DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work included research, development, and testing of the patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This process was field-proven to be technically useful in providing tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing; however, technical licensing restrictions blocked Realtimezone from fully field-testing this real-time gamma diagnostic system, as originally planned. Said restrictions were encountered during Phase 2 field test work as result of licensing limitations and potential conflicts between service companies participating in project work, as related to their gamma tracer logging tool technology. Phase 3 work principally demonstrated field-testing of Realtimezone (RTZ) and NETL's Downhole-mixed Reservoir Stimulation process. Early on, the simplicity of and success of downhole-mixing was evident from well tests, which were made commercially productive. A downhole-mixed acid stimulation process was tested successfully and is currently commercially used in Canada. The fourth well test was aborted due to well bore conditions, and an alternate test project is scheduled April, 2004. Realtimezone continues to effectuate ongoing patent protection in the United States and foreign markets. In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed their United States patent to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing arrangements with other industry companies are anticipated in 2004-2005. Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer and various industry presentations and publications including Society of Petroleum Engineers. These real-time enhanced stimulation procedures should significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States, onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George Scott III

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

An Extended and More Sensitive Search for Periodicities in Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/all-sky Monitor X-ray Light Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a systematic search in ~14 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor (ASM) data for evidence of periodicities. Two variations of the commonly used Fourier analysis search method have ...

Levine, Alan M.

124

Peeping at chaos: Nondestructive monitoring of chaotic systems by measuring long-time escape rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One or more small holes provide non-destructive windows to observe corresponding closed systems, for example by measuring long time escape rates of particles as a function of hole sizes and positions. To leading order the escape rate of chaotic systems is proportional to the hole size and independent of position. Here we give exact formulas for the subsequent terms, as sums of correlation functions; these depend on hole size and position, hence yield information on the closed system dynamics. Conversely, the theory can be readily applied to experimental design, for example to control escape rates.

L. A. Bunimovich; C. P. Dettmann

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

126

Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

Hooker, Jacob Matthew (Port Jefferson, NY); Schonberger, Matthias (Mains, DE); Schieferstein, Hanno (Aabergen, DE); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

127

Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"  

SciTech Connect

The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a commercial Mach-Zehnder interferometer to a spinning mirror synchronized to the web speed, in order to make almost stationary measurements. The method was demonstrated at up to 10 m/s. Both teams developed their own version of a web simulator that was driving a web of paper at 10 m/s or higher. The Department of Energy and members of the Agenda 2020 started to make a push for merging the two projects. This made sense because their topics were really identical but this was not well received by Prof. Brodeur. Finally IPST decided to reassign the direction of the IPST-INL-GT project in the spring of 1999 to Prof. Chuck Habeger so that the two teams could work together. Also at this time, Honeywell-Measurex dropped as a member of the team. It was replaced by ABB Industrial Systems whose engineers had extensive previous experience of working with ultrasonic sensors on paperboard. INL also finished its work on the project as its competencies were partly redundant with LBNL. From the summer of 1999, the IPST-GT and LBNL teams were working together and helped each other often by collaborating and visiting either laboratory when was necessary. Around the beginning of 2000, began an effort at IPST to create an off-line laser-ultrasonics instrument that could perform automated measurements of paper and paperboard's bending stiffness. It was widely known that the mechanical bending tests of paper used for years by the paper industry were very inaccurate and exhibited poor reproducibility; therefore the team needed a new instrument of reference to validate its future on-line results. In 1999-2000, the focus of the on-line instrument was on a pre-industrial demonstration on a pilot coater while reducing the damage to the web caused by the generation laser, below the threshold where it could be visible by the naked eye. During the spring of 2000 Paul Ridgway traveled to IPST and brought with him a redesigned system still using the same Mach-Zehnder interferometer as before, but this time employing an electric motor-driven spinning mirror instead of the previously belt-driven m

Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge  

SciTech Connect

The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

2005-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted that the CO{sub 2} injected into the reef would remain in the northern portion of the field. Two new wells, the State Charlton 4-30 and the Larsen 3-31, were drilled into the field in 2006 and 2008 respectively and supported this assessment. A second (or 'Monitor') 3D seismic survey was acquired during September 2007 over most of the field and duplicated the first (Base) survey, as much as possible. However, as the simulation and new well data available at that time indicated that the CO{sub 2} was concentrated in the northern portion of the field, the second seismic survey was not acquired over the extreme southern end of the area covered by the original (or Base) 3D survey. Basic processing was performed on the second 3D seismic survey and, finally, 4D processing methods were applied to both the Base and the Monitor surveys. In addition to this 3D data, a shear wave seismic data set was obtained at the same time. Interpretation of the 4D seismic data indicated that a significant amplitude change, not attributable to differences in acquisition or processing, existed at the locations within the reef predicted by the reservoir simulation. The reservoir simulation was based on the porosity distribution obtained from seismic attributes from the Base 3D survey. Using this validated reservoir simulation the location of oil within the reef at the time the Monitor survey was obtained and recommendations made for the drilling of additional EOR wells. The economic impact of this project has been estimated in terms of both enhanced oil recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. In the northern Michigan Basin alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. Potentially there is over 1 billion bbls of oil (original oil in place minus primary recovery) remains in the reefs in Michigan, much of which could be more efficiently mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

Brian Toelle

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Tracking Accuracy of a Real-Time Fiducial Tracking System for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In radiation therapy there is a need to accurately know the location of the target in real time. A novel radioactive tracking technology has been developed to answer this need. The technology consists of a radioactive implanted fiducial marker designed to minimize migration and a linac mounted tracking device. This study measured the static and dynamic accuracy of the new tracking technology in a clinical radiation therapy environment. Methods and Materials: The tracking device was installed on the linac gantry. The radioactive marker was located in a tissue equivalent phantom. Marker location was measured simultaneously by the radioactive tracking system and by a Microscribe G2 coordinate measuring machine (certified spatial accuracy of 0.38 mm). Localization consistency throughout a volume and absolute accuracy in the Fixed coordinate system were measured at multiple gantry angles over volumes of at least 10 cm in diameter centered at isocenter. Dynamic accuracy was measured with the marker located inside a breathing phantom. Results: The mean consistency for the static source was 0.58 mm throughout the tested region at all measured gantry angles. The mean absolute position error in the Fixed coordinate system for all gantry angles was 0.97 mm. The mean real-time tracking error for the dynamic source within the breathing phantom was less than 1 mm. Conclusions: This novel radioactive tracking technology has the potential to be useful in accurate target localization and real-time monitoring for radiation therapy.

Shchory, Tal [Navotek Medical, Ltd., Yokneam (Israel); Schifter, Dan; Lichtman, Rinat [Tel Aviv Medical Center (Israel); Neustadter, David, E-mail: david.n@navotek.co [Navotek Medical, Ltd., Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center (Israel)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Real-time NMR monitoring of intermediates and labile products of the bifunctional enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time time NMR monitoring of intermediates and labile products of the bifunctional enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase Paul Guyett , John Glushka, Xiaogang Gu, Maor Bar-Peled * Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, and BioEnergy Science Center 315 Riverbend Rd., University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 11 February 2009 Received in revised form 17 March 2009 Accepted 23 March 2009 Available online 27 March 2009 Keywords: Apiose UDP-apiose UDP-xylose synthase NMR spectroscopy Stocsy a b s t r a c t The conversion of UDP-a-D-glucuronic acid to UDP-a-D-xylose and UDP-a-D-apiose by a bifunctional potato enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase was studied using real-time nuclear magnetic reso- nance (NMR) spectroscopy. UDP-a-D-glucuronic acid is converted via the intermediate uridine 5 0 -b-L- threo-pentapyranosyl-4 00 -ulose

132

Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability distribution functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSim) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of the spatial-temporal correlation of the state variables. We first apply the inversion framework to a static synthetic example and then to a time-lapse GPR tomographic dataset collected during a dynamic experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. We demonstrate that the MRE-Bayesian inversion enables us to merge various data types, quantify uncertainty, evaluate nonlinear models, and produce more detailed and better resolved estimates than straight-ray based inversion; therefore, it has the potential to improve estimates of inter-wellbore dielectric permittivity and soil moisture content and to monitor their temporal dynamics more accurately.

Hou, Z; Terry, N; Hubbard, S S; Csatho, B

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability density functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSIM) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of the spatial-temporal correlation of the state variables. We first apply the inversion framework to a static synthetic example and then to a time-lapse GPR tomographic dataset collected during a dynamic experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. We demonstrate that the MRE-Bayesian inversion enables us to merge various data types, quantify uncertainty, evaluate nonlinear models, and produce more detailed and better resolved estimates than straight-ray based inversion; therefore, it has the potential to improve estimates of inter-wellbore dielectric permittivity and soil moisture content and to monitor their temporal dynamics more accurately.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Terry, Neil C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect

The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

On-Demand Generation of a Formaldehyde-in-Air Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous work suggested that formaldehyde product is less ... 5. Appendix A. Measurement of Additional Products ... of Synthesis Gas and Alco- hols to ...

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

The ''Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations'' project is investigating the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This project will involve the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) to try to observe the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through the reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, will be used to detect and map the movement of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in EOR projects such as Weyborne. The project is being conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in northern Michigan Basin which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that has completed its primary production. This field is now undergoing enhanced oil recovery using CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} flood was initiated the end of 2005 when the injection of small amounts of CO{sub 2} begin in the A1 Carbonate. This injection was conducted for 2 months before being temporarily halted in order for pressure measurements to be conducted. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution is proving to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model had to be developed. From this model, an accurate determination of porosity within the carbonate reservoir must be obtained. For this certain seismic attributes have been investigated. The study reservoirs in the Charlton 30/31 field range from 50 to 400 acres in size. The relatively small area to image makes 3-D seismic data acquisition reasonably cost effective. Permeability and porosity vary considerably throughout the reef, thus it is essential to perform significant reservoir characterization and modeling prior to implementing a CO{sub 2} flood to maximize recovery efficiency. Should this project prove successful, the same technique could be applied across a large spectrum of the industry. In Michigan alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. These reservoirs range in thickness from 200 to 400 ft and are at depths of 2000 to 5000 ft. Approximately 113 of these Niagaran oil fields have produced over 1 million bbls each and the total cumulative production is in excess of 300 million bbls and 1.4 Tcf. There could potentially be over 1 billion bbls of oil remaining in reefs in Michigan much of which could be mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

Brian E. Toelle

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

Oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde catalyzed by a bituminous coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been observed that molecular hydrogen is formed during long-term storage of bituminous coals via oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde by coal surface peroxides. This study has investigated the effects of coal quantity, temperature, and water content on the molecular hydrogen formation with a typical American coal (Pittsburgh No. 6). The results indicate that the coal's surface serves as a catalyst in the formation processes of molecular hydrogen. Furthermore, the results also indicate that low temperature emission of molecular hydrogen may possibly be the cause of unexplained explosions in confined spaces containing bituminous coals, for example, underground mines or ship holds. 20 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Haim Cohen; Uri Green [Ariel University Center in Samaria, Beer Sheva (Israel). Biological Chemistry Department

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Real-time hands, face and facial features detection and tracking: Application to cognitive rehabilitation tests monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a marker-free computer vision system for cognitive rehabilitation tests monitoring is presented. The system monitors and analyzes the correct and incorrect realization of a set of psicomotricity exercises in which a hand has to touch a ... Keywords: AdaBoost, CAMShift, Cognitive rehabilitation, Human body parts detection and tracking, Human-computer interaction, TSL color space

D. González-Ortega; F. J. Díaz-Pernas; M. Martínez-Zarzuela; M. Antón-Rodríguez; J. F. Díez-Higuera; D. Boto-Giralda

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NRC Job Code V6060: Extended in-situ and real time monitoring. Task 4: Detection and monitoring of leaks at nuclear power plants external to structures  

SciTech Connect

In support of Task 4 of the NRC study on compliance with 10 CFR part 20.1406, minimization of contamination, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a one-year scoping study, in concert with a parallel study performed by NRC/NRR staff, on monitoring for leaks at nuclear power plants (NPPs) external to structures. The objective of this task-4 study is to identify and assess those sensors and monitoring techniques for early detection of abnormal radioactive releases from the engineered facility structures, systems and components (SSCs) to the surrounding underground environment in existing NPPs and planned new reactors. As such, methods of interest include: (1) detection of anomalous water content of soils surrounding SSCs, (2) radionuclides contained in the leaking water, and (3) secondary signals such as temperature. ANL work scope includes mainly to (1) identify, in concert with the nuclear industry, the sensors and techniques that have most promise to detect radionuclides and/or associated chemical releases from SSCs of existing NPPs and (2) review and provide comments on the results of the NRC/NRR staff scoping study to identify candidate technologies. This report constitutes the ANL deliverable of the task-4 study. It covers a survey of sensor technologies and leak detection methods currently applied to leak monitoring at NPPs. The survey also provides a technology evaluation that identifies their strength and deficiency based on their detection speed, sensitivity, range and reliability. Emerging advanced technologies that are potentially capable of locating releases, identifying the radionuclides, and estimating their concentrations and distributions are also included in the report along with suggestions of required further research and development.

Sheen, S. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Real-time analysis of physiological data and development of alarm algorithms for patient monitoring in the Intensive Care Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of effective data integration and knowledge representation in patient monitoring limits its utility to clinicians. Intelligent alarm algorithms that use artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to ...

Zhang, Ying, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hydrogeologic settings of A/M Area: Framework for groundwater transport: Book 6, Appendix B, Time/concentration graphs A/M Area monitoring wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the time/concentration graphs for the Savannah River A/M monitoring wells. This Appendix B is part of the determination of the hydrogeologic setting of the A/M Area as a part of ground water transport studies.

Van Pelt, R.; Lewis, S.E.; Aadand, R.K.

1994-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Shoreline monitoring program on the Upper Texas Coast utilizing a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to shoreline erosion, approximately seventeen miles of Texas State Highway 87, located in Jefferson County Texas, have been repeatedly destroyed by storms and rebuilt. This thesis describes a shoreline monitoring program developed to obtain a comprehensive data set that will be used to define the coastal erosion problem and assist in the reconstruction of the roadway. An improved survey system similar to a concept developed by Beach et al. (1996) was designed and constructed for this project. This thesis discusses the improved survey system design and testing. The nearshore system utilizes a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System (RTK-DGPS) mounted on a personal watercraft and integrated with a survey quality echo sounder. The nearshore system was tested by repeating transects in the nearshore. The repeatability of the profiles demonstrated a standard deviation of 6.2 cm from the mean absolute difference of 8.0 cm. The beach survey utilizes RTK-DGPS equipment carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The maximum expected error for the beach survey is approximately []4 cm. The system is an accurate, mobile and efficient method to obtain beach profiles. Additional accuracy may be obtained by integrating a motion sensor and CTD profiler. The survey data are processed using commercially available software packages and programs developed for this project. The processed data is integrated and stored in a geographic information system (GIS). The data collected exemplify morphological features indicative of erosion due to overwash. This is consistent with visual observations and numerical model results provided by Howard (1999). The shoreline movement since 1996 is consistent with historical data and is related to storm events. The current research has provided a survey system capable of performing fast, accurate surveys in the nearshore and a baseline data set. The survey system is fully operational and will be instrumental in the ongoing research related to the Highway 87 reconstruction project. The baseline data set, together with sediment analyses data and water level predictions, provides the foundation from which further investigations will be conducted and will provide information that can be used for the design of the new highway.

Wamsley, Ty V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Formaldehyde yields from methanol electrochemical oxidation on carbon-supported platinum catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of formaldehyde during methanol electrochemical oxidation on supported Pt and Pt-Ru catalysts was investigated. While on solid platinum electrodes, the formaldehyde yields from methanol oxidation are near 30% at low potentials; the yields fall below 2% for methanol electrochemical oxidation on carbon-supported catalysts in Nafion. The lower formaldehyde yields, which result from more complete methanol oxidation, are believed to arise from the ability of partial oxidation products to be transported to an array of active catalyst sites dispersed within the three-dimensional network of the Nafion film.

Childers, C.L.; Huang, H.; Korzeniewski, C. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Synthesis by Inverse Suspension Polymerization  

SciTech Connect

Base catalyzed sol-gel polycondensation of resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) with formaldehyde by inverse suspension polymerization leads to the formation of uniform, highly cross-linked, translucent, spherical gels, which have increased selectivity and capacity for cesium ion removal from high alkaline solutions. Because of its high selectivity for cesium ion, resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resins are being considered for process scale column radioactive cesium removal by ion-exchange at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), which is now under construction at the Hanford site. Other specialty resins such as Superlig{reg_sign} 644 have been ground and sieved and column tested for process scale radioactive cesium removal but show high pressure drops across the resin bed during transition from column regeneration to loading and elution. Furthermore, van Deemter considerations indicate better displacement column chromatography by the use of spherical particle beads rather than irregularly shaped ground or granular particles. In our studies batch contact equilibrium experiments using a high alkaline simulant show a definite increase in cesium loading onto spherical R-F resin. Distribution coefficient (Kd) values ranged from 777 to 429 mL/g in the presence of 0.1M and 0.7M potassium ions, respectively. Though other techniques for making R-F resins have been employed, to our knowledge no one has made spherical R-F resins by inverse suspension polymerization. Moreover, in this study we discuss the data comparisons to known algebraic isotherms used to evaluate ion-exchange resins for WTP plant scale cesium removal operations.

Ray, Robert J.; Scrivens, Walter A.; Nash, Charles

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Near-Real-Time Acoustic Monitoring of Beaked Whales and Other Cetaceans Using a SeagliderTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ a glider ­ equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan Collective, Olympia, Washington, United States of America Abstract In most areas, estimating the presence for new, cost- effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high

Baird, Robin W.

147

Isotope enrichment by frequency-tripled temperature tuned neodymium laser photolysis of formaldehyde  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Enrichment of carbon, hydrogen and/or oxygen isotopes by means of isotopically selective photo-predissociation of formaldehyde is achieved by irradiation provided by a frequency-tripled, temperature tuned neodymium laser.

Marling, John B. (Livermore, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Development of a Real-Time Detection Strategy for Material Accountancy and Process Monitoring During Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Using the Urex+3A Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reprocessing nuclear fuel is becoming more viable in the United States due to the anticipated increase in construction of nuclear power plants, the growing stockpile of existing used nuclear fuel, and a public desire to reduce the amount of this fuel. However, a new reprocessing facility in non-weapon states must be safeguarded and new reprocessing facilities in weapon states will likely have safeguards due to political and material accountancy reasons. These facilities will have state of the art controls and monitoring methods to safeguard special nuclear materials, as well as to provide real-time monitoring. The focus of this project is to enable the development of a safeguards strategy that uses well established photon measurement methods to characterize samples from the UREX+3a reprocessing method using a variety of detector types and measurement times. It was determined that the errors from quantitative measurements were too large for traditional safeguards methods; however, a safeguards strategy based on qualitative gamma ray and neutron measurements is proposed. The gamma ray detection equipment used in the safeguard strategy could also be used to improve the real-time process monitoring in a yet-to-be built facility. A facility that had real-time gamma detection equipment could improve product quality control and provide additional benefits, such as waste volume reduction. In addition to the spectral analyses, it was determined by Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) simulations that there is no noticeable self shielding for internal pipe diameters less than 2 inches, indicating that no self shielding correction factors are needed. Further, it was determined that HPGe N-type detectors would be suitable for a neutron radiation environment. Finally, the gamma ray spectra for the measured samples were simulated using MCNP and then the model was extended to predict the responses from an actual reprocessing scenario from UREX+3a applied to fuel that had a decay time of three years. The 3-year decayed fuel was more representative of commercially reprocessed fuel than the acquired UREX+3a samples. This research found that the safeguards approach proposed in this paper would be best suited as an addition to existing safeguard strategies. Real-time gamma ray detection for process monitoring would be beneficial to a reprocessing facility and could be done with commercially available detectors.

Goddard, Braden

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An Acoustic Telemetry System Implemented for Real-Time Monitoring of the Gulf Stream with Inverted Echo Sounders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From August 1989 until August 1990, a simple acoustic telemetry system was used for obtaining real-time data from four inverted echo sounders (IESs) deployed in the Synoptic Ocean Prediction Experiment (SYNOP) inlet array in the Gulf Stream east ...

Stephan D. Howden; D. Randolph Watts; Karen L. Tracey; H. Thomas Rossby

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL FORMATION OF ORGANIC SOLIDS IN CHONDRITES AND COMETS THROUGH POLYMERIZATION OF INTERSTELLAR FORMALDEHYDE  

SciTech Connect

Polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde, first through the formose reaction and then through subsequent condensation reactions, provides a plausible explanation for how abundant and highly chemically complex organic solids may have come to exist in primitive solar system objects. In order to gain better insight on the reaction, a systematic study of the relationship of synthesis temperature with resultant molecular structure was performed. In addition, the effect of the presence of ammonia on the reaction rate and molecular structure of the product was studied. The synthesized formaldehyde polymer is directly compared to chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from primitive meteorites using solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The molecular structure of the formaldehyde polymer is shown to exhibit considerable similarity at the functional group level with primitive chondritic IOM. The addition of ammonia to the solution enhances the rate of polymerization reaction at lower temperatures and results in substantial incorporation of nitrogen into the polymer. Morphologically, the formaldehyde polymer exists as submicron to micron-sized spheroidal particles and spheroidal particle aggregates that bare considerable similarity to the organic nanoglobules commonly observed in chondritic IOM. These spectroscopic and morphological data support the hypothesis that IOM in chondrites and refractory organic carbon in comets may have formed through the polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde after planetesimal accretion, in the presence of liquid water, early in the history of the solar system.

Kebukawa, Yoko; Cody, George D. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)] [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); David Kilcoyne, A. L., E-mail: ykebukawa@ciw.edu, E-mail: yoko@ep.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Mail Stop 7R0222, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

In situ multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for monitoring nanoparticle generation in a high-pressure fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for studying the dynamics of nanoparticles generated by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) in a high-pressure fluid. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure optical cell and three spectrometers for in situ measurements. The optical cell was designed for experiments at temperatures up to 400 K and pressures up to 30 MPa with fluctuations within {+-}0.1% h{sup -1}. The three spectrometers were used for the following in situ measurements at high pressures: (i) transient absorption spectrum measurements from 350 to 850 nm to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle generation from nanoseconds to milliseconds after laser irradiation, (ii) absorption spectrum measurements from 220 to 900 nm to observe the time evolution of nanoparticles from seconds to hours after laser ablation, and (iii) dynamic light scattering measurements to track nanoparticles with sizes from 10 nm to 10 {mu}m in the time range from seconds to hours after laser ablation. By combining these three spectrometers, we demonstrate in situ measurements of gold nanoparticles generated by PLA in supercritical fluids. This is the first report of in situ time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of nanoparticles generated in a supercritical fluid.

Wei, Shaoyu [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, 739-8526 Higashi-hiroshima (Japan); Saitow, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, 739-8526 Higashi-hiroshima (Japan); Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development (N-BARD), 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, 739-8526 Higashi-hiroshima (Japan)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Real-time collaborative network monitoring and control using 3D game engines for representation and interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identifying and reacting to malicious or anomalous IP traffic is a significant challenge for network operators. Automated real-time responses have been simplistic and require followup actions by technically specialised employees. We describe a system ... Keywords: enterprise networks, network control, network visualisation

Warren Harrop; Grenville Armitage

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CAMS–OPI: A Global Satellite–Rain Gauge Merged Product for Real-Time Precipitation Monitoring Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been developed to produce real-time rain gauge–satellite merged analyses of global monthly precipitation. A dataset of these analyses spans the period from January 1979 to the present, which is sufficiently long to allow the ...

John E. Janowiak; Pingping Xie

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Demonstration of a real-time interferometer as a bunch-length monitor in a high-current electron beam accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A real-time interferometer (RTI) has been developed to monitor the bunch length of an electron beam in an accelerator. The RTI employs spatial autocorrelation, reflective optics, and a fast response pyro-detector array to obtain a real-time autocorrelation trace of the coherent radiation from an electron beam thus providing the possibility of online bunch-length diagnostics. A complete RTI system has been commissioned at the A0 photoinjector facility to measure sub-mm bunches at 13 MeV. Bunch length variation (FWHM) between 0.8 ps ({approx}0.24 mm) and 1.5 ps ({approx}0.45 mm) has been measured and compared with a Martin-Puplett interferometer and a streak camera. The comparisons show that RTI is a viable, complementary bunch length diagnostic for sub-mm electron bunches.

Thangaraj, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A. S.; Lumpkin, A.; Santucci, J.; Maxwell, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Andonian, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, California 90404 (United States); Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Ovodenko, A. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, California 90404 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Demonstration of a real-time interferometer as a bunch-lenght monitor in a high-current electron beam accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time interferometer (RTI) has been developed to monitor the bunch length of an electron beam in an accelerator. The RTI employs spatial autocorrelation, reflective optics, and a fast response pyro-detector array to obtain a real-time autocorrelation trace of the coherent radiation from an electron beam thus providing the possibility of online bunch-length diagnostics. A complete RTI system has been commissioned at the A0 photoinjector facility to measure sub-mm bunches at 13 MeV. Bunch length variation (FWHM) between 0.8 ps (-0.24 mm) and 1.5 ps (-0.45 mm) has been measured and compared with a Martin-Puplett interferometer and a streak camera. The comparisons show that RTI is a viable, complementary bunch length diagnostic for sub-mm electron bunches.

Thangaraj, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A; Santucci, J.; Maxwell, T.; /Fermilab; Andonian, G.; /UCLA /RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Ovodenko, A.; /RadiaBeam Tech.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Colorimetric Detection of Formaldehyde: A Sensor for Air Quality Measurements and a Pollution-Warning Kit for Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new chemical sensors for the detection of formaldehyde, a ubiquitous and carcinogenic indoor air pollutant is described. These sensors are based on the use of nanoporous matrices acting as sponge to trap the targeted pollutant and ... Keywords: Formaldehyde, colorimetric detection, chemical sensor, indoor air, nanoporous matrices, sol-gel

S. Mariano; W. Wang; G. Brunelle; Y. Bigay; T. H. Tran-Thi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Characterization of the Sources and Concentrations of Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds in four new manufactured houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of formaldehyde, 52 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs (TVOC) were measured in four new manufactured houses on three occasions over a period of approximately nine months following completion of their construction. The houses were furnished, but unoccupied, model homes produced by a single U.S. manufacturer. Several of the houses incorporated interior finish materials with lower VOC emissions than standard materials. One house had a modified ventilation system. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently with the collection of air samples. A steady-state mass-balance model was used to calculate the area-specific emission rates of the target compounds and TVOC. The emissions of formaldehyde and VOCs from a specimen of plywood used as the floor sheeting were additionally quantified. The median formaldehyde concentration in the four houses was 37 parts-per-billion ( ppb). The formaldehyde concentrations were all less than the most restrictive guideline for this compound of 50 ppb. The concentrations of many of the target VOCs were low. Thirty-one of the VOCs had median concentrations that were at or below 1 ppb. Seven of the compounds were among the most abundant VOCs in all four houses. These compounds were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, ethylene glycol, hexanal, 2-butanone, and acetic acid. The concentrations of the aldehydes, hexanal, octanal and nonanal, in the four houses were either near or exceeded their respective odor thresholds. The concentrations of acetic acid increased with time. In the final sampling period, the odor threshold for acetic acid was exceeded in all of the houses. The range of TVOC concentrations in the four houses was 0.8 to 3 mg m{sup -3}, with a median value of 1.6 mg m{sup -3}. These concentrations were somewhat lower than TVOC concentrations previously measured in several new site-built houses, and the median concentration was only about twice the typical value for existing residences. The house with the modified ventilation system and several lower emitting materials had consistently low TVOC concentrations that were near 1 mg m{sup -3}. There were no large decreases with time in the emission rates of the individual VOCs or TVOC during the course of the study. However, the emission rates were often lowest in the final sampling with the notable exception of the acetic acid emission rate that increased with time. The source of the aldehydes was most likely engineered wood products, such as the plywood floor sheeting and possibly other structural or interior components. The source of the acetic acid was uncertain. The effects of the source substitution treatments were measurable but turned out to be relatively minor due to the predominance of other sources.

Hodgson, A.T.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large numbers of houses using passive monitoring techniques.rates by passive techniques in 61 occupied houses, half ofhouses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive

Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM VALUES IN AN ACIDIC AQUEOUS SOLUTION WITH FORMALDEHYDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for reducing Pu to the tetravalent state and lowering the high acidity of dissolver solutions containing U and Pu. Formaldehyde is added to the HNO/sub 3/ solution of U and Pu to effect a formaldehyde to HNO/sub 3/ molar ratio of 0.375:1 to 1.5:1. The Pu can then be removed from the solution by carrier precipitation using BiPO/sub 4/ or by ion exchange. (T.R.H.)

Olson, C.M.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23E 23E A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building E.S. Lee, L.L. Fernandes, B. Coffey, A. McNeil, R. Clear Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory T. Webster, F. Bauman, D. Dickerhoff, D. Heinzerling, T. Hoyt University of California Berkeley Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 ! 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

163

Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

165

Catalytic performance of vanadium incorporated MCM-41 catalysts for the partial oxidation of methane to formaldehyde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam reforming of methane to syngas (CO and H2), (ii) high pressure conversion to methanol and (iii disadvantages, e.g. the energy requirements of the endothermic steam reforming of the first step, the high of methane to formaldehyde Guoan Du, Sangyun Lim, Yanhui Yang, Chuan Wang, Lisa Pfefferle, Gary L. Haller

Haller, Gary L.

166

EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig® 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Real-Time Target Position Estimation Using Stereoscopic Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Imaging and External Respiratory Monitoring for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a real-time target position estimation method using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) imaging and external respiratory monitoring, and to investigate the performance of a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system using this method. Methods and Materials: The real-time three-dimensional internal target position estimation was established by creating a time-varying correlation model that connected the external respiratory signals with the internal target motion measured intermittently using kV/MV imaging. The method was integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system. Tracking experiments were performed for 10 thoracic/abdominal traces. A three-dimensional motion platform carrying a gold marker and a separate one-dimensional motion platform were used to reproduce the target and external respiratory motion, respectively. The target positions were detected by kV (1 Hz) and MV (5.2 Hz) imaging, and external respiratory motion was captured by an optical system (30 Hz). The beam-target alignment error was quantified as the positional difference between the target and circular beam center on the MV images acquired during tracking. The correlation model error was quantified by comparing a model estimate and measured target positions. Results: The root-mean-square errors in the beam-target alignment that had ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 mm without tracking were reduced to <1.5 mm with tracking, except during the model building period (6 s). The root-mean-square error in the correlation model was submillimeters in all directions. Conclusion: A novel real-time target position estimation method was developed and integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system and demonstrated an average submillimeter geometric accuracy after initializing the internal/external correlation model. The method used hardware tools available on linear accelerators and therefore shows promise for clinical implementation.

Cho, Byungchul, E-mail: bcho@amc.seoul.k [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

170

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electromagnetic Real-Time Tumor Position Monitoring and Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking Using a Siemens 160 MLC: Geometric and Dosimetric Accuracy of an Integrated System  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dynamic multileaf collimator tracking represents a promising method for high-precision radiotherapy to moving tumors. In the present study, we report on the integration of electromagnetic real-time tumor position monitoring into a multileaf collimator-based tracking system. Methods and Materials: The integrated system was characterized in terms of its geometric and radiologic accuracy. The former was assessed from portal images acquired during radiation delivery to a phantom in tracking mode. The tracking errors were calculated from the positions of the tracking field and of the phantom as extracted from the portal images. Radiologic accuracy was evaluated from film dosimetry performed for conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy applied to different phantoms moving on sinusoidal trajectories. A static radiation delivery to the nonmoving target served as a reference for the delivery to the moving phantom with and without tracking applied. Results: Submillimeter tracking accuracy was observed for two-dimensional target motion despite the relatively large system latency of 500 ms. Film dosimetry yielded almost complete recovery of a circular dose distribution with tracking in two dimensions applied: 2%/2 mm gamma-failure rates could be reduced from 59.7% to 3.3%. For single-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivery, accuracy was limited by the finite leaf width. A 2%/2 mm gamma-failure rate of 15.6% remained with tracking applied. Conclusion: The integrated system we have presented marks a major step toward the clinical implementation of high-precision dynamic multileaf collimator tracking. However, several challenges such as irregular motion traces or a thorough quality assurance still need to be addressed.

Krauss, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.krauss@dkfz-heidelberg.d [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon; Tacke, Martin; Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported on Mcm-48  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mechanism of methanol oxidation to formaldehyde catalyzed by isolated vanadate species supported on silica has been investigated by in situ Raman and TPD/TPO experiments. Raman, XANES, and EXAFS were used to characterize the V-MCM-48 sample, prepared with a loading of 0.3 V/nm{sup 2}, and it is concluded that the oxidized form of the vanadium is isolated VO{sub 4} units. The VO{sub 4} species consist of one V=O bond and three V-O-Si bonds in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Methanol reacts reversibly, at a ratio of approximately 1 methanol per V, with one V-O-Si to produce both V-OCH{sub 3}/Si-OH and V-OH/Si-OCH{sub 3} group pairs in roughly equivalent concentrations. Formaldehyde is formed from the methyl group of V-OCH{sub 3}, most likely by the transfer of one H atom to the V=O bond of the vanadium containing the methoxide group. Formaldehyde is formed in nearly equal concentrations both in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. CO and H{sub 2} are produced by the decomposition of CH{sub 2}O at higher temperature. In the absence of O{sub 2}, Si-OCH{sub 3} groups undergo hydrogenation to form CH{sub 4}, and in the presence of O{sub 2}, these groups are oxidized to COx (x = 1, 2) and H{sub 2}O above 650 K. Under steady-state reaction conditions, CH{sub 2}O is produced as the dominant product of methanol oxidation at temperatures below 650 K with an apparent activation energy of 23 kcal/mol. Schemes for the product flows during both TPD and TPO experiments, along with proposed surface intermediates, are presented.

Bronkema, J.L.; Bell, A.T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Chem. Eng. Dept.

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

178

Formaldehyde-exposure characterization in garment-manufacturing plants: a composite summary of three in-depth industrial-hygiene surveys  

SciTech Connect

The extent of exposure to formaldehyde was investigated at three garment manufacturing facilities using fabrics pretreated with a formaldehyde-based resin system. Two of the facilities (in Georgia) operated on a two-shift basis with approximately 1000 and 500 workers; one facility (in Pennsylvania) operated on a one-shift basis and had approximately 600 workers. The facilities cut and sewed men's dress shirts from treated fabric. Measured exposures to formaldehyde, respirable dust, and organic cleaning solvent vapors were all below the applicable American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values and Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limits.

Elliott, L.J.; Stayner, L.T.; Blade, L.M.; Halperin, W.; Keenlyside, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NEMO-\\onde: a submarine station for real-time monitoring of acoustic background installed at 2000 m depth in the Mediterranean Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NEMO (NEutrino Mediterranean Observatory) Collaboration installed, 25 km E offshore the port of Catania (Sicily) at 2000 m depth, an underwater laboratory to perform long-term tests of prototypes and new technologies for an underwater high energy neutrino km$^3$-scale detector in the Mediterranean Sea. In this framework the collaboration deployed and successfully operated for about two years, starting form January 2005, an experimental apparatus for on-line monitoring of deep-sea noise. The station was equipped with 4 hydrophones and it is operational in the range 30 Hz - 43 kHz. This interval of frequencies matches the range suitable for the proposed acoustic detection technique of high energy neutrinos. Hydrophone signals were digitized underwater at 96 kHz sampling frequency and 24 bits resolution. A custom software was developed to record data on high resolution 4-channels digital audio file. This paper deals with the data analysis procedure and first results on the determination of sea noise sound pressure density curves. The stored data library, consisting of more than 2000 hours of recordings, is a unique tool to model underwater acoustic noise at large depth, to characterise its variations as a function of environmental parameters, biological sources and human activities (ship traffic, ...), and to determine the presence of cetaceans in the area.

The NEMO Collaboration; L. Cosentino; M. Favetta; G. Larosa; G. Pavan; D. J. Romeo; S. Privitera; F. Speziale

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Robustness provided by internet monitoring systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internet applications such as Wealth Management Banking Programs require a very high degree of robustness. To attain this continuous testing - that is monitoring the systems over a period of time - is suggested. The preparation of an appropriate site-monitoring ... Keywords: continuous testing, internet, internet offering, monitoring systems, requirements, robustness, site monitoring, soft launch, test environment, testing recommendation, transitional state

Barry Dellar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

185

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

186

A density functional theory study of the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over vanadia supported on silica, titania, and zirconia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Density functional theory was used to investigate the mechanism and kinetics of methanol oxidation to formaldehyde over vanadia supported on silica, titania, and zirconia. The catalytically active site was modeled as an isolated VO{sub 4} unit attached to the support. The calculated geometry and vibrational frequencies of the active site are in good agreement with experimental measurements both for model compounds and oxide-supported vanadia. Methanol adsorption is found to occur preferentially with the rupture of a V-O-M bond (M = Si, Ti, Zr) and with preferential attachment of a methoxy group to V. The vibrational frequencies of the methoxy group are in good agreement with those observed experimentally as are the calculated isobars. The formation of formaldehyde is assumed to occur via the transfer of an H atom of a methoxy group to the O atom of the V=O group. The activation energy for this process is found to be in the range of 199-214 kJ/mol and apparent activation energies for the overall oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde are predicted to lie in the range of 112-123 kJ/mol, which is significantly higher than that found experimentally. Moreover, the predicted turnover frequency (TOF) for methanol oxidation is found to be essentially independent of support composition, whereas experiments show that the TOF is 10{sup 3} greater for titania- and zirconia-supported vanadia than for silica-supported vanadia. Based on these findings, it is proposed that the formation of formaldehyde from methoxy groups may require pairs of adjacent VO{sub 4} groups or V{sub 2}O{sub 7} dimer structures.

Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.

2002-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

188

The Drought Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Drought Monitor was started in spring 1999 in response to a need for improved information about the status of drought across the United States. It serves as an example of interagency cooperation in a time of limited resources. The Drought ...

Mark Svoboda; Doug LeComte; Mike Hayes; Richard Heim; Karin Gleason; Jim Angel; Brad Rippey; Rich Tinker; Mike Palecki; David Stooksbury; David Miskus; Scott Stephens

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Testing for Cesium Removal from Hanford Tank Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

A new spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin was tested for efficacy of cesium removal from Hanford tank waste. Two spherical RF formulations, prepared by varying curing temperature, were tested. Both resins had a tight particle size distribution and a high degree of sphericity. Small-scale column testing (on {approx}20-mL resin beds) was conducted evaluating the cesium load profile with AZ-102 simulated tank waste and the cesium elution profile using 0.5 M HNO3 eluant. The load and elution profiles were compared in side-by-side testing with ground-gel RF resin and SuperLig? 644, the Waste Treatment Plant baseline ion exchanger. Although capacity was not as high at the other resins tested, the spherical RF resin met plant cesium loading requirements with the AZ-102 simulant matrix. Excellent reproducibility of cesium load and elution was demonstrated over three process cycles with no evidence of degraded performance. Residual cesium on the resin beds after elution was nearly a factor of 10 lower than that of the ground-gel RF and SuperLig? 644.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Blanchard, David L.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Thorson, Murray R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Monitoring Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Overview Please see the man pages of the commands below for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, and job summary statistics. Command Description qsub batch_script Submit batch script to queue; returns job_id. qdel job_id Delete job from queue. qhold job_id Place job on hold in queue. qrls job_id Release held job. qalter Change attributes of submitted job. qmove new_queue job_id Move job to a different queue. qstat -a List jobs in submission order. qstat -f job_id Produce detailed report about job. qs List jobs in priority order. showq List jobs in priority order, categorized by job state. showstart job_id Produce estimate of start time for job. checkjob job_id Produce scheduling diagnostics for job.

197

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Better Real-Time Monitoring of Cargo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Town Crier Method The Town Crier Method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

202

Real-Time Particulate Monitoring – Detecting Respiratory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They are found in older transformers and other ... HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) inspections and ... This set of conditions is not likely ...

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

204

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

205

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part III. Residential studies in Colorado and Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

Formaldehyde levels were measured in homes in problem and non-problem areas in Wisconsin and Colorado to elucidate the severity and the extent of formaldehyde emission under field conditions, help correlate laboratory findings with field observations, and investigate the cause and effect relationship between insulation stability and weather conditions of an area. Methods for selecting homes and sampling are described. Interviews were conducted with occupants of the homes and the data are tabulated. Results are summarized. Investigation forms are shown and weather information in Denver and Wisconsin is tabulated. (MCW)

Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Formaldehyde Masers in NGC 7538 and G29.96-0.02: VLBA, MERLIN, and VLA Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) maser sources in the compact HII regions NGC 7538-IRS1 and G29.96-0.02 have been imaged at high resolution (beams < 50 mas). Using the VLBA and MERLIN, we find the angular sizes of the NGC 7538 masers to be ~10 mas (30 AU) corresponding to brightness temperatures ~10^8 K. The angular sizes of the G29.96-0.02 masers are ~20 mas (130 AU) corresponding to brightness temperatures ~10^7 K. Using the VLA, we detect 2 cm formaldehyde absorption from the maser regions. We detect no emission in the 2 cm line, indicating the lack of a 2 cm maser and placing limits on the 6 cm excitation process. We find that both NGC 7538 maser components show an increase in intensity on 5-10 year timescales while the G29.96-0.02 masers show no variability over 2 years. A search for polarization provides 3-sigma upper limits of 1% circularly polarized and 10% linearly polarized emission in NGC 7538 and of 15% circularly polarized emission in G29.96-0.02. A pronounced velocity gradient of 28 km/s/arcsecon...

Hoffman, I M; Palmer, P; Richards, A M S; Hoffman, Ian M.; Palmer, Patrick

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Formaldehyde and VOC Emissions from a Siemens-Westinghouse 501F Combustion Turbine with Lean Pre-Mix Combustors and SCR and CO Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of flue gas formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measurements conducted at a Siemens-Westinghouse 501F gas-fired combustion turbine with lean pre-mix low-NOx combustors and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and carbon monoxide (CO) catalysts.

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Formaldehyde Emissions from a Siemens-Westinghouse 501F Combustion Turbine with Pre-Mix Combustors, with SCR and CO Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents a summary of formaldehyde emission measurements conducted at full operating load from a Siemens-Westinghouse 501F gas-fired combustion turbine with lean pre-mix low-NOx combustors, and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and carbon monoxide (CO) catalysts.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Benzene Monitor System report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

Livingston, R.R.

1992-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Blue LED for RS Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We report on a design of RS gain monitor system based on blue LED. Gain of each RS PMT is monitored by a LED, which is mounted in front of the PMT window in its _-metal shield. The blue LED well simulates scintillation light with its short pulse and wavelength. The LED is as small as 3 mmOE. The light yield is stable and has small temperature dependence. These are nice properties to install in present RS system with small modification and to operate without air conditioning. In this note we will present outline of our design and test results which demonstrate its desirable properties. 1 Introduction RS gain monitor has been carried out with K_2 events at E787. They are sat- isfactory to monitor long and medium term stability but it is not satisfactory to monitor short term stability and to check PMT and related electronics quickly and frequently. These capabilities are important to reduce setup time and loss time in long E949 run. For these purpose triggerable and stable light source is required at RS system. We consider two types of monitoring system. One is the system which consists of one light source and its light distribution network, such as a Xe lamp with a optical fiber network. It has the advantage that light intensity of the source itself can be monitored and be corrected. But, practically, it is not easy to estimate light output of individual fiber correctly by checking light source and to handle optical fibers, and we have to think out a solution how we introduce lights to RS or its PMT. Also the system is rather expensive and it will take long time to

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Quality monitored distributed voting system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

Skogmo, D.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

Machine Health Monitoring and Prognostication Via Vibration Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health monitoring of the hydropower turbine and timely identification of potential failure areas can prevent failure of the entire vertical axis hydropower turbine. A health monitoring system integrated within the turbine could locate blade failures, ...

Suyi Liu; Shuqing Wang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Zone based indoor mobile air pollution monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution is one of the main problems that humans are suffering from. Moreover air pollution is one of the hardest to escape. Although human spend most of their time indoor, most of the previous pollution monitoring studies focused on outdoor air monitoring. ... Keywords: indoor pollution, mobile sensing, nfc

Noura Alhakbani, Eiman Kanjo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Portal Monitor Future Development Work: Hardware Improvements  

SciTech Connect

LANL portal monitor was a modification of a previously installed (permanent) unattended monitoring system (UMS). Modifications to the UMS to make the portal were sometimes based on mistaken assumptions about exercise-specific installation and access. Philosophical approach to real-time portal differs in some areas from UMS.

Browne, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

220

Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bunch Shape Monitor for SSCL linac  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and the Institute for Nuclear Research ore collaboratively developing a Bunch Shape Monitor diagnostics for commission the SSCL linac. The Bunch Shape Monitor is designed to measure the intensity of beam as a function of time over the micro-bunch of the beam. Design resolution for the SSCL monitors is approximately 7 psec. The first monitor will operate at the fundamental frequency of 428 MHz and will be used to measure the output beam of the RFQ Linac. First available results will be presented and compared with predictions. Further development will allow the monitors to fit in a standard SSCL beam box and one will operate at the third harmonic of 428 MHz. Proposals to use the Bunch Shape Monitor to measure the longitudinal phase space distribution of the beam will be discussed.

Hurd, J.W.; Arbique, G.M.; Crist, C.E.; Guy, F.W.; Leifeste, G.T.; Raparia, D.; Saadatmand, K.; Swenson, D.A. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Esin, S.; Feschenko, A.; Stepanov, A.; Mirzojan, A. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Variational transition state theory calculations of tunneling effects on concerted hydrogen motion in water clusters and formaldehyde/water clusters  

SciTech Connect

The direct participation of water molecules in aqueous phase reaction processes has been postulated to occur via both single-step mechanisms as well as concerted hydrogen atom or proton shifts. In the present work, simple prototypes of concerted hydrogen atom transfer processes are examined for small hydrogen-bonded water clusters -- cyclic trimers and tetramers -- and hydrogen-bonded clusters of formaldehyde with one and two water molecules. Rate constants for the rearrangement processes are computed using variational transition state theory, accounting for quantum mechanical tunneling effects by semiclassical ground-state adiabatic transmission coefficients. The variational transition state theory calculations directly utilize selected information about the potential energy surface along the minimum energy path as parameters of the reaction path Hamiltonian. The potential energy information is obtained from ab ignite electronic structure calculations with an empirical bond additivity correction (the BAC-MP4 method). Tunneling is found to be very important for these concerted rearrangement processes -- the semiclassical ground-state adiabatic transmission coefficients are estimated to be as high as four order of magnitude at room temperature. Effects of the size of the cluster (number of water molecules in the cyclic complex) are also dramatic -- addition of a water molecule is seen to change the calculated rates by orders of magnitude. 36 refs., 10 figs.

Garrett, B.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Melius, C.F. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Baculovirus proteins IE-1, LEF-3, and P143 interact with DNA in vivo: a formaldehyde cross-linking study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IE-1, LEF-3, and P143 are three of six proteins encoded by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) essential for baculovirus DNA replication in transient replication assays. IE-1 is the major baculovirus immediate early transcription regulator. LEF-3 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) and P143 is a DNA helicase protein. To investigate their interactions in vivo, we treated AcMNPV-infected Spodoptera frugiperda cells with formaldehyde and separated soluble proteins from chromatin by cell fractionation and cesium chloride equilibrium centrifugation. Up to 70% of the total LEF-3 appeared in the fraction of soluble, probably nucleoplasmic proteins, while almost all P143 and IE-1 were associated with viral chromatin in the nucleus. This suggests that LEF-3 is produced in quantities that are higher than needed for the coverage of single stranded regions that arise during viral DNA replication and is consistent with the hypothesis that LEF-3 has other functions such as the localization of P143 to the nucleus. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation procedure, we present the first direct evidence of LEF-3, P143, and IE-1 proteins binding to closely linked sites on viral chromatin in vivo, suggesting that they may form replication complexes on viral DNA in infected cells.

Ito, Emma [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Sahri, Daniela [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Knippers, Rolf [Department of Biology, Universitaet Konstanz, D-78464 Constance (Germany); Carstens, Eric B. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)]. E-mail: carstens@post.queensu.ca

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

AN IONIZATION CHAMBER LAUNDRY MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the amount of contamination remaining on a garment after it has been washed is an important part of hot laundry operations. In the past garments were monitored by measuring the contamination concentrated in the crotch with a GM tube probe. This type of spot check does not detect any isolated hot spots on other pants of the garment. To monitor the entire garment with a GM tube instrument is excessively time consuming for a large number of garments. To overcome these difficulties a sensitive, large-volume ionization chamber was constructed. It is rectangular in shape, 5 ft high by 2 1/2 ft wide by 4 in. deep. The center electrode is of a grid type and is mounted halfway between the front window and the back of the chamber. In a 0.5-mr/hr field, 180 v is sufficient to saturate toe chamber. In order to insure beta sensitivity, the front window has an equivalent thickness of approximately 7 mg/cm/sup 2/. The measuring device is a line-operated electrometer circuit equipped with an alarm that may be set at the rejection limit for the type of garment being monitored. A fullscale deflection on the most sensitive range is given by 2 to 3 mu C of liquid mixed fission products deposited on a garment. Since the chamber monitors the entire garment, the results are independent of the location of the contarnination. In practice, garments may be monitored at the rate of 7 per min, while only 3 per min may be completely checked with a GM tube probs. Field tests indicate that this instrument is stable and trouble free. Background causes a meter deflection of about 20 divisions, which is low enough to give reliable accuracy for monitoring garments. (auth)

Chester, J.D.; Handloser, J.S.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Stress-Based Fatigue Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FatiguePro software, developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and first deployed in 1989, is a fatigue monitoring program that is widely used around the world to assist with aging management of nuclear power plants. The FatiguePro stress-based fatigue (SBF) module has used a single stress term for calculating fatigue usage factors. This simplified approach was chosen not only because of computer limitations at the time, but also because the conventional stress cycle counting algorith...

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

230

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

233

Computer-controlled radiation monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer-controlled radiation monitoring system was designed and installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (10 MV tandem accelerator from High Voltage Engineering Corporation). The system continuously monitors the photon and neutron radiation environment associated with the facility and automatically suspends accelerator operation if preset radiation levels are exceeded. The system has proved reliable real-time radiation monitoring over the past five years, and has been a valuable tool for maintaining personnel exposure as low as reasonably achievable.

Homann, S.G.

1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Online circuit breaker monitoring system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circuit breakers are used in a power system to break or make current flow through power system apparatus. Reliable operation of circuit breakers is very important to the well-being of the power system. Historically this is achieved by regular inspection and maintenance of the circuit breakers. An automated online circuit breaker monitoring system is proposed to monitor condition, operation and status of high and medium voltage circuit breakers. By tracking equipment condition, this system could be used to perform maintenance only when it is needed. This could decrease overall maintenance cost and increase equipment reliability. Using high accurate time synchronization, this system should enable development of system-wide applications that utilize the data recorded by the system. This makes possible tracking sequence of events and making conclusions about their effect on-line. This solution also enables reliable topology analysis, which can be used to improve power flow analysis, state estimation and alarm processing.

Djekic, Zarko

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

236

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

237

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effects of polymerization and briquetting parameters on the tensile strength of briquettes formed from coal coke and aniline-formaldehyde resin  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the utilization of aniline (C{sub 6}H{sub 7}N) formaldehyde (HCHO) resins as a binding agent of coke briquetting was investigated. Aniline (AN) formaldehyde (F) resins are a family of thermoplastics synthesized by condensing AN and F in an acid solution exhibiting high dielectric strength. The tensile strength sharply increases as the ratio of F to AN from 0.5 to 1.6, and it reaches the highest values between 1.6 and 2.2 F/AN ratio; it then slightly decreases. The highest tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette (23.66 MN/m{sup 2}) was obtained from the run with 1.5 of F/AN ratio by using (NH4){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} catalyst at 310 K briquetting temperature. The tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette slightly decreased with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.10%, and then it sharply decreased to zero with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.2%. The effect of pH on the tensile strength is irregular. As the pH of the mixture increases from 9.0 to 9.2, the tensile strength shows a sharp increase, and the curve reaches a plateau value between pH 9.3 and 9.9; then the tensile strength shows a slight increase after pH = 9.9.

Demirbas, A.; Simsek, T. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Review Functional hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a costeffective manner.

Michael R Pinsky; Didier Payen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electronics of LHCb calorimeter monitoring system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All calorimeter sub-detectors in LHCb, the Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD), the Preshower detector (PS), the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) and the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) are equipped with the Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as devices for light to electrical signal conversion [1]. The PMT gain behaviour is not stable in a time, due to changes in the load current and due to ageing. The calorimeter light emitting diode (LED) monitoring system has been developed to monitor the PMT gain over time during data taking. Furthermore the system will play an important role during the detector commissioning and during LHC machine stops, in order to perform tests of the PMTs, cables and FE boards and measurements of relative time alignment. The aim of the paper is to describe the LED monitoring system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation based on radiation tolerant components and to summarize the system performance.

Konoplyannikov, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design and development of a portable gamma radiation monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable gamma radiation monitor has been designed and developed. The monitor can be used effectively in the dose range from 0.07 to 500 mGy/h due to gamma rays of energy greater than 65 keV. The monitor overestimated radiation doses and the uncertainty in the measured dose rate has been found to be {+-}30%. Provision has also been added to use the monitor as an installed radiation monitor. In installed mode, it can be operated from a remote location up to 1 km and the timing history can be stored on a personal computer.

Munir, M.; Khalid, M. [Health Physics Division, Directorate of Systems and Services, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, N.; Sohail, S.; Naveed, R. A.; Rafiq, M. Q. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

MCO Monitoring activity description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

SEXTON, R.A.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

SAMOS: a model for monitoring students' and groups' activities in collaborative e-learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the issue of monitoring students' and groups' activities in online collaborative learning environments. Such monitoring can provide valuable information to online instructors, who may guide and support the development of efficient ... Keywords: JIT, activity levels, collaborative learning, e-learning, educational data analysis, educational technology, group monitoring, just-in-, learning technology, online learning, student monitoring, time assistance

Angel A. Juan; Thanasis Daradoumis; Javier Faulin; Fatos Xhafa

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Transformative monitoring approaches for reprocessing.  

SciTech Connect

The future of reprocessing in the United States is strongly driven by plant economics. With increasing safeguards, security, and safety requirements, future plant monitoring systems must be able to demonstrate more efficient operations while improving the current state of the art. The goal of this work was to design and examine the incorporation of advanced plant monitoring technologies into safeguards systems with attention to the burden on the operator. The technologies examined include micro-fluidic sampling for more rapid analytical measurements and spectroscopy-based techniques for on-line process monitoring. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model was used to design the layout and test the effect of adding these technologies to reprocessing. The results here show that both technologies fill key gaps in existing materials accountability that provide detection of diversion events that may not be detected in a timely manner in existing plants. The plant architecture and results under diversion scenarios are described. As a tangent to this work, both the AMUSE and SEPHIS solvent extraction codes were examined for integration in the model to improve the reality of diversion scenarios. The AMUSE integration was found to be the most successful and provided useful results. The SEPHIS integration is still a work in progress and may provide an alternative option.

Cipiti, Benjamin B.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Hopper Batch Jobs See the man pages for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, ALPS logs and job summary statistics. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. To delete a job from the hopper xfer queue users must add an additional parameter @hopper06 Example:6004861.hopper06@hopper06 qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low)

248

What We Monitor & Why  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by monitoring wildlife, plants, water quality, and air quality. June 27, 2012 Raft Trip: rafts on the Rio Grande Workers prepare for the annual Fall sampling campaign on the...

249

WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart A. Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the WIPP DOEWIPP-03-3230 Describes the groundwater...

250

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

252

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Structure function monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator. 13 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. 12 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

VME system monitor board  

SciTech Connect

Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P was dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were sampled for the first time during third quarter.

Chase, J.A.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High Performance Network Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Burrowing Owl Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

The monitoring during 2012 focused on documenting the status of known burrows. Newly identified burrows were documented while examining historical locations, during ecological resource reviews, or discovered during other monitoring efforts. The timing of the monitoring effort allowed staff to perform the surveys without disrupting any breeding or hatching, while also allowing for easy discernment of adults from juveniles, which helped in determining burrow-use type.

Wilde, Justin W.; Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Usability in multiple monitor displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to examine the impact of multiple monitors on user performance and multitasking. Forty-three participants were assigned to two groups - a multi-monitor group and a singlemonitor group - to carry out a series of tasks. ... Keywords: large display monitor, multiple monitors, multitasking, usability, user performance

Jacob M. Truemper; Hong Sheng; Michael G. Hilgers; Richard H. Hall; Morris Kalliny; Basanta Tandon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

265

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

266

Airlift mission monitoring and dynamic rescheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the Flight Manager Assistant (FMA), a prototype system, designed to support real-time management of airlift operations at the USAF Air Mobility Command (AMC). In current practice, AMC flight managers are assigned to manage individual air ... Keywords: Collaboration, Dynamic schedule repair, Execution monitoring, Mediation, Scheduling

David E. Wilkins; Stephen F. Smith; Laurence A. Kramer; Thomas J. Lee; Timothy W. Rauenbusch

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method and apparatus for monitoring machine performance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Machine operating conditions can be monitored by analyzing, in either the time or frequency domain, the spectral components of the motor current. Changes in the electric background noise, induced by mechanical variations in the machine, are correlated to changes in the operating parameters of the machine.

Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Castleberry, Kimberly N. (Harriman, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A new paradigm for integrated environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vision of an integrated Earth observation system to help protect and sustain the planet and its inhabitants is significant and timely, and thus has been identified recently by many organizations. Clearly, the societal benefits of global integrated ... Keywords: cloud computing, data integration, environmental monitoring, modeling and simulation, sensors, visualization

Kevin Montgomery; Carsten Mundt

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

Samborsky, J.K.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

Samborsky, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced Monitoring systems initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Managing time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professionals overwhelmed with information glut can find hope from new insights about time management.

Peter J. Denning

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Towards a secure Frequency Monitoring NETwork (FNET) system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive and real-time wide area monitoring systems (WAMS), such as the Frequency Monitoring NETwork (FNET) developed at Virginia Tech, allow for the gathering of frequency data throughout the entire power grid. FNET uses the Internet as a communication ... Keywords: FNET, Smart Grid, cyber security

Joseph L. McDaniel; Ambareen Siraj

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Smart Vibration Monitoring System for an Ocean Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a Smart Vibration Monitoring System (SVMS) developed as an effective way to reduce equipment losses and enhance safety, efficiency, reliability, availability and long life time duration of an ocean turbine. The system utilizes advanced ... Keywords: Diagnostics, Vibration, Monitoring, Dynamometer, Ocean Turbine

Mustapha Mjit; Pierre-Philippe J. Beaujean; David J. Vendittis

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

S.V. Gerasimov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Rack Protection Monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

A system for monitoring and displaying the consumption of energy by measuring the actual energy consumed and comparing the measured energy consumption with an ideal or desired energy consumption. The desired energy consumption data may be based upon actual operations or may be generated by ideal consumption characteristics. In some instances, the ideal figures may be modified to compensate for variations in external conditions.

Bertolasi, R.B.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Monitoring informs management  

SciTech Connect

Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

West, Tristram O.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

of seashore Why monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource Manage ment at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Umeå. The survey of habitats and the field survey, the total area of shore habitats along the coast can be calculated and their overall of seashore monitoring Over an aerial photo of each sample unit, a hexagonal grid is laid. At every crossing

283

Rack protection monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

implications for gas phase species. Less attention, however, has been given to the modification of aerosol surfaces during such reactions. Alteration of aerosol surface species...

285

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas. There has also been invented an apparatus for analyzing ambient air, other sample gas, or nebulized and desolvated liquids wherein a novel arrangement of plasma gas and...

286

Continuous Monitoring of Grout Set Time Using Ultrasonic Pulse ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Other cementitious systems analyzed are three grout mixtures used for in-situ decommissioning of nuclear reactors at the Savannah River Site. These grouts will ...

287

Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Western interconnections: a report to congress pursuant to section 1839 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1839 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the...

288

MOISTURE MONITOR TESTING AND CALIBRATION  

SciTech Connect

ABS>Electrolytic moisture monitors which continuously analyze the moisture content of gases are commercially available. After a period of operation, these instruments may give erroneous readings, frequently because of damage to the electrolytic cell. A gas with a known and reproducible moisture content within the operating range would be useful for making operational response tests on these monltors and for checking their calibration. A paired- hydrate system of a chemical compound exhibits a water vapor pressure that is constant at a constant temperature. ff an unreactive gas is allowed to equilibrate with a paired-hydrate system, the moisture content of the gas is determined by the vapor pressure of the hydrate pair, the total pressure, and the temperature. Hydrated magnesium perchlorate was prepared which contained between four and six moles of water per mole of perchlorate. This material was pulverized lightly then packed into a stainless steel column and 100 cc/minute of air at atmospheric pressure was passed through the bed. The exit air from the column was analyzed with a moisture monitor. A gas residence time of two minutes in the column was found to be sufficient for establishing moisture equilibrium in the exit flow. The moisture content of the exit air was found to vary from 34 to 70 ppm by volume as the temperature of the paired-hydrate system varied from 20 to 28 un. Concent 85% C. Other paired-hydrate systems can extend this range to higher moisture levels. (auth)

Montgomery, C.D.; Googin, J.M.; Phillips, L.R.

1963-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Host Event Based Network Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

Jonathan Chugg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

WIPP Transparency Project - container tracking and monitoring demonstration using the Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS) is designed to answer the need for global monitoring of the status and location of proliferation-sensitive items on a worldwide basis, 24 hours a day. ATMS uses wireless sensor packs to monitor the status of the items within the shipment and surrounding environmental conditions. Receiver and processing units collect a variety of sensor event data that is integrated with GPS tracking data. The collected data are transmitted to the International Maritime Satellite (INMARSAT) communication system, which then sends the data to mobile ground stations. Authentication and encryption algorithms secure the data during communication activities. A typical ATMS application would be to track and monitor the stiety and security of a number of items in transit along a scheduled shipping route. The resulting tracking, timing, and status information could then be processed to ensure compliance with various agreements.

SCHOENEMAN, J. LEE; SMARTT, HEIDI ANNE; HOFER, DENNIS

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Network Management and Performance Monitoring at SLAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subjectively, the ultimate measurers of system performance are the users and their perceptions of the performance of their networked applications. The performance of a system is affected by the physical network plant (routers, bridges, hubs, etc.) as well as by every "computer " and peripheral device that is attached to it, and the software running on the computers and devices. Performance monitoring of a network must therefore include computer systems and services monitoring and well as monitoring of the physical network plant. This paper will describe how this challenge has been tackled at SLAC, and how, via the World Wide Web 1,2 , this information is made available for quick perusal by concerned personnel and users. INTRODUCTION The ultimate measure of system performance is the perception of the users. The users' perception is generally based on the response time to various commands they enter at their keyboards. This maybe any command from a print command, the submission of a l...

Logg And; C. A. Logg; R. L. A. Cottrell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Entropic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: News Release - Underground Monitoring of Carbon Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions." Innovative real-time monitoring of the CO2 injection is being led by the Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic...

297

Monitoring the Stability of Satellite Altimeters with Tide Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for using tide gauge sea levels to monitor time-dependent drift in satellite altimetric measurements of sea surface height. The method depends on a careful assessment of the quality of the tide gauge measurements available ...

Gary T. Mitchum

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

FY-2010 Process Monitoring Technology Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2010, work under the Spectroscopy-Based Process Monitoring task included ordering and receiving four fluid flow meters and four flow visible-near infrared spectrometer cells to be instrumented within the centrifugal contactor system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Initial demonstrations of real-time spectroscopic measurements on cold-stream simulants were conducted using plutonium (Pu)/uranium (U) (PUREX) solvent extraction process conditions. The specific test case examined the extraction of neodymium nitrate (Nd(NO3)3) from an aqueous nitric acid (HNO3) feed into a tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/ n-dodecane solvent. Demonstration testing of this system included diverting a sample from the aqueous feed meanwhile monitoring the process in every phase using the on-line spectroscopic process monitoring system. The purpose of this demonstration was to test whether spectroscopic monitoring is capable of determining the mass balance of metal nitrate species involved in a cross-current solvent extraction scheme while also diverting a sample from the system. The diversion scenario involved diverting a portion of the feed from a counter-current extraction system while a continuous extraction experiment was underway. A successful test would demonstrate the ability of the process monitoring system to detect and quantify the diversion of material from the system during a real-time continuous solvent extraction experiment. The system was designed to mimic a PUREX-type extraction process with a bank of four centrifugal contactors. The aqueous feed contained Nd(NO3)3 in HNO3, and the organic phase was composed of TBP/n-dodecane. The amount of sample observed to be diverted by on-line spectroscopic process monitoring was measured to be 3 mmol (3 x 10-3 mol) Nd3+. This value was in excellent agreement with the 2.9 mmol Nd3+ value based on the known mass of sample taken (i.e., diverted) directly from the system feed solution.

Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Hines, Wes; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; henkell, J.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Jordan, Elizabeth A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peterson, James M.; Verdugo, Dawn E.; Christensen, Ronald N.; Peper, Shane M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

300

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Method for radioactivity monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Cowder, Leo R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1976-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Relay contact monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A switching system for switching on and off heating and air conditioning units in an environmental control system. The switching system includes a thermostat and a relay conductively coupled to the thermostat. The relay has a contact, which is responsive to a change signal for changing its position. The system further includes a programmable monitor having predetermined positions stored in a memory. The monitor is conductively coupled to the contact and to the thermostat for continually determining the position of the contact, and for sending a change signal to the relay for switching the position of the contact, as needed, to be in conformance with a predetermined position stored in the memory. 3 figs.

Mehta, V.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Transmission Line Security Monitor: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Transmission Line Security Monitor System Operational Test is a project funded by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). TSWG operates under the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office that functions under the Department of Defense. The Transmission Line Security Monitor System is based on technology developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The technology provides a means for real-time monitoring of physical threats and/or damage to electrical transmission line towers and conductors as well as providing operational parameters to transmission line operators to optimize transmission line operation. The end use is for monitoring long stretches of transmission lines that deliver electrical power from remote generating stations to cities and industry. These transmission lines are generally located in remote transmission line corridors where security infrastructure may not exist. Security and operational sensors in the sensor platform on the conductors take power from the transmission line and relay security and operational information to operations personnel hundreds of miles away without relying on existing infrastructure. Initiated on May 25, 2007, this project resulted in pre-production units tested in realistic operational environments during 2010. A technology licensee, Lindsey Manufacturing of Azusa California, is assisting in design, testing, and ultimately production. The platform was originally designed for a security monitoring mission, but it has been enhanced to include important operational features desired by electrical utilities.

John Svoboda

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advanced Distribution Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Distribution Automation (ADA) is a concept for a fully controllable and flexible distribution system that will facilitate the exchange of electrical energy AND information between participants and system components. Advances in the monitoring of system parameters like voltages, currents and breaker/switch positions as well as environmental variables like temperature and wind speed will be required in order to fully implement ADA. This report presents background information on distribution monito...

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

Multizone infiltration monitoring system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multizone infiltration monitoring system (MIMS) using a single tracer gas has been developed. MIMS measures zonal infiltration and exfiltration as well as interzonal air movement rates. The system has been used at the 4-zone test house at the SERI interim field site, and this paper presents preliminary results. The present system can determine zonal infiltration rates, and the results show significant differences in infiltration rates for the various zones.

Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.; Judkoff, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Definition: Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control Wide area monitoring and visualization requires time synchronized sensors, communications, and information processing that make it possible for the condition of the bulk power system to be observed and understood in real-time so that protective, preventative, or corrective action can be taken.[1] Related Terms Wide area, bes emergency, sustainability, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Functions' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Wide_Area_Monitoring,_Visualization,_%26_Control&oldid=502579

308

1984 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

5.6 Security Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... monitoring of the cloud-provider infrastructure to demonstrate compliance with cloud-subscriber security policies and auditing requirements. ...

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Adequate monitoring of service compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring is essential to validate the runtime behaviour of dynamic distributed systems. However, monitors can inform of relevant events as they occur, but by their very nature they will not report about all those events that are not happening. In ... Keywords: Adequacy criteria, Branch coverage, Choreography, Monitoring, Operation coverage

Antonia Bertolino; Eda Marchetti; Andrea Morichetta

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Environmental monitoring via compressive sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring aims to describe the state of the environment. It identifies environmental issues to show us how well our environmental objectives are being met. Traditional large-scale sensor networks for environmental monitoring suffers from ... Keywords: compressive sensing, environmental monitoring, information management, sensor networks

Shulin Yan; Chao Wu; Wei Dai; Moustafa Ghanem; Yike Guo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Protecting against physical resource monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of resource monitoring. We consider the scenario where an adversary is physically monitoring on the resource access, such as the electricity line or gas pipeline, of a user in order to learn private information about ... Keywords: differential privacy, resource monitoring, smart grids, smart metering

Gergely Acs; Claude Castelluccia; William Lecat

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array of solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1[times]3[times]5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A wake-up' circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described. 4 figures.

Valentine, K.H.; Falter, D.D.; Falter, K.G.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1.times.3.times.5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A "wake-up" circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (San Diego, CA); Falter, Diedre D. (Knoxville, TN); Falter, Kelly G. (Knoxville, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

TIMING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

1956-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the ALS, developed a new technique for monitoring protein phosphorylation inside living mammalian cells, enabling them to follow cellular chemical changes in real time,...

318

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

On-line transformer monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are presently many different approaches to transformer monitoring, either on the market or under development. There are also, many different opinions about how on-line monitoring should be accomplished. On the one hand, efforts are being made to develop expert systems that monitor all transformer parameters and generate an estimate of overall transformer condition. On the other hand, a large number of transformer monitors, designed to monitor one or two specific parameters are already on the market. Another important factor to consider in choosing a monitor is who receives the information and how it is transmitted. The ultimate transformer monitor should feed into the supervisory control and data acquisition (Scada) system. This paper discusses the various aspects of this issue including asset protection, cost control, dissolved gases, pinpointing bad bushings and current transformers, hot spot measurement partial discharge, and water-in-oil measurements. 10 figs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Monitoring of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements. Under Contract 48, Appendix F, the Laboratory commits to minimizing its waste streams and to avoiding adverse impacts to the environment from its operations (UC/DOE 2001).

Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

Robinson, Alex L. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Moorman, Matthew W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

Portsmouth X300 remote assay monitor system  

SciTech Connect

Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in association with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) have recently developed a system for monitoring and tracking the assay of enriched uranium from the production facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This work was sponsored by the USEC and has involved the expansion and improvement of an existing system that was developed by ORNL. The system provides control room operators with real-time information on the withdrawal operations of uranium hexafluoride at the withdrawal stations at PORTS. An additional system was developed to display the real-time information from each of the three withdrawal stations at a remotely located building. This report describes the remote assay monitor and display system that has been developed and installed at PORTS Building X300.

Smith, D.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An Effective Method of Automatic Image Mosaic for Remote Video Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current remote video monitoring system in substation can not fully play the role it is supposed to have in real-time active supervision. In order to improve the effect of remote video monitoring system, image mosaic technology is introduced firstly. ... Keywords: Image Mosaic, SIFT Algorithm, Remote Video Monitoring System

Zhao Zhenbing; Wang Rui; Zhang Tiefeng

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis and monitoring design for networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of applying experimental design methodologies to develop monitoring systems for computer networks is relatively novel even though it was applied in other areas such as meteorology, seismology, and transportation. One objective of a monitoring system should always be to collect as little data as necessary to be able to monitor specific parameters of the system with respect to assigned targets and objectives. This implies a purposeful monitoring where each piece of data has a reason to be collected and stored for future use. When a computer network system as large and complex as the Internet is the monitoring subject, providing an optimal and parsimonious observing system becomes even more important. Many data collection decisions must be made by the developers of a monitoring system. These decisions include but are not limited to the following: (1) The type data collection hardware and software instruments to be used; (2) How to minimize interruption of regular network activities during data collection; (3) Quantification of the objectives and the formulation of optimality criteria; (4) The placement of data collection hardware and software devices; (5) The amount of data to be collected in a given time period, how large a subset of the available data to collect during the period, the length of the period, and the frequency of data collection; (6) The determination of the data to be collected (for instance, selection of response and explanatory variables); (7) Which data will be retained and how long (i.e., data storage and retention issues); and (8) The cost analysis of experiments. Mathematical statistics, and, in particular, optimal experimental design methods, may be used to address the majority of problems generated by 3--7. In this study, the authors focus their efforts on topics 3--5.

Fedorov, V.; Flanagan, D.; Rowan, T.; Batsell, S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

TransForum v4n3 - Argonne's Weld Monitoring Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

developed by Argonne and industrial partners for real-time quality monitoring of laser welding processes may be adapted for similar use in heat- treating applications. A leading...

331

Multicomponent seismic monitoring of strain due to CO2 injection at Delhi field, Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Time-lapse, multicomponent seismic data are used in this thesis to monitor geomechanical changes within the reservoir and in the overburden layers at Delhi Field, Louisiana.… (more)

Bishop, John E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Name: Shakti Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Summer 2010 Question: What is the best way to find a cat's heart rate using a stethoscope? Because I have tried to hear their heart beat but their purring is all I can hear. If I shouldn't use a stethoscope, then what should I use? Replies: Hi Shakti! If you want to use a stethoscope, the trick is to get your cat to stop purring. Two good ways that I have found to help stop the purring 1. Cover their nose (generally cats don't like this and will stop purring) or 2. Put on the tap to drip or lightly stream water (also, they generally don't like this and will stop purring). Alternatively, you can get their heart rate from feeling their pulse. A good place to try to feel a pulse is right where the leg attaches to the abdomen - in an area called the inguinal region. Now granted there are some heart conditions that will cause an animals pulse and their heart rates don't match up, and it's hard to feel if you have a fat cat, but it's a good place to try if you are really trying to get a heart rate in a healthy kitty!

333

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety March 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In February, the WIPP Laboratory, which operates out of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), was accredited by the DOE's Laboratory Accreditation Program for the fourth consecutive time. The lab received accreditation for conducting in vitro radiobioassay

337

WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety March 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In February, the WIPP Laboratory, which operates out of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), was accredited by the DOE's Laboratory Accreditation Program for the fourth consecutive time. The lab received accreditation for conducting in vitro radiobioassay

338

Uranium mill monitoring for natural fission reactors  

SciTech Connect

Isotopic monitoring of the product stream from operating uranium mills is proposed for discovering other possible natural fission reactors; aspects of their occurrence and discovery are considered. Uranium mill operating characteristics are formulated in terms of the total uranium capacity, the uranium throughput, and the dilution half-time of the mill. The requirements for detection of milled reactor-zone uranium are expressed in terms of the dilution half-time and the sampling frequency. Detection of different amounts of reactor ore with varying degrees of /sup 235/U depletion is considered.

Apt, K.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United United States Environmental Monitoring EPA 600/R-93/141 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory January 1992 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research and Development _EPA Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1991 Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientificand Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak ridge,TN 39831; pricesavailablefrom (615) 576-8401 Availableto the publicfrom the NationalTechnicalInformationService, U.S. Departmentof Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Price Code: PrintedCopyof MicroficheA01 Frontand back cover: CommunityMonitorStation (front) and Whole BodyLaboratory(back), Craig A. Tsosle EnvironmentalMonitoringSystemsLaboratory-LasVegas, Nevada Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report:

340

Flow cytometer jet monitor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

Ryan, M.J.

1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

343

Sidewall, appearance monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a sidewall appearance monitor. It comprises: a frame, a fixed upper chuck and a vertically-movable lower chuck for supporting a tire on the frame, means for inflating the tire, means for rotating the tire when inflated, a tread probe and support therefor depending vertically from the frame, an upper probe mounted and the frame adjacent the upper sidewall of tire, a pair of normally vertical support arms horizontally-spaced from each other and straddling the tread probe and support therefor. The lower prove being mounted between the lower ends of the support arms, means for mounting the upper ends of the support arms to swing the support arms between a vertical operative position and a horizontal inoperative position above the level of the tire, whereby the lower chuck may move downwardly to release the tire and the tire may be moved laterally away from the chucks without interference from the lower probe.

Hayes, R.H.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electron launching voltage monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM); Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad-based deployment of postcombustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), in response to more stringent NOx control mandates has highlighted the need for continuous ammonia monitoring capabilities. EPRI has investigated the potential that tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy can have in the continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. Field measurement programs for validation of TDL-based monitors, however, have yi...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad-based deployment of post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOX) control systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), in response to more stringent NOX control mandates has highlighted the need for continuous ammonia monitoring capabilities. EPRI has investigated the potential that tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy can have in the continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. Field measurement programs for validation of TDL-based monitors, however, have y...

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

349

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Digestion time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

351

Design and implementation of a prototype generator monitoring system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes an implementation framework for an intelligent generator monitoring system. This solution is based on high performance front-end data acquisition system and real-time processing of electrical signals and contacts from related protective relays, circuit breakers, and switches. Based on this data, the system performs continuous monitoring of the electrical part of the generator and informs operators of any deviations from the normal operating conditions. The monitoring involves automated comparison and evaluation of several input quantities according to the rules defined by the experts. The system is implemented using a PC interfaced to an advanced digital fault recorder.

Sun, Jianyong

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average “all modes” failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

Technologies for Remote Monitoring of Substation Assets: Physical Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the benefits of including remote monitoring with the various security technologies used for providing physical security to substation facilities and equipment. This remote monitoring provides near-real-time security information on the access points to substation facilities as well as the status and health of equipment to determine if the equipment has been tampered with or is otherwise not functioning correctly. The types of security technologies include locks at gates and doors, vid...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

An introduction to plant monitoring through the EPICS control system  

SciTech Connect

The experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) environment (1) provides the framework for monitoring any equipment connected to it. Various tools offer engineers and scientists the opportunity to easily create high-level monitoring applications without having to rely on expert programmers to develop custom programs. This paper is aimed at the first-time or casual user, providing essential information for using several of the tools. Examples are taken from applications in regular use the Advanced Photon Source (APS).

Carwardine, J.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

A reactor core on-line monitoring program - COMP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program named COMP is developed for on-line monitoring PWRs' in-core power distribution in this paper. Harmonics expansion method is used in COMP. The Unit 1 reactor of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (Daya Bay NPP) in China is considered for verification. The numerical results show that the maximum relative error between measurement and reconstruction results from COMP is less than 5%, and the computing time is short, indicating that COMP is capable for online monitoring PWRs. (authors)

Wang, C. [State Nuclear Power Software Development Center, Beijing, 100029 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ. (China); Building 1, Compound No.29, North Third Ring Road, Xicheng District, Beijing, 100029 (China); Wu, H.; Cao, L. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ. (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Wind energy prediction and monitoring with neural computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy has an important part to play as renewable energy resource in a sustainable world. For a reliable integration of wind energy high-dimensional wind time-series have to be analyzed. Fault analysis and prediction are an important aspect in this ... Keywords: Dimension reduction, Self-organizing feature maps, Support vector regression, Time-series monitoring, Wind energy, Wind prediction

Oliver Kramer; Fabian Gieseke; Benjamin Satzger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Davis says. However, there will be times when a human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Davis says. However, there will be times when a human operator may want to give particular guidance, there may be only one or a few people trying to watch a very large number of television monitors showing the surveillance video feeds (below). Because people can only focus on a few monitors at a time, much

Davis, James W.

359

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Bakhtiari, Sasan (Bolingbrook, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Downers Grove, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

A Resilient Condition Assessment Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

An architecture and supporting methods are presented for the implementation of a resilient condition assessment monitoring system that can adaptively accommodate both cyber and physical anomalies to a monitored system under observation. In particular, the architecture includes three layers: information, assessment, and sensor selection. The information layer estimates probability distributions of process variables based on sensor measurements and assessments of the quality of sensor data. Based on these estimates, the assessment layer then employs probabilistic reasoning methods to assess the plant health. The sensor selection layer selects sensors so that assessments of the plant condition can be made within desired time periods. Resilient features of the developed system are then illustrated by simulations of a simplified power plant model, where a large portion of the sensors are under attack.

Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface.

Lettsome, Annette K.; /Bethune-Cookman Coll. /SLAC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Background compensation for a radiation level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

Keefe, D.J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Monitoring smartphones for anomaly detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we demonstrate how to monitor a smartphone running Symbian operating system and Windows Mobile in order to extract features for anomaly detection. These features are sent to a remote server because running a complex intrusion detection ... Keywords: anomaly detection, monitoring, smartphones

Aubrey-Derrick Schmidt; Frank Peters; Florian Lamour; Christian Scheel; Seyit Ahmet Çamtepe; Sahin Albayrak

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Pantex Plant meteorological monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

The current meteorological monitoring program of the US Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas, is described in detail. Instrumentation, meteorological data collection and management, and program management are reviewed. In addition, primary contacts are noted for instrumentation, calibration, data processing, and alternative databases. The quality assurance steps implemented during each portion of the meteorological monitoring program are also indicated.

Snyder, S.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

ORISE: Media Analysis and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Analysis and Monitoring Media Analysis and Monitoring The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) uses comprehensive media analysis and monitoring tools to define media interest and the public's perceptions of a particular issue. ORISE's media analysis process includes analyzing news reports combined with media outlet data, such as circulation, readership, number of viewers and listeners; recording frequency of publication and collecting quotes from subject matter experts. To improve the overall consistency and efficiency of the process, ORISE employs tools, such as AutoINFORM (Auto Immunization News FOR Managers), that enable the monitoring of social media, email and other Web content. On average, ORISE tracks, codes and analyzes more than 17,000 articles daily, monitoring 1,400+ news resources and 1,000+ blogs. Annually, the

373

Multi-unit energy use monitor  

SciTech Connect

A system is described for monitoring energy use by each user of a common heating/cooling system wherein each user is provided with an individual on/off state thermostat coupled to the system such that when any thermostat is in the on state heating/cooling is provided to the respective user. The energy monitoring system comprises: means for generating clock pulses at a preselected frequency; first gating means, one associated with each of the individual thermostats, having a first input coupled to its respective thermostat, and having a second input coupled to the clock pulse generating means. It also has an output whereby clock pulses are passed to the output of the plurality of first gating means at any time the associated thermostat is on; first counting means, one associated with each of the first gating means, having an input coupled to the output of and operative to count the clock pulses passed by its respective first gating means; means for periodically scanning each of the plurality of first counting means to determine the number of pulses counted thereby since the next previous scan thereof; and means coupled to the scanning means for accumulating the number of pulses counted by each individual counting means during a preselected interval of time and generating an output signal indicating the total amount of time that each thermostat was on during the interval of time.

Deeds, R.G.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

375

Fast track article: Design of smart sensing components for volcano monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a volcano monitoring application, various geophysical and geochemical sensors generate continuous high-fidelity data, and there is a compelling need for real-time raw data for volcano eruption prediction research. It requires the network to support ... Keywords: Situation awareness, Time synchronization, Volcano monitoring, Wireless sensor network

Mingsen Xu; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang; Yang Peng; Behrooz Shirazi; Richard Lahusen; Aaron Kiely; Nina Peterson; Andy Ma; Lohith Anusuya-Rangappa; Michael Miceli; Devin McBride

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Quality of monitoring of stochastic events by periodic & proportional-share scheduling of sensor coverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the quality of monitoring (QoM) of stochastic events by a periodic sensor which monitors a point of interest (PoI) for q time every p time. We show how the amount of information captured at a PoI is affected by the proportion ...

David K. Y. Yau; Nung Kwan Yip; Chris Y. T. Ma; Nageswara S. Rao; Mallikarjun Shankar

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Storm-Triggered Landslide Monitoring and Prediction System: Formulation and Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting the location and timing of mudslides with adequate lead time is a scientifically challenging problem that is critical for mitigating landslide impacts. Here, a new dynamic modeling system is described for monitoring and predicting ...

Diandong Ren; Lance M. Leslie; Rong Fu; Robert E. Dickinson; Xiang Xin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Ng, Esmond G. (Concord, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Time Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Cosmology from . . . Time Brightness ... . . . 50-100 Fields Lunar Calendar Scheduled Follow-Up Imaging at Hubble, Cerro Tololo, WIYN, Isaac Newton Scheduled Follow-Up Spectroscopy at Keck Almost 1000 Galaxies per Field RESULT: ~24 Type Ia supernovae discovered while still brightening, at new moon Berkeley Lab Keck WIYN Cerro Tololo Isaac Newton Hubble Strategy We developed a strategy to guarantee a group of supernova discoveries on a certain date. Just after a new moon, we observe some 50 to 100 high-galactic lattitute fields-each containing almost a thousand high-redshift galaxies-in two nights on the Cerro Tololo 4-meter telescope with Tyson & Bernstein's wide-field camera. We return three weeks later to observe the same

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Power System Monitoring Using Petri Net Embeddings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A failure in a power transmission line causes a number of circuit breakers to activate in an eort to isolate the failure and prevent it from corrupting the rest of the power system. Based on information from these physically distributed protective devices, a central controller needs to quickly identify and locate the failure. The task becomes challenging due to the complexity of modern power transmission networks and due to the possibility of multiple sensor failures or incorrect operation of protective devices. In this paper we investigate a solution to this problem using Petri net models. Our approach is attractive because it allows concurrent/incremental processing of the information that arrives at the controller and because it requires only simple calculations (linear checks) during execution time. Most reasoning is implicitly performed at design time, which gives our method an important edge for real-time monitoring. Furthermore, these same techniques can potentially handle mult...

C. N. Hadjicostis; G. C. Verghese

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A method of noncontacting ultrasonic process monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of monitoring a material during processing comprising the steps of (a) shining a detection light on the surface of a material; (b) generating ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material to cause a change in frequency of the detection light; (c) detecting a change in the frequency of the detection light at the surface of the material; (d) detecting said ultrasonic waves at the surface point of detection of the material; (e) measuring a change in the time elapsed from generating the ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material and return to the surface point of detection of the material, to determine the transit time; and (f) comparing the transit time to predetermined values to determine properties such as, density and the elastic quality of the material.

Garcia, G.V.; Walter, J.B.; Telschow, K.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements  

SciTech Connect

Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

Yin, Y.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

REMOTE RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING  

SciTech Connect

A gamma-radiation telemetering system was utilized to measure fall-out levels at the Ncvada Test Site. Two methods of signal transmission were used: directcoupled field lines for on-site installations and commercial telephone lines for areas out to 330 miles. Graphic and tabular data cover on-site and off- site residual gamma-radiation dose rate measurements taken as a function of time after selected events. (auth)

Sigoloff, S.C.; Borella, H.M.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pseudo-interactive monitoring in distributed computing  

SciTech Connect

Distributed computing, and in particular Grid computing, enables physicists to use thousands of CPU days worth of computing every day, by submitting thousands of compute jobs. Unfortunately, a small fraction of such jobs regularly fail; the reasons vary from disk and network problems to bugs in the user code. A subset of these failures result in jobs being stuck for long periods of time. In order to debug such failures, interactive monitoring is highly desirable; users need to browse through the job log files and check the status of the running processes. Batch systems typically don't provide such services; at best, users get job logs at job termination, and even this may not be possible if the job is stuck in an infinite loop. In this paper we present a novel approach of using regular batch system capabilities of Condor to enable users to access the logs and processes of any running job. This does not provide true interactive access, so commands like vi are not viable, but it does allow operations like ls, cat, top, ps, lsof, netstat and dumping the stack of any process owned by the user; we call this pseudo-interactive monitoring. It is worth noting that the same method can be used to monitor Grid jobs in a glidein-based environment. We further believe that the same mechanism could be applied to many other batch systems.

Sfiligoi, I.; /Fermilab; Bradley, D.; Livny, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Energy Monitoring - Objectives vs Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universities, hospitals and similar institutions as well as manufacturers and plants have implemented programs of utility submetering. Submetering of utilities is defined as the measurement of energy at or near the point of use as opposed to gross measurement of energy coming into a building or facility. Without exception, the results achieved have met or exceeded expectations. Most of the programs are continuing in an expanding mode. Results of improvements to the utility distribution system can be measured in reduced usage and improved efficiency after submetering is in place. Networking of this monitoring system further enhances information collection and analysis. When other factors such as outside temperature and time of day are included in the data base, an emerging picture of energy usage for an entire facility is developed. A summary of highlights from several of these programs will be discussed in terms of what has been and is being accomplished. The importance of the commitment of both management and technologists/operators becomes evident as the initial objectives are achieved and expanded to match the innovation and skills of these professionals. The programs highlighted represent a group of progressive companies and institutions which have joined a "savings club." We are familiar with the savings clubs based on the investment of capital, depending strictly on interest to generate funds for us. The kind of savings clubs to be discussed in this paper joins capital with the more important human element to generate significant savings in deferred energy expenses. Steps necessary to "join the club" are listed and the ingredients of commitment and planning are discussed.

McEver, R. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Design of the AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor electronics  

SciTech Connect

The operational requirements of the AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system necessitate the use of electronics with wide dynamic range and broad instantaneous bandwidth. Bunch synchronization is provided by a remote timing sequencer coupled to the local ring electronics via digital fiber-optic links. The Sequencer and local ring circuitry work together to provide single turn trajectory or average orbit and intensity information, integrated over 1 to 225 bunches. Test capabilities are built in for the purpose of enhancing BPM system accuracy. This paper describes the design of the Booster Beam Position Monitor electronics, and presents performance details of the front end processing, acquisition and timing circuitry.

Ciardullo, D.J.; Smith, G.A.; Beadle, E.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Design of the AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor electronics  

SciTech Connect

The operational requirements of the AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system necessitate the use of electronics with wide dynamic range and broad instantaneous bandwidth. Bunch synchronization is provided by a remote timing sequencer coupled to the local ring electronics via digital fiber-optic links. The Sequencer and local ring circuitry work together to provide single turn trajectory or average orbit and intensity information, integrated over 1 to 225 bunches. Test capabilities are built in for the purpose of enhancing BPM system accuracy. This paper describes the design of the Booster Beam Position Monitor electronics, and presents performance details of the front end processing, acquisition and timing circuitry.

Ciardullo, D.J.; Smith, G.A.; Beadle, E.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

monitoring data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitoring data monitoring data Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Source Freedom Field Date Released July 19th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas monitoring data PV radiance solar temperature

392

New technologies for item monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advanced nonintrusive load monitoring system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a need for flexible, inexpensive metering technologies that can be deployed in many different monitoring scenarios. Individual loads may be expected to compute information about their power consumption. Utility ...

Wichakool, Warit, 1977-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Microsoft Word - WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety CARLSBAD, N.M., March 3, 2011 - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In February, the WIPP Laboratory, which operates out of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), was accredited by the DOE's Laboratory Accreditation Program for the fourth consecutive time. The lab received accreditation for conducting in vitro radiobioassay analysis - meaning it analyzes levels of radioactivity in the biological waste of radiological workers who might have come into contact with radiological

395

Performance assessment on continuous air monitors under real operating conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the nuclear industry, workers may be exposed to artificial radioactive aerosols. These aerosols are generally composed of particles with a diameter measuring between 0.1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m. To protect workers in nuclear facilities, monitors that continuously measure radioactivity in the air are used. The main function of the monitor is to provide real-time measurement of activity concentration. Measurement of aerosol activity concentration can be affected by a number of factors specific to the aerosols and the instrument. The first part of the article will present the general operating principles of continuous air monitors (CAMs) and inherent measurement difficulties, as well as the main standard tests. The second section describes the experimental ICARE facility The ICARE facility generates standard artificial and natural radioactive aerosols for calibrating continuous air monitors under real operating conditions. (authors)

Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Liatimi, N.; Gensdarmes, F. [Inst. of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN, Saclay (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Efficient Collaborative Application Monitoring Scheme for Mobile Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New operating systems for mobile devices allow their users to download millions of applications created by various individual programmers, some of which may be malicious or flawed. In order to detect that an application is malicious, monitoring its operation in a real environment for a significant period of time is often required. Mobile devices have limited computation and power resources and thus are limited in their monitoring capabilities. In this paper we propose an efficient collaborative monitoring scheme that harnesses the collective resources of many mobile devices, "vaccinating" them against potentially unsafe applications. We suggest a new local information flooding algorithm called "TTL Probabilistic Propagation" (TPP). The algorithm periodically monitors one or more application and reports its conclusions to a small number of other mobile devices, who then propagate this information onwards. The algorithm is analyzed, and is shown to outperform existing state of the art information propagation al...

Altshuler, Yaniv; Elovici, Yuval

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ORR Deer Hunt Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose for the initiation of deer hunts on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was deer population control to reduce collisions with vehicles and maintain a healthy herd and habitat. As of 1997, thirteen annual deer hunts have been conducted on the ORR. The deer hunt monitoring program (DHMP) has two components -- a field screening monitoring program and a confirmatory laboratory analysis program of both retained and randomly selected released deer samples.

Scofield, P.A.; Teasley, N.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing use of post combustion NOx control systems such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) has heightened the need for reliable continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. This report describes laboratory tests conducted to assess the ability of the Norsk Elektro Optik's (NEO) LaserGas II tunable diode laser monitor to measure ammonia under highly controlled conditions over a typical range of process conditions.

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Condition Monitoring of Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on industry experience, after four years of operation, failures of wind turbine gearboxes, generators, and other major components become common, and each failure typically requires major repairs and/or component replacement. Wind project owners and operators who apply lube oil monitoring, vibration-signature analysis, and other condition monitoring technology can expect to detect subtle changes in machine condition that often lead to major failures if left unrepaired. The estimated cost savings of ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

PEM fuel cell monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "time formaldehyde monitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PEM fuel cell monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Grot, Stephen Andreas (West Henrietta, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Monitoring Switchyard Electricity | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Switchyard ... Monitoring Switchyard Electricity Monitoring electricity coming in through the switchyard to the Y-12 Plant...

403

Improved Characterization and Monitoring of Electromagnetic ...  

LLNL's technology is useful in fields such as power systems engineering, security monitoring, and vehicle tracking to identify, locate and monitor a ...

404

Definition: Thermal Overload Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overload Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Overload Monitoring Technology including sensors, information processors and communications that can detect...

405

Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2002 update to the "Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines" reflects information learned from current utility continuous emission monitoring (CEM) system (CEMS) installations and practices.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Market Monitoring Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Tools Market Monitoring Tools Use dispatch, profit, revenueoffer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some...

407

Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP), Environmental Protection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Water Chapter 11 - Potable Water Chapter 12 - Groundwater Monitoring Chapter 13 - Landfill Gas and Leachate Monitoring Appendix A - Acronyms and Technical Terms Appendix B...

408

The development of a monitoring system for use in Iraq  

SciTech Connect

In April 1993, the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM), through the U.S. Department of State, requested hardware to monitor two rocket motor test stands in Iraq. The Department of Energy`s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory responded with project Dustcloud. Within two weeks of the request, LLNL delivered two video monitoring systems which were deployed to Iraq and installed at the Al Azim solid motor test site and the Al Rafah liquid engine test site, each about 75 km from Baghdad. The original request included a set of loosely defined requirements to perform remote monitoring in accordance with applicable United Nations Resolutions. The Sheraton Hotel in Baghdad was to be the site of the central monitoring station. While these first systems satisfied the original requirements, they were technically cumbersome and did not lend themselves to easy expansion, or mass production. A request for a second phase design was received in May 1994. The second phase design provided a more general solution to the monitoring requirement and extended the number of monitored facilities to a total of 25 and provided a continuous monitoring capability at a mutually agreed upon site located outside of the monitored country. The Phase II hardware was placed in service in June 1994. In both the Phase I and Phase II designs we worked against extremely tight time constraints where the schedule was driven solely by international negotiations and agreements. One result of the tight time schedules was the inability to consider a wide range of international sources for the hardware. This paper is devoted to an in depth discussion of the requirements and the hardware design.

Fuess, D.A.

1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Smooth Brome Monitoring...

411

Ground potential rise monitor  

SciTech Connect

A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulison Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Monitoring Rulison Monitoring Rulison, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Fourth Quarter 2012 and First Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2012. Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (2nd quarter 2012) Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (1st quarter 2012) Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (4th quarter 2011) Project Rulison Monitoring Results for Water Vapor in Gas at the Holmes Mesa Compressor Station, Garfield County, Colorado (3rd quarter

413

Wireless Sensor Network for Electric Transmission Line Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Generally, federal agencies tasked to oversee power grid reliability are dependent on data from grid infrastructure owners and operators in order to obtain a basic level of situational awareness. Since there are many owners and operators involved in the day-to-day functioning of the power grid, the task of accessing, aggregating and analyzing grid information from these sources is not a trivial one. Seemingly basic tasks such as synchronizing data timestamps between many different data providers and sources can be difficult as evidenced during the post-event analysis of the August 2003 blackout. In this project we investigate the efficacy and cost effectiveness of deploying a network of wireless power line monitoring devices as a method of independently monitoring key parts of the power grid as a complement to the data which is currently available to federal agencies from grid system operators. Such a network is modeled on proprietary power line monitoring technologies and networks invented, developed and deployed by Genscape, a Louisville, Kentucky based real-time energy information provider. Genscape measures transmission line power flow using measurements of electromagnetic fields under overhead high voltage transmission power lines in the United States and Europe. Opportunities for optimization of the commercial power line monitoring technology were investigated in this project to enable lower power consumption, lower cost and improvements to measurement methodologies. These optimizations were performed in order to better enable the use of wireless transmission line monitors in large network deployments (perhaps covering several thousand power lines) for federal situational awareness needs. Power consumption and cost reduction were addressed by developing a power line monitor using a low power, low cost wireless telemetry platform known as the ''Mote''. Motes were first developed as smart sensor nodes in wireless mesh networking applications. On such a platform, it has been demonstrated in this project that wireless monitoring units can effectively deliver real-time transmission line power flow information for less than $500 per monitor. The data delivered by such a monitor has during the course of the project been integrated with a national grid situational awareness visualization platform developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Novel vibration energy scavenging methods based on piezoelectric cantilevers were also developed as a proposed method to power such monitors, with a goal of further cost reduction and large-scale deployment. Scavenging methods developed during the project resulted in 50% greater power output than conventional cantilever-based vibrational energy scavenging devices typically used to power smart sensor nodes. Lastly, enhanced and new methods for electromagnetic field sensing using multi-axis magnetometers and infrared reflectometry were investigated for potential monitoring applications in situations with a high density of power lines or high levels of background 60 Hz noise in order to isolate power lines of interest from other power lines in close proximity. The goal of this project was to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of using small form factor, highly optimized, low cost, low power, non-contact, wireless electric transmission line monitors for delivery of real-time, independent power line monitoring for the US power grid. The project was divided into three main types of activity as follows; (1) Research into expanding the range of applications for non-contact power line monitoring to enable large scale low cost sensor network deployments (Tasks 1, 2); (2) Optimization of individual sensor hardware components to reduce size, cost and power consumption and testing in a pilot field study (Tasks 3,5); and (3) Demonstration of the feasibility of using the data from the network of power line monitors via a range of custom developed alerting and data visualization applications to deliver real-time information to federal agencies and others tasked with grid reliability (Tasks 6,8)

Alphenaar, Bruce

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

PERFORMACE OF MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

CAROTHERS KD; BOOMER KD; ANDA VS; DAHL MM; EDGEMON GL

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

CERTS 2012 Program Review - Oscillation Monitoring System - Mani Venkatasubramanian, WSU  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System System Mani V. Venkatasubramanian Washington State University Pullman WA 2 Oscillation Monitoring System OpenPDC OMS OMS action adapter built into OpenPDC 64 bit version 1.4 sp1. Available for beta testing. IEEE C37.118 TCP or UDP Real-time PMU data stream OMS results Oscillation Monitoring System OpenPDC OMS OMS action adapter built into OpenPDC 64 bit version 1.4 sp1. Available for beta testing. IEEE C37.118 Real-time PMU data stream SQL server txt file 3 Event Analysis Engine Damping Monitor Engine OMS Flowchart FDD analysis for ambient data Event? Prony analysis for post- disturbance data Start Read data from PDC Moving window crosscheck Yes No Moving window crosscheck Alarm Controller trigger Poorly damped mode detected? Yes No 4 Complementary Engines

416

1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Analyzing harmonic monitoring data using data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonic monitoring has become an important tool for harmonic management in distribution systems. A comprehensive harmonic monitoring program has been designed and implemented on a typical electrical MV distribution system in Australia. The monitoring ... Keywords: classification, clustering, data mining, harmonics, monitoring system, power quality, segmentation

Ali Asheibi; David Stirling; Danny Soetanto

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

Sheng, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy efficiency in military housing: Monitoring to support revitalization guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the US Army, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Energy to develop a guidebook to be used by architectural and engineering firms in the design phases of military family housing revitalization projects. The purpose of the guidebook is to ensure that energy efficiency is properly addressed in revitalization projects. Monitoring space-heating and cooling energy used in houses both before and after they are revitalized is necessary in order to assess the amount of energy saved by the revitalization process. Three different methods of conducting monitoring experiments are discussed, as well as the methods of data analysis to be used. Houses will be monitored individually using standard gas and electric meters to obtain heating and cooling data for the houses. The authors recommend conducting monitoring programs at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, and Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, because of their project schedules and potential for savings. They do not recommend doing any monitoring at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, because of the relatively small savings that they expect revitalization to accomplish there. They do not recommend seeking out alternative sites for monitoring because of the time required to become familiar with the installation and also because revitalization schedules at alternative sites may be no better than those at the sites they inspected.

Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Survey of hydrogen monitoring devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are results of a survey of commercially available monitoring devices suitable for hydrogen detection in the secondary containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during the post postulated accident period. Available detectors were grouped into the following five classes: combustion, solid state, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and absorption. The performance of most available sensors is likely to deteriorate when exposed to the postulated conditions which include moisture, which could be at high temperature, and radioactive noncondensibles. Of the commercial devices, those using metallic filament thermal conductivity detectors seem least susceptible to performance change. Absorption detectors are best suited for this monitoring task but the only available device is designed for pipeline corrosion assessment. Initiation of experimental study to assess apparent deficiencies of commercial detectors is recommended. Also recommended is an analytical/experimental effort to determine the optimum detector array for monitoring in the secondary containment vessels.

Lai, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes S. L. Ansley M. Leecaster

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Device for monitoring cell voltage  

SciTech Connect

A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

Doepke, Matthias (Garbsen, DE); Eisermann, Henning (Edermissen, DE)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Monitoring probe for groundwater flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Response to ISRP Comments Monitoring and Evaluation Statistical Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ifyou prorate the costs by number of daily users, this project compares even more favorably from a cost BPA Project No. 199105100 ISRP Preliminary Comments a. A response related to monitoring and evaluation and subtasks. Performance of the project is measured, in part, on the timely and on-budget completion

426

PROCESS MONITORING FOR SAFEGUARDS VIA EVENT GENERATION, INTEGRATION, AND INTERPRETATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a recognized safeguards benefit from using process monitoring (PM) on nuclear facilities to complement nuclear materials accountancy. We introduce a model-based approach for PM in which the assessment regarding the state of the monitored system is conducted at a system-centric level. The proposed architecture integrates both time-driven and event-driven data integration and analysis for decision-making. While the time-driven layers of the proposed architecture encompass more traditional PM methods based on time series data and analysis, the event-driven layers encompass operation monitoring methods based on discrete event data integration and analysis. By integrating process- and operation-related information and methodologies within an unified modeling and monitoring framework that includes not only current but also past plant behaviors, the task of anomaly detection is greatly improved because this decision-making approach can benefit from not only known time-series relationships among measured signals but also from known event sequence relationships among generated events. Building from the proposed system-centric PM architecture, we briefly introduce methods that can be used to implement its different components. The application of the proposed approach is then demonstrated via simulation experiments.

Humberto E. Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Tae-Sic Yoo

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A New Tall-Tower Meteorological Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Technologies Group of the Savannah River Technology Center operates an extensive meteorological monitoring network of 13 tower in and near the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The data from this system are available in ''real-time'' for emergency response atmospheric release modeling and operational weather forecasting.

Parker, M.J.

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Landscape Environmental Monitoring: Sample Based Versus Complete Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 Landscape Environmental Monitoring: Sample Based Versus Complete Mapping Approaches in Aerial for this purpose. In mapping, homogenous areas are first delineated as polygons. Aerial photo interpretation and Traub, 2003). The argument is that a sample survey takes less