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1

Continuity and permeability development in the tight gas sands of the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between reservoir characteristics and flow regimes exhibited by twenty-one Uinta Basin gas wells represent fluvial, lake margin, and lacustrine deposits. Production data were analyzed to determine the type of flow for each well. This analysis indicated that one well exhibits radial flow, thirteen wells linear flow, and seven wells indeterminate flow regimes. Values of SSP, ..delta..t, R/sub w/ and SP curve patterns were determined from well logs. These data were compared for the three types of flow observed. It appears that SSP, R/sub w/ and SP pattern may be useful in qualitatively distinguishing between sands of low continuity and those with moderate continuity. The permeabilities are considerably higher than those normally attributed to ''tight sands.'' Also permeability correlates inversely with the number of sands completed in each well. Consideration of the orientations of linear features in the area and those of reservoir lenses in outcrops indicates that the relationship between frac orientation and lens geometry cannot be effectively predicted without a good technique to predict lens orientation. Completion strategies to optimize frac efficiency are suggested, based upon the findings of this study.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Variograms of Radar Reflectivity to Describe the Spatial Continuity of Alpine Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors use variograms of radar reflectivity as a summary statistic to describe the spatial continuity of Alpine precipitation on mesogamma scales. First, how to obtain such variograms is discussed. Second, a set of typical variograms of ...

Urs Germann; Jürg Joss

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report discusses 3D-3C seismic acquisition and 3D P-wave alternate processing.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

High Hopes, Tight Quarters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hopes, Hopes, Tight Quarters Unique Recycler, world's largest array of permanent magnets, taking shape in crowded Main Injector tunnel. by Mike Perricone, Office of Public Affairs The magnets are numbered in the hundreds; their weight is measured in tons. The available space in the tunnel is usually about four and a half feet, but it can be as little as two or three inches, and the forklifts doing the moving have been custom- designed for these tight quarters. The obstacles include water systems, cable trays, workers performing other installations, and the precisely aligned components of the signature Main Injector accelerator. The consequences of a possible slip-up: Don't even ask. Installation crews can put eight to 10 magnets in place in a day, if the magnets are located close together. Installing a magnet

5

University of California system in federal expenditures, at $381.6 million. The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), continues to reflect its leadership among the nation's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Brief University of California system in federal expenditures, at $381.6 million. The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), continues to reflect its leadership among the nation's leading research of California system in federal awards, at $539.8 milllion, and second in the 2001-02 7 The table below shows

Krstic, Miroslav

6

Spectral Reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory Precision Engineering Automated Production Technology Intelligent ... in the center of a light-tight room with ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Table 2. Principal tight oil plays: oil production and proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other tight oil plays (e.g. Monterey, Woodford)",,,24,253 "All U.S. tight oil plays",,,228,3628 "Note: Includes lease condensate." "Source: U.S. Energy...

9

Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2002 update to the "Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines" reflects information learned from current utility continuous emission monitoring (CEM) system (CEMS) installations and practices.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to locate the best locations to drill for them. The tight gas sands of the Piceance Basin have long been understanding of the way that fractures have controlled the production of gas in these tight gas sands an east to west trend of tight gas sand fields that produce a substantial amount of the total gas produced

11

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore space. Although the grains in tight sand samples do notfluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predictflow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. Operators can use the data on the websites to expand natural gas recovery in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and the central Appalachian Basin of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. As production from conventional natural gas resources declines, natural gas from tight-gas sandstone formations is expected to contribute a growing percentage to the nation's energy supply. "Tight gas" is natural gas

14

Market model finds tight gas sands R and D offers most promise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional natural gas (UNG) - primarily tight gas sands - offers by far the largest opportunity for reducing gas costs between now and 2000, a team of researchers reported at the Sept. 1984 International Gas Research conference in Washington, DC. The promises of UNG R and D far outweigh those of synthetic natural gas (SNG), the researchers concluded, but stressed that SNG R and D should nonetheless continue - but with a different focus and changed performance goals.

Not Available

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

A-84: Tight Binding Understanding of Carbon Defects in Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, a coherent transferable tight-binding (TB) parameterization was developed for Fe-C by ... A-54: Used Foundry Sand Reclamation in New Vibratory Unit.

16

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor’s logic, which mimics human expert’s decision-making process. TGS Advisor’s recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evaluation of the Sparton Tight-Tolerance AXBT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-six near-simultaneous pairs of conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) and Sparton “tight tolerance” air expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) temperature profiles were obtained in summer 1991 from a location in the Sargasso Sea. The data were ...

Janice D. Boyd; Robert S. Linzell

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

File:EIA-tight-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tight-gas.pdf tight-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 2.04 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Sources U.S. Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-06-06 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:44, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:44, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (2.04 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload You cannot overwrite this file.

22

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Notes: To reinforce the impact that inventory levels (I.e., tight markets) have on price, note the variation in spot gasoline prices relative to crude oil prices, as shown by the...

23

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities June 11, 2010 - 4:33pm Addthis Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Joshua DeLung "I think everyone has their heart in it. I think we see weatherization as a really worthy process." Morgan McKane, weatherization auditor at SEVCA Morgan McKane spent most of his career in southeast Vermont working in the

26

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Gasoline inventories indicate how tight the gasoline product market is in any one region. When the gasoline market is tight, it affects the portion of gasoline price is the spread between spot product price and crude oil price. Note that in late 1998-and early 1999 spreads were very small when inventories were quite high. Contrast summers of 1998 or 1999 with summer 2000. Last summer's tight markets, resulting low stocks and transition to Phase 2 RFG added price pressure over and above the already high crude price pressure on gasoline -- particularly in the Midwest. As we ended last winter, gasoline inventories were low, and the spread between spot prices and crude oil were higher than typical as a result. Inventories stayed well below average and the spread during the

27

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Victor Atanasov; Rossen Dandoloff

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Atanasov, Victor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

SPE Tight Gas Conference, 2009 "Program for the Beneficial Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE Tight Gas Conference, 2009 "Program for the Beneficial Use of Oil Field Produced Water" David B Additional cost of demineralization of water. The (probable) salinity of the produced brine. Environmental. Servicing Schedule weekly #12;Comparison of Desalinated Produced Water with Municipal

31

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: TightBinding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight­Binding Now that we have shown that /( ~ k; ~r) = \\Gamma P ~ R e i ~ k \\Delta ~ R OE A (~r \\Gamma ~ R) satisfies the Bloch condition, all that remains is to grind the calculation explicitly. First, the wave­function /( ~ k; ~r) must be normalized. Thus Z / \\Lambda / dV = 1 = j

Winokur, Michael

32

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas reservoirs provide almost one quarter of the current U.S. domestic gas production, with significant projected increases in the next several decades in both the U.S. and abroad. These reservoirs constitute an important play type, with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually acquired by upscaling the detailed 3D geologic models. Earlier studies of flow simulation have developed layer-based coarse reservoir simulation models, from the more detailed 3D geologic models. However, the layer-based approach cannot capture the essential sand and flow. We introduce and utilize the diffusive time of flight to understand the pressure continuity within the fluvial sands, and develop novel adaptive reservoir simulation grids to preserve the continuity of the reservoir sands. Combined with the high resolution transmissibility based upscaling of flow properties, and well index based upscaling of the well connections, we can build accurate simulation models with at least one order magnitude simulation speed up, but the predicted recoveries are almost indistinguishable from those of the geologic models. General practice of well placement usually requires reservoir simulation to predict the dynamic reservoir response. Numerous well placement scenarios require many reservoir simulation runs, which may have significant CPU demands. We propose a novel simulation-free screening approach to generate a quality map, based on a combination of static and dynamic reservoir properties. The geologic uncertainty is taken into consideration through an uncertainty map form the spatial connectivity analysis and variograms. Combining the quality map and uncertainty map, good infill well locations and drilling sequence can be determined for improved reservoir management. We apply this workflow to design the infill well drilling sequence and explore the impact of subsurface also, for a large-scale tight gas reservoir. Also, we evaluated an improved pressure approximation method, through the comparison with the leading order high frequency term of the asymptotic solution. The proposed pressure solution can better predict the heterogeneous reservoir depletion behavior, thus provide good opportunities for tight gas reservoir management.

Zhou, Yijie

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

Scott, L.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mobil completes deep, tight, horizontal gas well in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion and fracturing program for stimulating a horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes sand onshore Germany included casing design, completion fluid selection, overbalanced perforation, analysis of the stimulation treatment, design modification, zone and fracture isolation, well testing and acid stimulation. This paper reviews the field geology, the well design, casing design, describes the completion fluids, perforation techniques, fracture treatment, and methods for zone isolation.

Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Chambers, M.R. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mueller, M.W. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Transferable tight-binding parameters: An application to Ni and Ni-Al alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two approaches for obtaining tight-binding parameters for metallic alloys are compared and contrasted with special regard for the application to large scale simulations such as may occur in tight-binding molecular dynamics studies.

Sluiter, M.H.F.; Singh, P.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessment of API Thread Connections Under Tight Gas Well Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern oil and gas industry of America has seen most of the high quality, easily obtainable resources, already produced, thus causing wells to be drilled deeper in search for unconventional resources. This means Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) must improve in order to withstand harsher conditions; especially the ability of connections to effectively create leak tight seals. This study investigates the use of thread connections in tight gas fields; therefore, an insight into their potential to contribute to fulfilling the energy demands is necessary. Also, a survey of completed projects done in tight gas fields can provide vital information that will establish the minimum requirements thread connection must meet to perform its functions. To make suitable adjustments to ensure safe and efficient operations we must thoroughly understand the many aspects of thread connections. To have this understanding, a review of previous works was carried out that highlights the capabilities and imitations of thread connections. In addition to reviewing previous work done on thread connections; this study measured the viscosity of thread compounds under variable conditions. It was found that viscosity of thread compound falls in the range of 285,667 cP and 47,758 cP when measured between 32.9 degrees F and 121.5 degrees F. This can be very important because thread compound is essential to the function of thread connections. The knowledge of its viscosity can help choose the most suitable compound. By knowing the value of the viscosity of a thread compound it can also be used to form an analytical assessment of the grooved plate method by providing a means to calculate a pressure gradient which impacts the leakage.

Bourne, Dwayne

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tight-binding model for hydrogen-silicon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an empirical tight-binding model for use in molecular-dynamics simulations to study hydrogen-silicon systems. The hydrogen-silicon interaction is constructed to reproduce the electronic energy levels and vibration frequencies of silane (SiH{sub 4}). Further use of the model in the studies of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and of hydrogen on the Si(111) surface also yields results in good agreement with first-principles calculations and experiments.

Min, B.J.; Lee, Y.H.; Wang, C.Z.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M. (Microelectronics Research Center, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States) Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight-Binding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight-Binding Now that we have shown that (~k;~r) = P ~R ei~k~RA(~r ~R-function (~k;~r) must be normalized. Thus Z dV = 1 = j j2 X R X R0 ei~k~R ~R0 Z A(~r ~R0)A(~r ~R)dV Now for each ~R0, the sum over ~R must be the same since the crystal has the same distribution of neighbors

Winokur, Michael

42

MANAGING TIGHT BINDING RECEPTORS FOR NEW SPEARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much of the earth's pollution involves compounds of the metallic elements, including actinides, strontium, cesium, technetium, and RCRA metals. Metal ions bind to molecules called ligands, which are the molecular tools that can manipulate the metal ions under most conditions. This DOE-EMSP sponsored program strives (1) to provide the foundations for using the most powerful ligands in transformational separations technologies and (2) to produce seminal examples of their applications to separations appropriate to the DOE EM mission. These ultra tight-binding ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances (from mineralized sites, lesser ligands, and even extremely dilute solutions), but they react so slowly that they are useless in traditional separations methodologies. Two attacks on this problem are underway. The first accommodates to the challenging molecular lethargy by developing a seminal slow separations methodology termed the soil poultice. The second designs ligands that are only tight-binding while wrapped around the targeted metal ion, but can be put in place by switch-binding and removed by switch-release. We envision a kind of molecular switching process to accelerate the union between metal ion and tight-binding ligand. Molecular switching processes are suggested for overcoming the slow natural equilibration rate with which ultra tight-binding ligands combine with metal ions. Ligands that bind relatively weakly combine with metal ions rapidly, so the trick is to convert a ligand from a weak, rapidly binding species to a powerful, slow releasing ligand--during the binding of the ligand to the metal ion. Such switch-binding ligands must react with themselves, and the reaction must take place under the influence of the metal ion. For example, our generation 1 ligands showed that a well-designed linear ligand with ends that readily combine, forms a cyclic molecule when it wraps around a metal ion. Our generation 2 ligands are even more interesting. They convert from rings to structures that wrap around a metal ion to form a cage. These ligands are called cryptands. Switch release is accomplished by photolytic cleavage of a bond to convert a cyclic ligand into a linear ligand or to break similar bonds in a cryptate. Our studies have demonstrated switch binding and switch release with cryptates of calcium. These remarkable cyclic ligands and cage-like ligands are indeed tight-binding and may, in principle, be incorporated in various separations methodologies, including the soil poultice. The soil poultice mimics the way in which microbes secrete extremely powerful ligands into the soil in order to harvest iron. The cellular membrane of the microbe recognizes the iron/ligand complex and admits it into the cell. The soil poultice uses molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to play the role of the cellular membrane. Imprinting involves creation of the polymer in the presence of the metal/ligand complex. In principle, a well design ligand/MIP combination can be highly selective toward almost any targeted metal ion. The principles for that design are the focus of these investigations. An imprinting molecule can interact with the polymer through any, some, or all of the so-called supramolecular modes; e.g., hydrogen bonding, electrostatic charge, minor ligand bonding, Pi-Pi stacking, and hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions. Historically these modes of binding have given MIPs only small re-binding capacities and very limited selectivities. This program has shown that each mode of interaction can be made more powerful than previously suspected and that combinations of different supramolecular interaction modes can produce remarkable synergisms. The results of this systematic study provide a firm foundation for tailoring molecular imprinted polymers for reclamation of specific metal ion, including those important to the DOE EM mission.

DARYLE H BUSCH RICHARD S GIVENS

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

Wood, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; Bustin, Mark [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Methods and apparatus for measuring the tightness of enclosures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for measuring tightness of an enclosure such as a building by utilizing alternating pressurization techniques. One method comprises providing apparatus capable of causing an internal volume change for the enclosure, the apparatus including a means for determining the instantaneous volume change, and a means for determining the instantaneous pressure within the enclosure. The apparatus is operated within the enclosure to change the volume thereof, and at least one of the frequency and the displacement is adjusted to achieve a root mean square pressure in the enclosure approximately equal to a reference pressure. At that pressure, the leakage of the enclosure is determined from the instantaneous displacement and instantaneous pressure values. 3 figs.

Modera, M.P.; Sherman, M.H.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Reflective diffraction grating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

NIST Terahertz Reflection Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... b) Superimposed Fourier Transform amplitude and power reflection map ... laser for broadband (0.2-2.5) THz GaAs antenna generation and detection ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Hydraulic fracture productivity performance in tight gas sands, a numerical simulation approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulically fractured tight gas reservoirs are one of the most common unconventional sources being produced today, and look to be a regular source of gas… (more)

Ostojic, Jakov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a… (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS IN TIGHT GAS SANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on fossil fuels and the decline in their production promote producing hydrocarbon from unconventional sources. Natural gas existing in tight reservoirs has a… (more)

Kulga, Ihsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Pore-scale characterization and modeling of two-phase flow in tight gas sandstones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas resources, particularly tight gas sands, constitute a significant percentage of the natural gas resource base and offer abundant potential for future reserves… (more)

Mousavi, Maryam Alsadat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Prediction of Gas Leak Tightness of Superplastically Formed Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some applications, in this case an aluminium box in a subatomic particle detector containing highly sensitive detecting devices, it is important that a formed sheet should show no gas leak from one side to the other. In order to prevent a trial-and-error procedure to make this leak tight box, a method is set up to predict if a formed sheet conforms to the maximum leak constraint. The technique of superplastic forming (SPF) is used in order to attain very high plastic strains before failure. Since only a few of these boxes are needed, this makes, this generally slow, process an attractive production method. To predict the gas leak of a superplastically formed aluminium sheet in an accurate way, finite element simulations are used in combination with a user-defined material model. This constitutive model couples the leak rate with the void volume fraction. This void volume fraction is then dependent on both the equivalent plastic strain and the applied hydrostatic pressure during the bulge process (backpressure).

Snippe, Corijn H. C. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef) PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinders, T. [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Stability of spinor Fermi gases in tight waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two- and three-body correlation functions of the ground state of an optically trapped ultracold spin-(1/2) Fermi gas (SFG) in a tight waveguide [one-dimensional (1D) regime] are calculated in the plane of even- and odd-wave coupling constants, assuming a 1D attractive zero-range odd-wave interaction induced by a 3D p-wave Feshbach resonance, as well as the usual repulsive zero-range even-wave interaction stemming from 3D s-wave scattering. The calculations are based on the exact mapping from the SFG to a 'Lieb-Liniger-Heisenberg' model with delta-function repulsions depending on isotropic Heisenberg spin-spin interactions, and indicate that the SFG should be stable against three-body recombination in a large region of the coupling constant plane encompassing parts of both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. However, the limiting case of the fermionic Tonks-Girardeau gas, a spin-aligned 1D Fermi gas with infinitely attractive p-wave interactions, is unstable in this sense. Effects due to the dipolar interaction and a Zeeman term due to a resonance-generating magnetic field do not lead to shrinkage of the region of stability of the SFG.

Campo, A. del; Muga, J. G. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reflective Insulation Handbook.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When reflective-foil insulation manufacturers wanted the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to include their products in the Residential Weatherization Program, they lacked conclusive test data to prove that their products met program specifications. Reflective foils lacked widespread acceptance because of uncertainty about their insulation values. BPA discovered that the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was preparing a study to test how well reflective foils reduced horizontal heat flow. Because the insulation value of reflective foils depends upon the direction of heat flow, BPA provided additional funding to test their effectiveness in reducing upward and downward heat flow and to produce this Handbook. The objectives of this study were to develop acceptable test and evaluation methods, produce an initial data base of idealized reflective-foil insulation systems, extend this data base to a limited number of commercially available products to develop and test analytical models to predict thermal performance and develop a Reflective Insulation Handbook for homeowners and insulation contractors. This handbook describes how heat is transferred; the function of an insulation; what reflective insulation is; types of reflective insulation; where it can be used; installation procedures; thermal performance; and useful sources of information. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Desjarlais, Andre O.; Tye, Ronald P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Piceance basin area have created the Mesaverde Group tight gas sand reservoirs. As shown in Figure 2 of siltstones, shales and tight sandstones with a coaly interval at the base. The main producing interval was predominantly from the fluvial point bar sand bodies, with extremely low matrix permeabilities (

62

Parabolic Kazhdan-Lusztig R-polynomials for tight quotients of the symmetric groups 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic Kazhdan-Lusztig R-polynomials for tight quotients of the symmetric groups formulas for the parabolic Kazhda* *n- Lusztig R-polynomials of the tight quotients* * to that of the Kazhdan-Lusztig polynomials. In 1987 Deodhar ([5]) introduced parabolic analogues of all

Brenti, Francesco

63

TOWARD TIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST LUMINOSITY RELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large scatters of luminosity relations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been one of the most important reasons preventing the extensive application of GRBs in cosmology. Many efforts have been made to seek tight luminosity relations. With the latest sample of 116 GRBs with measured redshift and spectral parameters, we investigate 6 two-dimensional (2D) correlations and 14 derived three-dimensional (3D) correlations of GRBs to explore the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic scatters of the luminosity relations of GRBs. We find the 3D correlation of E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L to be evidently tighter (at the 2{sigma} confidence level) than its corresponding 2D correlations, i.e., the E{sub peak}-L and {tau}{sub RT}-L correlations. In addition, the coefficients before the logarithms of E{sub peak} and {tau}{sub RT} in the E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L correlation are almost exact opposites of each other. Inputting this situation as a prior reduces the relation to L{proportional_to}(E'{sub peak}/{tau}{sub RT}'){sup 0.842{+-}0.064}, where E'{sub peak} and {tau}'{sub RT} denote the peak energy and minimum rise time in the GRB rest frame. We discuss how our findings can be interpreted/understood in the framework of the definition of the luminosity (energy released in units of time). Our argument about the connection between the luminosity relations of GRBs and the definition of the luminosity provides a clear direction for exploring tighter luminosity relations of GRBs in the future.

Qi Shi; Lu Tan, E-mail: qishi11@gmail.com, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Tight Coal Market: Volatility Spike or Trend?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spot coal market experienced a major price spike beginning in late 2000 and early 2001. This run-up in coal prices caught most producers and generators by surprise. While spot prices have declined from their peak, they remain well above historical levels. It is not clear whether this run-up in prices was merely a short-term event reflecting an increase in coal price volatility or the start of a new trend in coal pricing generally. This report analyzes possible causes of the price spike, the likelihoo...

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Shape optimization using reflection lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many common objects have highly reflective metallic or painted finishes. Their appearance is primarily defined by the distortion the curved shape of the surface introduces in the reflections of surrounding objects. Reflection lines are commonly used ...

E. Tosun; Y. I. Gingold; J. Reisman; D. Zorin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

67

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 15 20 25 30 35 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Associated with oil Coalbed methane Tight gas Shale gas Alaska Non-associated onshore Non-associated...

68

Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation, 2011-2040 (million barrels per day) Permian Basin Bakken Eagle Ford

69

DensEl: An O(N) Tight Binding Code - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2008 ... DensEl is an O(N) (or linear scaling) tight binding code written in the first place by Chris Goringe with contributions by Paul Godwin and David ...

70

Economics of tight sands gas extraction as affected by r and d. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the economics and resource potential of tight sand formations as a major near-term source of unconventional gas. The main vehicles for analyzing the issues to date are the 1980 study by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) on tight sand resources and two studies based on the NPC's work at different stages of completion for the GRI Center for Energy Systems Analysis (CESA).

Rosenberg, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Low Total OECD Oil Stocks* Keep Market Balance Tight  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This chart illustrates why EIA sees crude oil prices staying relatively high. It shows global inventories, as measured by OECD petroleum stocks. EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels of forward demand coverage in order to avoid continued price volatility. The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. Low inventories increase the potential for price volatility throughout 2001. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum

72

TMS Continuing Education Home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Continuing Education Home. TMS is dedicated to encouraging the lifelong education of materials science and engineering professionals through ...

73

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

74

Polarizer reflectivity variations  

SciTech Connect

On Shiva the beam energy along the chain is monitored using available reflections and/or transmission through beam steering, splitting, and polarizing optics without the intrusion of any additional glass for diagnostics. On the preamp table the diagnostic signal is obtained from the signal transmitted through turning mirrors. At the input of each chain the signal is obtained from the transmission through one of the mirrors used for the chain input alignment sensor (CHIP). At the chain output the transmission through the final turning mirror is used. These diagnostics have proved stable and reliable. However, one of the prime diagnostic locations is at the output of the beta rod. The energy at this location is measured by collecting small reflections from the last polarizer surface of the beta Pockels cell polarizer package. Unfortunately, calibration of this diagnostic has varied randomly, seldom remaining stable for a week or more. The cause of this fluctuation has been investigated for the past year and'it has been discovered that polarizer reflectivity varies with humidity. This report will deal with the possible causes that were investigated, the evidence that humidity is causing the variation, and the associated mechanism.

Ozarski, R.G.; Prior, J.

1980-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

76

Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional gas has become an important resource to help meet our future energy demands. Although plentiful, it is difficult to produce this resource, when locked in a massive sedimentary formation. Among all unconventional gas resources, tight gas sands represent a big fraction and are often characterized by very low porosity and permeability associated with their producing formations, resulting in extremely low production rate. The low flow properties and the recovery factors of these sands make necessary continuous efforts to reduce costs and improve efficiency in all aspects of drilling, completion and production techniques. Many of the recent improvements have been in well completions and hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the main goal of a hydraulic fracture is to create a long, highly conductive fracture to facilitate the gas flow from the reservoir to the wellbore to obtain commercial production rates. Fracture conductivity depends on several factors, such as like the damage created by the gel during the treatment and the gel clean-up after the treatment. This research is focused on predicting more accurately the fracture conductivity, the gel damage created in fractures, and the fracture cleanup after a hydraulic fracture treatment under certain pressure and temperature conditions. Parameters that alter fracture conductivity, such as polymer concentration, breaker concentration and gas flow rate, are also examined in this study. A series of experiments, using a procedure of “dynamical fracture conductivity test”, were carried out. This procedure simulates the proppant/frac fluid slurries flow into the fractures in a low-permeability rock, as it occurs in the field, using different combinations of polymer and breaker concentrations under reservoirs conditions. The result of this study provides the basis to optimize the fracturing fluids and the polymer loading at different reservoir conditions, which may result in a clean and conductive fracture. Success in improving this process will help to decrease capital expenditures and increase the production in unconventional tight gas reservoirs.

Correa Castro, Juan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

TMS Continuing Education Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Education Development. If you are interested in developing a continuing education activity, please review the specific course options and requirements below.

79

Continuous Sludge Leaching  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Sludge Leaching Reid Peterson and Renee Russell - Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Terry Sams and Bill Brasel - Parsons 2 What is CSL? * Process diagram * Full scale...

80

Documentation : a reflective practice approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Center for Reflective Community Practice in MIT's Department of Urban studies is involved in projects helping community organizers working on social change. In order to foster reflection, they are currently utilizing ...

Ouko, Luke Odhiambo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Continuations and Web Servers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming web applications in direct style with the help of continuations is a much simpler, safer, modular and better-performing technology than the current dominating "page-centric" technology combining CGI scripts, active pages or servlets. This ... Keywords: WWW, continuations, hypertext, scheme

Christian Queinnec

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Continuations and transducer composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-line transducers are an important class of computational agent; we construct and compose together many software systems using them, such as stream processors, layered network protocols, DSP networks and graphics pipelines. We show an interesting use ... Keywords: calculus, continuation-passing style (CPS), continuations, coroutines, flow analysis, functional languages, fusion, lambda, language design, program analysis, stream processing

Olin Shivers; Matthew Might

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Generalization of Lambert's reflectance model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lambert's model for body reflection is widely used in computer graphics. It is used extensively by rendering techniques such as radiosity and ray tracing. For several real-world objects, however, Lambert's model can prove to be a very inaccurate approximation ... Keywords: BRDF, Lambert's model, moon reflectance, reflection models, rough surfaces

Michael Oren; Shree K. Nayar

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

MISMATCHES CREATE REFLECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike low-power, metal-gate CMOS, high-speed 54HC/74HC devices readily drive long cable runs and backplanes. While the family maintains CMOS’s traditional noise immunity, you must watch transmission-line effects in such applications. Because of 54HC/74HC high-speed CMOS’s short propagation delays and fast rise and fall times, you must understand its transmission-line behavior when driving lines as short as even a foot or two, whether those lines are coaxial cables, twisted pairs or backplanes. Moreover, the devices ’ fast edge rates increase the likelihood of crosstalk among interconnecting cables. Despite the need, however, to take design precautions that minimize adverse effects related to high-speed operation, 54HC/74HC logic—unlike slower metal-gate CMOS—includes many features that suit it to driving transmission lines. For example, its symmetrical push-pull outputs result in stiff logic levels, and its high output drive allows fast bit rates. Another advantage of high-speed-CMOS designs is that they don’t prove to be as difficult as those based on other high-speed logic families. In general, high-speed CMOS doesn’t require the detailed attention to pc-board layout and transmission-line characteristics that Schottky TTL or ECL designs do. Furthermore, controlling unwanted reflections is easier in the CMOS designs, because 54HC/74HC devices’ electrostatic-protection diodes tend to clamp the reflected voltages to the power-supply levels.

unknown authors

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Business Continuity Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article considers various strategies for protecting an organisation from both natural and man-made disasters. The differences between business continuity planning, and disaster recovery planning are recognised. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, ...

Martin Nemzow

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Social navigation for loosely-coupled information seeking in tightly-knit groups using webwear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many web-based information-seeking tasks are set in a social context where other people's knowledge and advice improves success in finding information. However, when tightly-knit contacts (friends, family, colleagues) are not available, information seeking ... Keywords: collaborative information seeking, social navigation

Scott S. Bateman; Carl A. Gutwin; Gordon I. McCalla

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Efficiency and Fluctuation in Tight-Coupling Model of Molecular Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple tight-coupling model of a molecular chemical engine is proposed. The efficiency of the chemical engine and its average velocity can be explicitly calculated. The diffusion constant is evaluated approximately using the fluctuation theorem. Langevin simulations with stochastic boundary conditions are performed and the numerical results are compared with theoretical calculations.

Hidetsugu Sakaguchi

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

High Performance Biomorphic Image Processing Under Tight Space and Power Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image processing for space systems must be performed under tight space and power constraints while not compromising performance. Traditional computer vision approaches are not ideal because they are notoriously power hungry and physically large. We present ... Keywords: centroid localization chip, computational sensing, focal-plane processing, image process chip, motion detection chip, spatiotemporal convolution chip, vision chip

Ralph Etienne-Cummings; Viktor Gruev; Mathew Clapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Tight Lower Bound to the Outage Probability of Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this correspondence, a tight lower bound to the outage probability of discrete-input Nakagami-m block-fading channels is proposed. The approach permits an efficient method for numerical evaluation of the bound, providing an additional tool for system ... Keywords: Block-fading channel, diversity, error probability, outage probability, rate-diversity tradeoff, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-exponent

K. D. Nguyen; A. Guillen i Fabregas; L. K. Rasmussen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission and the oil & gas industries. The combustion system used in Solar's products are discussed along- bility for the introduction of new combustion systems for gas turbine products to enhance fuel

Ponce, V. Miguel

94

Wilcox formation evaluation; Improved procedures for tight-gas-sand evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses risks in tight-gas-sand evaluation, reduced by defining relationships between pore geometry and critical water saturations. These results are integrated with log interpretation to derive an estimated kh that compares favorably with a true kh from production tests. These procedures are potentially applicable for evaluating other complex reservoirs.

Lewis, D.J.; Perrin, J.D. (BP Exploration Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Symmetric continued fractions  

SciTech Connect

Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

Panprasitwech, Oranit [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Laohakosol, Vichian [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Chaichana, Tuangrat [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum industry commonly uses single-layer models to characterize and forecast long-term production in tight gas reservoir systems. However, most tight gas reservoirs are layered systems where the permeability and porosity of each layer can vary significantly, often over several orders of magnitude. In addition, the drainage areas of each of the layers can be substantially different. Due to the complexity of such reservoirs, the analysis of pressure and production history using single-layer analyses techniques provide incorrect estimates of permeability, fracture conductivity, drainage area, and fracture half-length. These erroneous values of reservoir properties also provide the reservoir engineer with misleading values of forecasted gas recovery. The main objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate the typical errors that can occur in reservoir properties when single-layer modeling methods are used to history match production data from typical layered tight gas reservoirs, and (2) to use the single-layer match to demonstrate the error that can occur when forecasting long-term gas production for such complex gas reservoirs. A finite-difference reservoir simulator was used to simulate gas production from various layered tight gas reservoirs. These synthetic production data were analyzed using single-layer models to determine reservoir properties. The estimated reservoir properties obtained from the history matches were then used to forecast ten years of cumulative gas production and to find the accuracy of gas reserves estimated for tight gas reservoirs when a single-layer model is used for the analysis. Based on the results obtained in this work, I conclude that the accuracy in reservoir properties and future gas flow rates in layered tight gas reservoirs when analyzed using a single-layer model is a function of the degree of variability in permeability within the layers and the availability of production data to be analyzed. In cases where there is an idea that the reservoir presents a large variability in ��k�, using a multi-layer model to analyze the production data will provide the reservoir engineer with more accurate estimates of long-term production recovery and reservoir properties.

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Benchmarking of Graphite Reflected Critical Assemblies of UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of experiments were carried out in 1963 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 253 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27 cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 253 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506 cm triangular pitch [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods with a 1.506 cm triangular pitch. [3] Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. The first part of this experimental series has been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5] and is discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems. [6

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Countdown Continues INSIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 1996 1, 1996 Number 11 The Countdown Continues INSIDE 2 University Close-Up: Elmhurst College 4 DOE Reviews DZero Upgrade 5 Griffing Appointed ES&H Head 10 Laboratory Adopts More Efficient Payroll System Only a month remains before fixed-target experiments will resume at Fermilab. As the days dwindle down to a precious few, experi- menters and staff throughout the Laboratory scramble to get ready. The last issue of FermiNews reported on countdown activities for the Accelerator and Computing Divisions and the Facilities Engineering Services Section. For this issue the Research Division, the Physics Section and five of the 10 experiments f continued on page 6 Photo by Reidar Hahn described their down-to-the-wire preparations. "It's nip and tuck in terms of building the

103

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Continuous steel production and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

Peaslee, Kent D. (Rolla, MO); Peter, Jorg J. (McMinnville, OR); Robertson, David G. C. (Rolla, MO); Thomas, Brian G. (Champaign, IL); Zhang, Lifeng (Trondheim, NO)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Photothermal and thermo-refractive effects in high reflectivity mirrors at room and cryogenic temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing requirements in the sensitivity of interferometric measurements is a common feature of several research fields, from gravitational wave detection to quantum optics. This motivates refined studies of high reflectivity mirrors and of noise sources that are tightly related to their structure. In this work we present an experimental characterization of photothermal and thermo-refractive effects in high reflectivity mirrors, i.e., of the variations in the position of their effective reflection plane due to weak residual power absorption. The measurements are performed by modulating the impinging power in the range 10 Hz $\\div$ 100 kHz. The experimental results are compared with an expressly derived theoretical model in order to fully understand the phenomena and exploit them to extract useful effective thermo-mechanical parameters of the coating. The measurements are extended at cryogenic temperature, where most high sensitivity experiments are performed (or planned in future versions) and where characterizations of dielectric film coatings are still poor.

Alessandro Farsi; Mario Siciliani de Cumis; Francesco Marino; Francesco Marin

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Photothermal and thermo-refractive effects in high reflectivity mirrors at room and cryogenic temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing requirements in the sensitivity of interferometric measurements is a common feature of several research fields, from gravitational wave detection to quantum optics. This motivates refined studies of high reflectivity mirrors and of noise sources that are tightly related to their structure. In this work we present an experimental characterization of photothermal and thermo-refractive effects in high reflectivity mirrors, i.e., of the variations in the position of their effective reflection plane due to weak residual power absorption. The measurements are performed by modulating the impinging power in the range 10 Hz $\\div$ 100 kHz. The experimental results are compared with an expressly derived theoretical model in order to fully understand the phenomena and exploit them to extract useful effective thermo-mechanical parameters of the coating. The measurements are extended at cryogenic temperature, where most high sensitivity experiments are performed (or planned in future versions) and where charact...

Farsi, Alessandro; Marino, Francesco; Marin, Francesco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter was tested with two different reflected pulse trajectories in flowing air at ambient conditions against an orifice meter. The flowmeter was designed to be highly accurate, to require ...

Hoyle, David C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radar Reflectivity of Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the radar reflectivity factor Z and significant physical cloud parameters are studied from a dataset collected with an instrumented aircraft in non- or very weakly precipitating warm clouds. The cloud droplet populations ...

Henri Sauvageot; Jilani Omar

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ground Reflections and Green Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested that green light often observed in association with severe thunderstorms is caused by sunlight being reflected onto the cloud by green vegetation. Colorimetric observations were recorded of green-colored and blue-colored ...

Frank W. Gallagher III

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Continuous plutonium dissolution apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is concerned with continuous dissolution of metals such as plutonium. A high normality acid mixture is fed into a boiler vessel, vaporized, and subsequently condensed as a low normality acid mixture. The mixture is then conveyed to a dissolution vessel and contacted with the plutonium metal to dissolve the plutonium in the dissolution vessel, reacting therewith forming plutonium nitrate. The reaction products are then conveyed to the mixing vessel and maintained soluble by the high normality acid, with separation and removal of the desired constituent. (Official Gazette)

Meyer, F.G.; Tesitor, C.N.

1974-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Continuous chain bit development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continuous chain drill is a diamond drill bit in which the cutting surface can be replaced while the bit is still in the hole. The first prototype of the chain drill system was fabricated and tested in 1977. Problems were encountered with the mechanism used to cycle the bit. A second prototype bit was designed to circumvent these problems. An accelerated development and test program has provided field test results on Prototype II in less than 2 years. Field testing at Nevada Test Site has proven the feasibility of the downhole changing mechanism. The development and testing of this prototype are described.

St. Clair, J.A.; Duimstra, F.A.; Varnado, S.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Tight bound on coherent-state-based entanglement generation over lossy channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first stage of the hybrid quantum repeaters is entanglement generation based on transmission of pulses in coherent states over a lossy channel. Protocols to make entanglement with only one type of error are favorable for rendering subsequent entanglement distillation efficient. Here we provide the tight upper bound on performances of these protocols that is determined only by the channel loss. In addition, we show that this bound is achievable by utilizing a proposed protocol [K. Azuma, N. Sota, R. Namiki, S. K. Oezdemir, T. Yamamoto, M. Koashi, and N. Imoto, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060303(R) (2009)] composed of a simple combination of linear optical elements and photon-number-resolving detectors.

Azuma, Koji; Sota, Naoya; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

Good, R.H.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ohno continuous casting  

SciTech Connect

Production of net-shape products directly from the liquid is an attractive manufacturing route for alloys that are difficult to process or that cannot be rolled, drawn, or extruded. Developed at the Chiba Institute of Technology in Japan, the Ohno Continuous Casting (OCC) approach not only provides significant cost savings, but also has the potential to create new products. OCC process equipment includes a melting furnace, crucible, mold level-control block, cooling device, and pinch rolls. OCC is currently used to produce copper rods and wires for audio and video cables, and aluminum alloy welding rods for hard-surfacing applications. For example, Mitsui Engineering and Ship Building Co. has used OCC to produce copper tubing products with internal fins and partitions for applications such as heat exchanger tubes and induction coils.

Soda, H.; McLean, A. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Motoyasu, G.; Ohno, A. [Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nonlinear continuous feedback controllers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packet-switched communication networks such as today's Internet are built with several interconnected core and distribution packet forwarding routers and several sender and sink transport agents. In order to maintain stability and avoid congestion collapse in the network, the sources control their rate behavior and voluntarily adjust their sending rates to accommodate other sources in the network. In this thesis, we study one class of sender rate control that is modeled using continuous first-order differential equation of the sending rates. In order to adjust the rates appropriately, the network sends continuous packet-loss feedback to the sources. We study a form of closed-loop feedback congestion controllers whose rate adjustments exhibit a nonlinear form. There are three dimensions to our work in this thesis. First, we study the network optimization problem in which sources choose utilities to maximize their underlying throughput. Each sender maximizes its utility proportional to the throughput achieved. In our model, sources choose a utility function to define their level of satisfaction of the underlying resource usages. The objective of this direction is to establish the properties of source utility functions using inequality constrained bounded sets and study the functional forms of utilities against a chosen rate differential equation. Second, stability of the network and tolerance to perturbation are two essential factors that keep communication networks operational around the equilibrium point. Our objective in this part of the thesis is to analytically understand the existence of local asymptotic stability of delayed-feedback systems under homogeneous network delays. Third, we propose a novel tangential controller for a generic maximization function and study its properties using nonlinear optimization techniques. We develop the necessary theoretical background and the properties of our controller to prove that it is a better rate adaptation algorithm for logarithmic utilities compared to the well-studied proportional controllers. We establish the asymptotic local stability of our controller with upper bounds on the increase / decrease gain parameters.

Sitharaman, Sai Ganesh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? 5/17/99 Click here to start Table of Contents PPT Slide Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? Demand U.S. Propane Demand Sectors (1996) PPT Slide 1998 Propane Prices Fell with Crude Oil PPT Slide Warm Weather Behind Demand Decline 1998 Warm Weather Kept Demand Down Supply Propane Production Fell in 1998 1998 Propane Net Imports Increased Algeria Was Major Source of ‘98 Import Increase U.S. Chemical Use & Large Storage Attracts Excess Propane Petroleum & Propane Market Over Supply Average Stock Levels: Crude Market & Propane Futures Market Incentives to Build Petroleum Stocks New “Structure” or Cycle? Near-Term Future Large January Draw Did Not Remove Excess How Might Excess Stocks Decline? Near Term U.S. Propane Production

119

Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Reflection Survey Details Activities (35) Areas (22) Regions (2) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

120

Continuous Box game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The classical positional game Box was introduced by Chvátal and Erd?s in 1978 in their study of the biased connectivity game on the complete graph. Their analysis was subsequently extended by Hamidoune and Las Vergnas. The board of the Box game consists of elements of n disjoint sets (boxes), which might vary in size. The game is played by two players, Maker and Breaker. Maker claims m board elements per move whereas Breaker claims just one. Maker wins this game if and only if he claims all elements of some box by the end of the game. In this paper we introduce the game CBox, a continuous version of the Box game, where the sizes of the boxes need not be integral and in every move Maker puts a nonnegative real weight into each box, such that the weights sum up to the real number m. This new game, while closely related to the original Box game, turns out to be more amenable to analysis – we derive explicit and easy to use criteria for determining the winner in every instance of the game. Consequently, establishing a connection between CBox and Box, we also obtain applicable criteria for the Box game. 1

Dan Hefetz; Michael Krivelevich; Tibor Szabó

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Title Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2002 Authors Berdahl, Paul, Hashem...

122

Continuous production of conducting polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A device to continuously produce polypyrrole was designed, manufactured, and tested. Polypyrrole is a conducting polymer which has potential artificial muscle applications. The objective of continuous production was to ...

Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various models featuring horizontal wells with multiple induced fractures have been proposed to characterize flow behavior over time in tight gas and shale gas systems. Currently, there is little consensus regarding the effects of non-ideal fracture geometries and coupled primary-secondary fracture interactions on reservoir performance in these unconventional gas reservoirs. This thesis provides a grid construction tool to generate high-resolution unstructured meshes using Voronoi grids, which provides the flexibility required to accurately represent complex geologic domains and fractures in three dimensions. Using these Voronoi grids, the interaction between propped hydraulic fractures and secondary "stress-release" fractures were evaluated. Additionally, various primary fracture configurations were examined, where the fractures may be non-planar or non-orthogonal. For this study, a numerical model was developed to assess the potential performance of tight gas and shale gas reservoirs. These simulations utilized up to a half-million grid-blocks and consider a period of up to 3,000 years in some cases. The aim is to provide very high-definition reference numerical solutions that will exhibit virtually all flow regimes we can expect in these unconventional gas reservoirs. The simulation results are analyzed to identify production signatures and flow regimes using diagnostic plots, and these interpretations are confirmed using pressure maps where useful. The coupled primary-secondary fracture systems with the largest fracture surface areas are shown to give the highest production in the traditional "linear flow" regime (which occurs for very high conductivity vertical fracture cases). The non-ideal hydraulic fracture geometries are shown to yield progressively lower production as the angularity of these fractures increases. Hence, to design optimum fracture completions, we should endeavor to keep the fractures as orthogonal to the horizontal well as possible. This work expands the current understanding of flow behavior in fractured tight-gas and shale-gas systems and may be used to optimize fracture and completion design, to validate analytical models and to facilitate more accurate reserves estimation.

Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Anyon-Fermion Mapping and Applications to Ultracold Gases in Tight Waveguides  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi-Bose mapping method for one-dimensional Bose and Fermi gases with zero-range interactions is generalized to an anyon-fermion mapping and applied to exact solution of several models of ultracold gases with anyonic exchange symmetry in tight waveguides: anyonic Calogero-Sutherland model, anyons with point hard-core interaction (anyonic Tonks-Girardeau gas), and spin-aligned anyon gas with infinite zero-range odd-wave attractions (attractive anyonic Tonks-Girardeau, or AATG, gas). It is proved that for even N{>=}4 there are states of the AATG gas on A, with anyonic phase slips which are odd integral multiples of {pi}/(N-1), of energy lower than that of the corresponding fermionic ground state. A generalization to a spinor Fermi gas state with anyonic symmetry under purely spatial exchange enables energy lowering by the same mechanism.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

127

Soluble Models of Strongly Interacting Ultracold Gas Mixtures in Tight Waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Fermi-Bose mapping method is used to determine the exact ground states of several models of mixtures of strongly interacting ultracold gases in tight waveguides, which are generalizations of the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas (1D Bose gas with point hard cores) and fermionic Tonks-Girardeau (FTG) gas (1D spin-aligned Fermi gas with infinitely strong zero-range attractions). We detail the case of a Bose-Fermi mixture with TG boson-boson (BB) and boson-fermion (BF) interactions. Exact results are given for density profiles in a harmonic trap, single-particle density matrices, momentum distibutions, and density-density correlations. Since the ground state is highly degenerate, we analyze the splitting of the ground manifold for large but finite BB and BF repulsions.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Minguzzi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Mileux Condenses, C.N.R.S., B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France)

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Formation of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs) via Aerodynamic Drift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NASA Kepler mission has revealed an abundant class of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs). The current paradigm for planet formation suggests that small planetesimals will quickly spiral into the host star due to aerodynamic drag, preventing rocky planet formation. In contrast, we find that aerodynamic drift, when acting on an ensemble of solids, can concentrate mass at short orbital periods in gaseous disks. Sublimation fronts may further aid this process. Kepler data suggest that the innermost known planets are found near the silicate sublimation zone. STIP planets should have a wide range of volatile fractions due to aerodynamic drift and H2 dissociation-driven gas accretion. We further propose that the low mass of Mars is evidence that the Solar System was once a proto-STIP.

Boley, Aaron C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electron acceleration by a tightly focused Hermite-Gaussian beam: higher-order corrections  

SciTech Connect

Taking the TEM{sub 1,0}-mode Hermite-Gaussian (H-G) beam as a numerical calculation example, and based on the method of the perturbation series expansion, the higher-order field corrections of H-G beams are derived and used to study the electron acceleration by a tightly focused H-G beam in vacuum. For the case of the off-axis injection the field corrections to the terms of order f{sup 3} (f=1/kw{sub 0}, k and w{sub 0} being the wavenumber and waist width, respectively) are considered, and for the case of the on-axis injection the contributions of the terms of higher orders are negligible. By a suitable optimization of injection parameters the energy gain in the giga-electron-volt regime can be achieved.

Zhao Zhiguo [Department of Physics, Luoyang Normal College, Luoyang 471022 (China); Institute of Laser Physics and Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Yang Dangxiao; Lue Baida [Institute of Laser Physics and Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hybrid Monte-Carlo simulation of interacting tight-binding model of graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, results are presented of Hybrid-Monte-Carlo simulations of the tight-binding Hamiltonian of graphene, coupled to an instantaneous long-range two-body potential which is modeled by a Hubbard-Stratonovich auxiliary field. We present an investigation of the spontaneous breaking of the sublattice symmetry, which corresponds to a phase transition from a conducting to an insulating phase and which occurs when the effective fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ of the system crosses above a certain threshold $\\alpha_C$. Qualitative comparisons to earlier works on the subject (which used larger system sizes and higher statistics) are made and it is established that $\\alpha_C$ is of a plausible magnitude in our simulations. Also, we discuss differences between simulations using compact and non-compact variants of the Hubbard field and present a quantitative comparison of distinct discretization schemes of the Euclidean time-like dimension in the Fermion operator.

Dominik Smith; Lorenz von Smekal

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Discovery of a tight correlation among the prompt emission properties of long Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a correlation among three prompt emission properties of GRBs. These are the isotropic peak luminosity L_iso, the peak energy of the time-integrated prompt emission spectrum E_pk, and the ``high signal" timescale T_0.45, previously used to characterize the variability behavior of bursts. In the rest frame of the source the found correlation reads L_iso\\propto E_pk^1.62 T_0.45^-0.49. We find other strong correlations, but at the cost of increasing the number of variables, involving the variability and the isotropic energy of the prompt emission. With respect to the previous tight correlations found in GRBs the newly found correlation does not require any information from the afterglow phase of the bursts, nor any model-dependent assumption. In the popular scenario in which we are receiving beamed radiation originating in a fireball pointing at us, the found correlation preserves its form in the comoving frame. This helps to explain the small scatter of the correlation, and underlines the role of the local brightness (i.e. the brightness of the visible fraction of the fireball surface). This correlation has been found for 19 objects, and it is hard to establish if any selection bias affects it. Its connection with the prompt local brightness is promising, but a solid physical understanding is still to be found. Despite all that, we find that some properties of the correlation, which we discuss, support its true existence, and this has important implications for the GRB physics. Furthermore, it is possible to use such correlation as an accurate redshift estimator, and its tightness will allow us to use it as a tool to constrain the cosmological parameters (abridged)

C. Firmani; G. Ghisellini; V. Avila-Reese; G. Ghirlanda

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

133

A policy story of continuity and change : reflections on the Obama Administration's Metropolitan Agenda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

President Obama was sworn into office on January 20, 2009 and within the first month of his presidency, against a backdrop of staggering concerns about financial reform, energy efficiency, and the need to allocate $787 ...

Ullah, Athena Jade

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Continual Learning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continual Learning Continual Learning Continual Learning Continual Learning Workshops Continual Learning is a change initiative which is used to help develop and grow a learning culture within DOE. The purpose of Continual Learning is to improve the professional development of our federal workforce. In an effort to support this initiative, HC-20 offers 3 instructional workshops, located under additional information, to assist employees and supervisors with employee development. These workshops are full of helpful tips and tricks for identifying low cost/no cost training, creating a high-quality IDP and assist supervisors with their responsibilities with employee development. Employees and supervisor are encouraged to attend these workshops and let us (HC-20) help you as we promote a learning

136

(Continued on page 2) (Continued on page 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAY 2009 (Continued on page 2) (Continued on page 2) WWW.RSMAS.MIAMI.EDU DEAN OTIS BROWN: A LEGACY of his decades of service and dedication to the University of Miami, Brown was awarded the UM Presidents in 2003, the University of Miami Presidents Medal honors individuals for their outstanding leadership

Miami, University of

137

Why continue the GEBA project?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and subfamilies that could be useful to the DOE missions. Principal Investigators: Jonathan Eisen, DOE JGI Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why continue the GEBA project...

138

Microscale controlled continuous cell culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of metabolic and cellular activity through substrate and product interactions are highly dependent on environmental conditions and cellular metabolic state. For such experiments to be feasible, continuous ...

Lee, Kevin Shao-Kwan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Discharge lamp with reflective jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Acoustic wave propagation in cracked porous rocks and application to interpreting acoustic log data in tight formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rocks in earth's crust usually contain both pores and cracks. Typical examples include tight sandstone and shale rocks that have low porosity but contain abundant microcracks. By extending the classic Biot's poroelastic wavetheory to include the effects of cracks

Xiaoming Tang; Xuelian Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hybrid derivative-free extended Kalman filter for unknown lever arm estimation in tightly coupled DGPS/INS integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential carrier phase observations from GPS (Global Positioning System) integrated with high-rate sensor measurements, such as those from an inertial navigation system (INS) or an inertial measurement unit (IMU), in a tightly coupled approach can ... Keywords: Global positioning system (GPS), Inertial measurement unit (IMU), Kalman filter, Lever arm

Yanrui Geng; Richard Deurloo; Luisa Bastos

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ACT sup 2 project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building's performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building's performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ACT{sup 2} project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building`s performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building`s performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Spatial Convergence of Bidirectional Reflectance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of bidirectional reflectance data are presented with implications regarding the spatial scales appropriate for inferring irradiances from radiances reflected by various surface–atmosphere scenes. Multiple-angle radiance data collected in ...

John M. Davis; Stephen K. Cox

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Semantic Models for Distributed Object Reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generic formal model of distributed object reflection is proposed, that combines logical reflection with a structuring of distributed objects as nested configurations of metaobject that can control subobjects under them. The model provides mathematical ...

José Meseguer; Carolyn L. Talcott

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Advantages of Wearable Green Reflected Photoplethysmography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the efficacy of reflected-type green light photoplethysmography (green light PPG). Transmitted infrared light was used for PPG and the arterial pulse was monitored transcutaneously. The reflected PPG signal contains AC components ... Keywords: Green light, Heat stress, Infrared light, Photoplethysmography, Reflection

Yuka Maeda; Masaki Sekine; Toshiyo Tamura

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Reflective coatings for solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R&D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

Jorgensen, G.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Reflective coatings for solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

Jorgensen, G.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.3 cents from a week ago, based on the...

151

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.98 a gallon on Labor Day Monday. That's up 6.8 cents from a week ago, based...

152

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.92 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 cents from a week ago based on the...

153

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.6 cents from a week ago, based on the...

154

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 2013 Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.94 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 12 cents from a week ago, based...

155

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.98 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the...

156

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.1 cents from a week ago based on the...

157

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's down 5 12 cents from a week ago, based on the...

158

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.01 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.1 cents from a week ago, based on the...

159

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

160

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.92 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.4 cents from a week ago, based on the...

162

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down a penny from a week ago, based on the...

163

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.83 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago, based on the...

164

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

165

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4, 2013 Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.86 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.3 cents from a week ago, based...

166

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

167

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for IEA Bilateral Meetings March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, IEA Bilateral Meetings, March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

168

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For Consumer Energy Alliance February 21, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski February 21, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

169

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

170

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

171

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society April 08, 2013 | Baltimore, MD By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, Baltimore CFA Society April 08, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

172

LANL continuity of operations plan  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a premier national security research institution, delivering scientific and engineering solutions for the nation's most crucial and complex problems. Our primary responsibility is to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. LANL emphasizes worker safety, effective operational safeguards and security, and environmental stewardship, outstanding science remains the foundation of work at the Laboratory. In addition to supporting the Laboratory's core national security mission, our work advances bioscience, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, materials science, and physics disciplines. To accomplish LANL's mission, we must ensure that the Laboratory EFs continue to be performed during a continuity event, including localized acts of nature, accidents, technological or attack-related emergencies, and pandemic or epidemic events. The LANL Continuity of Operations (COOP) Plan documents the overall LANL COOP Program and provides the operational framework to implement continuity policies, requirements, and responsibilities at LANL, as required by DOE 0 150.1, Continuity Programs, May 2008. LANL must maintain its ability to perform the nation's PMEFs, which are: (1) maintain the safety and security of nuclear materials in the DOE Complex at fixed sites and in transit; (2) respond to a nuclear incident, both domestically and internationally, caused by terrorist activity, natural disaster, or accident, including mobilizing the resources to support these efforts; and (3) support the nation's energy infrastructure. This plan supports Continuity of Operations for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This plan issues LANL policy as directed by the DOE 0 150.1, Continuity Programs, and provides direction for the orderly continuation of LANL EFs for 30 days of closure or 60 days for a pandemic/epidemic event. Initiation of COOP operations may be required to support an allhazards event, including a national security emergency, major fire, catastrophic natural disaster, man-made disaster, terrorism event, or technological disaster by rendering LANL buildings, infrastructure, or Technical Areas unsafe, temporarily unusable, or inaccessible.

Senutovitch, Diane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "seismic analyses" - no indication of active/passive, reflection/refraction, etc. ---> "On the contrary, in areas with little or no volcanic activity, assumptions on the nature, size and characteristics of the source of the thermal anomaly are generally much more difficult and hypothetical. In these circumstances, some useful data can be obtained from accurate seismic analyses, together with a seismotectonic and geodynamic

174

Condenser optic with sacrificial reflective surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Employing collector optics that has a sacrificial reflective surface can significantly prolong the useful life of the collector optics and the overall performance of the condenser in which the collector optics are incorporated. The collector optics is normally subject to erosion by debris from laser plasma source of radiation. The presence of an upper sacrificial reflective surface over the underlying reflective surface effectively increases the life of the optics while relaxing the constraints on the radiation source. Spatial and temporally varying reflectivity that results from the use of the sacrificial reflective surface can be accommodated by proper condenser design.

Tichenor, Daniel A. (Castro Valley, CA); Kubiak, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Sung Hun (Sunnyvale, CA)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Definition: Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reflection Survey Seismic reflection surveys image the structure of the subsurface through the measurement of the two way travel time of reflected artificially-generated elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Seismic Reflection References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Geophysical-Prospecting-Milton-Dobrin/dp/0071004041 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reflection_Survey&oldid=598371" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

177

Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical pr...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy dependence of the optical potential of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target  

SciTech Connect

Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding energies from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical potential were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold anomaly observed in the behavior of the potential of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.

Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Niello, J. O. Fernandez [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad de San Martin, B1650BWA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Gragoata, Niteroi, R. J., 24210-340 (Brazil)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

REFLECTED LIGHT INTENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM DEFECTS ON HIGHLY REFLECTIVE SPHERES PDO 6984778, Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

A light reflection technique suitable for development into an automated surface quality certification system was investigated to determine if reflected light intensity distributions could be corre]ated with surface defect depths. Reflected laser light intensity distributions from pit and scratch defects on highly reflective spheres were studied with a commercial multi-element photodetector. It was found that the intensity distributions --Goll'lf be correlated with depths of pits and scratches in a size range of concern on highly reflective' spheres.

Klingsport, P. E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimization of density functional tight-binding and classical reactive molecular dynamics for high-throughput simulations of carbon materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon materials and nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes) are promising building blocks of nanotechnology. Potential applications include optical and electronic devices, sensors, and nano-scale machines. The multiscale character of processes related ... Keywords: ACM proceedings, BLAS, Cray XT5, LAPACK, advanced materials, density-functional tight binding, high-throughput, linear algebra, material science, molecular dynamics, multiscale-modeling, quantum chemistry, scientific libraries, scientific-computing

Jacek Jakowski; Bilel Hadri; Steven J. Stuart; Predrag Krstic; Stephan Irle; Dulma Nugawela; Sophya Garashchuk

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Feasibility of calculating petrophysical properties in tight-sand reservoirs using neural networks. Final report, October 1989-July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to determine the feasibility of using neural networks to estimate petrophysical properties in tight sand reservoirs. A second objective was to gain some experience concerning how to approach the development of a future prototype, including what should be done and what should be avoided. Gas Research Institute (GRI) focused the project on tight sands because they contain enormous gas reserves and their complicated lithology represents a challenge to log analysts. The data were supplied by GRI from two of its geographically proximate experimental wells in tight sand formations. The nets were tested in sections of those wells that were not used for training, and in two other wells, one in a geographically close but geologically unrelated formation and one in Wyoming. The feasibility testing demonstrated that the relatively simple neural networks developed have comparable accuracy with standard logging analysis estimates in wells that contributed data to the training set. Transportability of the network was tested by using core measurements in two wells in which the nets were not trained, with inconclusive results. Recommendations were made to increase the accuracy of the neural networks.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Javitz, H.S.; Park, W.; Lee, J.D.; Bergman, A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the world will require additional supplies of natural gas to meet the demand for energy. Tight gas reservoirs can be defined as reservoirs where the formation permeability is so low (flowback procedures, production strategy, and reservoir conditions. Residual polymer in the fracture can reduce the effective fracture permeability and porosity, reduce the effective fracture half-length, and limit the well productivity. Our ability to mathematically model the fundamental physical processes governing fluid recovery in hydraulic fractures in the past has been limited. In this research, fracture fluid damage mechanisms have been investigated, and mathematical models and computer codes have been developed to better characterize the cleanup process. The codes have been linked to a 3D, 3-phase simulator to model and quantify the fracture fluid cleanup process and its effect on long-term gas production performances. Then, a comprehensive systematic simulation study has been carried out by varying formation permeability, reservoir pressure, fracture length, fracture conductivity, yield stress, and pressure drawdown. On the basis of simulation results and analyses, new ways to improve fracture fluid cleanup have been provided. This new progress help engineers better understand fracture fluid cleanup, improve fracture treatment design, and increase gas recovery from tight sand reservoirs, which can be extremely important as more tight gas reservoirs are developed around the world.

Wang, Yilin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

LANL continuity of operations plan  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a premier national security research institution, delivering scientific and engineering solutions for the nation's most crucial and complex problems. Our primary responsibility is to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. LANL emphasizes worker safety, effective operational safeguards and security, and environmental stewardship, outstanding science remains the foundation of work at the Laboratory. In addition to supporting the Laboratory's core national security mission, our work advances bioscience, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, materials science, and physics disciplines. To accomplish LANL's mission, we must ensure that the Laboratory EFs continue to be performed during a continuity event, including localized acts of nature, accidents, technological or attack-related emergencies, and pandemic or epidemic events. The LANL Continuity of Operations (COOP) Plan documents the overall LANL COOP Program and provides the operational framework to implement continuity policies, requirements, and responsibilities at LANL, as required by DOE 0 150.1, Continuity Programs, May 2008. LANL must maintain its ability to perform the nation's PMEFs, which are: (1) maintain the safety and security of nuclear materials in the DOE Complex at fixed sites and in transit; (2) respond to a nuclear incident, both domestically and internationally, caused by terrorist activity, natural disaster, or accident, including mobilizing the resources to support these efforts; and (3) support the nation's energy infrastructure. This plan supports Continuity of Operations for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This plan issues LANL policy as directed by the DOE 0 150.1, Continuity Programs, and provides direction for the orderly continuation of LANL EFs for 30 days of closure or 60 days for a pandemic/epidemic event. Initiation of COOP operations may be required to support an allhazards event, including a national security emergency, major fire, catastrophic natural disaster, man-made disaster, terrorism event, or technological disaster by rendering LANL buildings, infrastructure, or Technical Areas unsafe, temporarily unusable, or inaccessible.

Senutovitch, Diane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Continuous production of polymethylpentene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas separation membranes may be prepared in a continuous manner by passing a porous support which may, if so desired, be backed by a fabric through a solution of polymethylpentene dissolved in an organic solvent such as hexane. The support member is passed through the solution while one side thereof is in contact with a roller, thereby permitting only one side of the support member to be coated with the polymer. After continuously withdrawing the support member from the bath, the solvent is allowed to evaporate and the resulting membrane is recovered.

Epperson, B.J.; Burnett, L.J.; Helm, V.D.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Photovoltaic module with light reflecting backskin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic module comprises electrically interconnected and mutually spaced photovoltaic cells that are encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant between a light-transparent front cover and a back cover, with the back cover sheet being an ionomer/nylon alloy embossed with V-shaped grooves running in at least two directions and coated with a light reflecting medium so as to provide light-reflecting facets that are aligned with the spaces between adjacent cells and oriented so as to reflect light falling in those spaces back toward said transparent front cover for further internal reflection onto the solar cells, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to the photovoltaic cells, thereby increasing the current output of the module. The internal reflector improves power output by as much as 67%.

Gonsiorawski, Ronald C. (Danvers, MA)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

190

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

191

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

192

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

193

On HVAC duct acoustical end reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duct end reflection (ER) is the apparent loss of sound power resulting from an abrupt change in a cross?sectional area of the duct. In most references

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

195

5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 99 5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring The restructuring of the natural gas ...

196

Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carlo program simulating light propagation in isotropic orTerms—Lambertian reflection, light collection, Monte Carloy-axis) and fraction specular light (right y- axis) for a

Janecek, Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reflective Coherent Spatial Light Modulator (RCSLM)  

Reflective Coherent Spatial Light Modulator (RCSLM) Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

198

Does Shareholder Voting Reflect Shareholder Preferences?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

=980422. Kamar, Ehud. 2006. “Does Shareholder Voting onDoes Shareholder Voting Reflect Shareholder Preferences?contests. The literature that does exist is methodologically

Listokin, Yair Jason

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Sandia National Laboratories Solar Reflection Panels  

Sandia National Laboratories Solar Reflection Panels HTTPS://IP.SANDIA.GOV Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia ...

200

Diesel prices continue to fall  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to fall The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.09 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Diesel prices continue to rise  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to rise The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 4.16 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly...

202

(continued on page 4) Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey (USGS). Two separate film formats were acquired, including black-and-white aerial photography Survey The tradition of systematic collection of federal aerial photography has been maintained(continued on page 4) Introduction First-time statewide coverage of vertical aerial photography

Frank, Thomas D.

203

Identification coding schemes for modulated reflectance systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An identifying coding apparatus employing modulated reflectance technology involving a base station emitting a RF signal, with a tag, located remotely from the base station, and containing at least one antenna and predetermined other passive circuit components, receiving the RF signal and reflecting back to the base station a modulated signal indicative of characteristics related to the tag.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Platts, David (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, David D. (Santa Fe, NM)

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

Data Souvenirs: Environmental psychology and reflective design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical form of technology and its relationship to the surrounding environment is an important factor in design; we argue that this is especially true in the design of reflective technology. We suggest environmental psychology theory as a tool for ... Keywords: Design, Environmental psychology, Personal reflection, Tangible interfaces

Ryan Aipperspach; Ben Hooker; Allison Woodruff

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs remain cooler than absorptive roofs and thus conserve electricity otherwise needed for air conditioning. A currently controversial aspect of solar-reflective cool roofing is the extent to which an initially high solar reflectance decreases with time. We present experimental data on the spectral absorption of deposits that accumulate on roofs, and we attribute most of the absorption to carbon soot originally produced by combustion. The deposits absorb more at short wavelengths (e.g., in the blue) than in the red and infrared, imparting a slightly yellow tinge to formerly white surfaces. The initial rate of reflectance reduction by soot accumulation is consistent with known emission rates that are due to combustion. The long-term reflectance change appears to be determined by the ability of the soot to adhere to the roof, resisting washout by rain.

Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Rose, Leanna S.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reflectance based optical fiber chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film chemical sensor undergoes changes in reflective optical properties when exposed to a chemical species. A thin metal film is deposited at the end of an optical fiber, and exposure of the thin film to the chemical species causes changes in the effective thickness of the thin film, thereby changing its reflective properties. A chemical detection system based on the thin film sensor includes a light source and an optical divider for dividing light from the light source into a first and second light path. The first light path leads to circuitry for providing a reference signal. The thin film chemical sensor receives light from the second light path, and a photoelectric detector detects light reflected from the chemical sensor and provides an electrical signal representative of the reflected light. Circuitry is provided for comparing the reference signal with the reflected light signal, thereby providing a measurement signal indicative of the presence of the chemical species. 5 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Pfeifer, K.B.; Ricco, A.J.

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

Best Practices for Continuing Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-HDBK-1118-99 Reaffirmed January 2014 Superseding DOE-STD-1060-93 February 1993 DOE HANDBOOK BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINUING TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE HDBK-1118-99 Errata January 2014 Table of Changes Page/Section Change Page 0 Best Practices for Continuing Training Page i/Section 2

209

APPROVAL TO CONTINUE SPONSORSHIP OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition Competition APPROVAL TO CONTINUE SPONSORSHIP OF THE_[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]___ AS A FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER The _[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]_ is a Department of Energy (DOE) Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) managed and operated by _[insert the name of the contractor]_ under DOE Contract _[insert contract number]_. The current contract, which serves as the sponsoring agreement, expires [insert date]. _[insert one or two sentences briefly describing the laboratory/site/facility mission]_. Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 35.017-4 provides for the Head of the sponsoring Agency to approve the continuance of the sponsorship of the FFRDC.

210

U-043: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for HP version 14.x Reflection for UNIX and OpenVMS version 14.x Reflection for ReGIS Graphics version 14.x Reflection for IBM version 14.x Reflection X version 14.x ABSTRACT: A...

211

Lecture 2227 Continuous Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-x/100 dx = -e-x/100 100 0 = 1 - e-1 = .632 text typo Example 3 (Light Bulb): The lifetime X, in hours, of a certain kind of light bulb is a continuous random variable with density f(x) = 1500 x2 I(1500,) Check = 1 4 = p Let B denote the number of failures before 2000 hours among 5 light bulbs. Then P(B 1) = P

Scholz, Fritz

212

Lecture 2227 Continuous Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) = 100 0 1 100 e-x/100 dx = -e-x/100 100 0 = 1 - e-1 = .632 text typo Example 3 (Light Bulb): The lifetime X, in hours, of a certain kind of light bulb is a continuous random variable with density f 2000 1500 = 1 - 3 4 = 1 4 = p Let B denote the number of failures before 2000 hours among 5 light bulbs

Scholz, Fritz

213

Microsensors for Continuous Emission Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous emission monitors have evolved during the last fifteen years to include smaller and more compact units. The trend in miniaturizing detectors, as well as all electronic components, is the focus of this report. Micro- sensors, miniature spectrometers, and nano-sized sensors are only a few of the developments that are currently being incorporated into gas sensing instruments by industrial laboratories, research institutes and universities. This report focuses on the use of miniaturized sensors an...

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment,caverns involved in CAES include stability, air tightness, acceptable surface subsidence, and (later on) an environmentally safe decommissioning and abandonment [

Kim, H.-M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

(OAK/B204) A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI

Hiroshi Takahashi; Upendra Rohatgi; T.J. Downar

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pantex continues community outreach | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex continues community outreach Pantex continues community outreach Posted By Office of...

219

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small number of analytical models and published numerical studies there is currently little consensus regarding the large-scale flow behavior over time in such systems. The purpose of this work is to construct a fit-for-purpose numerical simulator which will account for a variety of production features pertinent to these systems, and to use this model to study the effects of various parameters on flow behavior. Specific features examined in this work include hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, multiple porosity and permeability fields, desorption, and micro-scale flow effects. The theoretical basis of the model is described in Chapter I, along with a validation of the model. We employ the numerical simulator to examine various tight gas and shale gas systems and to illustrate and define the various flow regimes which progressively occur over time. We visualize the flow regimes using both specialized plots of rate and pressure functions, as well as high-resolution maps of pressure distributions. The results of this study are described in Chapter II. We use pressure maps to illustrate the initial linear flow into the hydraulic fractures in a tight gas system, transitioning to compound formation linear flow, and then into elliptical flow. We show that flow behavior is dominated by the fracture configuration due to the extremely low permeability of shale. We also explore the possible effect of microscale flow effects on gas effective permeability and subsequent gas species fractionation. We examine the interaction of sorptive diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. We show that microscale porous media can result in a compositional shift in produced gas concentration without the presence of adsorbed gas. The development and implementation of the micro-flow model is documented in Chapter III. This work expands our understanding of flow behavior in tight gas and shale gas systems, where such an understanding may ultimately be used to estimate reservoir properties and reserves in these types of reservoirs.

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Inverse Transformation Optics and Reflection Analysis for Two-Dimensional Finite Embedded Coordinate Transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse transformation optics is introduced, and used to calculate the boundary reflection of a two-dimensional (2D) finite embedded coordinate transformation which is discontinuous at the boundary. For an electromagnetic excitation of particular polarization, many pairs of original medium (in a virtual space) and transformation function can give exactly the same anisotropic medium through a conventional procedure of transformation optics. Non-uniqueness of these pairs is then exploited for the analysis and calculation of the boundary reflection. The reflection at the boundary of the anisotropic transformation medium (associated with vacuum in the virtual space) is converted to the simple reflection between two isotropic media in a virtual space by a new transformation continuous at the boundary. A necessary condition for reflectionless boundary of finite embedded coordinate transformation is found as a special case. The theory is verified numerically with the finite element method.

Zhang, Pu; He, Sailing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance  

SciTech Connect

Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 ?m, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

B. R. Marshall

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Continuous Precipitation of Ceria Nanoparticles from a Continuous Flow Micromixer  

SciTech Connect

Cerium oxide nanoparticles were continuously precipitated from a solution of cerium(III) nitrate and ammonium hydroxide using a micro-scale T-mixer. Findings show that the method of mixing is important in the ceria precipitation process. In batch mixing and deposition, disintegration and agglomeration dominates the deposited film. In T-mixing and deposition, more uniform nanorod particles are attainable. In addition, it was found that the micromixing approach reduced the exposure of the Ce(OH)3 precipates to oxygen, yielding hydroxide precipates in place of CeO2 precipitates. Advantages of the micro-scale T-mixing approach include shorter mixing times, better control of nanoparticle shape and less agglomeration.

Tseng, Chih Heng; Paul, Brian; Chang, Chih-hung; Engelhard, Mark H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Proof Synthesis and Reflection for Linear Arithmetic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents detailed implementations of quantifier elimination for both integer and real linear arithmetic for theorem provers. The underlying algorithms are those by Cooper (for Z) and by Ferrante and Rackoff ... Keywords: Linear arithmetic, Proof synthesis, Reflection

Amine Chaieb; Tobias Nipkow

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Diffuse reflectance imaging with astronomical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse objects generally tell us little about the surrounding lighting, since the radiance they reflect blurs together incident lighting from many directions. In this paper we discuss how occlusion geometry can help invert ...

Hasinoff, Samuel W.

225

Solar Reflection Panels - Energy Innovation Portal  

Patent 7,077,532: Solar reflection panels A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front ...

226

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Butler, PA); Turner, Brian (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect

Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

Nguyen, Khanh Bao

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Competition] Contract Competition] AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF THE_[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]___ UNDER A MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT The _[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]_ is currently managed and operated by _[insert the name of the contractor]_ for the Department of Energy under a Management and Operating (M&O) contract as defined in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 17.6. The current contract and the determination authorizing the M&O form of contract expire on _[insert the expiration date]_. _[In one or two sentences, briefly describe the laboratory/site/facility mission]_. A new contract is currently being procured by the DOE _[insert DOE office name]_, under Request for Proposals (RFP) number _[insert RFP number]_. The resultant

230

AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-competitive Extension] Non-competitive Extension] AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF THE_[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]___ UNDER A MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT The _[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]_ is currently managed and operated by _[insert the name of the contractor]_ for the Department of Energy under DOE contract _[insert contract number]._This contract is a Management and Operating (M&O) contract as defined in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 17.6. The current contract and the determination authorizing the M&O form of contract expire on _[insert the expiration date]_. A non-competitive extension is currently being pursued in accordance with FAR 6.301. [In one or two sentences, briefly describe the

231

Global warming continues in 1989  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen eight-nine ranks as one of the warmest years on record despite the chill of unusually cool water in the tropical Pacific. The continued robustness of the warming trend that began in the mid-1970s lends support to claims that an intensifying greenhouse effect is behind it all, although that case has not yet been made definitively. Even at the current rate of global warming it will take another 10 years or so to be confident that the greenhouse effect is with us. Although the global warming trend is consistent with an increasing contribution by the greenhouse effect, direct signs that the greenhouse effect is intensifying are still hard to come by in the temperature record. Greenhouse models agree that if that is happening, the temperature increase should be most pronounced around the Arctic. Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Siberia warmed sharply in the 1980s, but the region from eastern Canada through Greenland and into Scandinavia cooled markedly.

Kerr, R.A.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here: DOE-ID Home > COOP Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) Call-In Number: 1-208-526-COOP (2667) or 1-877-DOE-DOE1 (1-877-363-3631) Wait for recording to start then Dial 382: If you are directed or forced to evacuate your current location to an alternate site, please contact us as soon as possible to advise us that you are safe and with a means of contacting you. This toll free or local number can be used by employees or their families to report their whereabouts or the whereabouts of another DOE-ID employee. Email Check-In: In addition to the call-in number, employees and families can report their status via a email check-in system. To access the email please click here. The email based check in system should only be used by DOE ID Employees.

233

Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones. References E. L. Majer (2003) 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary

234

Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

Berdahl, P.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Catalyst immobilization techniques for continuous flow synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processes are ubiquitous in both research and industrial settings. As continuous flow processes continue to gain traction in research labs and fine and pharmaceutical chemical processes, new opportunities exist ...

Nagy, Kevin David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Continuity properties of fuzzy set multifunctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study continuity properties in Hausdorff topology for different special set multifunctions. Keywords: exhaustive, increasing/decreasing convergent, multi(sub)measure, order continuity, probability, regular, set multifunction

Alina Gavrilut; Anca Croitoru; Nikos E. Mastorakis

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The discrete versus continuous controversy in physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a sample of the deep and multiple interplay between discrete and continuous behaviours and the corresponding modellings in physics. The aim of this overview is to show that discrete and continuous features coexist in any natural phenomenon, ...

Annick Lesne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Continuous Flow Multi-Step Organic Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using continuous flow techniques for multi-step synthesis enables multiple reaction steps to be combined into a single continuous operation. In this mini-review we discuss the current state of the art in this field and ...

Webb, Damien

240

Reflection Survey (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Seismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto and Daley. The project objective includes the development and application of active seismic methods for improved understanding of the subsurface structure, faults, fractures lithology, and fluid paths in geothermal reservoirs. While the objective of the work previous to FY2003 was concerned with the detection and location of faults and fractures based on an existing 3-D seismic data set collected at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir, the current work was aimed at investigating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Prisms with total internal reflection as solar reflectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved reflective wall for radiant energy collection and concentration devices is provided. The wall is comprised of a plurality of prisms whose frontal faces are adjacent and which reflect the desired radiation by total internal reflection.

Rabl, Arnulf (Downers Grove, IL); Rabl, Veronika (Downers Grove, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Robust Estimator of Rainfall Rate Using Differential Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional estimator of rainfall rate using reflectivity factor and differential reflectivity ZDR becomes unstable when the measured values of ZDR are small due to measurement errors. An alternate estimator of rainfall rate using reflectivity ...

Eugenio Gorgucca; Gianfranco Scarchilli; V. Chandrasekar

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement Presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continuous Improvement presentation More Documents & Publications 2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review -...

244

Resources and Training for Continuous Program Improvement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Continuous Improvement of Academic Programs (and Satisfying ABET Along ...

245

Continuing Management Reform | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Continuing Management Reform | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

246

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Title Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5022E Year...

247

Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions Title Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and...

248

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces,transfer at the siding surface. Direct solar radiation tosiding, reflected solar radiation from nearby surfaces,

Hart, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

250

Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP)...

251

Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

252

Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 .mu.m.

Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Gerouki, Alexandra (Medford, MA); Liu, Te-Yang (Arlington, MA); Goldner, Mark A. (Cambridge, MA); Haas, Terry E. (Southborough, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Land Surface Reflectance: A Possible Earth Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are in magenta, water bodies are outlined in white. MODIS Surface Reflectance South Africa From: E. Vermote, UMD correction (low, medium, high) ­ cloud and cloud shadow ­ snow flag ­ land/water flag · Supplemental information ­ Viewing geometry (view and solar zenith and azimuth angles) ­ Geolocation (lat

254

Dynamic shading enhancement for reflectance transformation imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a set of dynamic shading enhancement techniques for improving the perception of details, features, and overall shape characteristics from images created with Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) techniques. Selection of these perceptual ... Keywords: Visualization, cultural heritage shading enhancement, illumination, image processing

Gianpaolo Palma; Massimiliano Corsini; Paolo Cignoni; Roberto Scopigno; Mark Mudge

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Heat reflecting tape for thermoelectric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Threads are interlaced with thermoelectric wires to provide a woven cloth in tape form, there being an intermediate layer of heat radiation reflecting material (e.g., aluminum foil) insulated electrically from said wires, which are of opposite thermoelectric polarity and connected as a plurality of thermocouples.

Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Reflected Solar Radiances from Regional Scale Scenes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of bi-directional reflectance models is presented for various atmospheric scene types. The models were composited from data collected from an aircraft platform in May-July 1979 during Summer MONEX. The space scale of the composited models ...

John M. Davis; Stephen K. Cox

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Continuity Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Continuity Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Continuity Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Continuity Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Continuity Program Continuity Program NNSA develops and implements the policy of the United States to maintain a comprehensive and effective continuity capability composed of an

259

In-situ continuous water monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Characterization of background reflectivity for MEDUSA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DARPA MEDUSA program goal is to detect, locate, and identify electro-optical threats in the vicinity of a moving platform. Laser sensing will be employed to find these threats by looking for anomalous reflections from threat sensors. However, the reflectivity variability (clutter) in both natural and manmade backgrounds will inherently limit target detection levels. In parallel with advanced component development by several aerospace contractors, a study of this clutter limitation was initiated in the long-wave (LW) and midwave (MW) infrared spectral regions to properly drive system design parameters. The analysis of clutter and associated limits on detection has been a major component of LANL efforts in laser remote sensing for non-proliferation. LANL is now analyzing existing data and conducting additional selected measurements in both the LWIR (9 and 10.6 pm) and MWIR (4.6 pm) in support of the DARPA program to increase our understanding of these clutter limitations and, thereby aid in the design and development of the MEDUSA system. The status of the LANL effort will be discussed. A variety of different natural and manmade target types have been investigated. Target scenes range from relatively low clutter sites typical of a southwestern desert to higher clutter downtown urban sites. Images are created by conducting raster scans across a scene interest. These images are then analyzed using data clustering techniques (e g K-means) to identify regions within the scene that contain similar reflectivity profiles. Data will be presented illustrating the reflectivity variability among different samples of the same target type, Le. within the same cluster, and among different data clusters. In general, it is found that the variability of reflectivities among similar targets is well represented by a log-normal distribution. Furthermore, manmade target tend to have higher reflectivities and more variability than natural targets. The implications of this observation for MEDUSA systems designed to locate and identify threat sensors will be discussed. The implications for chemical sensing applications will also be addressed.

Oldenborg, R. C. (Richard C.); Tiee, J. J. (Joe J.); Foy, B. R. (Bernard R.); Petrin, R. R. (Roger R.); Wilson, C. W. (Carl W.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Milwaukee Installer Reflects on His Career In Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interested in joining America's solar workforce? One Milwaukee solar installer shares his career reflections and advice.

262

U.S. Reflects World Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: U.S. crude oil inventories reflect the world situation. U.S. inventories were drawn down in 1999 as world demand exceeded world supply of crude oil as OPEC cut back on production. Low crude oil inventories go hand in hand with low product inventories. Product inventories were also drawn down to help meet demand, as was seen with gasoline this Spring. The rise in crude oil inventories earlier this year, while indicating an improvement in the market balance, appears to be short-lived, just as we had predicted a few months ago. Looking at U.S. crude stock levels in April and May can be misleading, since increases then were more reflective of the surge in WTI and U.S. product prices in the 1st quarter. With U.S. crude oil stocks drawn down by more than 20 million barrels from

263

Modeling the effects of reflective roofing  

SciTech Connect

Roofing materials which are highly reflective to sunlight are currently being developed. Reflective roofing is an effective summertime energy saver in warm and sunny climates. It has been demonstrated to save up to 40% of the energy needed to cool a building during the summer months. Buildings without air conditioning can reduce their indoor temperatures and improve occupant comfort during the summer if highly reflective roofing materials are used. But there are questions about the tradeoff between summer energy savings and extra wintertime energy use due to reduced heat collection by the roof. These questions are being answered by simulating buildings in various climates using the DOE-2 program (version 2.1E). Unfortunately, DOE-2 does not accurately model radiative, convective and conductive processes in the roof-attic. Radiative heat transfer from the underside of a reflective roof is much smaller than that of a roof which absorbs heat from sunlight, and must be accounted for in the building energy model. Convection correlations for the attic and the roof surface must be fine tuned. An equation to model the insulation`s conductivity dependence on temperature must also be added. A function was written to incorporate the attic heat transfer processes into the DOE-2 building energy simulation. This function adds radiative, convective and conductive equations to the energy balance of the roof. Results of the enhanced DOE-2 model were compared to measured data collected from a school bungalow in a Sacramento Municipal Utility District monitoring project, with particular attention paid to the year-round energy effects.

Gartland, L.M.; Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

V-022: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities 2: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities V-022: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities November 13, 2012 - 1:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Reflection X 2011 Reflection Suite for X 2011 Reflection for Secure IT Server for Windows Reflection for Secure IT Client and Server for UNIX ABSTRACT: Security issues related to Reflection PKI Services Manager REFERENCE LINKS: PKI Services Manager Technical Note 2560 Secunia Advisory SA51256 CVE-2012-0551 CVE-2012-1711 CVE-2012-1713 CVE-2012-1716 CVE-2012-1717 CVE-2012-1718 CVE-2012-1719 CVE-2012-1720 CVE-2012-1721 CVE-2012-1722 CVE-2012-1723 CVE-2012-1724 CVE-2012-1725 CVE-2012-1726 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Attachmate has acknowledged multiple vulnerabilities in some Reflection

268

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

269

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

270

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

271

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

272

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

273

Reflection of Hydrostatic Gravity Waves in a Stratified Shear Flow. Part II: Application to Downslope Surface Windstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of continuous partial reflection of hydrostatic gravity waves, developed in Part I, is applied to the Klemp and Lilly model of downslope surface windstorms. It is shown how the magnitude and the location of the downslope winds both depend ...

William Blumen; Craig S. Hartsough

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Continued fraction as a discrete nonlinear transform  

SciTech Connect

The connection between a Taylor series and a continued fraction involves a nonlinear relation between the Taylor coefficients [l brace][ital a][sub [ital n

Bender, C.M. (Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)); Milton, K.A. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Continuous Heating Dissolution Diagrams of Aluminum Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method developed by Milkereit et al. [Milkereit et al. 2009] for quenching experiments can be used, to establish continuous heating dissolution diagrams.

276

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning. San Francisco, CA. 17.Commercial Buildings Commissioning, LBNL- 56637, Nov. 2004.Automated Continuous Commissioning Tool GUI Screenshots from

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE O 150.1, Continuity Programs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order provides requirements and responsibilities to ensure that the Department is ready to respond promptly, efficiently, and effectively to a continuity ...

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Measured energy savings from the application of reflective roofsin 2 small non-residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Energy use and environmental parameters were monitored in two small (14.9 m{sup 2}) non-residential buildings during the summer of 2000. The buildings were initially monitored for about 1 1/2 months to establish a base condition. The roofs of the buildings were then painted with a white coating and the monitoring was continued. The original solar reflectivities of the roofs were about 26%; after the application of roof coatings the reflectivities increased to about 72%. The monitored electricity savings were about 0.5kWh per day (33 Wh/m2 per day). The estimated annual savings are about 125kWh per year (8.4 kWh/m2); at a cost of $0.1/kWh, savings are about $0.86/m2 per year. Obviously, it costs significantly more than this amount to coat the roofs with reflective coating, particularly because of the remote locations of these buildings. However, since the prefabricated roofs are already painted green at the factory, painting them a white (reflective) color would bring no additional cost. Hence, a reflective roof saves energy at no incremental cost.

Akbari, Hashem

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Pantex continues community outreach | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

continues community outreach | National Nuclear Security continues community outreach | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex continues community outreach Pantex continues community outreach Posted By Office of Public Affairs Pantexans showed their community spirit last week when employees, along with their families and friends, volunteered their time at two local

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reflection and Transmission for Conformal Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider conformal defects joining two conformal field theories along a line. We define two new quantities associated to such defects in terms of expectation values of the stress tensors and we propose them as measures of the reflectivity and transmissivity of the defect. Their properties are investigated and they are computed in a number of examples. We obtain a complete answer for all defects in the Ising model and between certain pairs of minimal models. In the case of two conformal field theories with an enhanced symmetry we restrict ourselves to non-trivial defects that can be obtained by a coset construction.

Thomas Quella; Ingo Runkel; Gerard M. T. Watts

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A replaceable reflective film for solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 3M Company manufactures a silvered acrylic film called ECP-305 that is regarded as the preferred reflective film for use on stretched-membrane heliostats. However, ECP-305 will degrade in time, due to both corrosion of the silver layer and delamination at the film's silver-to-acrylic interface, and will eventually need to be replaced. 3M uses a very aggressive adhesive on this film, and once it is laminated, replacement is very difficult. The purpose of this investigation was the development of a replaceable reflector, a reflective film that can be easily removed and replaced. A replaceable reflector was successfully configured by laminating ECP-305 to the top surface of a smooth, dimensionally stable polymer film, with a removable adhesive applied to the underside of the polymer film. Several stages of screening and testing led to the selection of a 0.010-inch thick polycarbonate (GE 8030) as the best polymer film and a medium tack tape (3M Y-9425) was selected as the best removable adhesive. To demonstrate the feasibility of the replaceable reflector concept and to provide a real-time field test, the chosen construction was successfully applied to the 50-m{sup 2} SKI heliostat at the Central Receiver Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. 4 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reflection-Based Python-C++ Bindings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Python is a flexible, powerful, high-level language with excellent interactive and introspective capabilities and a very clean syntax. As such, it can be a very effective tool for driving physics analysis. Python is designed to be extensible in low-level C-like languages, and its use as a scientific steering language has become quite widespread. To this end, existing and custom-written C or C++ libraries are bound to the Python environment as so-called extension modules. A number of tools for easing the process of creating such bindings exist, such as SWIG and Boost. Python. Yet, the process still requires a considerable amount of effort and expertise. The C++ language has few built-in introspective capabilities, but tools such as LCGDict and CINT add this by providing so-called dictionaries: libraries that contain information about the names, entry points, argument types, etc. of other libraries. The reflection information from these dictionaries can be used for the creation of bindings and so the process can be fully automated, as dictionaries are already provided for many end-user libraries for other purposes, such as object persistency. PyLCGDict is a Python extension module that uses LCG dictionaries, as PyROOT uses CINT reflection information, to allow /cwPython users to access C++ libraries with essentially no preparation on the users' behalf. In addition, and in a similar way, PyROOT gives ROOT users access to Python libraries.

Generowicz, Jacek; Lavrijsen, Wim T.L.P.; Marino, Massimo; Mato, Pere

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS ENGINEERING UNIT (PEU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0092 UC-61 ORNIA LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSLBL~l0092 LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSof Energy LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS

Figueroa, Carlos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Satellite-Observed Reflectance of Snow and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of snow and cloud cover on bidirectional reflectance were examined using visible radiation (0.5–0.7 ?m) data measured by NOAA polar orbiting satellites between June 1974 and February 1978. Reflectances resulting from different cloud/...

Alan Robock; Dale Kaiser

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Narrowband to Broadband Conversion with Spatially Autocorrelated Reflectance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for estimating broadband reflectance from Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) narrowband reflectances in channel 1 and 2 is developed. The data used are simultaneous and coincident narrowband and broadband ...

Zhanqing Li; H. G. Leighton

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

RefaFlex: safer refactorings for reflective Java programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If programs access types and members through reflection, refactoring tools cannot guarantee that refactorings on those programs are behavior preserving. Refactoring approaches for highly reflective languages like Smalltalk therefore check behavior preservation ...

Andreas Thies; Eric Bodden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Reflected Fluxes for Broken Clouds over a Lambertian Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for broken cloudiness (i.e., nonplane parallel) as a function of cloud cover, cloud optical depth, solar zenith angle and surface albedo. These calculations extend previous results for broken cloud reflected fluxes ...

Ronald M. Welch; Bruce A. Wielicki

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reconstruction of shape and reflectance properties based on visual hull  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method based on Visual Hull is proposed for simultaneously recovering an object's shape and its reflectance properties from multiple images. Here, the reflectance properties are described by the Ward BRDF model. Firstly, the shape represented by voxels ...

Zuoyong Zheng; Lizhuang Ma; Zhong Li; Zhihua Chen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Low-Latitude Reflection of Rossby Wave Trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear reflection of an isolated Rossby wave train at a low-latitude wave-breaking region is contrasted with the more familiar longitudinally periodic case. General theoretical arguments for nonlinear reflection based on absorptivity ...

G. Brunet; P. H. Haynes

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

What is Continual Learning? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What is Continual Learning? What is Continual Learning? What is Continual Learning? November 25, 2013 - 3:56pm Addthis The purpose of Continual Learning is to improve the professional development of the federal workforce within the Department of Energy. In an effort to support this initiative, HC-20 offers 3 instructional workshops to assist employees and supervisors with employee development. These workshops are full of helpful tips and tricks for identifying low cost/no cost training, creating a high-quality IDP and assist supervisors with their responsibilities with employee development. The workshops will be offered either via adobe connect or classroom. Employees and supervisor are encouraged to attend these workshops and let us (HC-20) help you as we promote a learning culture.

294

Method for the continuous production of hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

Getty, John Paul (Knoxville, TN); Orr, Mark T. (Kingsport, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Continuous flow separation techniques for microchemical synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performing multistep microchemical synthesis requires many techniques from combining micromixers in series to the development of continuous microfluidic separation tools. Safety, high heat and mass transfer rates, and cost ...

Kralj, Jason G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Gasoline prices continue to decrease (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, 2013 Gasoline prices continue to decrease (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.65 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 12 cents from a week...

297

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline decreased for the second week in a row to 3.71 a gallon on Monday. That's down...

298

Gasoline prices continue to rise (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to rise (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to 3.67 a gallon on Monday. That's up 7 cents from a week ago, based on the...

299

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.61 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.7 cents from a week ago, based on...

300

Diesel prices continue to decrease nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.95 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Magnetically enhanced centrifugation for continuous biopharmaceutical processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective separation and purification of biopharmaceutical products from the media in which they are produced continues to be a challenging task. Such processes usually involve multiple steps and the overall product loss ...

Chen, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Method and apparatus for continuous annular electrochromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Separation of complex mixtures and solutions can be carried out using a method and apparatus for continuous annular electrochromatography. Solutes are diverted radially by an imposed electrical field as they move downward in a rotating chromatographic column.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Scheme for Continuous Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major revisions to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL) continuous data-assimilation system have been implemented and tested. Shortcomings noted during the original processing of data from FGGE [First GARP (Global Atmospheric ...

W. F. Stern; J. J. Ploshay

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

More on the term ŤFission? continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

continues to work in the same field that Bill Arnold worked in for so many years, photosynthesis. Eli said that, "Bill discovered the electronic nature of energy transfer in...

306

Solitons in a Continuously Stratified Equatorial Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial soliton studies of Boyd are extended to include the effects of continuous vertical stratification. We use vertical profiles of density measured in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and an idealized profile.

Hal G. Marshall; John P. Boyd

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA projections for carbon dioxide emissions reflect changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... The lowered projections reflect both market and policy developments that have reduced recent and projected ...

308

Oxide Multilayer Thermal Radiation Energy Reflection EBCs: Effect ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with thermal radiation energy reflection have been developed recently. The EBCs utilize interaction between ...

309

The Case for Continuing RHIC Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Drafted by Steve Vigdor Revised with extensive feedback from RHIC user and support community 9/2/2012 The Case for Continuing RHIC Operations 1 The Case for Continuing RHIC Operations Table of Contents 1. The Case in a Nutshell ........................................................................................................................... 2 2. Hot QCD Matter: RHIC's Intellectual Challenges and Greatest Hits To Date ....................................... 4 3. Recent Breakthroughs and RHIC's Versatility Inform the Path Forward .............................................. 5 4. Unanticipated Intellectual Connections ............................................................................................. 16 5. Cold QCD Matter Studies at RHIC ....................................................................................................... 18

310

A method and apparatus for continuous electrophoresis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for conducting continuous separation of substances by electrophoresis are disclosed. The process involves electrophoretic separation combined with couette flow in a thin volume defined by opposing surfaces. By alternating the polarity of the applied potential and producing reciprocating short rotations of at least on of the surfaces relative to the other, small increments of separation accumulate to cause substantial, useful segregation of electrophoretically separable components in a continuous flow system.

Watson, J.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A method and apparatus for continuous electrophoresis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for conducting continuous separation of substances by electrophoresis are disclosed. The process involves electrophoretic separation combined with couette flow in a thin volume defined by opposing surfaces. By alternating the polarity of the applied potential and producing reciprocating short rotations of at least on of the surfaces relative to the other, small increments of separation accumulate to cause substantial, useful segregation of electrophoretically separable components in a continuous flow system.

Watson, J.S.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Autonomous recovery from hostile code insertion using distributed reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a hostile environment, an autonomous cognitive system requires a reflective capability to detect problems in its own operation and recover from them without external intervention. We present an architecture in which reflection is distributed so that ... Keywords: Anomaly, Immune systems, Meta-level, Quality-monitoring, Reflection, Self-repair

Catriona M Kennedy; Aaron Sloman

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reflection and transmission at dimensional boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein compactification of a higher dimensional spacetime may give rise to an effective 4d spacetime with distinct domains having different sizes of the extra dimensions. The domains are separated by domain walls generated by the extra dimensional scale factor. The scattering of electromagnetic and massive particle waves at such boundaries is examined here for models without warping or branes. We consider the limits corresponding to thin (thick) domain walls, i.e., limits where wavelengths are large (small) in comparison to wall thickness. We also obtain numerical solutions for a wall of arbitrary thickness and extract the reflection and transmission coefficients as functions of frequency. Results are obtained which qualitatively resemble those for electroweak domain walls and other "ordinary" domain walls for 4d theories.

Nelson De Leon; John Morris

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Effect of Mean and Differential Attenuation on the Precision and Accuracy of the Estimates of Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error propagation analysis is applied to evaluate the effects of correcting horizontal and differential attenuation on the precision of the estimates of reflectivity and differential reflectivity. The analysis shows that the loss of precision on ...

Enrico Torlaschi; Isztar Zawadzki

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

MS&T '04 Volume 2: Continuous Casting Fundamentals, Engineered  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous Casting Fundamentals I – Initial Solidification and Interfacial .... Continuous Casting Fundamentals II – Mold Fluid Flow and Water Spray Cooling.

316

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

317

OPEC 1991 results reflect hard times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that low crude oil prices and economic tough times in industrial countries cause a lean 1991 for members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. OPEC's 1991 annual report the member countries reported an overall loss of $12 billion in 1991 on oil revenues that fell 16.2%. Iraq and Kuwait were not included because of their unusual circumstances in the wake of the Persian Gulf war. Reduced oil revenues reflected a slide to $18.66/bbl in 1991 from $22.26/bbl in 1990 for the average price of OPEC basket crudes. As of last June 5 OPEC's basket crude price has averaged only $17.42/bbl this year, OPEC News Agency (Opecna) reported. First quarter 1992 prices averaged $16.77/bbl, compared wit $19.31/bbl in fourth quarter 1991. The average price jumped 52 cent/bbl the first week in June this year to $19.93/bbl, bouyed by Saudi Arabia's move at the end of May to shift its policy from price moderation to one in favor of higher prices, Opecna the. OPEC members increased production 1% in 1991 to an average 23.28 million b/d in spite of negligible production from Iraq and Kuwait and reduced production from Qatar.

Not Available

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Action principle for continuous quantum measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a stochastic path integral formalism for continuous quantum measurement that enables the analysis of rare events using action methods. By doubling the quantum state space to a canonical phase space, we can write the joint probability density function of measurement outcomes and quantum state trajectories as a phase space path integral. Extremizing this action produces the most-likely paths with boundary conditions defined by preselected and postselected states as solutions to a set of ordinary differential equations. As an application, we analyze continuous qubit measurement in detail and examine the structure of a quantum jump in the Zeno measurement regime.

A. Chantasri; J. Dressel; A. N. Jordan

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

CONTINUOUS ANALYZER UTILIZING BOILING POINT DETERMINATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is designed for continuously determining the boiling point of a mixture of liquids. The device comprises a distillation chamber for boiling a liquid; outlet conduit means for maintaining the liquid contents of said chamber at a constant level; a reflux condenser mounted above said distillation chamber; means for continuously introducing an incoming liquid sample into said reflux condenser and into intimate contact with vapors refluxing within said condenser; and means for measuring the temperature of the liquid flowing through said distillation chamber. (AEC)

Pappas, W.S.

1963-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Quantum Particle Undergoing Continuous Observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic model for the continuous nondemolition ohservation of the position of a quantum particle in a potential field and a boson reservoir is given. lt is shown that any Gaussian wave function evolving according to the posterior wave equation with a quadratic potential collapses to a Gaussian wave packet given by the stationary solution of this equation.

V. P. Belavkin; P. Staszewski

2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Continuous Emission Monitoring System Procurement Specification Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current regulatory requirements mandate the use of continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) on many new gas turbine power generation units. Retrofit CEMS for older units may also be needed. These guidelines provide a detailed methodology for specifying CEMS for purchase and installation.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Emergency Response, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Response, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery at UCAR Presented by Stephen Sadler the "university" system ·Open Campus ·Public Access-Mesa Lab #12;Emergency Response, Disaster Recovery Issues Response ·Install backup power #12;Curtailed Public Access if Necessary (3 times since 2000

324

A framework for business continuity management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An enterprise is exposed to risks-such as acts of terrorism, natural disasters and utility failure-which may disrupt operations, disaffect customers and compromise business credibility and revenue streams. Risk can also be introduced to an enterprise ... Keywords: Business continuity management, Information strategy, Risk management

Forbes Gibb; Steven Buchanan

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Information gain in quantum continual measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by works on information transmission through quantum channels, we propose the use of a couple of mutual entropies to quantify the efficiency of continual measurement schemes in extracting information on the measured quantum system. Properties of these measures of information are studied and bounds on them are derived.

Albert Barchielli; Giancarlo Lupieri

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rule, were published by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) on February 20, 2003. PurposeApril 2005 Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA) SECURITY RULE By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory

327

CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION Business and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Professional Coaching for Life and Work Certificate Program Dec. 6: Tues., 5:30-7 p.m. No Charge. Enroll Studies Program Jan. 18: Wed., 5:30-7 p.m. No Charge. Enroll in section 113OPE200. OR April 4: Wed., 5., Sacramento. FREE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM INFO SESSIONS Find out how continuing education through UC Davis

Hammock, Bruce D.

328

New Developments in the Continuous Renormalization Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last several years, there has been a resurgence of interest in using non-perturbative approximation methods based on Wilson's continuous renormalization group. In this lecture, I review progress particularly in the past year, concentrating on theoretical issues in the structure of the exact renormalization group and its approximations.

Tim R. Morris

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

COLIN: planning with continuous linear numeric change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe COLIN, a forward-chaining heuristic search planner, capable of reasoning with COntinuous LINear numeric change, in addition to the full temporal semantics of PDDL2.1. Through this work we make two advances to the state-of-the-art ...

Amanda Coles; Andrew Coles; Maria Fox; Derek Long

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Constructing continuous cartograms: a constraint-based approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a constraint-based automatic cartogram construction method that successfully achieves desired region areas while maintaining map topology and preserving essential shape cues to enable region recognition. Results are compared with a number of existing methods, and appear to be superior in both accuracy and preservation of shape recognition cues. A continuous area cartogram is a map transformation in which the map regions are resized relative to the geographic distribution of a data set. By spatially reflecting the data within the map base, the cartogram emphasizes each region's data instead of territorial land area, thereby providing a powerful tool for visualizing data distribution. There are two distinct and conflicting goals in the construction of cartograms: adjusting region sizes and retaining region shapes. Our Constraint-Based Method utilizes three foundational mechanisms to achieve these goals: alternating relaxation, constrained dynamics, and hierarchical resolution. We converge upon each goal in an alternating relaxation fashion, by achieving desired areas without regard to shape, and then utilizing constrained dynamics to attempt to hold the areas fixed while shape is restored. Through hierarchical resolution, we perform gross adjustments initially upon a coarsely resampled map and refinements later at progressively higher levels of detail.

Kocmoud, Christopher James

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

LBNL-5022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Authors: R. Hart*, C. Curcija, D. Arasteh, H. Goudey, C. Kohler, S. Selkowitz Environmental Energy Technologies...

332

Experimental Cell for Neutron Reflection on Lithium Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Experimental Cell for Neutron Reflection on Lithium Manganese Oxide to Study the Electrode/Electrolyte Interface. Author(s), Brian Kitchen.

333

Measuring solar reflectance-Part II: Review of practical methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Review of practical methods Title Measuring solar reflectance-Part II: Review of practical methods Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Levinson,...

334

Reflection and transmission resonances and accuracy of the wkb method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we calculate the transmission and reflection amplitudes of wave functions for different potentials such as the delta function, the rectangular barrier, the Eckart potential, and the Hulthen potential. We describe the relationship between these amplitudes and compute the reflection resonances between each potential. We describe the transmission and reflection probabilities using the WKB formula and compare the results with ones obtained from matching the boundary conditions. Furthermore, we use a two by two transfer matrix to calculate a rigorous bound on the transmission and reflection probabilities.

Tritos Ngampitipan; Petarpa Boonserm

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Improvement of retrieved reflectance in the presence of clouds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many algorithms exist to invert airborne imagery from units of either radiance or sensor specific digital counts to units of reflectance. These compensation algorithms remove… (more)

Bartlett, Brent

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Rail traffic reflects more oil production, less coal-fired ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The record increase in U.S. crude oil production during 2012 and the significant decline in coal use for domestic electricity generation were reflected in the ...

337

High-Temperature Reactor for Diffuse Reflectance Infrared ...  

High-Temperature Reactor for Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy Note: The technology described above is an early stage ...

338

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique...

339

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique...

340

Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Area (Goranson, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A fast directional continuous spherical wavelet transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fast algorithm for Antoine and Vandergheynst's (1998) directional continuous spherical wavelet transform (CSWT) is presented. Computational requirements are reduced by a factor of O(\\sqrt{N}), when N is the number of pixels on the sphere. The spherical Mexican hat wavelet Gaussianity analysis of the WMAP 1-year data performed by Vielva et al. (2003) is reproduced and confirmed using the fast CSWT. The proposed extension to directional analysis is inherently afforded by the fast CSWT algorithm.

J. D. McEwen; M. P. Hobson; A. N. Lasenby; D. J. Mortlock

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

342

Continuous Circulation System: a new enabling technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellbore problems have existed since the very first oil well was drilled. These problems have cost the oil industry millions of dollars because they lead to substantial loss of valuable rig time, or even loss of the well. Some of these problems are caused by the interruption of the drilling-fluid circulation. This interruption normally occurs when making drillpipe connections. Interruption of circulation causes wellbore problems like ballooning of the well, gelation of drilling mud, and settling of drilled cuttings. It also causes some operating problems in underbalanced drilling. A new technology in drilling has been introduced through a joint industry project to overcome problems caused by interruption of circulation. This technology is the Continuous Circulation System (CCS). The CCS is capable of achieving continuous circulation while making/breaking drillpipe connections. This research highlights the significance of the new technology by investigating the problems caused by interruption of circulation. It presents some potential operational problems regarding the new system and discusses the possibility to achieve continuous drilling. The economics of the new technology is presented. This study found that the CCS would prevent significant wellbore problems from occurring, hence saving valuable rig time and money. It also showed that CCS would be a valuable addition to the equipment used in underbalanced drilling. Continuous drilling while making connections can be achieved using mud-motors. On the other hand, it is not feasible through rotation of the drillstring under the current technology. Finally, the suitable marketing strategy for this phase of the new technology is to offer it for lease rather than for sale.

Kenawy, Walid F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Continuous Monitoring of MACT-Regulated Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles the experiences of and lessons learned by continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) users with mercury and particulate matter CEMS and to address some recent issues that have arisen with 40 CFR Part 60 and 40 CFR Part 75 CEMS. Project efforts included holding a workshop with CEMS users to evaluate mercury, particulate matter, and criteria pollutant CEMS performance issues, potential design enhancements, and operation and maintenance procedures. Experienced CEMS technicians ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Sumpman, Wayne C. (North Huntingdon, PA); Baker, Robert J. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Williams, Robert S. (Plum Borough, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Continuous-time quantum error correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous-time quantum error correction (CTQEC) is an approach to protecting quantum information from noise in which both the noise and the error correcting operations are treated as processes that are continuous in time. This chapter investigates CTQEC based on continuous weak measurements and feedback from the point of view of the subsystem principle, which states that protected quantum information is contained in a subsystem of the Hilbert space. We study how to approach the problem of constructing CTQEC protocols by looking at the evolution of the state of the system in an encoded basis in which the subsystem containing the protected information is explicit. This point of view allows us to reduce the problem to that of protecting a known state, and to design CTQEC procedures from protocols for the protection of a single qubit. We show how previously studied CTQEC schemes with both direct and indirect feedback can be obtained from strategies for the protection of a single qubit via weak measurements and weak unitary operations. We also review results on the performance of CTQEC with direct feedback in cases of Markovian and non-Markovian decoherence, where we have shown that due to the existence of a Zeno regime in non-Markovian dynamics, the performance of CTQEC can exhibit a quadratic improvement if the time resolution of the weak error-correcting operations is high enough to reveal the non-Markovian character of the noise process.

Ognyan Oreshkov

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Blogs, reflective practice and student-centered learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blogging can be used to enhance education by encouraging reflective practice. We present a study in which a final year HCI course was constructed around regular blogging activity. We discuss the role of blogs in providing a social mechanism for the student ... Keywords: blogging, cultural probe, education, reflective practice

Russell Beale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Technical Section: Linear approximation of Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various empirical and theoretical models of the surface reflectance have been introduced so far. Most of these models are based on functions with non-linear parameters and therefore faces some computational difficulties involved in non-linear optimization ... Keywords: BRDF representation, Linear models, Principal components, Reflection models, Rendering

Aydin Ozturk; Murat Kurt; Ahmet Bilgili; Cengiz Gungor

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Efficient virtual machine support of runtime structural reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing trends towards adaptive, distributed, generative and pervasive software have made object-oriented dynamically typed languages become increasingly popular. These languages offer dynamic software evolution by means of reflection, facilitating ... Keywords: Dynamically typed languages, JIT compilation, Prototype-based object-oriented model, SSCLI, Structural reflection, Virtual machine

Francisco Ortin; Jose Manuel Redondo; J. Baltasar García Perez-Schofield

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Change Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

351

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 -...

352

FAQ 38-What are the potential environmental impacts from continued...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

continued storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride? What are the potential environmental impacts from continued storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride? In addition to human...

353

EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear...

354

EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona County, Wyoming EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona...

355

Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007, P.L. 110...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007, P.L. 110-5 Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007,...

356

Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

Schroeder, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 1989 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the crustul structure of the Coso geothermal system Notes In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeastern most base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these

358

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A reflection survey was done to analyze the brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Notes The relationships between upper crustal faults, the brittle-ductile transition zone, and underlying magmatic features imaged by multifold seismic reflection data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Coso geothermal field, which lies within an extensional step-over between dextral faults, is a young, actively developing metamorphic core complex.

359

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

360

Discrete- versus continuous-state descriptions of the F1-ATPase molecular motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A discrete-state model of the F1-ATPase molecular motor is developed which describes not only the dependences of the rotation and ATP consumption rates on the chemical concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, but also on mechanical control parameters such as the friction coefficient and the external torque. The dependence on these mechanical parameters is given to the discrete-state model by fitting its transition rates to the continuous-angle model of P. Gaspard and E. Gerritsma [J. Theor. Biol. 247 (2007) 672-686]. This discrete-state model describes the behavior of the F1 motor in the regime of tight coupling between mechanical motion and chemical reaction. In this way, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the F1 motor are obtained such as the Michaelis-Menten dependence of the rotation and ATP consumption rates on ATP concentration and its extension in the presence of ADP and Pi, their dependences on friction and external torque, as well as the chemical and mechanical thermodynamic efficiencies.

E. Gerritsma; P. Gaspard

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Correction of Radar Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity for Rain Attenuation at X Band. Part I: Theoretical and Empirical Basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, a correction for rain attenuation of radar reflectivity (ZH) and differential reflectivity (ZDR) at the X-band wavelength is presented. The correction algorithm that is used is based on the self-consistent method with ...

S-G. Park; V. N. Bringi; V. Chandrasekar; M. Maki; K. Iwanami

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Continuous air monitor filter changeout apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and corresponding method for automatically changing out a filter cartridge in a continuous air monitor. The apparatus includes: a first container sized to hold filter cartridge replacements; a second container sized to hold used filter cartridges; a transport insert connectively attached to the first and second containers; a shuttle block, sized to hold the filter cartridges that is located within the transport insert; a transport driver mechanism means used to supply a motive force to move the shuttle block within the transport insert; and, a control means for operating the transport driver mechanism.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Quantum limit in continuous quantum measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum noise is calculated based on the description of imprecise measurement theory, which is used to analyse the general detector's quantum limit in continuous quantum measurement. Different from the traditional description of the linear-response theory, we don't introduce the hypotheses on the properties of the susceptibilities of the detector, and first show a rigorous result: The minimum noise added by the detector in quantum measurement is precisely equal to the zero-point noise. We also discuss the statistic characters of the back-action force in quantum measurement and show how to reach the quantum limit.

Shao, ChengGang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Distillation by repeated measurements: Continuous spectrum case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repeated measurements on one part of a bipartite system strongly affect the other part that is not measured, the dynamics of which is regulated by an effective contracted evolution operator. When the spectrum of this operator is discrete, the nonmeasured system is driven into a pure state, irrespective of the initial state, provided that the spectrum satisfies certain conditions. We show here that, even in the case of continuous spectrum, an effective distillation can occur under rather general conditions. We confirm it by applying our formalism to a simple model.

Bellomo, Bruno; Compagno, Giuseppe [CNISM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, IT-90123 Palermo (Italy); Nakazato, Hiromichi [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yuasa, Kazuya [Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ?), where (1-?) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 [angstrom] to 500 [angstrom  

SciTech Connect

We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 [Angstrom] to 500 [Angstrom]). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 [Angstrom] as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 [Angstrom]. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 [Angstrom]. 8 figs, 18 refs.

Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 {angstrom} to 500 {angstrom}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 {Angstrom} to 500 {Angstrom}). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 {Angstrom} as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 {Angstrom}. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 {Angstrom}. 8 figs, 18 refs.

Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Continuous Wavelet Transform in Quantum Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the application of the continuous wavelet transform to calculation of the Green functions in quantum field theory: scalar $\\phi^4$ theory, quantum electrodynamics, quantum chromodynamics. The method of continuous wavelet transform in quantum field theory presented in M.Altaisky Phys. Rev. D81(2010)125003 for the scalar $\\phi^4$ theory, consists in substitution of the local fields $\\phi(x)$ by those dependent on both the position $x$ and the resolution $a$. The substitution of the action $S[\\phi(x)]$ by the action $S[\\phi_a(x)]$ makes the local theory into nonlocal one, and implies the causality conditions related to the scale $a$, the region causality C. Christensen and L. Crane, J.Math. Phys 46 (2005) 122502. These conditions make the Green functions $G(x_1,a_1,..., x_n,a_n)= $ finite for any given set of regions by means of an effective cutoff scale $A=\\min (a_1,...,a_n)$.

Altaisky, Mikhail V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage and energy efficiency viewpoint. Our numerical approach and energy analysis will next be applied in designing and evaluating the performance of a planned full-scale pilot test of the proposed underground CAES concept.

Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a projection reflection optical system having two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have aspherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 {mu}m, and preferably less than 100 {mu}m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05--0.1 {mu}m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm {times} 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

Mark Spitzer

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

Standardization of Solar Mirror Reflectance Measurements - Round Robin Test: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the SolarPaces Task III standardization activities, DLR, CIEMAT, and NREL have concentrated on optimizing the procedure to measure the reflectance of solar mirrors. From this work, the laboratories have developed a clear definition of the method and requirements needed of commercial instruments for reliable reflectance results. A round robin test was performed between the three laboratories with samples that represent all of the commercial solar mirrors currently available for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The results show surprisingly large differences in hemispherical reflectance (sh) of 0.007 and specular reflectance (ss) of 0.004 between the laboratories. These differences indicate the importance of minimum instrument requirements and standardized procedures. Based on these results, the optimal procedure will be formulated and validated with a new round robin test in which a better accuracy is expected. Improved instruments and reference standards are needed to reach the necessary accuracy for cost and efficiency calculations.

Meyen, S.; Lupfert, E.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Kennedy, C.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Retrieval of Reflectivity in a Networked Radar Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for reflectivity and attenuation retrieval for rain medium in a networked radar environment is described. Electromagnetic waves backscattered from a common volume in networked radar systems are attenuated differently along the different ...

V. Chandrasekar; S. Lim

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Solar Radiative Fluxes for Broken Cloud Fields above Reflecting Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical bidirectional method for including the effects of underlying reflecting surfaces in Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric photon transport is presented. It is illustrated for the idealized Lambertian surface and a general ...

Howard W. Barker; John A. Davies

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Progress Toward Roll Processing of Solar Reflective Material (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the goal of this project which was to demonstrate that it is possible to cost-effectively produce high performance solar reflective material using vacuum deposition techniques.

Smilgys, R.; Wallace, S.; Kennedy, C.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radar Reflectivity–Based Estimates of Mixed Layer Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential for estimating mixed layer depth by taking advantage of the radial gradients in the radar reflectivity field produced by the large vertical gradients in water vapor mixing ratio that are characteristic of the ...

P. L. Heinselman; P. L. Spencer; K. L. Elmore; D. J. Stensrud; R. M. Hluchan; P. C. Burke

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Calibrating Differential Reflectivity on the WSR-88D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A calibration procedure of differential reflectivity on the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) is described. It has been tested on NOAA's modified WSR-88D research and development polarimetric radar and is directly applicable to ...

Dusan S. Zrnic; Valery M. Melnikov; John K. Carter

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Internal Wave Reflection and Scatter from Sloping Rough Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal gravity waves propagating in a uniformly stratified ocean are scattered on reflection from a rough inclined boundary. The boundary is inclined at angle ? to the horizontal and the roughness is represented by superimposed sinusoidal ...

S. A. Thorpe

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

On the Interactions of Internal Waves Reflecting from Slopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incident internal waves and those reflected from a uniform slope interact at second order. These interactions are considered for incident waves traveling obliquely to the slope in a uniformly stratified rotating fluid. It is found that (i) ...

S. A. Thorpe

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reflective Interfaces : assisting teens with stressful situations online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the concept of Reflective Interfaces, a novel approach to user experience design that promotes positive behavioral norms. Traditional interface design methodologies such as User Centered Design are ...

Jones, Birago (Birago Korayga)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Microphysical Interpretation of Radar Reflectivity–Rain Rate Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical aspects of the relationship between radar reflectivity Z and rainfall rate R are examined. Various concepts discussed in the literature are integrated into a coherent analytical framework and discussed with a focus on the ...

Matthias Steiner; James A. Smith; Remko Uijlenhoet

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Relationship of Highly Reflective Clouds to Tropical Climate Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual variability of tropical convection related to the Southern Oscillation (SO) and regional climate anomalies is studied from satellite-derived estimates of highly reflective clouds (HRC) during 1971–87. The novel HRC data bank ...

Stefan Hastenrath

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Assessing Snowfall Rates from X-Band Radar Reflectivity Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realistic aggregate snowflake models and experimental snowflake size distribution parameters are used to derive X-band power-law relations between the equivalent radar reflectivity factor Ze and the liquid equivalent snowfall precipitation rate S ...

Sergey Y. Matrosov; Carroll Campbell; David Kingsmill; Ellen Sukovich

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Transport Issues North and South Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: August 16, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg....

388

Kinematic, Thermodynamic, and Visual Structure of Low-Reflectivity Microbursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 9 July 1987, a series of low-reflectivity microbursts were studied over Colorado using dual-Doppler analyses, cloud photogrammetry, and in situ measurements collected by aircraft. These types of wind-shear events are particularly hazardous to ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; Cathy J. Kessinger; David E. Kingsmill

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EM-ONE : an architecture for reflective commonsense thinking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes EM-ONE, an architecture for commonsense thinking capable of reflective reasoning about situations involving physical, social, and mental dimensions. EM-ONE uses as its knowledge base a library of ...

Singh, Pushpinder, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Beryllium based multilayers for normal incidence extreme ultraviolet reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the experimental results of beryllium based multilayer mirrors for use in the 11.4 nm region. Mirrors using molybdenum as the high-Z material have demonstrated 68.7% peak reflectance at 11.3 nm.

Skulina, K.; Alford, C.; Bionta, R.; Makowiecki, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gullikson, E.; Soufli, R.; Kortright, J.; Underwood, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Degradation of Radar Reflectivity by Cloud Attenuation at Microwave Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main object of this paper is to emphasize that clouds—the nonprecipitating component of condensed atmospheric water—can produce a strong attenuation at operational microwave frequencies, although they present a low reflectivity preventing ...

Olivier Pujol; Jean-François Georgis; Laurent Féral; Henri Sauvageot

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Using parametric {ital B} splines to fit specular reflectivities  

SciTech Connect

Parametric {ital B}-spline curves offer a flexible and appropriate mathematical description of scattering length density profiles in specular reflectivity analysis. Profiles combining smooth and sharp features can be defined in low dimensional representations using control points in the density-depth plane which provide graded local influence on profile shape. These profiles exist in vector spaces defined by {ital B}-spline order and parameter knot set, which can be systematically densified during analysis. Such profiles can easily be rendered as adaptive histograms for reflectivity computation. {ital B}-spline order can be chosen to accommodate the asymptotic (large-{ital Q}) behavior indicated by reflectivity data. We describe an interactive fitting strategy in which the Nelder and Mead simplex method is used in the {ital B}-spline control point space to guide the discovery of profiles that can produce given reflectivity data. Examples using actual and simulated spectra are discussed.

Berk, N.F.; Majkrzak, C.F. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Insitute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-0001 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Insitute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-0001 (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Image statistics and the perception of surface reflectance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans are surprisingly good at judging the reflectance of complex surfaces even when the surfaces are viewed in isolation, contrary to the Gelb effect. We argue that textural cues are important for this task. Traditional ...

Sharan, Lavanya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A New Relationship between Mean Doppler Velocity and Differential Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new relationship has been established linking the vertical mean Doppler velocity of raindrop spectra and the accompanying differential reflectivities. It is based upon the specific radar combination of a vertically pointing Doppler and a ...

Matthias Steiner

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Can Reflected Extra-equatorial Rossby Waves Drive ENSO?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that the evolution of the ENSO phenomenon is determined by the reflection of extra-equatorial Rossby waves from the western boundary into the equatorial waveguide has been a subject of recent debate. Observations and some wind-...

William S. Kessler

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Operational Monitoring of Radar Differential Reflectivity Using the Sun  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the daily monitoring of the differential reflectivity bias for polarimetric weather radars is presented. Sun signals detected in polar volume data produced during operational scanning of the radar are used. This method is an ...

Iwan Holleman; Asko Huuskonen; Rashpal Gill; Pierre Tabary

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Stratocumulus Cloud Field Reflected Fluxes: The Effect of Cloud Shape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for stratocumulus cloud fields as a function of sky cover, cloud aspect ratio, and cloud shape. Cloud liquid water volume is held invariant as cloud shape is varied so that the results can be utilized more ...

R. M. Welch; B. A. Wielicki

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Microsoft Word - 25A2340 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon coated carbon nanofiber paper is a transformative advance for lithium ion batteries. This unique anode material shows stable cycling, low Silicon coated carbon nanofiber paper is a transformative advance for lithium ion batteries. This unique anode material shows stable cycling, low irreversible capacity, and energy storage >1000 mAh/g (based on its full weight). Its effective energy storage can be far higher via dual use as an active material and a current collector (saving weight/cost/volume). This material is made using bulk-available nanofibers combined with an advanced inexpensive Si deposition method that keeps the materials cost under $185/lb, clearly practical. It is made in two steps. 1) A porous, flexible, conductive pure carbon nanofiber paper is first prepared. A sophisticated nonwoven papermaking process has already been developed to make the uncoated paper, and professional pilot-scale equipment to produce it on a continuous basis has been built. 2) Then the paper is coated

399

Microsoft Word - Continual Improvement GSEP.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E International Approaches to Measurement and Verification of Continual Improvement in Industrial Facilities Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Miriam Goldberg and Julia Vetromile DNV KEMA July 2013 To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Niagara Falls, NY July 24-26, 2013 and to be published online at ACEEE.org DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express

400

Microsoft Word - 25A2340 Continued  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Silicon coated carbon nanofiber paper is a transformative advance for lithium ion batteries. This unique anode material shows stable cycling, low Silicon coated carbon nanofiber paper is a transformative advance for lithium ion batteries. This unique anode material shows stable cycling, low irreversible capacity, and energy storage >1000 mAh/g (based on its full weight). Its effective energy storage can be far higher via dual use as an active material and a current collector (saving weight/cost/volume). This material is made using bulk-available nanofibers combined with an advanced inexpensive Si deposition method that keeps the materials cost under $185/lb, clearly practical. It is made in two steps. 1) A porous, flexible, conductive pure carbon nanofiber paper is first prepared. A sophisticated nonwoven papermaking process has already been developed to make the uncoated paper, and professional pilot-scale equipment to produce it on a continuous basis has been built. 2) Then the paper is coated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Notices INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES-Continued  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

926 Federal Register 926 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 78 / Tuesday, April 23, 2013 / Notices INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES-Continued CFDA No. and name Application package available Deadline for trans- mittal of applications Estimated range of awards * Project period For further information contact fi National Re- search and Devel- opment Center on Developmental Education Assess- ment and Instruc- tion. June 6, 2013 ........... September 4, 2013 $1,000,000 to $2,000,000. Up to 5 years .......... Rebecca McGill- Wilkinson. Re- becca.McGill@ed.gov. fi National Re- search and Devel- opment Center on Knowledge Utiliza- tion. 84.305D Statistical and Research Methodology in Education: fi Statistical and Research Method- ology Grants. June 6, 2013 ........... September 4, 2013 $40,000 to $300,000 Up to 3 years

402

Range Selectivity Estimation for Continuous Attributes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many commercial database systems maintain histograms to efficiently estimate query selectivities as part of query optimization. Most work on histogram design is implicitly geared towards discrete or categorical attribute value domains. In this paper, we consider approaches that are better suited for the continuous valued attributes commonly found in scientific and statistical databases. We propose two methods based on spline functions for estimating the selectivity of range queries over univariate and multivariate data. These methods are more accurate than histograms. As the results from our experiments on both real and synthetic data sets demonstrate, the proposed methods achieved substantially better (up to 5.5 times) estimation error than the state-of-the-art histograms, at exactly the same storage space and with comparable CPU runtime overhead; moreover, the superiority of the proposed spline methods is amplified when applied to multivariate data. 1 Introduction Selectivity esti...

Flip Korn; Theodore Johnson; H. V. Jagadish

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Quantifying decoherence in continuous variable systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed report on the decoherence of quantum states of continuous variable systems under the action of a quantum optical master equation resulting from the interaction with general Gaussian uncorrelated environments. The rate of decoherence is quantified by relating it to the decay rates of various, complementary measures of the quantum nature of a state, such as the purity, some nonclassicality indicators in phase space and, for two-mode states, entanglement measures and total correlations between the modes. Different sets of physically relevant initial configurations are considered, including one- and two-mode Gaussian states, number states, and coherent superpositions. Our analysis shows that, generally, the use of initially squeezed configurations does not help to preserve the coherence of Gaussian states, whereas it can be effective in protecting coherent superpositions of both number states and Gaussian wave packets. 1

A. Serafini; M. G. A. Paris; F. Illuminati; S. De Siena

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Continuous spray forming of functionally gradient materials  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Plasma Processes Inc. have produced a Functional Gradient Material (FGM) through advanced vacuum plasma spray processing for high heat flux applications. Outlined in this paper are the manufacturing methods used to develop a four component functional gradient material of copper, tungsten, boron, and boron nitride. The FGM was formed with continuous gradients and integral cooling channels eliminating bondlines and providing direct heat transfer from the high temperature exposed surface to a cooling medium. Metallurgical and x-ray diffraction analyses of the materials formed through innovative VPS (vacuum plasma spray) processing are also presented. Applications for this functional gradient structural material range from fusion reactor plasma facing components to missile nose cones to boilers.

McKechnie, T.N.; Richardson, E.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

Breillatt, Jr., Julian P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Remenyik, Carl J. (Knoxville, TN); Sartory, Walter K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN); Penland, William Z. (Bethesda, MD)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Quantifying decoherence in continuous variable systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed report on the decoherence of quantum states of continuous variable systems under the action of a quantum optical master equation resulting from the interaction with general Gaussian uncorrelated environments. The rate of decoherence is quantified by relating it to the decay rates of various, complementary measures of the quantum nature of a state, such as the purity, some nonclassicality indicators in phase space and, for two-mode states, entanglement measures and total correlations between the modes. Different sets of physically relevant initial configurations are considered, including one- and two-mode Gaussian states, number states, and coherent superpositions. Our analysis shows that, generally, the use of initially squeezed configurations does not help to preserve the coherence of Gaussian states, whereas it can be effective in protecting coherent superpositions of both number states and Gaussian wave packets.

A. Serafini; M. G. A. Paris; F. Illuminati; S. De Siena

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Continuous Emission of A Radiation Quantum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is in accordance with such experiments as single photon self-interference that a photon, conveying one radiation energy quantum "$ h \\times$ frequency", is spatially extensive and stretches an electromagnetic wave train. A wave train, hence an energy quantum, can only be emitted by its source gradually. In both the two processes the wave and "particle" attributes of the radiation field are simultaneously prominent, where an overall satisfactory theory has been lacking. This paper presents a first principles treatment, in a unified framework of the classical and quantum mechanics, of the latter process, the emission of a single radiation quantum based on the dynamics of the radiation-emitting source, a charged oscillator which is itself extensive across its confining potential well. During the emission of one single radiation quantum, the extensive charged oscillator undergoes a continuous radiation damping and is non-stationary. This process is in this work treated using a quasi stationary approach, whereby the classical equation of motion, which directly facilitates the correspondence principle for a particle oscillator, and the quantum wave equation are established for each sufficiently brief time interval. As an inevitable consequence of the division of the total time for emitting one single quantum, a fractional Planck constant $h$ is introduced. The solutions to the two simultaneous equations yield for the charged oscillator a continuously exponentially decaying Hamiltonian that is at the same time quantised with respect to the fractional-$h$ at any instant of time; and the radiation wave field emitted over time stretches a wave train of finite length. The total system of the source and radiation field maintains at any time (integer $n$ times) one whole energy quantum, $h \\times$ frequency, in complete accordance with the notion of quantum mechanics and experiment.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Single photon reflection and transmission in optomechanical system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cavity Optomechanical system is speedily approaching the regime where the radiation pressure of a single photon displaces the moving mirror. In this paper, we consider a cavity optomechanical system where the cavity field is driven by an external field. In the limit of weak mirror-cavity couplings, we calculate analytically the reflection and transmission rates for cavity field and discuss the effects of mirror-cavity coupling on the reflection and transmission.

M. A. Khan; S. C. Hou; K. Farooq; X. X. Yi

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

409

Reflection-Transmission Quantum Yang-Baxter Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the reflection-transmission quantum Yang-Baxter equations, arising in factorized scattering theory of integrable models with impurities. The physical origin of these equations is clarified and three general families of solutions are described in detail. Explicit representatives of each family are also displayed. These results allow to establish a direct relationship with the different previous works on the subject and make evident the advantages of the reflection-transmission algebra as an universal approach to integrable systems with impurities.

V. Caudrelier; M. Mintchev; E. Ragoucy; P. Sorba

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes first means which defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and second means acting on the first means for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected for and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Continuous variable tangle, monogamy inequality, and entanglement sharing in Gaussian states of continuous variable systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For continuous-variable systems, we introduce a measure of entanglement, the continuous variable tangle ({\\em contangle}), with the purpose of quantifying the distributed (shared) entanglement in multimode, multipartite Gaussian states. This is achieved by a proper convex roof extension of the squared logarithmic negativity. We prove that the contangle satisfies the Coffman-Kundu-Wootters monogamy inequality in all three--mode Gaussian states, and in all fully symmetric $N$--mode Gaussian states, for arbitrary $N$. For three--mode pure states we prove that the residual entanglement is a genuine tripartite entanglement monotone under Gaussian local operations and classical communication. We show that pure, symmetric three--mode Gaussian states allow a promiscuous entanglement sharing, having both maximum tripartite residual entanglement and maximum couplewise entanglement between any pair of modes. These states are thus simultaneous continuous-variable analogs of both the GHZ and the $W$ states of three qubits: in continuous-variable systems monogamy does not prevent promiscuity, and the inequivalence between different classes of maximally entangled states, holding for systems of three or more qubits, is removed.

Gerardo Adesso; Fabrizio Illuminati

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

413

Continuous Time Group Discovery in Dynamic Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rise in availability and importance of graphs and networks, it has become increasingly important to have good models to describe their behavior. While much work has focused on modeling static graphs, we focus on group discovery in dynamic graphs. We adapt a dynamic extension of Latent Dirichlet Allocation to this task and demonstrate good performance on two datasets. Modeling relational data has become increasingly important in recent years. Much work has focused on static graphs - that is fixed graphs at a single point in time. Here we focus on the problem of modeling dynamic (i.e. time-evolving) graphs. We propose a scalable Bayesian approach for community discovery in dynamic graphs. Our approach is based on extensions of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). LDA is a latent variable model for topic modeling in text corpora. It was extended to deal with topic changes in discrete time and later in continuous time. These models were referred to as the discrete Dynamic Topic Model (dDTM) and the continuous Dynamic Topic Model (cDTM), respectively. When adapting these models to graphs, we take our inspiration from LDA-G and SSN-LDA, applications of LDA to static graphs that have been shown to effectively factor out community structure to explain link patterns in graphs. In this paper, we demonstrate how to adapt and apply the cDTM to the task of finding communities in dynamic networks. We use link prediction to measure the quality of the discovered community structure and apply it to two different relational datasets - DBLP author-keyword and CAIDA autonomous systems relationships. We also discuss a parallel implementation of this approach using Hadoop. In Section 2, we review LDA and LDA-G. In Section 3, we review the cDTM and introduce cDTMG, its adaptation to modeling dynamic graphs. We discuss inference for the cDTM-G and details of our parallel implementation in Section 4 and present its performance on two datasets in Section 5 before concluding in Section 6.

Miller, K; Eliassi-Rad, T

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reserves estimation in unconventional (low/ultra-low permeability) reservoirs has become a topic of increased interest as more of these resources are being developed, especially in North America. The estimation of reserves in unconventional reservoirs is challenging due to the long transient flow period exhibited by the production data. The use of conventional methods (i.e., Arps' decline curves) to estimate reserves is often times inaccurate and leads to the overestimation of reserves because these models are only (theoretically) applicable for the boundary-dominated flow regime. The premise of this work is to present and demonstrate a methodology which continuously estimates the ultimate recovery during the producing life of a well in order to generate a time-dependent profile of the estimated ultimate recovery (EUR). The "objective" is to estimate the final EUR value(s) from several complimentary analyses. In this work we present the "Continuous EUR Method" to estimate reserves for unconventional gas reservoirs using a rate-time analysis approach. This work offers a coherent process to reduce the uncertainty in reserves estimation for unconventional gas reservoirs by quantifying "upper" and "lower" limits of EUR prior to the onset of boundary-dominated flow. We propose the use of traditional and new rate-time relations to establish the "upper" limit for EUR. We clearly demonstrate that rate-time relations which better represent the transient and transitional flow regimes (in particular the power law exponential rate decline relation) often lead to a more accurate "upper" limit for reserves estimates — earlier in the producing life of a well (as compared to conventional ("Arps") relations). Furthermore, we propose a straight line extrapolation technique to offer a conservative estimate of maximum produced gas which we use as the "lower" limit for EUR. The EUR values estimated using this technique continually increase with time, eventually reaching a maximum value. We successfully demonstrate the methodology by applying the approach to 43 field examples producing from 7 different tight sandstone and shale gas reservoirs. We show that the difference between the "upper" and "lower" limit of reserves decreases with time and converges to the "true" value of reserves during the latter producing life of a well.

Currie, Stephanie M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average “all modes” failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is disclosed which is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

Ritter, D.F.; St. Clair, J.A.; Togami, H.K.

1981-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

417

Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

Ritter, Don F. (Albuquerque, NM); St. Clair, Jack A. (Albuquerque, NM); Togami, Henry K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

An artists' community in the Back Bay : continuity and change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the relationship between continuity and change. It's premise is the idea that architecture can be receptive to the need for growth and change while still being rooted to the continuity of its ...

Duckham, Kenton Leland

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Resilient hosting in a continuously available virtualized environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe continuously available services and application hosting on the Events/IBM.com® Infrastructure (EI)-a continuously available virtualized environment based on three active data centers that has demonstrated 100-percent availability ...

R R. Scadden; R J. Bogdany; J. W. Clifford; H. D. Pearthree; R. A. Locke

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Comment re DOE's NOI re continuation or modification of Price...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comment re DOE's NOI re continuation or modification of Price-Anderson Act Comment re DOE's NOI re continuation or modification of Price-Anderson Act Comments of Kerr-McGee...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

422

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

though day-ahead hourly real- time prices can be continuous,or 15-minute ahead real time price. A facility manager hasyr (though hour-ahead real-time prices can be continuous,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aerial survey of Bay Area continues through Saturday | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Aerial survey of Bay Area continues through Saturday Aerial survey of Bay Area continues...

424

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Medical Consultation Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Continuing Medical Education Radiation Emergency Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Health Physics in Radiation...

426

NNSA, NNSS Continue to Conduct Consequence Management Around...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

427

Monitoring the dynamic web to respond to continuous queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous queries are queries for which responses given to users must be continuously updated, as the sources of interest get updated. Such queries occur, for instance, during on-line decision making, e.g., traffic flow control, weather monitoring, ... Keywords: allocation policies, continuous queries

Sandeep Pandey; Krithi Ramamritham; Soumen Chakrabarti

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A high-resolution seismic reflection survey was conducted by Utah Geophysical, Inc. (1990) along four widely spaced survey lines normal to range front fault sets. The survey was designed primarily to detect silicified zones or zones of argillic alteration, and faulting, to depths of about 300 meters (1000 feet), as part of the precious metals exploration program. One interpretation of the data showed discrete, high-angle faults

429

Reflection Survey At Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Simultan eously, we surveyed over 2500 linear km with high-resolution seismic reflection profling that penetrated the upper ~25 m of the lake bottom. References L. A. Morgan, W. C. Shanks, D. A. Lovalvo, S. Y. Johnson, W. J. Stephenson, K. L. Pierce, S. S. Harlan, C. A. Finn, G. Lee, M. Webring, B. Schulze, J. Duhn, R. Sweeney, L. Balistrieri (2003) Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging,

430

Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Kirkham, Randy R. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electron reflection from one-dimensional potential barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the relevant experimental evidence for electron reflectivity effects in TEC and describes the analytical effort to better understand electron reflectivity as a function of the potential configuration of the surface layer. The analyses consider rectangular and triangular barrier models with, and without, image potentials. The calculated results are presented and discussed. Details of the solutions are given in Appendices A, B, and C. The computer programs to obtain these results are listed in Appendix D. These analyses demonstrate that cesium-oxygen composites with potential discontinuities around one volt and 20 A thick can be expected to be highly reflective to thermal electrons. Consequently, such composites would be expected to have significant effects on TEC performance.

Balestra, C.L.; Huffman, F.N.; Yang, C.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

1979-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

Barnes, Paul R. (Lenoir City, TN); Shapira, Hanna B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Reflection Survey (Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We believe we have demonstrated two sources that can generate S-waves that are appropriate for evaluating geothermal prospects. The first, a vector-explosive package, has never been available to the seismic industry, and the demonstration of its source pe References M. DeAngelo, B.A. Hardage, J. L. Simmons Jr. (1999) Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Reflection_Survey_(Deangelo,_Et_Al.,_1999)&oldid=388218

435

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The subject of glass solar reflectance and its contribution to permanent vinyl siding distortion has not been extensively studied, and some phenomena are not yet well understood. This white paper presents what is known regarding the issue and identifies where more research is needed. Three primary topics are discussed: environmental factors that control the transfer of heat to and from the siding surface; vinyl siding properties that may affect heat build-up and permanent distortion; and factors that determine the properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces, including insulating window glass. Further research is needed to fully characterize the conditions associated with siding distortion, the scope of the problem, physical properties of vinyl siding, insulating window glass reflection characteristics, and possible mitigation or prevention strategies.

Hart, Robert; Curcija, Charlie; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Selkowitz, Stephen

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Critical reflection in a digital media artwork - Playas: homeland mirage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introduction of digital media into the working practice of artists has produced challenges previously unknown to the field of art. This inquiry follows an atypical model of artist-driven research derived from disciplines such as social science and education. Here, an artwork functions as a model that is self-reflective, integrating methodologies in a form that benefits art and science. Using Naturalistic Inquiry, including semi-structured interviews of fifteen participants, the work illustrates a process of creation, analysis and evaluation that places the values of the artist on equal footing with the needs of science. Recently, artists have begun using video game engines as a tool to produce 3D navigable spaces. Using the hybrid video game/installation Playas: Homeland Mirage as a case study, this research examines the impact of technology on the artwork and identifies a number of key issues related to the function of critical reflection in this environment. Rules-of-play were a fundamental pre-requisite to the stimulation of critically reflective experience. The human interface with software and hardware was also a primary factor in reflective experience. Based on participant evaluation and observation, the interface was altered in response to its effect on critical reflection, illustrating how choices in this area impact aesthetic experience. Those with experience in visual art were more likely to engage the work in a critically reflective manner than seasoned video game players who tended to be more interested in scoring and winning. These findings and others inform our understanding of the stimulation of critical reflection in immersive environments and show how we can sensitively integrate technology with meaningful evaluative methods. By repurposing a video game in this manner, we learn about the nature of the video game and the nature of art. This research enables artists to gain a better understanding of the medium to more fully integrate technology within a meaningful practice. Conversely, other fields will benefit from a better understanding of the stimulation of meaning in immersive spaces and gain a comprehensive view of a work that strives to contribute to our culture on a deeper level than as simple entertainment. Ultimately, more fully understanding critical reflection in virtual environments will enable us to create enriched experiences that transcend space to create “real” or “virtual” place.

Stenner, Jack Eric

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Effect of window reflections on photonic Doppler velocimetry measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) has rapidly become a standard diagnostic for measuring velocities in dynamic compression research. While free surface velocity measurements are fairly straightforward, complications occur when PDV is used to measure a dynamically loaded sample through a window. Fresnel reflections can severely affect the velocity and time resolution of PDV measurements, especially for low-velocity transients. Shock experiments of quartz compressed between two sapphire plates demonstrate how optical window reflections cause ringing in the extracted PDV velocity profile. Velocity ringing is significantly reduced by using either a wedge window or an antireflective coating.

Ao, T.; Dolan, D. H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Total Resonant Transmission and Reflection by Periodic Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonant scattering of plane waves by a periodic slab under conditions close to those that support a guided mode is accompanied by sharp transmission anomalies. For two-dimensional structures, we establish sufficient conditions, involving structural symmetry, under which these anomalies are characterized by total transmission and total reflection at frequencies separated by an arbitrarily small amount. The loci of total reflection and total transmission are real-analytic curves in frequency-wavenumber space that intersect quadratically at a single point corresponding to the guided mode. A single anomaly or multiple anomalies can be excited by the interaction with a single guided mode.

Stephen P. Shipman; Hairui Tu

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Determination of the Scaled Optical Thickness of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining the scaled optical thickness of clouds from reflected solar radiation measurements. The procedure compares measurements of the reflection function with asymptotic expressions for the reflection function of ...

Michael D. King

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Report on Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement on Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement Report on Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement EM senior management has committed to extensive management reforms and has completed several robust improvements in contract and project management. Additional improvement initiatives are continuing and this document outlines the consolidated plan of these initiatives in a top-down framework of EM vision, goals, strategies, performance metrics, and specific improvement actions completed or being undertaken. Report on Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S., Canada continue dominance of world`s gas processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas plants in the US and Canada continued to lead the rest of the world in processing capacity, throughput, and NGL production in 1996. The consolidation of gas-processing assets that has been rolling through US companies in recent years continued to limit growth in new capacity. Canadian liquids producers, on the other hand, will likely benefit from increased gas production and export sales to the US when a clutch of pipeline expansions in the next 18--30 months eases the capacity constraints on gas movements southward. And, markets and suppliers around the world continue to become more closely dependent on each other, stimulating new capacity and production. US capacity stood at slightly more than 678 bcfd as of January 1, 1997; throughput for 1996 averaged 48.8 bcfd; and NGL production exceeded 76,000 gpd. Canadian gas-processing capacity last year approached 40 bcfd. Gas-processing throughput there averaged more than 30.8 bcfd; NGL production fell to slightly more than 42,000 gpd. Oil and Gas Journal`s most recent exclusive, plant-by-plant, worldwide gas-processing survey and its international survey of petroleum-derived sulfur recovery reflect these trends. This report supplements operator-supplied capacity and production data for Alberta with figures from the (1) Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB), formerly the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERBC), (2) British Columbia Ministry of Employment and Investment`s Engineering and Operations Branch, and (3) Saskatchewan Ministry of Energy and Mines.

True, W.R.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

Advances in Measuring Solar Reflectance-or, Why That Roof isn...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reflectance is often used to estimate the solar heat gain and rate the "coolness" of roofs and pavements. A solar reflectance property measured by two popular ASTM standard...

443

Bragg Reflectivity of X-rays: At the Limit of the Possible |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of reflectivity across the sample. Their results, which are published in Nature Photonics, represent a quantum leap to the largest reflectivity measured, at the limit of what...

444

Reflection Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP)...

445

Reflection Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP)...

446

The adsorption effect of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} on density of states for double wall carbon nanotubes by tight binding model  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical approach based on a tight-binding model is developed to study the effects of the adsorption of finite concentrations of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} gas molecules on double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) electronic properties. To obtain proper hopping integrals and random on-site energies for the case of one molecule adsorption, the local density of states for various hopping integrals and random on-site energies are calculated. Since C{sub 6}H{sub 5} molecule is a donor with respect to the carbon nanotubes and their states should appear near the conduction band of the system, effects of various hopping integral deviations and on-site energies for one molecule adsorption are considered to find proper hopping and on-site energies consistent with expected n-type semiconductor. We found that adsorption of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} gas molecules could lead to a (8.0)-(20.0) DWCNT n-type semiconductor. The width of impurity adsorbed gas states in the density of states could be controlled by adsorbed gas concentration.

Fathalian, A., E-mail: a.fathalian@gmail.com [Razi University, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Removing the veil: personal reflections on educating women in Dubai  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a personal reflection on the culture and the education of young women in the United Arab Emirates, a group of seven emirates along the Persian Gulf, which has only been a federated nation since 1971. The rapid pace of development in the ... Keywords: UAE, education, gender, social impact

C. Dianne Martin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Does your distillation simulation reflect the real world?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The question ``Do you have a simulation?`` is asked during almost every troubleshooting investigation. A question equally important: ``Does your simulation reflect the real world?`` is raised far less frequently. To correctly answer the latter question, it is imperative that the simulation reflects the real world (i.e., plant data). Any mismatch provides a warning of a potential simulation deficiency. A previous paper described a case where a seemingly minor mismatch led to the discovery of a major simulation deficiency. Undiscovered, the deficiency would have led to a failed tower debottleneck. This paper expands on this previous theme, but focuses on column troubleshooting. A simulation that did not reflect the real world steered a troubleshooting investigation toward an incorrect diagnosis and into inadequate solutions. Once revised to reflect the real world, the same simulation proved invaluable for identifying the correct root cause and guiding the investigation toward the proper solution. An initial simulation of an aromatics fractionator revealed no cause for an operational instability apparent in the tower. Field testing of the tower, establishing correct energy balances, overcoming an analytical limitation, and finally, identifying a simulation trap, yielded information that led to revision of the initial simulation. The revised simulation readily identified the cause of the tower instability.

Kister, H.Z. [Brown and Root, Alhambra, CA (United States); Neves, S.B.; Siles, R.C.; Costa Lima, R. da [Copene Petroquimica do Nordeste S.A., Camacari, Bahia (Brazil)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Designing optimal iBGP route-reflection topologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is used today by all Autonomous Systems (AS) in the Internet. Inside each AS, iBGP sessions distribute the external routes among the routers. In large ASs, relying on a full-mesh of iBGP sessions between routers is not ... Keywords: BGP, iBGP topology design, optimization, route-reflection

Marc-Olivier Buob; Steve Uhlig; Mickael Meulle

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experiences surveying the crowd: reflections on methods, participation, and reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crowdsourcing services such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) provide new venues for recruiting participants and conducting studies; hundreds of surveys may be offered to workers at any given time. We reflect on the results of six related studies we ... Keywords: crowdsourcing, demographics, reliability, surveys

Catherine C. Marshall; Frank M. Shipman

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A 16-ELEMENT REFLECTION GRID AMPLIFIER Frederic Lecuyer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which can double as a large metal heat sink. Otherwise, the operation of reflection grid amplifiers to improve common- Mirror/Heat Sink Active GridInput Polarizer Active Grid Output Polarizer E Output Beam E Input Beam E Output Beam Differential Transistor Pair E Input Beam Mirror/Heat Sink Active Grid

452

Remote Sensing Of Photosynthetic Processes By Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) has been proposed as a tool for the estimation of leaf and canopy light?use efficiency and photosynthesis from remote?sensing data. The application of the index is based on more than fifteen years of spectroscopic studies at the leaf level

S. Raddi; S. Cortes; E. Vicinelli; F. Magnani

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Low Stocks Mean Tight Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Like those for other petroleum products, gasoline inventories have been running below normal. As of the latest weekly data, stocks are about 5% lower than the low end of the normal range for this time of year. Behind all of the low product inventories are low crude oil inventories. Recall that the crude market tightened in 1999 when OPEC cut back production. Demand was greater than supply and inventories were used to make up the difference. They have not yet recovered. Crude oil inventories are running about 7% below the low end of the normal range for this time of year. After last week's very large stock draw, it appears inventories are the lowest that they have been since December 1975. The U.S. inventory data will be an important price barometer to

454

Prediction of Reflection Cracking in Hot Mix Asphalt Overlays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflection cracking is one of the main distresses in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) overlays. It has been a serious concern since early in the 20th century. Since then, several models have been developed to predict the extent and severity of reflection cracking in HMA overlays. However, only limited research has been performed to evaluate and calibrate these models. In this dissertation, mechanistic-based models are calibrated to field data of over 400 overlay test sections to produce a design process for predicting reflection cracks. Three cracking mechanisms: bending, shearing traffic stresses, and thermal stress are taken into account to evaluate the rate of growth of the three increasing levels of distress severity: low, medium, and high. The cumulative damage done by all three cracking mechanisms is used to predict the number of days for the reflection crack to reach the surface of the overlay. The result of this calculation is calibrated to the observed field data (severity and extent) which has been fitted with an S-shaped curve. In the mechanistic computations, material properties and fracture-related stress intensity factors are generated using efficient Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms. In the bending and shearing traffic stress models, the traffic was represented by axle load spectra. In the thermal stress model, a recently developed temperature model was used to predict the temperature at the crack tips. This process was developed to analyze various overlay structures. HMA overlays over either asphalt pavement or jointed concrete pavement in all four major climatic zones are discussed in this dissertation. The results of this calculated mechanistic approach showed its ability to efficiently reproduce field observations of the growth, extent, and severity of reflection cracking. The most important contribution to crack growth was found to be thermal stress. The computer running time for a twenty-year prediction of a typical overlay was between one and four minutes.

Tsai, Fang-Ling

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Implementation of solar-reflective surfaces: Materials and utility programs  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on implementation issues for using solar-reflective surfaces to cool urban heat islands, with specific examples for Sacramento, California. Advantages of solar-reflective surfaces for reducing energy use are: (1) they are cost-effective if albedo is increased during routine maintenance; (2) the energy savings coincide with peak demand for power; (3) there are positive effects on environmental quality; and (4) the white materials have a long service life. Important considerations when choosing materials for mitigating heat islands are identified as albedo, emissivity, durability, cost, pollution and appearance. There is a potential for increasing urban albedo in Sacramento by an additional 18%. Of residential roofs, we estimate that asphalt shingle and modified bitumen cover the largest area, and that built-up roofing and modified bitumen cover the largest area of commercial buildings. For all of these roof types, albedo may be increased at the time of re-roofing without any additional cost. When a roof is repaired, a solar-reflective roof coating may be applied to significantly increase albedo and extend the life of the root Although a coating may be cost-effective if applied to a new roof following installation or to an older roof following repair, it is not cost-effective if the coating is applied only to save energy. Solar-reflective pavement may be cost-effective if the albedo change is included in the routine resurfacing schedule. Cost-effective options for producing light-colored pavement may include: (1) asphalt concrete, if white aggregate is locally available; (2) concrete overlays; and (3) newly developed white binders and aggregate. Another option may be hot-rolled asphalt, with white chippings. Utilities could promote solar-reflective surfaces through advertisement, educational programs and cost-sharing of road resurfacing.

Bretz, S.; Akbari, H.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Reflected Neutron Effects in Multiplicity Measurements of Bare HEU Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

In a passive multiplicity characterization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) assemblies, fission chains are initiated by the characteristically fast neutrons from spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U as well as cosmic-ray spallation neutrons. Active interrogation of HEU uses other physical mechanisms for starting chains by inducing fission from high-energy neutrons, high-energy gamma-rays, delayed neutrons, or thermal neutrons. In all cases a contribution to the initiation of fission chains is the reflection of neutrons that initially escape the assembly and re-enter it after undergoing some scattering. The reflected neutron flux is geometry dependent and a combination of fast and thermal energies. The reflected thermal neutron contribution occurs hundreds of microseconds after the beginning of the fission chain and can be distinguished from the cosmic-ray spallation neutrons unrelated to fission chains, resulting in an HEU detection signature with high signal-to-noise. However, the reflected thermal neutron flux can be eliminated with an efficient thermal neutron absorber to investigate reflected neutron effects. In this paper, active and passive multiplicity measurements with HEU oxide assemblies of up to 16 kg of fuel pins and HEU metal assemblies of up to five 18 kg storage castings are reported. Each case demonstrates the differences in HEU signature when a borated thermal neutron absorber is present and shows the various detectable signatures with 3He proportional counters, the standard detector for differential die-way and neutron multiplicity measurements, and liquid scintillators, a detector capable of operating on the timescale of fission chains.

McConchie, Seth M [ORNL; Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the solar reflectance of asphalt roofing shingles that are covered with pigmented mineral roofing granules. The reflecting surface is rough, with a total area approximately twice the nominal area. We introduce a simple analytical model that relates the 'micro-reflectance' of a small surface region to the 'macro-reflectance' of the shingle. This model uses a mean field approximation to account for multiple scattering effects. The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are known. Simple linear averaging works well, with small corrections to linear averaging derived for highly reflective materials. Reflective base granules and reflective surface coatings aid achievement of high solar reflectance. Other factors that influence the solar reflectance are the size distribution of the granules, coverage of the asphalt substrate, and orientation of the granules as affected by rollers during fabrication.

Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Jacobs, Jeffry; Klink, Frank

2008-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- 5 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6 Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6 Questions concerning the policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at (202) 287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov for the AL or Richard Bonnell at (202) 287-1747 or at richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov for the FAL. Policy flash 2014-05 CRA Appropriations AL FY2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressional

459

Proceedings: Continuous Emission Monitoring User's Group 2007 Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of the thirteenth Continuous Emission Monitoring User's Group (CEMUG) Conference held in Phoenix, Arizona, May 9 11, 2007. The meetings have been held since 1992 and have become a valuable forum for both the regulator and the regulated community to resolve complex monitoring issues. Mercury monitoring has and continues to be a major concern for the industry, and updates on continuous mercury monitoring demonstration projects highlighted the 2007 conference. Other con...

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

Active Reflection Absorption for a Three Dimensional Multidirectional Wave Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to implement an accurate system that allows for absorption of reflected waves impinging to a wave maker (Active Reflection Absorption), it was required to apply a method to estimate properly the direction of arrival of the waves that does it in the fastest way possible. Our wavemaker control system has been prepared to handle an algorithm provided by Bosch-Rexroth where the wave angle estimation is practically locked to a very narrow frequency band (spatial gain-mixer). The system was evaluated with physical tests in a 3D wave basin for different conditions of reflected waves arriving with an angle to the wavemaker front, and acceptable performance has been found for the 3D ARA mode. However, for certain conditions over-compensation or sub-compensation can develop resulting in a poor absorption. This is mainly related to not being able to determine accurately the direction from which the reflected waves travel towards the wavemaker. The present work employed concepts found in the areas of antenna array signal processing and signal propagation, which were applied to this problem. This approach coupled naturally with our wavemaker system since it was prepared with 48 gages that can be employed in an array antenna fashion. A program was codified from an algorithm found in literature to calculate the Direction of Arrival (DOA) of the reflected waves. The focus for the testing of this program was with regular waves. The tests were conducted to validate the program with different angles of incidence and show that for regular waves the program was able to detect accurately the DOA of these in as few as 5 snapshots, with a minimum of 7 gages used as the antenna input. With data obtained directly from the control system of our wavemaker using regular waves, the program was able to determine the DOA. The computational burden of the algorithm is not significant in the case of regular waves. A modification of the program is required to analyze the DOA of reflected irregular waves, which could increase the computational burden. Actual implementation of this program to our control system depends on cooperation with Bosch-Rexroth.

Cruz Castro, Oscar

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Type Environmental Regulations Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous...

462

A Q-Learning Algorithm with Continuous State Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 23, 2006 ... Abstract: We study in this paper a Markov Decision Problem (MDP) with continuous state space and discrete decision variables. We propose an ...

463

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous papers have discussed definitions of energyThis paper provides a framework linking continuous energyThe paper presents a framework about when energy is used,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Continuous Improvement Model| A K-12 Literacy Focus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of the study was to determine if the eight steps of the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) provided a framework to raise achievement… (more)

Brown, Jennifer V.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Well Collimated Quasi-Continuous Atom Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quasi-continuous Atom Laser. ... We can develop a rather complete analogy between the so-called "atom laser" and the traditional photon laser. ...

466

Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 2011 RICHLAND, Wash. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work at the Hanford site continues with several projects intended to reduce the Cold War cleanup foot-...

467

Continuous Casting Simulation of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel Via ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Continuous Casting Simulation of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel Via ... Applications of Thermo-Chemical and Thermo-Physical Models in the ...

468

System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted ...  

ORNL 2011-G00246/jcn UT-B ID 200501518 09.2011 System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted Plasma Processing Technology Summary

469

NERSC Continues Tradition of Cosmic Microwave Background Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tradition of Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis with the Planck Cluster NERSC Continues Tradition of Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis with the Planck...

470

System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave ...  

A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in ...

471

Dairy Outreach Program Training and Continuing Education Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication describes the training and continuing education required for those who own or operate concentrated animal feeding operations in Texas.

Mukhtar, Saqib

1999-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Microfluidic systems for continuous crystallization of small organic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents one of the first demonstrations of continuous crystallization in microfluidic devices, and illustrates their use for various applications related to crystallization of small organic molecules. ...

Sultana, Mahmooda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Development of a Continuous Process to Produce Ti via ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Development of a Continuous Process to Produce Ti via Metallothermic Reduction of TiCl4 in Molten Salt. Author(s), David Steyn van Vuuren, ...

474

Atmospheric CO2 Record from Continuous Measurements at Jubany...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNRA (National Research Program in Antarctica) began continuous atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements at Jubany in 1994. The laboratory at Jubany Station is operated...

475

Cavity and Continuous Insulation in REScheck | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cavity and Continuous Insulation in REScheck Insulation should be installed to fill the entire cavity. REScheck(tm) uses nominal insulation R-values. The assemblies listed in...

476

NNSA Continues Emergency Training in Taiwan | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continues Emergency Training in Taiwan | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

477

NETL: NETL Emergency Response/Continuity of Operations for Employees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Only > Emergency Response For Employees NETL Emergency ResponseContinuity of Operations for Employees This website is for postings of special instructions for personnel...

478

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Transport Issues North and South Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: August 16, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Marcia Beck This talk reviews quantitative and qualitative trends in urban transportation and environment, focusing on developing countries. Reviewing recent efforts to look at transportation, the talk adopts a definition of "sustainable transportation" that includes economic and environmental sustainability as well as equity as key criteria. It is argued that governance sustainability is also important if policies and technologies are to reduce the main externalities from urban transport. An important identity is introduced to relate emissions to traffic, modal share, fuel

479

Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Measurements from Cirrus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Measurements from Cirrus Clouds K. Ivanova, H. N. Shirer, and E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The state variables of the atmosphere exhibit correlations at various spatial and temporal scales. These correlations are crucial for understanding short- and long-term trends in climate. Cirrus clouds are important phenomena in the troposphere affecting climate. To improve future parameterization of cirrus clouds in climate models, we must understand the cloud properties and how they change within the cloud. We consider fluctuations of cloud radar signals obtained at isodepths within cirrus clouds

480

Method and apparatus for inspecting reflection masks for defects  

SciTech Connect

An at-wavelength system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defect detection is provided. When a focused beam of wavelength 13 nm is incident on a defective region of a mask blank, three possible phenomena can occur. The defect will induce an intensity reduction in the specularly reflected beam, scatter incoming photons into an off-specular direction, and change the amplitude and phase of the electric field at the surface which can be monitored through the change in the photoemission current. The magnitude of these changes will depend on the incident beam size, and the nature, extent and size of the defect. Inspection of the mask blank is performed by scanning the mask blank with 13 nm light focused to a spot a few .mu.m in diameter, while measuring the reflected beam intensity (bright field detection), the scattered beam intensity (dark-field detection) and/or the change in the photoemission current.

Bokor, Jeffrey (Oakland, CA); Lin, Yun (Berkeley, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight reflecting continued" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 2001 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Look for features that are characteristic of the geothermal producing region not originally seen by imaging the Coso Field using seismic Notes During December of 1999, approximately 32 miles of seismic data were acquired as part of a detailed seismic investigation undertaken by the US Navy Geothermal Program Office. Data acquisition was designed to make effective use of advanced data processing methods, which include Optim's proprietary nonlinear velocity optimization technique and pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The velocity models from the 2-D lines were combined

482

On the Complexity of the "Reflections" game David Kempe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A single player tries to hit a given set of light bulbs with a laser beam, by placing mirrors and other beam must be reflected and split with the help of the movable items, so as to hit a set of light bulbs of the bombs that are part of the board must be hit by a beam. In addition to the laser, light bulbs and bombs

Kempe, David

483

Summary report of the Solar Reflective Materials Technology Workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Reflective Materials Technology Workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Solar Energy Research Institute was held on March 28--30, 1978, in Denver, Colorado. The two and one-half day seminar/workshop was attended by over 95 people representing some 60 private companies and government laboratories. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the ''state-of-the-art'' of solar reflector materials technology, define current mirror design requirements, and make recommendations to DOE for future research and development efforts. The reflector materials are defined for the purpose of this workshop as including all the materials which make up the reflector structure including the actual reflecting surface, the protective coatings, and the support substrate. The reflective surface includes metals, metallic films, metallic alloys, and dielectric or ceramic stacks. The protective coatings, which can be applied to both the front and back of the reflective surface, include such materials as polymer paints and films as well as inorganic coatings such as SiO, MgF/sub 2/ and thin glass. Mirror support structures which have been considered include polymer foams, cellular glass, aluminum honeycomb, wood and paper products, and fiberglass and epoxy composites. The authors of the invited papers were asked to emphasize one or more of four basic areas. These topics included: the requirements and properties for reflector materials, the testing procedures used to evaluate the materials, the results of environmental tests performed on some of the materials, and the actual field experience of solar concentrator structures. Acknowledging that the most severe applications for reflector materials result from high concentration ratio or central receiver concepts, the majority of the speakers addressed specific problems dealing with these concepts. (WHK)

Lind, M.A.; Ault, L.E.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Bohmian transmission and reflection dwell times without trajectory sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of Bohmian mechanics dwell times find a straightforward formulation. The computation of associated probabilities and distributions however needs the explicit knowledge of a relevant sample of trajectories and therefore implies formidable numerical effort. Here a trajectory free formulation for the average transmission and reflection dwell times within static spatial intervals [a,b] is given for one-dimensional scattering problems. This formulation reduces the computation time to less than 5% of the computation time by means of trajectory sampling.

Sabine Kreidl

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

U-043: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets 3: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote Servers Execute Arbitrary Code U-043: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote Servers Execute Arbitrary Code November 22, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote Servers Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: 14.1.1173 and prior versions The following product versions are affected: Reflection for HP version 14.x Reflection for UNIX and OpenVMS version 14.x Reflection for ReGIS Graphics version 14.x Reflection for IBM version 14.x Reflection X version 14.x ABSTRACT: A remote server can execute arbitrary code on the connected target system. reference LINKS: Security Updates and Reflection Attachmate Support Lifecycle Attachmate Downloads

486

U-043: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets 3: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote Servers Execute Arbitrary Code U-043: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote Servers Execute Arbitrary Code November 22, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets Remote Servers Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: 14.1.1173 and prior versions The following product versions are affected: Reflection for HP version 14.x Reflection for UNIX and OpenVMS version 14.x Reflection for ReGIS Graphics version 14.x Reflection for IBM version 14.x Reflection X version 14.x ABSTRACT: A remote server can execute arbitrary code on the connected target system. reference LINKS: Security Updates and Reflection Attachmate Support Lifecycle Attachmate Downloads

487

Analytical study of residential building with reflecting roofs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the effect of roof solar reflectance on the annual heating (cooling) loads, peak heating (cooling) loads, and roof temperatures of the residential buildings. The annual heating (cooling) loads, peak heating (cooling) loads, and exterior roof temperatures for a small compact ranch house are computed using the Thermal Analysis Research Program (TARP). The residential models, with minor modifications in the thermal envelope for different locations, are subjected to hourly weather data for one year compiled in the Weather Year for Energy Calculation (WYEC) for in the following locations: Birmingham, Alabama; Bismarck, North Dakota; Miami, Florida; Phoenix, Arizona; Portland, Maine; and, Washington, D.C. Building loads have been determined for a full factorial experimental design that varies the following parameters of the residential model: solar reflectance of the roof, ceiling thermal resistance, attic ventilation, and attic mass framing area. The computed results for annual heating (cooling) loads and peak heating (cooling) loads are illustrated graphically, both globally for all cities and locally for each geographic location. The effect of peak parameter is ranked (highest to lowest) for effect on annual heating and cooling loads, and peak heating and cooling loads. A parametric study plots the building loads as a function of roof solar reflectance for different levels of ceiling thermal resistances and for each geographic location.

Zarr, R.R.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Bayesian Conditioning, the Reflection Principle, and Quantum Decoherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The probabilities a Bayesian agent assigns to a set of events typically change with time, for instance when the agent updates them in the light of new data. In this paper we address the question of how an agent's probabilities at different times are constrained by Dutch-book coherence. We review and attempt to clarify the argument that, although an agent is not forced by coherence to use the usual Bayesian conditioning rule to update his probabilities, coherence does require the agent's probabilities to satisfy van Fraassen's [1984] reflection principle (which entails a related constraint pointed out by Goldstein [1983]). We then exhibit the specialized assumption needed to recover Bayesian conditioning from an analogous reflection-style consideration. Bringing the argument to the context of quantum measurement theory, we show that "quantum decoherence" can be understood in purely personalist terms---quantum decoherence (as supposed in a von Neumann chain) is not a physical process at all, but an application of the reflection principle. From this point of view, the decoherence theory of Zeh, Zurek, and others as a story of quantum measurement has the plot turned exactly backward.

Christopher A. Fuchs; Ruediger Schack

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Helios model for the optical behavior of reflecting solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Helios model simulates the optical behavior of reflecting concentrators. The model follows the incident solar radiation through the system (including the atmosphere) and includes all the factors that influence the optical performance of a collector. An important output is the flux-density pattern (W/cm/sup 2/) at a grid of points on a surface such as the absorbing surface of a receiver and its integral (power in watts) over the surface. The angular distribution of sunrays for the radiation incident on a concentrator is modified by convolution, using the fast Fourier transform, to incorporate the effects of other nondeterministic factors such as sun-tracking errors, surface slope errors, and reflectance properties. The analytical methods used for the statistics, the off-axis reflecting optics, the atmospheric effects, and the various coordinate systems are described and illustrated. This model forms a basis for the simulation code HELIOS as well as for other codes under development. Some of the HELIOS routines are described, a few of its capabilities are discussed and illustrated, and comparisons of data with calculations are presented. These capabilities have been used for performance predictions, safety studies, design trade-offs, data analysis problems, the specification and analysis of concentrator quality, and for the general understanding of solar-concentrator technology.

Biggs, F.; Vittitoe, C.N.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Development of the T+M coupled flow-geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow-thermal-geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, ... Keywords: Double porosity, Fracture propagation, Hydraulic fracturing, Poromechanics, Shale gas, Tensile failure

Jihoon Kim, George J. Moridis

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

A Fast Response Continuous Analyzer for Halogenated Atmospheric Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast response version of the continuous SF6 analyzer originally introduced in 1976 has been developed. The new continuous analyzer has a response time constant of 0.36 s, which is 4–30 times faster than previous analyzers. The very fast ...

Richard L. Benner; Brian Lamb

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

ANFIS based sensor fault detection for continuous stirred tank reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) based Sensor fault detection and isolation for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is proposed. CSTR is a highly nonlinear process exhibiting stable and unstable steady state at different ... Keywords: ANFIS observer, Continuous stirred tank reactor, Dedicated observer, Fault detection

U. Sabura Banu; G. Uma

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493