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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation, 2011-2040 (million barrels per day) Permian Basin Bakken Eagle Ford

2

Table 2. Principal tight oil plays: oil production and proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other tight oil plays (e.g. Monterey, Woodford)",,,24,253 "All U.S. tight oil plays",,,228,3628 "Note: Includes lease condensate." "Source: U.S. Energy...

3

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Does EIA have data on shale (or “tight oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

5

tight oil - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

6

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 15 20 25 30 35 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Associated with oil Coalbed methane Tight gas Shale gas Alaska Non-associated onshore Non-associated...

7

Low Total OECD Oil Stocks* Keep Market Balance Tight  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This chart illustrates why EIA sees crude oil prices staying relatively high. It shows global inventories, as measured by OECD petroleum stocks. EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels of forward demand coverage in order to avoid continued price volatility. The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. Low inventories increase the potential for price volatility throughout 2001. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum

8

Table A14. Oil and gas supply - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery ... 3Tight oil represents resources in low-permeability reservoirs, including shale and chalk formations.

9

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 ... oil demand growth, slow supply growth and tight spare capacity 22 Richard Newell, May 5, 2011

10

The Formation of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs) via Aerodynamic Drift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NASA Kepler mission has revealed an abundant class of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs). The current paradigm for planet formation suggests that small planetesimals will quickly spiral into the host star due to aerodynamic drag, preventing rocky planet formation. In contrast, we find that aerodynamic drift, when acting on an ensemble of solids, can concentrate mass at short orbital periods in gaseous disks. Sublimation fronts may further aid this process. Kepler data suggest that the innermost known planets are found near the silicate sublimation zone. STIP planets should have a wide range of volatile fractions due to aerodynamic drift and H2 dissociation-driven gas accretion. We further propose that the low mass of Mars is evidence that the Solar System was once a proto-STIP.

Boley, Aaron C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of stress sensitivity and its influence on oil production from tight reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid flow into a production oil well, subject to constant-on the productivity of oil well,” Journal of Xi’an Petroleumpermeability can affect well oil production. Specifically,

Lei, Qun; Xiong, Wei; Yuan, Cui; Wu, Yu-Shu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... oil refers to oil produced from shale, or other very low-permeability rocks, with horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing technologies.

13

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves ... EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2012 ...

14

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... to oil produced from shale, or other very low-permeability rocks, with horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing technologies.

15

FORECASTING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF WELLS LOCATED IN TIGHT OIL PLAYS USING ARTIFICIAL EXPERT SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs is promising to account for the declining conventional supplies in the future. However, because of their complex… (more)

Bansal, Yogesh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Wilcox formation evaluation; Improved procedures for tight-gas-sand evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses risks in tight-gas-sand evaluation, reduced by defining relationships between pore geometry and critical water saturations. These results are integrated with log interpretation to derive an estimated kh that compares favorably with a true kh from production tests. These procedures are potentially applicable for evaluating other complex reservoirs.

Lewis, D.J.; Perrin, J.D. (BP Exploration Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

18

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

19

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

20

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for IEA Bilateral Meetings March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, IEA Bilateral Meetings, March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

22

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For Consumer Energy Alliance February 21, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski February 21, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

23

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

24

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

25

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

26

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society April 08, 2013 | Baltimore, MD By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, Baltimore CFA Society April 08, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

27

Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.

Sisemore, Clyde J. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Recovery of heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from underground formations  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of producing heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from an underground formation. The method consists of utilizing or establishing an aqueous fluid communication path within and through the formation between an injection well or conduit and a production well or conduit by introducing into the formation from the injection well or conduit hot water and/or low quality steam at a temperature in the range about 60{sup 0}-130{sup 0}C and at a substantially neutral or alkaline pH to establish or enlarge the aqueous fluid communication path within the formation from the injection well or conduit to the production well or conduit by movement of the introduced hot water or low quality steam through the formation, increasing the temperature of the injected hot water of low quality steam to a temperature in the range about 110{sup 0}-180{sup 0}C while increasing the pH of the injected hot water or low quality steam to a pH of about 10-13 so as to bring about the movement or migration or stripping of the heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation substantially into the hot aqueous fluid communication path with the formation and recovering the resulting produced heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation as an emulsion containing less than about 30% oil or bitumen from the production well or conduit.

McKay, A.S.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

Acoustic wave propagation in cracked porous rocks and application to interpreting acoustic log data in tight formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rocks in earth's crust usually contain both pores and cracks. Typical examples include tight sandstone and shale rocks that have low porosity but contain abundant microcracks. By extending the classic Biot's poroelastic wavetheory to include the effects of cracks

Xiaoming Tang; Xuelian Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Richard Newell, Administrator Richard Newell, Administrator May 5, 2011 Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation EIA's Energy and Financial Markets Initiative 2 Richard Newell, May 5, 2011 * Collection of critical energy information to improve market transparency - improved petroleum storage capacity data - other improvements to data quality and coverage * Analysis of energy and financial market dynamics to improve understanding of what drives energy prices - internal analysis and sponsorship of external research * Outreach with other Federal agencies, experts, and the public - expert workshops - public sessions at EIA's energy conferences - solicitation of public comment on EIA's data collections

31

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

32

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Help Operators See Oil, Gas Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Six Research Teams to Develop Advanced Diagnostics And Imaging Technologies for Oil, Gas Fields TULSA, OK - If oil and gas producers could "see" hydrocarbon-bearing formations more accurately from the surface or from nearby wellbores, they can position new wells more precisely to produce more oil or gas with less risk and ultimately, at lower costs. For many producers in the United States, especially smaller producers operating on razor-thin margins, advanced diagnostics and imaging systems can help them in business. By visualizing the barriers and pathways for the flow of oil and gas through underground rock formations, producers can avoid dry holes and increase ultimate recovery.

33

Method of detonating explosives for fragmenting oil shale formation toward a vertical free face  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a method for explosively expanding oil shale formation toward a limited void volume provided by a void excavated in a retort site in formation containing oil shale, wherein said void has at least one vertical free face, the improvement comprising the steps of: placing explosive in a roiw of blasting holes in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent such a vertical free face, said blasting holes being mutually spaced apart along the length of the void; and detonating explosive in the blasting holes in a single round in a time delay sequence progressing along the length of the row of blasting holes for explosivelyexpanding formation in said remaining portion of unfragmented formation toward such vertical free face for forming at least a portion of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort.

Hutchins, N.; Ridley, R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Will lecture on: Unconventional Oil and Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are not yet resolved. Ten years ago this category comprised heavy oil, oil shale, coal bed methane, tight gas, and economic aspects of gas shale and tight oil development. The role of oil shale in the emerging energy applied research on heavy oil, gas hydrate, gas shale, tight oil, and oil shale reservoirs. He advises

Schuster, Assaf

36

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Tools & Models ... Oil production growth in the Bakken shale play mirrors somewhat the growth in natural gas production ... U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov

37

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

X-ray analysis can improve recovery of oil and natural gas |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gas industries are undergoing a revolution that has opened up previously inaccessible resources trapped in shale and tight play formations. Oil and GasFact SheetJanuary 2013...

39

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Staggered array of explosives for fragmented oil shale formation toward a vertical free face  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale formation is explosively expanded toward a limited void volume for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. In one embodiment, a void in the form of a vertical slot is excavated within a retort site, leaving at least one portion of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent to a vertical free face of the slot. Explosive is placed in at least two rows of vertical blasting holes in the remaining portion of unfragmented formation adjacent the vertical free face. The blasting holes in each row are mutually spaced apart along the length of the slot and longitudinally offset from blasting holes in the next adjacent row, and the row of blasting holes extends generally parallel to the vertical free face. Explosive in the blasting holes is detonated in a time delay sequence starting near one end of the slot and progressing along the length of the slot for explosively expanding formation in the remaining portion of unfragmented formation toward the vertical free face for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort.

Hutchins, N.M.; Studebaker, I.G.

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Staggered array of explosives for fragmented oil shale formation toward a vertical free face  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale formation is explosively expanded toward a limited void volume for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. In one embodiment, a void in the form of a vertical slot is excavated within a retort site, leaving at least one portion of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent a vertical free face of the slot. Explosive is placed in at least 2 rows of vertical blasting holes in the remaining portion of unfragmented formation adjacent the vertical free face. The blasting holes in each row are mutually spaced apart along the length of the slot and longitudinally offset from blasting holes in the next adjacent row, and the row of blasting holes extends generally parallel to the vertical free face. Explosive in the blasting holes is detonated in a time delay sequence starting near one end of the slot and progressing along the length of the slot for explosively expanding formation in the remaining portion of unfragmented formation toward the vertical free face for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. 31 claims.

Studebaker, I.G.; Hutchins, N.M.

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Multiphase flow modeling of oil mist and liquid film formation in oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A first level model is developed to account for the appearance and disappearance of liquid oil produced during oil shale retorting. Although nearly all the kerogen initially present in the oil shale exits the retort in the form of a liquid either in the form of a mist or a falling film, the flow of this valuable, clean liquid fuel is not presently accounted for in oil shale retorting computer models. A rigorous treatment of the problem is very difficult. A simplified but sophisticated treatment is developed which is designed to be easily incorporated into the LLL computer model now without major modifications to the numerical solution algorithms. A complete set of equations and simple models are developed to explicitly account for the movement of condensed oil mist and liquid film flowing at unequal velocities. The equations clearly illustrate where more detailed treatments may be inserted, as they are developed.

Lyczkowski, R.W.; Gidaspow, D.

1979-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

Method of detonating explosives for fragmenting oil shale formation toward a vertical free face  

SciTech Connect

An oil shale formation is explosively expanded toward a limited void volume for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation. A void in the form of a narrow vertical slot is excavated within a retort site, leaving at least one portion of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent a vertical free face of the slot. Explosive is placed in a row of vertical blasting holes in the remaining portion of unfragmented formation adjacent the vertical free face. The blasting holes are mutually spaced apart along the length of the slot, and the row of blasting holes extends parallel to the vertical free face. Explosive in the blasting holes is detonated in a time delay sequence starting near one end of the slot and progressing along the length of the slot for explosively expanding the formation in the vertical free face. A fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale is formed in an in situ oil shale retort. 34 claims.

Hutchins, N.M.; Ridley, R.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Notes: To reinforce the impact that inventory levels (I.e., tight markets) have on price, note the variation in spot gasoline prices relative to crude oil prices, as shown by the...

48

Radon (Rn-222) and thoron (Rn-220) emanation fractions from three separate formations of oil field pipe scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the course of normal oil well operations, pipes used downhole in the oil and petroleum industry tend to accumulate a mineral deposit on their interior, which restricts the flow of oil. This deposit, termed scale, will eventually occlude the interior diameter of the pipe making removal from service and descaling a cost effective option. The pipes are sent to cleaning yards where they remain until descaling can be performed. This storage period can potentially create a health concern not only because of the external radiation exposure but also because of the radon gas emissions, both of which are due to the radioactive minerals contained in the scale. It was believed that the structure of the scale is formed tightly enough to prevent much of the radon from becoming airborne. The goal of this research was to determine the emanation fractions for the rattled scale samples from three formations. A high purity germanium detector was used to measure the activities of the parents and progeny of radon, and electret ion chambers were used to measure the concentration of radon emanated from the scale. The emanation fractions of between 4.9x10-5 and 1.08x10-3 for radon were a factor of approximately 100 smaller than previous research results. For thoron, the fractions were and 5.72x10-8 and 4.92x10-7 for thoron with no previous research to compare. However, information that pertains to the temperature dependence of emanation was included in this research and was not available for previous, similar research. Therefore, differences in the environment (e.g., temperature, humidity, etc.) in which the previous experiments were conducted, as well as differences in the scale formation types used, could account for the discrepancy. In addition, measuring the emanation fractions of the rattled scale was a method of determining whether surface to volume ratio dependence existed. After acquiring the emanation fractions, insufficient evidence of any surface to volume ratio dependence could be found.

Fruchtnicht, Erich Harold

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hydrogenation of Fats and Oils: Theory and PracticeChapter 6 Isomer Formation During Hydogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of Fats and Oils: Theory and Practice Chapter 6 Isomer Formation During Hydogenation Processing eChapters Processing A23660281FB50C6D1CEB6F5BEDB60F50 Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Isomer Fo

50

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year under fully operational conditions in 2006, the multiple-partner Teapot Dome project could be one of the world's largest CO2 storage sites. CO2 injection has been used for decades to improve oil recovery from depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the CO2 sequestration technique, the aim is to "co-optimize" CO2 storage and oil recovery. In order to achieve the goal of CO2 sequestration, this study uses reservoir simulation to predict the amount of CO2 that can be stored in the Tensleep Formation and the amount of oil that can be produced as a side benefit of CO2 injection. This research discusses the effects of using different reservoir fluid models from EOS regression and fracture permeability in dual porosity models on enhanced oil recovery and CO2 storage in the Tensleep Formation. Oil and gas production behavior obtained from the fluid models were completely different. Fully compositional and pseudo-miscible black oil fluid models were tested in a quarter of a five spot pattern. Compositional fluid model is more convenient for enhanced oil recovery evaluation. Detailed reservoir characterization was performed to represent the complex characteristics of the reservoir. A 3D black oil reservoir simulation model was used to evaluate the effects of fractures in reservoir fluids production. Single porosity simulation model results were compared with those from the dual porosity model. Based on the results obtained from each simulation model, it has been concluded that the pseudo-miscible model can not be used to represent the CO2 injection process in Teapot Dome. Dual porosity models with variable fracture permeability provided a better reproduction of oil and water rates in the highly fractured Tensleep Formation.

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High Hopes, Tight Quarters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hopes, Hopes, Tight Quarters Unique Recycler, world's largest array of permanent magnets, taking shape in crowded Main Injector tunnel. by Mike Perricone, Office of Public Affairs The magnets are numbered in the hundreds; their weight is measured in tons. The available space in the tunnel is usually about four and a half feet, but it can be as little as two or three inches, and the forklifts doing the moving have been custom- designed for these tight quarters. The obstacles include water systems, cable trays, workers performing other installations, and the precisely aligned components of the signature Main Injector accelerator. The consequences of a possible slip-up: Don't even ask. Installation crews can put eight to 10 magnets in place in a day, if the magnets are located close together. Installing a magnet

52

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Increased tight oil production, vehicle efficiency reduce ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas overtakes coal as the largest fuel for U.S. electricity generation. ... Over the same period, pipeline imports from Canada fall by 30%, ...

54

DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. Operators can use the data on the websites to expand natural gas recovery in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and the central Appalachian Basin of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. As production from conventional natural gas resources declines, natural gas from tight-gas sandstone formations is expected to contribute a growing percentage to the nation's energy supply. "Tight gas" is natural gas

55

STEO January 2013 - oil production increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 U.S. crude oil production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. America's oil output will jump nearly 900,000 barrels per day in 2013 to an average 7.3 million barrels a day, according to the latest monthly forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This would mark the biggest one-year increase in output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. U.S. daily oil production is expected to rise by another 600,000 barrels in 2014 to nearly 8 million barrels a day, the highest level since 1988. Most of America's oil production growth over the next two years will come from more drilling activity in tight shale rock formations located in North Dakota and Texas

56

US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. Near-term tightness in crude oil ...

58

Resource appraisal of three rich oil-shale zones in the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The main oil-shale-bearing member of the Eocene Green River Formation, the Parachute Creek Member, contains several distinct rich oil-shale zones that underlie large areas of Piceance Creek Basin in NW. Colorado. Three of these have been selected for an oil-shale resource-appraisal study. Two over-lie and one underlies the main saline zone in the Parachute Creek Member. The uppermost of these zones, the Mahogany Zone, is in the upper third of the Parachute Creek Member/ it ranges in thickness from less than 75 to more than 225 ft and is the most persistent oil- shale unit in the Green River Formation underlying an area of more than 1,200 sq miles in the Piceance Creek Basin. The second rich zone is separated from the Mahogany Zone by a variable thickness of sandstone, siltstone, or low- grade oil shale. This zone attains a maximum thickness of more than 250 ft and underlies an area of more than 700 sq miles. The third rich oil-shale zone is in the lower third of the Parachute Creek Member. It underlies an area of about 300 sq miles near the depositional center of the Piceance Creek Basin and attains a thickness of more than 150 ft. The 3 rich oil-shale zones have total resources of 317 billion bbl of oil in the areas appraised.

Donnell, J.R.; Blair, R.W. Jr.

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee formation using horizontal drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. `The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. Additional project work comprises characterization of 30 Dundee fields in Michigan to aid in determining appropriate candidates for development through horizontal drilling. Further quantification of reservoir parameters such as importance of fracturing, fracture density, and irregularity of the dolomitized surface at the top of the reservoir will help in designing the optimal strategy for horizontal drilling. Technical progress is presented for the following tasks: project management; reservoir characterization; data measurement and analysis; database management; geochemical and basin modeling; and technology transfer.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marof seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field Irameasurement system in the Coal Oil Point seep field in the

Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Gasoline inventories indicate how tight the gasoline product market is in any one region. When the gasoline market is tight, it affects the portion of gasoline price is the spread between spot product price and crude oil price. Note that in late 1998-and early 1999 spreads were very small when inventories were quite high. Contrast summers of 1998 or 1999 with summer 2000. Last summer's tight markets, resulting low stocks and transition to Phase 2 RFG added price pressure over and above the already high crude price pressure on gasoline -- particularly in the Midwest. As we ended last winter, gasoline inventories were low, and the spread between spot prices and crude oil were higher than typical as a result. Inventories stayed well below average and the spread during the

62

SPE Tight Gas Conference, 2009 "Program for the Beneficial Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE Tight Gas Conference, 2009 "Program for the Beneficial Use of Oil Field Produced Water" David B Additional cost of demineralization of water. The (probable) salinity of the produced brine. Environmental. Servicing Schedule weekly #12;Comparison of Desalinated Produced Water with Municipal

63

Borehole gravity surveys in the Cretaceous-Tertiary Sagavanirktok Formation, Kuparuk River oil field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Detailed borehole gravity surveys (sponsored by the US Department of Energy) were made in three wells in the Kuparuk River and westernmost Prudhoe Bay oil fields, Alaska from depths as shallow as 15 m to as great as 1,340 m through permafrost and underlying heavy oil bearing sandstones of the Sagavanirktok Formation. A subbituminous coal-bearing sequence and the stability field for methane hydrate occur partly within and partly below the permafrost zone, whose base, defined by the 0{degree}C isotherm, varies from 464 to 564 m. The surveys provided accurate, large-volume estimates of in-situ bulk density from which equivalent porosity was calculated using independent grain and pore-fluid density information. This density and porosity data helped to define the rock mass properties within the hydrate stability field and the thermal conductivity, seismic character, and compaction history of the permafrost. Bulk density of the unconsolidated to poorly consolidated sections ranges mostly from 1.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}. The shallow permafrost section appears to be slightly overcompacted in comparison to similar sedimentary sequences in nonpermafrost regions. The cause of this apparent overcompaction is unknown but may be due to freeze-thaw processes that have similarly affected sea floor and surficial deposits elsewhere in the Arctic. Fluctuations of bulk density appear to be controlled principally by (1) textural variations of the sediments, possibly exaggerated locally within the permafrost zone by excess ice, (2) presence or absence of carbonaceous material, and (3) type of pore-fluid (water-ice vs. water vs. hydrocarbons). As hypothetical models predict bulk-density is slightly lower opposite one interval of possible methane hydrate. Porosity may be as high as 40-45% for selected coarser grained units within the permafrost zone, and as high as 30-35% in a series of well sorted, heavy oil-bearing sandstones.

Beyer, L.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Mechanism of formation of oil by the hot aqueous alkaline digestion of cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall mechanism of cellulose converson in hot aqueous alkali appears to be one of degradation through glucose to low molecular weight saccharinic acids, dihydroxybutyric acid, glycolic acid, and carbonyl products such as acetone, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and similar compounds. Although the products identified in the present report were fairly complex furans, carbocyclic ketones, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds, nevertheless, in most cases, they could have been formed from simple carbonyl compounds through a series of condensations involving carbanion intermediates. It is conceivable that residual alkali in the oil during acetone extraction could have given rise to diacetone alcohol as an artifact. This is refuted by examination of an aqueous residue which was extracted with diethyl ether and which was never exposed to any acetone: Compounds derived from diacetone alcohol (such as mesityl oxide or 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) were also identified in the diethyl ether extract of the aqueous phase. Other compounds were identified in the oil acetone extract which could not have been derived from acetone or diacetone alcohol, but which could have been formed from other carbonyl compounds by the same mechanism. Hence, diacetone alcohol is a genuine product of cellulose conversion although apparently not an intermediate in further synthesis of other products. The further reaction of the postulated cyclic intermediates, and the route to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons of high molecular weight is intended to be the next subject of investigation in the current work. The fundamental difference in the mechanism of cellulose conversion to oil by pyrolysis and by aqueous alkaline digestion predicted by theory is therefore confirmed. Pyrolysis products may be explained generally by carbonium ion and free radical reactions (in fact, cellulose decomposition is acid-catalyzed), while in aqueous alkali, nucleophilic carbanion reactions are favored.

Molten, P.M.; Miller, R.K.; Donovan, J.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

"U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Summary Data Tables, 2011" "Contents" "Table 1: Changes to Proved Reserves, 2011" "Table 2: Principal Tight Oil Plays: Oil...

66

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... March 2003 Price Spike August 2003 Price Spike Quarterly World Oil Demand Growth from Previous Year Overview of Market Fundamentals Tight balance in global ...

68

Emerging Oil & Gas Supplies: Future Prospects for Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The shale gas & tight oil technology story is only beginning, with much yet to be written • Technology is creating new resources out of rocks

69

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

70

Future Prospects for Oil Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 . High TRR . Reference . High EUR . Tight oil production . million barrels per day . Low EUR . 5 Adam Sieminski

71

Problem of sludge formation in benzol division solar oil and ''carbonization'' in coke oven gas compressor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the problem and possible causes of sludge formation in the return solar oil in benzene recovery units and on the problem of deposits in the pipe systems after coke oven gas compressors. The possible entrainment of fine particles of coal charge in the solar oil was also discussed. Sedimentation of the sludge was recommended with daily removal of the settled sludge. A chemical analysis of the deposits in the piping system of the coke oven gas and the coal charge revealed that the deposits were not caused by entrained coal particles. (JMT)

Rezunenko, Y.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 Trillion barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan.

Wood, J.R.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced domestically will probably be about 80 to 100 million bbls.

Wood, J.R.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

A practical model to predict gas hydrate formation, dissociation and transportability in oil and gas flowlines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil and gas industry is facing very challenging production issues with offshore explorations in deeper and colder waters. Longer subsea tiebacks will be required… (more)

Zerpa, Luis Eduardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was successful. It has produced over 37,000 bbls of oil as of December 31, 1996 at sustained rate of {approximately}100 bbls/day. At a nominal wellhead price of $20/bbl, this well has made about $750,000 and is still going strong. Two additional horizontal wells have just been completed and are on test. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan.

Wood, J.R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

DOE field test produces more oil, royalties from the Green River Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews a waterflood demonstration project that Lomax Exploration Company performed in the Monument Butte area of Utah. The results of this project were so successful that the methodology is being extended to other similar properties of Utah with oil shale deposits. The paper describes the reservoir characterization methods, methods of sampling and analyzing the reservoir data, the cost of designing and performing the waterflood projects, and the future of such a technology on the declining domestic oil production.

Lomax, J.D. [Lomax Energy LLC, Laguna Beach, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor’s logic, which mimics human expert’s decision-making process. TGS Advisor’s recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997  

SciTech Connect

This Class II field project has demonstrated that economic quantities of hydrocarbons can be produced from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The site selected for the demonstration horizontal well was Crystal Field, a nearly abandoned Dundee oil field in Montcalm County, Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well, the TOW 1-3, drilled as a field demonstration pilot was successful, producing at rate of 100 bbls of oil per day with a zero water cut. Although the well is capable of producing at a of 500+ bbls/day, the production rate is being kept low deliberately to try to prevent premature water coning. Cumulative production exceeded 50,000 bbls of oil by the end of April, 1997 and lead to the permitting and licensing of several dozen Dundee wells by project end. Twelve of these permits were for continued development of Crystal Field. Two long horizontal wells were drilled successfully in Crystal after the TOW 1-3, but were disappointing economically. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The addition of several horizontal wells will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A coupled flow and geomechanics model for enhanced oil and gas recovery in shale formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Economic production from shale formations has been achieved because of advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Nonetheless, hydrocarbon recovery from these reservoirs is… (more)

Fakcharoenphol, Perapon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economics success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The project is a cooperative venture between Michigan Technological University (MTU), Western Michigan University (WMU), and Terra Energy (now Cronus Development Co.). During the fall of 1995, the demonstration well for this project, the TOW No. 1-3 well in Crystal Field, Montcalm County, Michigan, was completed in the Dundee Formation and for the first three months of operation produced 50 bbl/day oil with no water cut. Because surface facilities were inadequate to handle full production, the well was produced for 12 hrs/day and shut in for 12 hrs/day. In January, 1996, new surface Facilities were completed and production was raised to 100 bbl/day. Daily production has varied from about 75 to 100 BOPD since that time. To date, the well has produced over 10, 000 bbls. The water cut remains at 0% and pressure has been maintained at 1445 psi by an active water drive. If expectations are met, the well will pay out in less than 1 year and continue on production for at least 5 years. Cronus Development Co. is tentatively planning to drill three more horizontal wells in the Dundee in Crystal Field. Thus, the play concept we chose to test, that bypassed attic oil remained in the Dundee reservoir between wells that had been produced at excessively high flow rates and had coned water during primary production, appears to be correct, and the TOW No. 1-3 HD-1 well is now a scientific, and appears soon to become an economic, success.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Low Stocks Mean Tight Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Like those for other petroleum products, gasoline inventories have been running below normal. As of the latest weekly data, stocks are about 5% lower than the low end of the normal range for this time of year. Behind all of the low product inventories are low crude oil inventories. Recall that the crude market tightened in 1999 when OPEC cut back production. Demand was greater than supply and inventories were used to make up the difference. They have not yet recovered. Crude oil inventories are running about 7% below the low end of the normal range for this time of year. After last week's very large stock draw, it appears inventories are the lowest that they have been since December 1975. The U.S. inventory data will be an important price barometer to

89

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report discusses 3D-3C seismic acquisition and 3D P-wave alternate processing.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

First Edition Geologic Storage Formation Classification: Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage. Currently, these tight organic rich shales are being developed as gas and oil shale plays, such as the Marcellus Shale, and are a significant contributor to the...

91

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to consider the enhanced recovery of petroleum from the Dundee Formation using horizontal wells. This report contains summaries of the following tasks: project management; reservoir characterization; database management; drilling; and technology transfer. Some of the highlights are: well and log data sets and production data sets for all 30 fields are now complete and are stored in the TerraSciences` database at WMU; tops have been picked on all formations in all wells; well location and formation tops data sets are also now complete; The GeoGraphix Exploration System (GES) software package was acquired this quarter and installed on a PC in the Subsurface Laboratory at MTU.

Wood, J.R.

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of a wireless sensor network for collaborative agents to treat scale formation in oil pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wireless network system (WSN) has been developed for a team of underwater Collaborative Autonomous Agents (CAAs) that are capable of repairing and locating scale formations in tanks and pipes within inaccessible environments. The design of the hardware ... Keywords: FPGA, WSN, Zigbee communication protocol, robotic development, underwater sensors

Frank Murphy; Dennis Laffey; Brendan O'Flynn; John Buckley; John Barton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Assessment of API Thread Connections Under Tight Gas Well Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern oil and gas industry of America has seen most of the high quality, easily obtainable resources, already produced, thus causing wells to be drilled deeper in search for unconventional resources. This means Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) must improve in order to withstand harsher conditions; especially the ability of connections to effectively create leak tight seals. This study investigates the use of thread connections in tight gas fields; therefore, an insight into their potential to contribute to fulfilling the energy demands is necessary. Also, a survey of completed projects done in tight gas fields can provide vital information that will establish the minimum requirements thread connection must meet to perform its functions. To make suitable adjustments to ensure safe and efficient operations we must thoroughly understand the many aspects of thread connections. To have this understanding, a review of previous works was carried out that highlights the capabilities and imitations of thread connections. In addition to reviewing previous work done on thread connections; this study measured the viscosity of thread compounds under variable conditions. It was found that viscosity of thread compound falls in the range of 285,667 cP and 47,758 cP when measured between 32.9 degrees F and 121.5 degrees F. This can be very important because thread compound is essential to the function of thread connections. The knowledge of its viscosity can help choose the most suitable compound. By knowing the value of the viscosity of a thread compound it can also be used to form an analytical assessment of the grooved plate method by providing a means to calculate a pressure gradient which impacts the leakage.

Bourne, Dwayne

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission and the oil & gas industries. The combustion system used in Solar's products are discussed along- bility for the introduction of new combustion systems for gas turbine products to enhance fuel

Ponce, V. Miguel

96

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee formation using horizontal drains. Second quarterly report, [January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

Well data, including drillers` logs, wireline logs, and seismic data, from the Crystal and 3 0 other Dundee oil fields in the Michigan basin have been acquired. Digitized logs of 336 wells that currently produce or have produced from the Dundee Formation in the seven-county study area have been purchased from Maness Petroleum Company. The data-gathering phase of the well-log program is now complete. Well-log analysis using TerraSciences TerraStation software has begun. Detailed analyses of wells with modem logs are being made using density/porosity and Pickett crossplots. Water saturations were calculated for several wells in the past month. Production data have been added to the well-file database. We now have the capability of mapping production as well as geology. Well-location basemaps with permit numbers were constructed for all 30 fields. Contour maps were completed for all 30 fields during the last quarter, including maps: on the top of the Dundee Formation, the top of the Dundee porosity zone (which is well below the top of the Dundee and varies in stratigraphic position throughout most fields), Dundee to Traverse isopachs, and initial production values before and after well treatment. At least two simple computer-generated cross sections were constructed for each field.

Wood, J.R.

1995-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, A.E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, Alex E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Economics of tight sands gas extraction as affected by r and d. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the economics and resource potential of tight sand formations as a major near-term source of unconventional gas. The main vehicles for analyzing the issues to date are the 1980 study by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) on tight sand resources and two studies based on the NPC's work at different stages of completion for the GRI Center for Energy Systems Analysis (CESA).

Rosenberg, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov ... Technology Economics . Theory . ... • Risk appetite of industry participants

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation (Devonian) of the Michigan Basin using horizontal drains. Final report, April 28, 1994--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Total hydrocarbon production in the Michigan Basin has surpassed 1 billion barrels (Bbbls) and total unrecovered reserves are estimated at 1--2 BBbls. However, hydrocarbon production in Michigan has fallen from 35 MMbbls/yr in 1979 to about 10 MMbbls/yr in 1996. In an effort to slow this decline, a field demonstration project designed around using a horizontal well to recover bypassed oil was designed and carried out at Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI. The project had two goals: to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee Formation, and to characterize additional Dundee reservoirs (29) that are look alikes to the Crystal Field. As much as 85 percent of the oil known to exist in the Dundee Formation in the Michigan Basin remains in the ground as bypassed oil. Early production techniques in the 137 fields were poor, and the Dundee was at risk of being abandoned, leaving millions of barrels of oil behind. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, Michigan is a good example of a worn out field. Crystal Field was once a prolific producer which had been reduced to a handful of wells, the best of which produced only 5 barrels per day. The demonstration well drilled as a result of this project, however, has brought new life to the Crystal Field. Horizontal drilling is one of the most promising technologies available for oil production. The new well was completed successfully in October of 1995 and has been producing 100 barrels of oil per day, 20 times better than the best conventional well in the field.

Wood, J.R.; Pennington, W.D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment,caverns involved in CAES include stability, air tightness, acceptable surface subsidence, and (later on) an environmentally safe decommissioning and abandonment [

Kim, H.-M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for disposal of radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of a preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. The objective of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and to obtain a broad overview of the physical and economic factors which would have an effect on the suitability of the oil shale formations for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. These physical and economic factors are discussed in sections on magnitude of the oil shales, waste disposal relations with oil mining, cavities requirements, hydrological aspects, and study requirements. (JRD)

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formations, such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs,sedimentary formations, including oil and gas reservoirs andassociated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). At the North-

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

106

Chemical evidence of kerogen formation in source rocks and oil shales via selective preservation of thin resistant outer walls of microalgae: Origin of ultralaminae  

SciTech Connect

New structures, termed ultralaminae, were recently observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy, usually in high amounts, in a number of kerogens from oil shales and source rocks. Morphological similarities were noted between ultralaminae and the thin (ca. 15 nm) resistant outer walls, composed of non-hydrolyzable macromolecules (algaenans), commonly occurring in extant Chlorophyceae, especially in the cosmopolitan genus Scenedesmus. Identification of the pyrolysis products of S. quadricauda algaenan showed (i) a highly aliphatic structure based on a macromolecular network of long (up to C{sub 32}) polymethylenic chains probably cross-linked by ether bridges, and (ii) a close correlation based on the formation of n-alkylnitriles, between this algaenan and two ultralaminar kerogens, the Rundle Oil Shale and the Green River Shale. These fossil ultralaminae, therefore, likely originated from the selective preservation of the thin, algaenan-containing, outer walls of Scenedesmus and/or of other Chlorophyceae containing outer walls of a similar morphology and composition. Previous evidence of kerogen formation via selective preservation of algaenans was restricted to rather uncommon kerogens; the present results, added to ultralamina common occurrence and abundance, point to a wide involvement and to a large contribution of the selective preservation of algaenan-containing thin outer walls of Chlorophyceae in the formation of kerogens in a number of lacustrine source rocks and oil shales.

Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Casadevall, E.; Berkaloff, C.; Rousseau, B. (Ecole Normale Superieure, Cedex (France))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4836 bytes) oil.gif (4836 bytes) The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(99), (Washington, DC, January 1999). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery and unconventional gas recovery from tight gas formations, gas shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

109

ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to locate the best locations to drill for them. The tight gas sands of the Piceance Basin have long been understanding of the way that fractures have controlled the production of gas in these tight gas sands an east to west trend of tight gas sand fields that produce a substantial amount of the total gas produced

110

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, W.B. III.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

continued production growth from U.S. tight oil formations and Canadian oil sands. U.S ... Drilling in tight oil plays in the onshore ...

114

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tight oil formations and Canadian oil sands. EIA slightly increased its forecast for Canada’s oil sands output ...

115

The Utilization of the Microflora Indigenous to and Present in Oil-Bearing Formations to Selectively Plug the More Porous Zones Thereby Increasing Oil Recovery During Waterflooding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to demonstrate the use of indigenous microbes as a method of profile control in waterfloods. It is expected that as the microbial population is induced to increase, that the expanded biomass will selectively block the more permeable zones of the reservoir thereby forcing injection water to flow through the less permeable zones which will result in improved sweep efficiency. This increase in microbial population will be accomplished by injecting a nutrient solution into four injectors. Four other injectors will act as control wells. During Phase I, two wells will be cored through the zone of interest. The core will be subjected to special core analyses in order to arrive at the optimum nutrient formulation. During Phase II, nutrient injection will begin, the results monitored, and adjustments to the nutrient composition made, if necessary. Phase II also will include the drilling of three wells for post-mortem core analysis. Phase III will focus on technology transfer of the results. It should be pointed out that one expected outcome of this new technology will be a prolongation of economical waterflooding operations, i.e. economical oil recovery should continue for much longer periods in the producing wells subjected to this selective plugging technique.

Brown, Lewis R.; Stephens, James O.; Vadie, Alex A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Utilization of the Microflora Indigenous to and Present in Oil-Bearing Formations to Selectively Plug the More Porous Zones Thereby Increasing Oil Recovery During Waterflooding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to demonstrate the use of indigenous microbes as a method of profile control in waterfloods. It is expected that as the microbial population is induced to increase, that the expanded biomass will selectively block the more permeable zones of the reservoir thereby forcing injection water to flow through the less permeable zones which will result in improved sweep efficiency. This increase in microbial population will be accomplished by injecting a nutrient solution into four injectors. Four other injectors will act as control wells. During Phase I, two wells will be cored through the zone of interest. The core will be subjected to special core analyses in order to arrive at the optimum nutrient formulation. During Phase II, nutrient injection will begin, the results monitored, and adjustments to the nutrient composition made, if necessary. Phase II also will include the drilling of three wells for post-mortem core analysis. Phase III will focus on technology transfer of the results. It should be pointed out that one expected outcome of this new technology will be a prolongation of economical waterflooding operations, i.e. economical oil recovery should continue for much longer periods in the producing wells subjected to this selective plugging technique. Results from work under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-90BC14665 will be incorporated as appropriate.

Brown, Lewis R.; Vadie, Alex A.

1996-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore space. Although the grains in tight sand samples do notfluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predictflow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

A site for horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan. Additional project work comprises characterization of 30 other Dundee fields in Michigan to aid in determining appropriate candidates for development through horizontal drilling. Further quantification of reservoir parameters such as importance of fracturing, fracture density, and irregularity of the dolomitized surface at the top of the reservoir will help in designing the optimal strategy for horizontal drilling.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

barrels per day for the first time in 25 years, according to the new monthly energy forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Rising oil output from tight oil...

120

www.myresources.com.au OIL & GAS BULLETIN VOL. 15, NO. 11 PAGE 9 Safety first: Oil rigs off the north west shelf will be studied for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.myresources.com.au OIL & GAS BULLETIN VOL. 15, NO. 11 PAGE 9 NEWS Safety first: Oil rigs off for future successful tight gas exploration projects in Western Australia has been set up and studies the tight gas sand field at its exploration permit in the South Perth Basin. Professor Rezaee said

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Characterization of the Dundee formation, Winterfield Field, Clare County, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Devonian Dundee Formation of the Winterfield field was originally developed in the late 1930`s and early 1940`s and rapid production helped support the U.S. war effort. Poor completion and production practices may have caused the field to have been inefficiently developed, and wells prematurely watered out due to water coning. Production occurs in porous dolomitized {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} where they extend above the oil-water contact within the otherwise {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. Cross plots of the PEF (Photoelectric) log and the LLD (deep lateral) log separate the porous, oil-saturated dolomite from water-saturated dolomites and the {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. The PEF distinguishes the lithologies (dolomite and limestone) and the LLD separates the fluids (water and oil); other useful logs are the CNL and GR to indicate porous and shale zones respectively. The dolomite {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} are small in scale, less than 60` high and can be laterally discontinuous between wells on 40 acres spacing. The dolomite zones tend to have good porosity and permeability; the API gravity of the oil is 44.2 and the reservoir is produced by a strong, constant water drive. Initial production tests on some wells indicate the ability to produce up to nearly 2000 barrels per day (BOPD). Wells drilled in the 1980`s to the deeper Richfield intercepted and isolated oil pocket in the Dundee off structure, prompting further drilling activity; subsequent production has significantly added to the cumulative production in the field. Due to the heterogeneity of the reservoir, the strong water drive, the low density of the oil and the relatively high permeabilities, the reservoir and others like it are ideal candidates for horizontal drain technology. The horizontal wells could link {open_quotes}chimney`s{close_quotes} that have previously been untapped, significantly adding to the total production of these Dundee fields.

Chittick, S.; Salotti, C.; Wood, J.R. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

HS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Fossil Energy Study Guide: Oil Pet roleum-or cr ude oil-is a fossil fuel that is found in large quantities beneath the Earth's sur face and is often used as a fuel or raw material in the chemical indust r y. It is a smelly, yellow-to-black liquid and is usually found in underg round areas called reser voirs. If you could look down an oil well and see oil where Nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-an "oil reservoir"-looks very much like any other rock formation. Oil exists in this underground formation as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th

124

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, April 1994--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI, was selected as a field trial site for this project. Analysis of production data for Crystal Field suggests that an additional 200,000 bbls of oil can be produced using one strategically located horizontal well. Total addition production from the Crystal Field could be as much as 6--8 MMBO. Application of the technology developed in this project to other Dundee fields in the area has the potential to increase Dundee production in Michigan by 35%, adding 80--100 MMBO to ultimate recovery. This project will demonstrate through a field trial that horizontal wells can be substantially increase oil production in older reservoirs that are at or near their economic limit. To maximize the potential of the horizontal well and to ensure that a comprehensive evaluation can be made, extensive reservoir characterization will be performed. In addition to the proposed field trial at Crystal Field, 29 additional Dundee fields in a seven-county area have been selected for study in the reservoir characterization portion of this project.

Wood, J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Catagenesis of organic matter of oil source rocks in Upper Paleozoic coal formation of the Bohai Gulf basin (eastern China)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bohai Gulf basin is the largest petroliferous basin in China. Its Carboniferous-Permian deposits are thick (on the average, ca. 600 m) and occur as deeply as 5000 m. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Carboniferous Taiyuan Formation formed in inshore plain swamps. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are fluorescent vitrinite, exinite, alginite, etc. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Permian Shanxi Formation were deposited in delta-alluvial plain. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are vitrinite, exinite, etc. The carbonaceous rocks of these formations are characterized by a high thermal maturity, with the vitrinite reflectance R{sub 0} > 2.0%. The Bohai Gulf basin has been poorly explored so far, but it is highly promising for natural gas.

Li, R.X.; Li, Y.Z.; Gao, Y.W. [Changan University, Xian (China)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

A-84: Tight Binding Understanding of Carbon Defects in Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, a coherent transferable tight-binding (TB) parameterization was developed for Fe-C by ... A-54: Used Foundry Sand Reclamation in New Vibratory Unit.

128

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Oil shale commercialization study  

SciTech Connect

Ninety four possible oil shale sections in southern Idaho were located and chemically analyzed. Sixty-two of these shales show good promise of possible oil and probable gas potential. Sixty of the potential oil and gas shales represent the Succor Creek Formation of Miocene age in southwestern Idaho. Two of the shales represent Cretaceous formations in eastern Idaho, which should be further investigated to determine their realistic value and areal extent. Samples of the older Mesozonic and paleozoic sections show promise but have not been chemically analyzed and will need greater attention to determine their potential. Geothermal resources are of high potential in Idaho and are important to oil shale prospects. Geothermal conditions raise the geothermal gradient and act as maturing agents to oil shale. They also might be used in the retorting and refining processes. Oil shales at the surface, which appear to have good oil or gas potential should have much higher potential at depth where the geothermal gradient is high. Samples from deep petroleum exploration wells indicate that the succor Creek shales have undergone considerable maturation with depth of burial and should produce gas and possibly oil. Most of Idaho's shales that have been analyzed have a greater potential for gas than for oil but some oil potential is indicated. The Miocene shales of the Succor Creek Formation should be considered as gas and possibly oil source material for the future when technology has been perfectes. 11 refs.

Warner, M.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

MS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL Ever wonder what oil looks like underground, down deep, hundreds or thousands of feet below the surface, buried under millions of tons of rock and dirt? If you could look down an oil well and see oil where nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-called an "oil reservoir" -looks very much like any other rock formation. It looks a lot like...well, rock. Oil exists underground as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th e "pores" and the oil droplets can be seen only through a microscope. Th e droplets cling to the rock, like drops of water cling

132

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, 4th quarter, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Well data, including drillers` logs, wireline logs, and seismic data, from the Crystal and other Dundee hydrocarbon fields in the Michigan basin, have been acquired. Digitized logs of 342 wells that currently produce or have produced from the Dundee Formation in the seven-county study area have been purchased from Maness Petroleum Company. Multiple logs exist for each well, and include gamma ray, caliper, lithodensity, neutron porosity, various types of resistivity, and some sonic logs. Twenty to thirty cores of the Dundee Formation from throughout the state of Michigan are currently available. Cuttings samples are also available from 60 to 100 Michigan wells. The storage locations of many of these core and cuttings samples have been identified, but sampling has not yet begun. A well has been designed and permitted and will soon be drilled. This well will have both a horizontal and a vertical leg. The vertical leg well will be cored through the producing interval of the Dundee Formation and the cores will be analyzed for porosity, permeability, and fluid saturations. A full set of well logs will be run, including gamma ray, porosity, resistivity, and geochemistry logs. This data will be incorporated into the existing database for the project area and used to calibrate the MWD (Measurement While Drilling) logs which will be run during the drilling of the horizontal leg. The horizontal leg will be drilled as a sidetrack from the vertical test well. If commercial amounts of hydrocarbons are encountered, the horizontal well will be placed on production. Drilling is expected to commence in late 1994 or early 1995, after completion of an environmental survey.

Wood, J.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains, Quarterly technical report, 1/1/97--3/31/97  

SciTech Connect

This Class 11 field project has demonstrated that economic quantities of hydrocarbons can be produced from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The site selected for the demonstration horizontal well was Crystal Field, a nearly abandoned Dundee oil field in Montcalm County, Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well, the TOW 1-3, drilled as a field demonstration pilot was successful, producing at rate of 100 bbls of oil per day with a zero water cut. Although the well is capable of producing at a rate of 500+ bbls/day, the production rate is being kept low deliberately to try to prevent premature water coning. Cumulative production exceeded 50,000 bbls of oil by the end of April, 1997 and lead to the permitting and licensing of several dozen Dundee wells by project end. Twelve of these permits were for continued development of Crystal Field. Two subsequent wells, the Frost 5-3 and the Happy Holidays 6-3, have not been as successful. Both are currently producing 10 BOPD with 90% water cut. Efforts are underway to determine why these wells are performing so poorly and to see if the situation can be remedied. The reasons for these poor performances of the new wells are not clear at this time. It is possible that the wells entered the Dundee too low and missed pay higher in the section. When the TOW 1-3 was drilled, a vertical probe well was also drilled and cored. That probe well penetrated the pay zone and helped guide the horizontal well. The important lesson may be that vertical probe wells are a crucial step in producing these old fields and should not be eliminated simply to save what amounts to a small incremental cost. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The addition of several horizontal wells will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Additional project work involved the characterization of 28 other Dundee fields in Michigan to aid in determining appropriate additional candidates for development through horizontal drilling. Further quantification of reservoir parameters such as importance of fracturing, fracture density, and irregularity of the dolomitized surface at the top of the reservoir will help in designing the optimal strategy for horizontal drilling. The project was a cooperative venture involving the US Department of Energy, Michigan Technological University (MTU), Western Michigan University (WMU), and Terra Energy (now Cronus Development Co.) in Traverse City, MI.

NONE

1997-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... between the production of oil from the layers of shale within the Bakken Formation and the extraction of oil from oil shale plays. See ...

135

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 662013 DE-08NT0005643 Goal The goal of this project is to determine the geomechanical properties...

136

Evaluation of the Sparton Tight-Tolerance AXBT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-six near-simultaneous pairs of conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) and Sparton “tight tolerance” air expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) temperature profiles were obtained in summer 1991 from a location in the Sargasso Sea. The data were ...

Janice D. Boyd; Robert S. Linzell

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

File:EIA-tight-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tight-gas.pdf tight-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 2.04 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Sources U.S. Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-06-06 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:44, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:44, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (2.04 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload You cannot overwrite this file.

138

Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993  

SciTech Connect

Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska Heavy Oils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal The goal of this project is to improve recovery of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) heavy oil resources in the Ugnu formation by improving our understanding of the formations...

142

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

144

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

145

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas and billion barrels (Bbbl) of shale oil for each major shale formation. Risked Recoverable Gas and Oil, reported in trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of shale gas and

146

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... respectively, resulting from continued production growth in U.S. onshore tight oil formations and from Canadian oil sands.

148

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. At the end of December, crude oil stocks were near 289 million barrels, about 4% below the 5-year average, and slightly higher than at the end of 1999. The latest weekly data, for the week ending January 19, show U.S. crude oil stocks at 286 million barrels, just about a million barrels above their level a year ago. Near-term tightness in U.S. crude oil markets have kept current prices above forward prices, reflecting current strength in crude oil demand relative to supply. Relatively strong U.S. oil demand next year should keep crude oil

150

Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities June 11, 2010 - 4:33pm Addthis Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Joshua DeLung "I think everyone has their heart in it. I think we see weatherization as a really worthy process." Morgan McKane, weatherization auditor at SEVCA Morgan McKane spent most of his career in southeast Vermont working in the

151

Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

Utah, University of

153

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Victor Atanasov; Rossen Dandoloff

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Atanasov, Victor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

157

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five areas of research is described briefly. The subtask in oil shale research is on oil shale process studies. For tar sand the subtask reported is on process development. Coal research includes the following subtasks: Coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes the following: Advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sup 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residua; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process;NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of Mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding. Technical progress report, January 1, 1997--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This project is a field demonstration of the ability of in-situ indigenous microorganisms in the North Blowhorn Creek Oil Field to reduce the flow of injection water in the more permeable zones of the reservoir, thereby diverting flow to other areas thus increasing the efficiency of the waterflood. The project is divided into three phases: Planning and Analysis (9 months), Implementation (45 months), and Technology Transfer (12 months). This report covers the fourth year of work on the project. Twenty-two months after the injection of nutrients into the reservoir began, three wells were drilled and cores taken therefrom were analyzed. Oil production volumes and water:oil ratios (WOR) of produced fluids have shown clearly that the MEOR treatment being demonstrated in this project is improving oil recovery. Of the 15 producer wells in the test patterns, seven have responded positively to the injection of microbial nutrients into the reservoir, while all eight of the producer wells only in control patterns have continued their natural decline in oil production, although one well did have some improvement in oil production due to increased water injection into a nearby injector well. In light of these positive findings and with DOE`s approval, the scope of the field demonstration was expanded in July 1997 to include six new injector wells. Of interest has been the performance of two wells in what was formerly a control pattern. Since the injector in this pattern (formerly Control Pattern 2) began receiving nutrients, two of the wells in the pattern have shown improved oil production for the last three months. While it would be premature to definitely characterize these two wells as yielding a positive response, these early results are certainly encouraging.

Stephens, J.O.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combustion Assisted Gravity Drainage (CAGD): An In-Situ Combustion Method to Recover Heavy Oil and Bitumen from Geologic Formations using a Horizontal Injector/Producer Pair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion assisted gravity drainage (CAGD) is an integrated horizontal well air injection process for recovery and upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen from tar sands. Short-distance air injection and direct mobilized oil production are the main features of this process that lead to stable sweep and high oil recovery. These characteristics identify the CAGD process as a high-potential oil recovery method either in primary production or as a follow-up process in reservoirs that have been partially depleted. The CAGD process combines the advantages of both gravity drainage and conventional in-situ combustion (ISC). A combustion chamber develops in a wide area in the reservoir around the horizontal injector and consists of flue gases, injected air, and mobilized oil. Gravity drainage is the main mechanism for mobilized oil production and extraction of flue gases from the reservoir. A 3D laboratory cell with dimensions of 0.62 m, 0.41 m, and 0.15 m was designed and constructed to study the CAGD process. The combustion cell was fitted with 48 thermocouples. A horizontal producer was placed near the base of the model and a parallel horizontal injector in the upper part at a distance of 0.13 m. Peace River heavy oil and Athabasca bitumen were used in these experiments. Experimental results showed that oil displacement occurs mainly by gravity drainage. Vigorous oxidation reactions were observed at the early stages near the heel of the injection well, where peak temperatures of about 550şC to 690şC were recorded. Produced oil from CAGD was upgraded by 6 and 2şAPI for Peace River heavy oil and Athabasca bitumen respectively. Steady O2 consumption for both oil samples confirmed the stability of the process. Experimental data showed that the distance between horizontal injection and production wells is very critical. Close vertical spacing has negative effect on the process as coke deposits plug the production well and stop the process prematurely. CAGD was also laboratory tested as a follow-up process. For this reason, air was injected through dual parallel wells in a mature steam chamber. Laboratory results showed that the process can effectively create self-sustained combustion front in the previously steam-operated porous media. A maximum temperature of 617şC was recorded, with cumulative oil recovery of 12% of original oil in place (OOIP). Post-experiment sand pack analysis indicated that in addition to sweeping the residual oil in the steam chamber, the combustion process created a hard coke shell around the boundaries. This hard shell isolated the steam chamber from the surrounding porous media and reduced the steam leakage. A thermal simulator was used for history matching the laboratory data while capturing the main production mechanisms. Numerical analysis showed very good agreement between predicted and experimental results in terms of fluid production rate, combustion temperature and produced gas composition. The validated simulation model was used to compare the performance of the CAGD process to other practiced thermal recovery methods like steam assistance gravity drainage (SAGD) and toe to heel air injection (THAI). Laboratory results showed that CAGD has the lowest cumulative energy-to-oil ratio while its oil production rate is comparable to SAGD.

Rahnema, Hamid

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sřrenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A,  B, C, D, contained crude oil and formation water model oils was used on the crude oil samples.    Sample Clcommunity structure in crude oil •When used in conjunction

Borglin, Sharon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: TightBinding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight­Binding Now that we have shown that /( ~ k; ~r) = \\Gamma P ~ R e i ~ k \\Delta ~ R OE A (~r \\Gamma ~ R) satisfies the Bloch condition, all that remains is to grind the calculation explicitly. First, the wave­function /( ~ k; ~r) must be normalized. Thus Z / \\Lambda / dV = 1 = j

Winokur, Michael

163

Oil recovery process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system is claimed for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P.A.; Rhudy, J.S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between wells. Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between wells. Crude oil development and production in U.S. oil reservoirs can include up to three distinct phases: primary, secondary, and tertiary (or enhanced) recovery. During primary recovery, the natural pressure of the reservoir or gravity drive oil into the wellbore, combined with artificial lift techniques (such as pumps) which bring the oil to the surface. But only about 10 percent of a reservoir's original oil in place is typically produced during primary recovery. Secondary recovery techniques extend a

165

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EIA - Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In three  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Data Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 6 complete) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Oil Production Capacity by Region and Country, Reference Case Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

168

Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

Scott, L.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Mobil completes deep, tight, horizontal gas well in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion and fracturing program for stimulating a horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes sand onshore Germany included casing design, completion fluid selection, overbalanced perforation, analysis of the stimulation treatment, design modification, zone and fracture isolation, well testing and acid stimulation. This paper reviews the field geology, the well design, casing design, describes the completion fluids, perforation techniques, fracture treatment, and methods for zone isolation.

Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Chambers, M.R. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mueller, M.W. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

shale oil and gas shale oil and gas IAEE/AEA Meeting January 4, 2014 | Philadelphia, PA By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Key insights on drilling productivity and production trends Adam Sieminski, IAEE/AEA January 4, 2014 2 * The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources * Six tight oil and shale gas plays taken together account for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth over the last 2 years * Higher drilling efficiency and new well productivity, rather than an increase in the rig count, have been the main drivers of recent production growth * Steep legacy production decline rates are being offset by growing

172

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding, Class 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were (1) to demonstrate the in situ microbial population in a fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir could be induced to proliferate to such an extent that they will selectively restrict flow in the more porous zones in the reservoir thereby forcing injection water to flow through previously unswept areas thus improving the sweep efficiency of the waterflood and (2) to obtain scientific validation that microorganisms are indeed responsible for the increased oil recovery. One expected outcome of this new technology was the prolongation of economical life of the reservoir, i.e. economical oil recovery should continue for much longer periods in areas of the reservoir subjected to the MPPM technology than it would if it followed its historic trend.

Stephens, James O.; Brown, Lewis R.; Vadie, A. Alex

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Feasibility of calculating petrophysical properties in tight-sand reservoirs using neural networks. Final report, October 1989-July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to determine the feasibility of using neural networks to estimate petrophysical properties in tight sand reservoirs. A second objective was to gain some experience concerning how to approach the development of a future prototype, including what should be done and what should be avoided. Gas Research Institute (GRI) focused the project on tight sands because they contain enormous gas reserves and their complicated lithology represents a challenge to log analysts. The data were supplied by GRI from two of its geographically proximate experimental wells in tight sand formations. The nets were tested in sections of those wells that were not used for training, and in two other wells, one in a geographically close but geologically unrelated formation and one in Wyoming. The feasibility testing demonstrated that the relatively simple neural networks developed have comparable accuracy with standard logging analysis estimates in wells that contributed data to the training set. Transportability of the network was tested by using core measurements in two wells in which the nets were not trained, with inconclusive results. Recommendations were made to increase the accuracy of the neural networks.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Javitz, H.S.; Park, W.; Lee, J.D.; Bergman, A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the world will require additional supplies of natural gas to meet the demand for energy. Tight gas reservoirs can be defined as reservoirs where the formation permeability is so low (flowback procedures, production strategy, and reservoir conditions. Residual polymer in the fracture can reduce the effective fracture permeability and porosity, reduce the effective fracture half-length, and limit the well productivity. Our ability to mathematically model the fundamental physical processes governing fluid recovery in hydraulic fractures in the past has been limited. In this research, fracture fluid damage mechanisms have been investigated, and mathematical models and computer codes have been developed to better characterize the cleanup process. The codes have been linked to a 3D, 3-phase simulator to model and quantify the fracture fluid cleanup process and its effect on long-term gas production performances. Then, a comprehensive systematic simulation study has been carried out by varying formation permeability, reservoir pressure, fracture length, fracture conductivity, yield stress, and pressure drawdown. On the basis of simulation results and analyses, new ways to improve fracture fluid cleanup have been provided. This new progress help engineers better understand fracture fluid cleanup, improve fracture treatment design, and increase gas recovery from tight sand reservoirs, which can be extremely important as more tight gas reservoirs are developed around the world.

Wang, Yilin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

In-situ laser retorting of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale formations were retorted in-situ and gaseous hydrocarbon products recovered by drilling two or more wells into an oil shale formation. After fracturing a region of oil shale formation by directing a high energy laser beam into one of the wells and focussing the laser beam into a region of oil shale formation from a laser optical system, compressed gas was forced into the well which supports combustion in the flame front ignited by laser beam, thereby retorting the oil shale and recovering gaseous hydrocarbon products which permeate through the fractured oil shale from one of the auxiliary wells.

Bloomfield, H.S.

1977-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

Transferable tight-binding parameters: An application to Ni and Ni-Al alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two approaches for obtaining tight-binding parameters for metallic alloys are compared and contrasted with special regard for the application to large scale simulations such as may occur in tight-binding molecular dynamics studies.

Sluiter, M.H.F.; Singh, P.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Deloitte Energy Conference Deloitte Energy Conference May 21, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 3 shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to reach half of U.S. output 4 U.S. dry natural gas production trillion cubic feet Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013

179

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Price College Energy Institute Energy Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Price College Energy Institute March 05, 2013 | Norman, OK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA's mission and main functions Adam Sieminski , Energy Symposium, March 05, 2013 2 Independent Statistical and Analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy - EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. - By law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government [EIA] ...is the gold standard for energy data around the world, and the

180

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Council The Energy Council March 09, 2013 | Washington, DC by Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA's mission and main functions Adam Sieminski, Energy Council March 09, 2013 2 Independent Statistical and Analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy - EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. - By law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government [EIA] ...is the gold standard for energy data around the world, and the accessibility of it is so much greater than other places - Dan Yergin,

182

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013

183

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , B of A/Merrill Lynch, April 20, 2013

184

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

• Renewable Fuels Standard / RINS / cellulosic ethanol • Growth of natural gas use in transportation

185

oil supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil supply oil supply Dataset Summary Description CIA: World Factbook assessment of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Estimated as of January 1st, 2010. Source CIA Date Released January 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords crude oil energy energy data international oil oil supply Data text/csv icon 2010 Proved Oil Reserves (csv, 4.6 KiB) text/plain icon Original Text Format (txt, 6.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

186

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Coalbed Natural Gas Produced-Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead DE-FC26-05NT15551...

187

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to...

188

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tight-binding model for hydrogen-silicon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an empirical tight-binding model for use in molecular-dynamics simulations to study hydrogen-silicon systems. The hydrogen-silicon interaction is constructed to reproduce the electronic energy levels and vibration frequencies of silane (SiH{sub 4}). Further use of the model in the studies of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and of hydrogen on the Si(111) surface also yields results in good agreement with first-principles calculations and experiments.

Min, B.J.; Lee, Y.H.; Wang, C.Z.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M. (Microelectronics Research Center, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States) Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight-Binding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight-Binding Now that we have shown that (~k;~r) = P ~R ei~k~RA(~r ~R-function (~k;~r) must be normalized. Thus Z dV = 1 = j j2 X R X R0 ei~k~R ~R0 Z A(~r ~R0)A(~r ~R)dV Now for each ~R0, the sum over ~R must be the same since the crystal has the same distribution of neighbors

Winokur, Michael

192

IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL WELLS BY GAS PRECONDITIONING M. A. Aggour, M. Al, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Experience has shown that for sandstone formations, oil wells respond to matrix acidizing in a different manner as compared to gas wells. For oil wells, the improvement

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

193

MANAGING TIGHT BINDING RECEPTORS FOR NEW SPEARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much of the earth's pollution involves compounds of the metallic elements, including actinides, strontium, cesium, technetium, and RCRA metals. Metal ions bind to molecules called ligands, which are the molecular tools that can manipulate the metal ions under most conditions. This DOE-EMSP sponsored program strives (1) to provide the foundations for using the most powerful ligands in transformational separations technologies and (2) to produce seminal examples of their applications to separations appropriate to the DOE EM mission. These ultra tight-binding ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances (from mineralized sites, lesser ligands, and even extremely dilute solutions), but they react so slowly that they are useless in traditional separations methodologies. Two attacks on this problem are underway. The first accommodates to the challenging molecular lethargy by developing a seminal slow separations methodology termed the soil poultice. The second designs ligands that are only tight-binding while wrapped around the targeted metal ion, but can be put in place by switch-binding and removed by switch-release. We envision a kind of molecular switching process to accelerate the union between metal ion and tight-binding ligand. Molecular switching processes are suggested for overcoming the slow natural equilibration rate with which ultra tight-binding ligands combine with metal ions. Ligands that bind relatively weakly combine with metal ions rapidly, so the trick is to convert a ligand from a weak, rapidly binding species to a powerful, slow releasing ligand--during the binding of the ligand to the metal ion. Such switch-binding ligands must react with themselves, and the reaction must take place under the influence of the metal ion. For example, our generation 1 ligands showed that a well-designed linear ligand with ends that readily combine, forms a cyclic molecule when it wraps around a metal ion. Our generation 2 ligands are even more interesting. They convert from rings to structures that wrap around a metal ion to form a cage. These ligands are called cryptands. Switch release is accomplished by photolytic cleavage of a bond to convert a cyclic ligand into a linear ligand or to break similar bonds in a cryptate. Our studies have demonstrated switch binding and switch release with cryptates of calcium. These remarkable cyclic ligands and cage-like ligands are indeed tight-binding and may, in principle, be incorporated in various separations methodologies, including the soil poultice. The soil poultice mimics the way in which microbes secrete extremely powerful ligands into the soil in order to harvest iron. The cellular membrane of the microbe recognizes the iron/ligand complex and admits it into the cell. The soil poultice uses molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to play the role of the cellular membrane. Imprinting involves creation of the polymer in the presence of the metal/ligand complex. In principle, a well design ligand/MIP combination can be highly selective toward almost any targeted metal ion. The principles for that design are the focus of these investigations. An imprinting molecule can interact with the polymer through any, some, or all of the so-called supramolecular modes; e.g., hydrogen bonding, electrostatic charge, minor ligand bonding, Pi-Pi stacking, and hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions. Historically these modes of binding have given MIPs only small re-binding capacities and very limited selectivities. This program has shown that each mode of interaction can be made more powerful than previously suspected and that combinations of different supramolecular interaction modes can produce remarkable synergisms. The results of this systematic study provide a firm foundation for tailoring molecular imprinted polymers for reclamation of specific metal ion, including those important to the DOE EM mission.

DARYLE H BUSCH RICHARD S GIVENS

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

Morea, Michael F.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Oil and Gas Gateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Gateway Oil and Gas Gateway Jump to: navigation, search Oil and Gas Companies The oil and gas industry is the largest energy industry in the world, with companies spanning the globe. The map below depicts the top oil companies. Anyone can add another company to this list. Add a new Oil and Gas Company Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

197

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Methods and apparatus for measuring the tightness of enclosures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for measuring tightness of an enclosure such as a building by utilizing alternating pressurization techniques. One method comprises providing apparatus capable of causing an internal volume change for the enclosure, the apparatus including a means for determining the instantaneous volume change, and a means for determining the instantaneous pressure within the enclosure. The apparatus is operated within the enclosure to change the volume thereof, and at least one of the frequency and the displacement is adjusted to achieve a root mean square pressure in the enclosure approximately equal to a reference pressure. At that pressure, the leakage of the enclosure is determined from the instantaneous displacement and instantaneous pressure values. 3 figs.

Modera, M.P.; Sherman, M.H.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale of the Bureau Vista Hills Field. Work was subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project focused on a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work would then be used to evaluate how the reservoir would respond to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes such as of CO2 flooding. The second phase of the project would be to implement and evaluate a CO2 in the Buena Vista Hills Field. A successful project would demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley.

Perri, Pasquale R.; Cooney, John; Fong, Bill; Julander, Dale; Marasigan, Aleks; Morea, Mike; Piceno, Deborah; Stone, Bill; Emanuele, Mark; Sheffield, Jon; Wells, Jeff; Westbrook, Bill; Karnes, Karl; Pearson, Matt; Heisler, Stuart

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

Oil shale retorting method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an improved method and apparatus for the retorting of oil shale and the formation of spent oil shale having improved cementation properties. The improved method comprises passing feed comprising oil shale to a contacting zone wherein the feed oil shale is contacted with heat transfer medium to heat said shale to retorting temperature. The feed oil shale is substantially retorted to form fluid material having heating value and forming partially spent oil shale containing carbonaceous material. At least a portion of the partially spent oil shale is passed to a combustion zone wherein the partially spent oil shale is contacted with oxidizing gas comprising oxygen and steam to substantially combust carbonaceous material forming spent oil shale having improved cementation properties.

York, E.D.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding. Sixteenth quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

There are ten injection wells receiving nutrients and twenty producing wells in test patterns are being monitoring for responses. Petrophysical studies of recovered core sample from the 3 newly drilled wells are still in progress. Monthly collection of produced fluids from the test and control wells in all patterns continued with the following tasks being performed: aliphatic profile (gas chromatographic analysis); API gravity and absolute viscosity under reservoir temperature; pH of produced water; surface tension (ST) of produced water (water-air); interfacial tension (IFT) for produced oil-water system; microbiological population; and inorganic analyses (nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, sulfide, chloride, potassium, and hardness). Production data on all wells in all patterns continues to be evaluated. Increased gas production that has been noted in some wells could be the result of microbial activity or from previous unswept areas of the reservoir. Samples of gas were collected from selected production wells and analyzed by gas chromatography using a Fisher Model No. 12 Gas Partitioner. The results of analyses from four sets of samples are given.

Brown, L.R.; Vadie, A.A. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

STEO December 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen topping 7 million bpd U.S. crude oil production is now expected to rise by about 760,000 barrels per day in 2012, the biggest annual increase in oil output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. American oil producers are expected to pump a daily average of 6.4 million barrels of crude oil this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administrator's new monthly energy forecast. The annual increase in oil output tops the previous record set in 1951 and marks the largest yearly production increase ever. Most of the increase in crude oil production is driven by drilling activity in shale formations located in Texas, North Dakota and Montana. U.S. crude oil production next year is expected to top 7 million barrels per day for the first time

203

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...

205

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone the

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. 2nd Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A meeting of project personnel was held in Traverse City, MI, on June 8, 1994 to initiate the DOE contract. The drilling program, which will be the project`s first major undertaking, was discussed in detail. Data from 12 Dundee fields, including Crystal Field, have been entered in a computer database by project staff at WMU. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been generated for all horizons in these fields using Terrasciences` TerraStation computer program. Arrangements have been made to purchase digitized logs of every well that produces or has produced from the Dundee Formation in the state of Michigan. Twenty to thirty cores of the Dundee Formation from wells throughout the state of Michigan are currently available. Cuttings samples are also available from 60 to 100 Michigan wells. A well in the project area has been designed and permitted and will soon be drilled. The well will have both a horizontal and a vertical leg. The vertical leg well will be cored through the producing interval of the Dundee Formation and the cores analyzed for porosity, permeability, and fluid saturations. A full set of well logs will be run, including gamma ray, porosity, resistivity, and geochemical logs. The horizontal leg will be drilled as a sidetrack from the vertical test well. If commercial amounts of hydrocarbons are encountered, the horizontal well will be placed on production. It is expected that drilling will commence in August, 1994, and will take 10 to 12 days to complete.

Wood, J.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Oil recovery process and system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P. A.; Rhudy, J. S.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

210

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hydraulic fracture productivity performance in tight gas sands, a numerical simulation approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulically fractured tight gas reservoirs are one of the most common unconventional sources being produced today, and look to be a regular source of gas… (more)

Ostojic, Jakov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a… (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS IN TIGHT GAS SANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on fossil fuels and the decline in their production promote producing hydrocarbon from unconventional sources. Natural gas existing in tight reservoirs has a… (more)

Kulga, Ihsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Pore-scale characterization and modeling of two-phase flow in tight gas sandstones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas resources, particularly tight gas sands, constitute a significant percentage of the natural gas resource base and offer abundant potential for future reserves… (more)

Mousavi, Maryam Alsadat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska Heavy Oils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluid and Rock Property Controls On Production and Seismic Monitoring Alaska Heavy Oils Last Reviewed 12/20/2012 Fluid and Rock Property Controls On Production and Seismic Monitoring Alaska Heavy Oils Last Reviewed 12/20/2012 DE-NT0005663 Goal The goal of this project is to improve recovery of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) heavy oil resources in the Ugnu formation by improving our understanding of the formationÂ’s vertical and lateral heterogeneities via core evaluation, evaluating possible recovery processes, and employing geophysical monitoring to assess production and modify production operations. Performers Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 Earthworks, Newtown, CT 06470 BP, Anchorage, AK 99519 Background Although the reserves of heavy oil on the North Slope of Alaska are enormous (estimates are up to 10 billion barrels in place), difficult

216

A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010....

218

Prediction of Gas Leak Tightness of Superplastically Formed Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some applications, in this case an aluminium box in a subatomic particle detector containing highly sensitive detecting devices, it is important that a formed sheet should show no gas leak from one side to the other. In order to prevent a trial-and-error procedure to make this leak tight box, a method is set up to predict if a formed sheet conforms to the maximum leak constraint. The technique of superplastic forming (SPF) is used in order to attain very high plastic strains before failure. Since only a few of these boxes are needed, this makes, this generally slow, process an attractive production method. To predict the gas leak of a superplastically formed aluminium sheet in an accurate way, finite element simulations are used in combination with a user-defined material model. This constitutive model couples the leak rate with the void volume fraction. This void volume fraction is then dependent on both the equivalent plastic strain and the applied hydrostatic pressure during the bulge process (backpressure).

Snippe, Corijn H. C. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef) PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinders, T. [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Stability of spinor Fermi gases in tight waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two- and three-body correlation functions of the ground state of an optically trapped ultracold spin-(1/2) Fermi gas (SFG) in a tight waveguide [one-dimensional (1D) regime] are calculated in the plane of even- and odd-wave coupling constants, assuming a 1D attractive zero-range odd-wave interaction induced by a 3D p-wave Feshbach resonance, as well as the usual repulsive zero-range even-wave interaction stemming from 3D s-wave scattering. The calculations are based on the exact mapping from the SFG to a 'Lieb-Liniger-Heisenberg' model with delta-function repulsions depending on isotropic Heisenberg spin-spin interactions, and indicate that the SFG should be stable against three-body recombination in a large region of the coupling constant plane encompassing parts of both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. However, the limiting case of the fermionic Tonks-Girardeau gas, a spin-aligned 1D Fermi gas with infinitely attractive p-wave interactions, is unstable in this sense. Effects due to the dipolar interaction and a Zeeman term due to a resonance-generating magnetic field do not lead to shrinkage of the region of stability of the SFG.

Campo, A. del; Muga, J. G. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Abandoned oil fields in Kansas and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Data on approximately 400 abandoned oil fields in Kansas and 90 abandoned oil fields in Nebraska are presented. The following information is obtained on each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; API gravity; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION IN THE ANTELOPE SHALE TO ESTABLISH THE VIABILITY OF CO2 ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY IN CALIFORNIA'S MONTEREY FORMATION SILICEOUS SHALES  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the evaluation, design, and implementation of a DOE funded CO{sub 2} pilot project in the Lost Hills Field, Kern County, California. The pilot consists of four inverted (injector-centered) 5-spot patterns covering approximately 10 acres, and is located in a portion of the field, which has been under waterflood since early 1992. The target reservoir for the CO{sub 2} pilot is the Belridge Diatomite. The pilot location was selected based on geologic considerations, reservoir quality and reservoir performance during the waterflood. A CO{sub 2} pilot was chosen, rather than full-field implementation, to investigate uncertainties associated with CO{sub 2} utilization rate and premature CO{sub 2} breakthrough, and overall uncertainty in the unproven CO{sub 2} flood process in the San Joaquin Valley. A summary of the design and objectives of the CO{sub 2} pilot are included along with an overview of the Lost Hills geology, discussion of pilot injection and production facilities, and discussion of new wells drilled and remedial work completed prior to commencing injection. Actual CO{sub 2} injection began on August 31, 2000 and a comprehensive pilot monitoring and surveillance program has been implemented. Since the initiation of CO{sub 2} injection, the pilot has been hampered by excessive sand production in the pilot producers due to casing damage related to subsidence and exacerbated by the injected CO{sub 2}. Therefore CO{sub 2} injection was very sporadic in 2001 and 2002 and we experienced long periods of time with no CO{sub 2} injection. As a result of the continued mechanical problems, the pilot project was terminated on January 30, 2003. This report summarizes the injection and production performance and the monitoring results through December 31, 2002 including oil geochemistry, CO{sub 2} injection tracers, crosswell electromagnetic surveys, crosswell seismic, CO{sub 2} injection profiling, cased hole resistivity, tiltmetering results, and corrosion monitoring results. Although the Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot was not successful, the results and lessons learned presented in this report may be applicable to evaluate and design other potential San Joaquin Valley CO{sub 2} floods.

Pasquale R. Perri

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Abandoned Texas oil fields  

SciTech Connect

Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

U.S. monthly crude oil production reaches highest level since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Eagle Ford formation in South Texas and the Permian Basin in West Texas. North Dakota's increase in oil production comes from the Bakken formation in the ...

224

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Piceance basin area have created the Mesaverde Group tight gas sand reservoirs. As shown in Figure 2 of siltstones, shales and tight sandstones with a coaly interval at the base. The main producing interval was predominantly from the fluvial point bar sand bodies, with extremely low matrix permeabilities (

225

Parabolic Kazhdan-Lusztig R-polynomials for tight quotients of the symmetric groups 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic Kazhdan-Lusztig R-polynomials for tight quotients of the symmetric groups formulas for the parabolic Kazhda* *n- Lusztig R-polynomials of the tight quotients* * to that of the Kazhdan-Lusztig polynomials. In 1987 Deodhar ([5]) introduced parabolic analogues of all

Brenti, Francesco

226

Method for forming an in-situ oil shale retort in differing grades of oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in-situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The formation comprises at least one region of relatively richer oil shale and another region of relatively leaner oil shale. According to one embodiment, formation is excavated from within a retort site for forming at least one void extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving a portion of unfragmented formation including the regions of richer and leaner oil shale adjacent such a void space. A first array of vertical blast holes are drilled in the regions of richer and leaner oil shale, and a second array of blast holes are drilled at least in the region of richer oil shale. Explosive charges are placed in portions of the blast holes in the first and second arrays which extend into the richer oil shale, and separate explosive charges are placed in portions of the blast holes in the first array which extend into the leaner oil shale. This provides an array with a smaller scaled depth of burial (sdob) and closer spacing distance between explosive charges in the richer oil shale than the sdob and spacing distance of the array of explosive charges in the leaner oil shale. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the regions of richer and leaner oil shale toward the horizontal void for forming a fragmented mass of particles. Upon detonation of the explosive, greater explosive energy is provided collectively by the explosive charges in the richer oil shale, compared with the explosive energy produced by the explosive charges in the leaner oil shale, resulting in comparable fragmentation in both grades of oil shale.

Ricketts, T.E.

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

TOWARD TIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST LUMINOSITY RELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large scatters of luminosity relations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been one of the most important reasons preventing the extensive application of GRBs in cosmology. Many efforts have been made to seek tight luminosity relations. With the latest sample of 116 GRBs with measured redshift and spectral parameters, we investigate 6 two-dimensional (2D) correlations and 14 derived three-dimensional (3D) correlations of GRBs to explore the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic scatters of the luminosity relations of GRBs. We find the 3D correlation of E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L to be evidently tighter (at the 2{sigma} confidence level) than its corresponding 2D correlations, i.e., the E{sub peak}-L and {tau}{sub RT}-L correlations. In addition, the coefficients before the logarithms of E{sub peak} and {tau}{sub RT} in the E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L correlation are almost exact opposites of each other. Inputting this situation as a prior reduces the relation to L{proportional_to}(E'{sub peak}/{tau}{sub RT}'){sup 0.842{+-}0.064}, where E'{sub peak} and {tau}'{sub RT} denote the peak energy and minimum rise time in the GRB rest frame. We discuss how our findings can be interpreted/understood in the framework of the definition of the luminosity (energy released in units of time). Our argument about the connection between the luminosity relations of GRBs and the definition of the luminosity provides a clear direction for exploring tighter luminosity relations of GRBs in the future.

Qi Shi; Lu Tan, E-mail: qishi11@gmail.com, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Experimental study of mechanisms of improving oil recovery in Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT Extensive laboratory work was done to investigate some of the important mechanisms of improving oil recovery in Shale formations. The objective of this research… (more)

Onyenwere, Emmanuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

231

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

232

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

233

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small number of analytical models and published numerical studies there is currently little consensus regarding the large-scale flow behavior over time in such systems. The purpose of this work is to construct a fit-for-purpose numerical simulator which will account for a variety of production features pertinent to these systems, and to use this model to study the effects of various parameters on flow behavior. Specific features examined in this work include hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, multiple porosity and permeability fields, desorption, and micro-scale flow effects. The theoretical basis of the model is described in Chapter I, along with a validation of the model. We employ the numerical simulator to examine various tight gas and shale gas systems and to illustrate and define the various flow regimes which progressively occur over time. We visualize the flow regimes using both specialized plots of rate and pressure functions, as well as high-resolution maps of pressure distributions. The results of this study are described in Chapter II. We use pressure maps to illustrate the initial linear flow into the hydraulic fractures in a tight gas system, transitioning to compound formation linear flow, and then into elliptical flow. We show that flow behavior is dominated by the fracture configuration due to the extremely low permeability of shale. We also explore the possible effect of microscale flow effects on gas effective permeability and subsequent gas species fractionation. We examine the interaction of sorptive diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. We show that microscale porous media can result in a compositional shift in produced gas concentration without the presence of adsorbed gas. The development and implementation of the micro-flow model is documented in Chapter III. This work expands our understanding of flow behavior in tight gas and shale gas systems, where such an understanding may ultimately be used to estimate reservoir properties and reserves in these types of reservoirs.

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

235

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 DE-08NT0005643 Goal The goal of this project is to determine the geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota, and use these results to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in order to improve the ultimate recovery of this vast oil resource. Performer University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7134 Background Compared to the success of producing crude oil from the Bakken Formation in eastern Montana, the horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation technology applied in western North Dakota has been less successful, thus requiring the development of new completion and fracturing technologies.

236

Screening criteria for enhanced recovery of Saudi crude oils  

SciTech Connect

This investigation studies and analyzes the screening guides that can be used to select the applicable enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method under Saudi oil field conditions. Based on the analysis of data obtained from 186 Saudi formations, the crude oils are produced from low to intermediate permeability formations in the range of 1-1500 millidarcies. The original reservoirs' pressure and temperature range from 2000 to 5500 psi and from 140 to 240{degrees}F, respectively. The porosity of the formations varies from 10 to 30% and the formations thickness ranges from 10 to 300 feet. The reservoirs of Saudi Arabia are characterized by high formation water salinity, which can be as high as 30% by weight. Saudi oil formations are characterized by connate water in the range of 10-50%. Thus residual oil saturation is expected to be high. The viscosity of most Saudi crude oils ranges from 0.10 to 10 centipoise. The API gravity ranges from 15 to 45. The basic parameters studied include formation permeability, porosity, and thickness; reservoir pressure and temperature; crude oil viscosity and API gravity, formation connate water saturation and its salinity, and formation type and heterogeneity. Based on the screening analysis the most suitable technical methods applicable to Saudi oil fields are the miscible processes using gases.

Sayyouh, M.H.; Al-Blehed (Petroleum Engineering Dept., King Saud Univ., Riyadh (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

238

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

239

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

240

DensEl: An O(N) Tight Binding Code - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2008 ... DensEl is an O(N) (or linear scaling) tight binding code written in the first place by Chris Goringe with contributions by Paul Godwin and David ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

242

Oil shale combustion/retorting  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted a number of feasibility studies on the combustion and retorting of five oil shales: Celina (Tennessee), Colorado, Israeli, Moroccan, and Sunbury (Kentucky). These studies generated technical data primarily on (1) the effects of retorting conditions, (2) the combustion characteristics applicable to developing an optimum process design technology, and (3) establishing a data base applicable to oil shales worldwide. During the research program, METC applied the versatile fluidized-bed process to combustion and retorting of various low-grade oil shales. Based on METC's research findings and other published information, fluidized-bed processes were found to offer highly attractive methods to maximize the heat recovery and yield of quality oil from oil shale. The principal reasons are the fluidized-bed's capacity for (1) high in-bed heat transfer rates, (2) large solid throughput, and (3) selectivity in aromatic-hydrocarbon formation. The METC research program showed that shale-oil yields were affected by the process parameters of retorting temperature, residence time, shale particle size, fluidization gas velocity, and gas composition. (Preferred values of yields, of course, may differ among major oil shales.) 12 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional gas has become an important resource to help meet our future energy demands. Although plentiful, it is difficult to produce this resource, when locked in a massive sedimentary formation. Among all unconventional gas resources, tight gas sands represent a big fraction and are often characterized by very low porosity and permeability associated with their producing formations, resulting in extremely low production rate. The low flow properties and the recovery factors of these sands make necessary continuous efforts to reduce costs and improve efficiency in all aspects of drilling, completion and production techniques. Many of the recent improvements have been in well completions and hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the main goal of a hydraulic fracture is to create a long, highly conductive fracture to facilitate the gas flow from the reservoir to the wellbore to obtain commercial production rates. Fracture conductivity depends on several factors, such as like the damage created by the gel during the treatment and the gel clean-up after the treatment. This research is focused on predicting more accurately the fracture conductivity, the gel damage created in fractures, and the fracture cleanup after a hydraulic fracture treatment under certain pressure and temperature conditions. Parameters that alter fracture conductivity, such as polymer concentration, breaker concentration and gas flow rate, are also examined in this study. A series of experiments, using a procedure of “dynamical fracture conductivity test”, were carried out. This procedure simulates the proppant/frac fluid slurries flow into the fractures in a low-permeability rock, as it occurs in the field, using different combinations of polymer and breaker concentrations under reservoirs conditions. The result of this study provides the basis to optimize the fracturing fluids and the polymer loading at different reservoir conditions, which may result in a clean and conductive fracture. Success in improving this process will help to decrease capital expenditures and increase the production in unconventional tight gas reservoirs.

Correa Castro, Juan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana's active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

fuel_oil.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Oil Usage Form Fuel Oil Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed report is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may c

246

Biosurfactant and enhanced oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pure culture of Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 (ATCC No. 39307) and a process for using said culture and the surfactant lichenysin produced thereby for the enhancement of oil recovery from subterranean formations. Lichenysin is an effective surfactant over a wide range of temperatures, pH's, salt and calcium concentrations.

McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

249

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

250

Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. July 30, 2009 DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and

252

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

253

Gas withdrawal from an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

Liquid and gaseous products are recovered from oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale by retorting oil shale in the fragmented mass to produce gaseous and liquid products. The liquid products are withdrawn from the retort to a first level in unfragmented formation below the elevation of the bottom boundary of the retort. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the retort to a second level below the elevation of the first level.

Mills, E.A.

1979-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

255

WORLD OIL SUPPLY – PRODUCTION, RESERVES, AND EOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“The weakness of intelligence is in discerning the turning points” (J. Schlesinger: former CIA Director and Ex-Secretary of Defense and of Energy) World Oil Consumption: Since 1980, the world has consumed far more oil than has been discovered. We are now finding only one barrel of new oil for every four barrels that we consume. As Donald Hodel, Ex-U.S. Secretary of Energy said: “We are sleepwalking into a disaster.” Global R/P: (Figure 1-A). Economists and laymen routinely view the future of global oil production as being directly related to a simple global Reserves/Production (R/P) ratio. This implies that oil produced in all of the world’s fields will abruptly stop when the R/P date (40 years in the future) is reached. This is as unrealistic as to expect all humans to die off suddenly, instead of gradually. Global R/Ps should NOT be used to estimate timing of future oil supplies. National R/P: (Figure 1-B). Instead of posting one average Global R/P of 40 years for the entire world, Figure 1-B shows (“National R/P”) for individual nations. This results in a very different, but a much more realistic semi-quantitative picture of the distribution of the world’s claimed oil reserves and future global oil supply than does Figure 1-A. Scale: All of these graphs are drawn to scale, which puts tight limits on their construction and analysis. A 40,000-million-barrels (4 BBO/year x 10 years) rectangle in the upper left corner of each figure shows the graphic scale for the area under the World Production Curve (WPC). (BBO =

M. King; Hubbert Center; M. King; Hubbert Center; L. F. Ivanhoe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

257

Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Geological model for oil gravity variations in Oriente Basin, Ecuador  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oriente basin is one of the major productive Subandean basins. Most of the fields produce 29/sup 0/-33/sup 0/ API paraffinic oils, but oils have been discovered with gravities ranging from 10/sup 0/to 35/sup 0/ API. All the oils have been recovered from multiple middle to Late Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs (Hollin and Napo Formations). Wells display a variety of oil gravities by reservoir. The origin of the Oriente oils is problematical and controversial, but structural, geochemical, and well evidence suggest a vast oil kitchen west of the present Andean foothills that was mature for oil generation by at least early Tertiary. Oil analyses indicate a single family of oils is present. Oil gravity variations can be explained systematically in terms of the various alteration processes suffered by the oil in each reservoir. Intermittent early Andean uplift (latest Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene) resulted in biodegradation and water-washing of oils, particularly in the uppermost Napo reservoirs. The main Andean orogeny (Pliocene) uplifted the Hollin reservoir to outcrop in the west, and tilted the basin down to the south. This movement resulted in water washing or flushing of the Hollin aquifer and a phase of northward remigration of oil. Late Andean structures postdated primary oil migration. Almost all structures displaying growth during the Late Cretaceous to early Eocene have been oil bearing, but some, particularly those located on the present-day basin flanks, were later severely biodegraded or breached.

Dashwood, M.F.; Abbotts, I.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

262

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma DE-FC26-00NT15125 Project Goal The Hunton formation in Oklahoma has some unique production characteristics, including large water production, initially decreasing gas-oil ratios, and excellent dynamic continuity—but poor geological continuity. The overall goal of the project is to understand the mechanism of gas and oil production from the Hunton Formation in Oklahoma so that similar reservoirs in other areas can be efficiently exploited. An additional goal is to develop methodologies to improve oil recovery using secondary recovery techniques. Performers University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Marjo Operating Company, Tulsa, OK University of Houston, Houston, TX Orca Exploration, Tulsa, OK

263

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

264

Effect of overbalance pressure on formation damage S.Z. Jilani a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wells is to produce maximum recoverable oil at minimum cost. Unfortunately, drilled wells are subject reduction of the flow capacity of an oil-, water-, or gas-bearing formation. The formation can be dam- aged formation comes first time in contact with a foreign fluid, i.e. drilling mud, which invades the formation

Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

265

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 3: air-quality impacts  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a mature oil shale industry on the air quality over the Green River Oil Shale Formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming is described. Climate information is supplied for the Piceance Creek Basin. (ACR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Two-stage oil shale retorting process and disposal of spent oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Formation is excavated from an in situ oil shale retort site for forming at least one void within the retort site, leaving at least one remaining zone of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent such a void. The remaining zone is explosively expanded toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. Oil shale in the in situ retort is retorted to produce liquid and gaseous products, leaving a mass of spent oil shale particles in the in situ retort. Oil shale particles excavated from the in situ retort site are separately retorted, such as in a surface retorting operation, producing liquid and gaseous products and spent surface retorted oil shale particles. The spent surface retorted particles are disposed of by forming an aqueous slurry of the particles, and pumping the slurry into a spent in situ retort. In one embodiment, the aqueous slurry is introduced into a hot lower portion of the spent retort where contact with hot spent oil shale particles generates steam which, in turn, is withdrawn from the spent retort in usable form. In another embodiment, water from the aqueous slurry introduced into a spent in situ retort collects at a level within the retort. The water can be recovered by drilling a drainage hole upwardly from a lower level drift into the level within the spent retort where the water collects and draining the water through the drainage hole to the lower level drift for recovery.

Tassoney, J.P.

1983-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Recent trends in oil shale. I. History, nature, and reserves  

SciTech Connect

To understand the current level of oil shale development and to anticipate some of the problems that will govern the growth rate of the domestic shale oil industry, this bulletin will discuss these issues in three parts. In this MIB, the nature of oil shale is discussed and a brief history of oil shale development is presented. The worldwide and domestic oil shale resources are described, with emphasis on recent geologic exploration of the Green River formation. Part II will cover oil shale mining and fuel extraction while Part III will discuss technical problems of shale oil refining and some economic and social problems of oil shale development. An extensive bibliography is provided. (MCW)

Sladek, T.A.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are a very important element in oil and gas industry due to their distinguished advantages. Horizontal wells are not technically horizontal. This is because of the structural nature of reservoir formations and drilling procedures. In response to the reservoir rock’s strength, the horizontal well deviates upward and downward while being drilled forming an undulating path instead of a horizontal. In this study, horizontal wells with an undulating trajectory within a gas reservoir have been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from different sources like an aquifer or a water flood job. In low permeability horizontal wells, hydraulic fracturing introduces water to gas wells. Water distribution is an important issue in gas wells production. In order to achieve the goal of this study, a model has been developed to simulate different situations for a horizontal well with an undulating trajectory in gas reservoirs. This study is a step forward to understand well performance in low permeability gas reservoirs.

Aldousari, Mohammad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Social navigation for loosely-coupled information seeking in tightly-knit groups using webwear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many web-based information-seeking tasks are set in a social context where other people's knowledge and advice improves success in finding information. However, when tightly-knit contacts (friends, family, colleagues) are not available, information seeking ... Keywords: collaborative information seeking, social navigation

Scott S. Bateman; Carl A. Gutwin; Gordon I. McCalla

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Efficiency and Fluctuation in Tight-Coupling Model of Molecular Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple tight-coupling model of a molecular chemical engine is proposed. The efficiency of the chemical engine and its average velocity can be explicitly calculated. The diffusion constant is evaluated approximately using the fluctuation theorem. Langevin simulations with stochastic boundary conditions are performed and the numerical results are compared with theoretical calculations.

Hidetsugu Sakaguchi

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

High Performance Biomorphic Image Processing Under Tight Space and Power Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image processing for space systems must be performed under tight space and power constraints while not compromising performance. Traditional computer vision approaches are not ideal because they are notoriously power hungry and physically large. We present ... Keywords: centroid localization chip, computational sensing, focal-plane processing, image process chip, motion detection chip, spatiotemporal convolution chip, vision chip

Ralph Etienne-Cummings; Viktor Gruev; Mathew Clapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Tight Lower Bound to the Outage Probability of Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this correspondence, a tight lower bound to the outage probability of discrete-input Nakagami-m block-fading channels is proposed. The approach permits an efficient method for numerical evaluation of the bound, providing an additional tool for system ... Keywords: Block-fading channel, diversity, error probability, outage probability, rate-diversity tradeoff, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-exponent

K. D. Nguyen; A. Guillen i Fabregas; L. K. Rasmussen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Current status of nonthermal heavy oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy oils are an important resource worldwide, and yet two-thirds of the heavy oil deposits cannot be exploited by means of thermal recovery methods, because the effective energy production approaches energy input for reasons of formation thickness, depth, oil saturation and/or porosity. In such instances, especially if the heavy oil is not too viscous (below ca 1000 cp), it may be economical to employ nonthermal recovery methods. These include polymer flooding, alkaline flooding, CO/sub 2/ (gaseous) floods, solvent floods, and other more specialized recovery methods, such as emulsion flooding, and combination techniques. This work discusses nonthermal heavy oil recovery methods, based upon their application in the field. The processes and their mechanistic features are discussed in the light of laboratory observations, which tend to be more optimistic than field results. 48 references.

Alikhan, A.A.; Farouq Ali, S.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

282

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

285

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the residual quantity of oil that never gets produced.order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil at a price P tD t Q t Q t+1 Quantity Figure 5. Monthly oil production for

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an important oil source for China, yet unlike itsthe United States as a major oil source outside the volatileto be a critical source of oil, and one that is almost

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

291

Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing stimulation technology is used to increase the amount of oil and gas produced from low permeability reservoirs. The primary objective of the process is to increase the conductivity of the reservoir by the creation of fractures deep into the formation, changing the flow pattern from radial to linear flow. The dynamic conductivity test was used for this research to evaluate the effect of closure stress, temperature, proppant concentration, and flow back rates on fracture conductivity. The objective of performing a dynamic conductivity test is to be able to mimic actual field conditions by pumping fracturing fluid/proppant slurry fluid into a conductivity cell, and applying closure stress afterwards. In addition, a factorial design was implemented in order to determine the main effect of each of the investigated factors and to minimize the number of experimental runs. Due to the stochastic nature of the dynamic conductivity test, each experiment was repeated several times to evaluate the consistency of the results. Experimental results indicate that the increase in closure stress has a detrimental effect on fracture conductivity. This effect can be attributed to the reduction in fracture width as closure stress was increased. Moreover, the formation of channels at low proppant concentration plays a significant role in determining the final conductivity of a fracture. The presence of these channels created an additional flow path for nitrogen, resulting in a significant increase in the conductivity of the fracture. In addition, experiments performed at high temperatures and stresses exhibited a reduction in fracture conductivity. The formation of a polymer cake due to unbroken gel dried up at high temperatures further impeded the propped conductivity. The effect of nitrogen rate was observed to be inversely proportional to fracture conductivity. The significant reduction in fracture conductivity could possibly be due to the effect of polymer dehydration at higher flow rates and temperatures. However, there is no certainty from experimental results that this conductivity reduction is an effect that occurs in real fractures or whether it is an effect that is only significant in laboratory conditions.

Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fluidized-bed pyrolysis of oil shale: oil yield, composition, and kinetics  

SciTech Connect

A quartz isothermal fluidized-bed reactor has been used to measure kinetics and oil properties relevant to surface processing of oil shale. The rate of oil formation has been described with two sequential first-order rate equations characterized by two rate constants, k/sub 1/ = 2.18 x 10/sup 10/ exp(-41.6 kcal/RT) s/sup -1/ and k/sub 2/ = 4.4 x 10/sup 6/ exp(-29.7 kcal/RT) s/sup -1/. These rate constants together with an expression for the appropriate weighting coefficients describe approximately 97/sup +/% of the total oil produced. A description is given of the results of different attempts to mathematically describe the data in a manner suitable for modeling applications. Preliminary results are also presented for species-selective kinetics of methane, ethene, ethane and hydrogen, where the latter is clearly distinguished as the product of a distinct intermediate. Oil yields from Western oil shale are approximately 100% Fischer assay. Oil composition is as expected based on previous work and the higher heating rates (temperatures) inherent in fluidized-bed pyrolysis. Neither the oil yield, composition nor the kinetics varied with particle size between 0.2 and 2.0 mm within experimental error. The qualitatively expected change in oil composition due to cracking was observed over the temperature range studied (460 to 540/sup 0/C). Eastern shale exhibited significantly faster kinetics and higher oil yields than did Western shale.

Richardson, J H; Huss, E B; Ott, L L; Clarkson, J E; Bishop, M O; Taylor, J R; Gregory, L J; Morris, C J

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Oil shale resources of the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The resource of potential oil represented by Green River Formation oil shale on Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 (NOSR No. 1) in the southeast corner of Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin is evaluated in detail. NOSR No. 1 is the site of intensive long-term oil-shale development studies and is the source of innumerable oil-shale samples for all manner of testing. A brief history of these studies is presented. This oil-shale resource is defined from oil-yield assay data on 33 cores plotted as histograms and correlated into cross sections. Contour maps of thickness, richness and oil resource in place are presented for the Mahogany Zone, the rich zone in the Mahogany zone, and for 2 units beneath and 5 units above the Mahogany zone. Total oil shale resource on NOSR No. 1 is 20.4 billion barrels of which 17.4 billion barrels are particularly suitable for development by vertical modified in-place processes. A previously unknown Mahogany zone outcrop providing much additional development access is described. Now under sole control of the US Department of Energy (DOE), NOSR No. 1 offers DOE a unique site for oil shale testing and development.

Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Trudell, L.G.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

297

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Oil gravity distribution in the diatomite at South Belridge Field, Kern County, CA: Implications for oil sourcing and migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding oil gravity distribution in the Belridge Diatomite has led to economic infill development and specific enhanced recovery methods for targeted oil properties. To date more than 100 wells have provided samples used to determining vertical and areal distribution of oil gravity in the field. Detailed geochemical analyses were also conducted on many of the oil samples to establish different oil types, relative maturities, and to identify transformed oils. The geochemical analysis also helped identify source rock expulsion temperatures and depositional environments. The data suggests that the Belridge diatomite has been charged by a single hydrocarbon source rock type and was generated over a relatively wide range of temperatures. Map and statistical data support two distinct oil segregation processes occurring post expulsion. Normal gravity segregation within depositional cycles of diatomite have caused lightest oils to migrate to the crests of individual cycle structures. Some data suggests a loss of the light end oils in the uppermost cycles to the Tulare Formation above, or through early biodegradation. Structural rotation post early oil expulsion has also left older, heavier oils concentrated on the east flank of the structure. With the addition of other samples from the south central San Joaquin area, we have been able to tie the Belridge diatomite hydrocarbon charge into a regional framework. We have also enhanced our ability to predict oil gravity and well primary recovery by unraveling some key components of the diatomite oil source and migration history.

Hill, D.W.; Sande, J.J. [Shell Western E& P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Doe, P.H. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

2011 Brief: Brent crude oil averages over $100 per barrel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, ... With low spare production ... Amid fast-rising crude oil production from the Bakken Shale formation and Canad ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NETL: News Release -Website Provides Data for Key Oil Play in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Mineral Resources. Additional well completion data is planned for future release. Unconventional oil sources such as the Bakken and Three Forks Formations represent a...

302

An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The supply and demand situation is crucial for the oil and gas industry during the first half of the 21st century. For the future, we… (more)

Pilisi, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum industry commonly uses single-layer models to characterize and forecast long-term production in tight gas reservoir systems. However, most tight gas reservoirs are layered systems where the permeability and porosity of each layer can vary significantly, often over several orders of magnitude. In addition, the drainage areas of each of the layers can be substantially different. Due to the complexity of such reservoirs, the analysis of pressure and production history using single-layer analyses techniques provide incorrect estimates of permeability, fracture conductivity, drainage area, and fracture half-length. These erroneous values of reservoir properties also provide the reservoir engineer with misleading values of forecasted gas recovery. The main objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate the typical errors that can occur in reservoir properties when single-layer modeling methods are used to history match production data from typical layered tight gas reservoirs, and (2) to use the single-layer match to demonstrate the error that can occur when forecasting long-term gas production for such complex gas reservoirs. A finite-difference reservoir simulator was used to simulate gas production from various layered tight gas reservoirs. These synthetic production data were analyzed using single-layer models to determine reservoir properties. The estimated reservoir properties obtained from the history matches were then used to forecast ten years of cumulative gas production and to find the accuracy of gas reserves estimated for tight gas reservoirs when a single-layer model is used for the analysis. Based on the results obtained in this work, I conclude that the accuracy in reservoir properties and future gas flow rates in layered tight gas reservoirs when analyzed using a single-layer model is a function of the degree of variability in permeability within the layers and the availability of production data to be analyzed. In cases where there is an idea that the reservoir presents a large variability in ��k�, using a multi-layer model to analyze the production data will provide the reservoir engineer with more accurate estimates of long-term production recovery and reservoir properties.

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Eco Oil 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Subject is oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The article reviews the current financial, legislative and regulatory problems of oil shale development. 2 refs.

Due, M.J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

308

Market model finds tight gas sands R and D offers most promise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional natural gas (UNG) - primarily tight gas sands - offers by far the largest opportunity for reducing gas costs between now and 2000, a team of researchers reported at the Sept. 1984 International Gas Research conference in Washington, DC. The promises of UNG R and D far outweigh those of synthetic natural gas (SNG), the researchers concluded, but stressed that SNG R and D should nonetheless continue - but with a different focus and changed performance goals.

Not Available

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

309

Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Low World Oil Price Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low World Oil Price Case Projections (1990-2030) Low World Oil Price Case Projections (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Low World Oil Price Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low World Oil Price Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low World Oil Price Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low World Oil Price Case Table E1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel, Low World Oil Price Case Table E2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

312

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas Author: Kondis, Paul Last modified by: ch4 Created Date: 5/9/2013 1:27:26 PM Document presentation format

313

Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through the disposal of produced water routinely dumped fromthey also pump produced water out of the formation. Mercury,Older reservoirs yield more produced water as the oil is

Reed, Kristin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http:www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an...

315

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the fresh to slightly saline Birds-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formations Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft...

316

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

317

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

318

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

319

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

320

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

322

Oil export policy and economic development in OPEC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1970s, members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) increased the price of their oil exports by 2000% in nominal terms. The ability of OPEC countries to increase the economic and other benefits they drew from each barrel of oil was a familiar theme of that decade. However, recent developments in the world oil market may not be so encouraging for OPEC. From 1979 to 1983, demand for OPEC crude oil decreased by almost 45%, or from 30.9 to 17.5 million barrels per day (mbd). Despite this dramatic decrease, the news on the price front has not so far been that bad for OPEC. The average OPEC oil price, which had increased from $1.80/bbl (barrel) in 1970 to $36/bbl by 1980, declined to $29/bbl by 1983. OPEC has thus defied many experts by managing to avoid a price collapse. Not surprisingly, these developments have raised arguments about the nature of OPEC and how it operates. OPEC has been characterized variously as a very tight cartel and as a loose and ineffectual organization. This paper tries to shed some light on OPEC, and especially on how the economic development objectives of influential OPEC members affect their oil policies.

Aperjis, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Making and breaking of water in crude oil emulsions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An understanding of the processes involved in oil spills, and how they interact to alter the composition and behavior of the oil with respect to time is essential to determine an effective oil spill response. The review of past research has shown more focus on the laboratory methods and computerized modeling schemes to estimate the formation and breaking of emulsions after an oil spill. However, relatively less effort has gone into the study of emulsions corresponding to actual field conditions. This research aims to simulate an oil spill at sea by developing a new technique to make water in oil emulsions, without disturbing the marine wildlife. Further, this research also attempts to analyze the viscosities of water in oil emulsions and determine appropriate emulsion breakers for different crude oil emulsions. The overall test design for the study includes a test apparatus for spreading and evaporation, three different crude oils, a mixing chamber to form the emulsion, and emulsion breakers. Experiments in this research attempt to gain a better understanding of the processes that occur after oil spills at sea. In particular, the rate of evaporation of different crude oils and the formation of crude oil emulsions on the sea surface have been investigated. It was observed that different crude oils behave differently when subjected to the same weathering procedure. Results indicate that the behavior of the crude oil on the sea surface, subjected to spreading, evaporation, and emulsification, can be predicted by using the new technique developed in this research. This technique can also assist the development of effective recovery equipments and materials.

Mehta, Shweta D.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 – 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to quantitatively describe and understand the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin by collecting and analyzing a wide range of parameters, including seismic and geochemical data, that impact well productivity/oil recovery. Performer Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Background The Bakken Formation is rapidly emerging as an important source of oil in the Williston Basin. The formation typically consists of three members, with the upper and lower members being shales and the middle member being dolomitic siltstone and sandstone. Total organic carbon (TOC) within the shales may be as high as 40%, with estimates of total hydrocarbon generation across the entire Bakken Formation ranging from 200 to 400 billion barrels. While the formation is productive in numerous reservoirs throughout Montana and North Dakota, with the Elm Coulee Field in Montana and the Parshall area in North Dakota being the most prolific examples of Bakken success, many Bakken wells have yielded disappointing results. While variable productivity within a play is nothing unusual to the petroleum industry, the Bakken play is noteworthy because of the wide variety of approaches and technologies that have been applied with apparently inconsistent and all too often underachieving results. This project will implement a robust, systematic, scientific, and engineering research effort to overcome these challenges and unlock the vast resource potential of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin.

325

Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO2 enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 7, 1997--February 6, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization during Phase 1 of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. During this period the following tasks have been completed: laboratory wettability; specific permeability; mercury porosimetry; acoustic anisotropy; rock mechanics analysis; core description; fracture analysis; digital image analysis; mineralogical analysis; hydraulic flow unit analysis; petrographic and confocal thin section analysis; oil geochemical fingerprinting; production logging; carbon/oxygen logging; complex lithologic log analysis; NMR T2 processing; dipole shear wave anisotropy logging; shear wave vertical seismic profile processing; structural mapping; and regional tectonic synthesis. Noteworthy technological successes for this reporting period include: (1) first (ever) high resolution, crosswell reflection images of SJV sediments; (2) first successful application of the TomoSeis acquisition system in siliceous shales; (3) first detailed reservoir characterization of SJV siliceous shales; (4) first mineral based saturation algorithm for SJV siliceous shales, and (5) first CO{sub 2} coreflood experiments for siliceous shale. Preliminary results from the CO{sub 2} coreflood experiments (2,500 psi) suggest that significant oil is being produced from the siliceous shale.

Morea, M.F.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

Gani, M. Royhan

327

VISUALIZATION OF SOLUTION GAS DRIVE IN VISCOUS OIL SUPRI TR -126  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is important during nucleation. Li and Yortsos (1991) visualized gas formation by pressure decline of solution gas drive behavior in heavy oil. Five different natural and synthetic oils were used, one of whichVISUALIZATION OF SOLUTION GAS DRIVE IN VISCOUS OIL SUPRI TR - 126 By D.S. George and A.R. Kovscek

328

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fuel Oil Use in Manufacturing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and residual fuel oils. Distillate fuel oil, the lighter product, is also used for heating of homes and commercial buildings. Residual oil is a much denser, heavier product...

331

Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ESSENTIAL OILS ON EXTRACELLULAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pityriasis capitis is a common scalp disorder caused by a fungus Malassezia globosa. The mechanism of Pityriasis capitis includes Malassezia-induced fatty acid metabolism, particularly lipase-mediated breakdown of sebaceous lipids and release of irritating free fatty acids. We report that extracellular lipase activity was detected in Malassezia globosa. The presence of lipase enzyme was performed in specific media on Petri dishes for formation of a zone.In this article, the effect of Cymbopogon citratus and Zingiber officinale essential oils on the extracellular lipase activity of Malassezia globosa had been studied by titrametric method. At the end of titration 4 µmol fatty acid/ml of reaction mixture was released in the presence of Cymbopogon citratus oil and 7µmol of fatty acid/ml of reaction mixture was liberated in the presence of Zingiber officinale oil. It was found that both essential oils strongly inhibit the lipase activity of M. globosa at a lower concentration.

Shubhangi Mugal; Ranjana Verma; Renu Mishra; Shikha Mandloi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Gas collection system for oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in-situ oil shale retorting process is described in which a cavity filled with broken particles of oil shale is formed within the subsurface oil shale formation and air is forced down through the cavity to sustain combustion of the top layer of oil shale particles, the products of combustion being withdrawn at the bottom of the cavity. A plurality of exhaust pipes traverse the bottom of the cavity and extend out through the sealed entrance to the retort cavity. The pipes are supported above the floor of the cavity and have holes opening on the bottom side of the pipes through which the product gases are withdrawn from the cavity. Valves in each pipe control the flow so as to balance the flow distribution of air and exhaust gases through the retorting cavity.

Ridley, R.D.; Burton, R.S. III

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geology of Kuparuk River Oil Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kuparuk River Oil Field is located on the Alaskan Arctic North Slope in the Colville-Prudhoe Trough ca. 25 miles west of the Prudhoe Bay Field. The 23 API crude is similar in type to that in the Prudhoe Bay Field. However, the Kuparuk Reservoir is in early Cretaceous clastics of the Kuparuk River Formation, stratigraphically higher than at Prudhoe. The origin of the oil is believed to be predominantly from the Jurassic Kingak formation with migration occurring along the basal Cretaceous unconformity. The dominant trapping mechanism is stratigraphic pinch-out and truncation of the reservoir at an intraformational unconformity along the southern and western flanks of a southeast plunging antiform. Structural dip closure exists along the northern and eastern flanks with a tilted oil-water contact at ca. 6675 ft subsea. The reservoir sandstones occur within cleaning and coarsening-upward sequences which are interpreted as shallow-marine and sublittoral in origin.

Hardwick, P.; Carman, G.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Compositional changes in heavy oil steamflood simulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numerical simulation of heavy oil steamfloods has generally been conducted assuming that the oil is non-volatile. Reservoir simulation has traditionally ignored compositional effect s due to heat and steam and assumed that the hydrocarbon phase is non-volatile. This is equivalent to assuming that the equilibrium ratios, K-values, are zero. In order to properly model the mechanism of steamflooding, however, compositional effects need to be taken into account. In this study, laboratory data including distillation, vapor pressure, steam distillation and viscosity measurements, along with a commercial PVT simulator are used to tune equation-of-state (EOS) and viscosity parameters to properly model the PVT properties of the oil. The Peng-Robinson equation-of-state (PR-EOS) was used for all phase behavior calculations. Viscosity as a function of temperature and composition was modeled with the Pedersen correlation for heavy oils. Once a tuned equation-of-state, compositional fluid description was developed for the heavy oil, one-dimensional numerical simulations of the steamflooding process were performed. These simulations demonstrated the utility of the equation-of-state approach. In addition, it was concluded that compositional effects are essential for the proper modeling of low residual oil saturations seen in the field and the formation of an in-situ solvent bank at the steam-oil interface.

Lolley, Christopher Scott

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

337

Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shales reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: reservoir matrix and fluid characterization: fracture characterization; reservoir modeling and simulation; and, CO{sub 2} pilot flood and evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills field. In this report, accomplishments for this period are presented for: reservoir matrix and fluid characterization; fracture characterization; reservoir modeling and simulation; and technology transfer.

Toronyi, R.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

340

Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for establishing a combustion zone in an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

A method for retorting oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort includes the steps of excavating a void in a subterranean formation containing oil shale and placing combustible material in the void adjacent an ignition situs. Formation is then explosively expanded toward the void to form a retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale, the top layer of the fragmented mass adjacent an ignition situs containing such combustible material. The combustible material is then ignited for establishing a combustion zone in the retort.

Bartel, W.J.; Cha, C.Y.; Burton, R.S. III

1979-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Conductivity heating a subterranean oil shale to create permeability and subsequently produce oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an improvement in a process in which oil is produced from a subterranean oil shale deposit by extending at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into the deposit, establishing a heat-conductive fluid-impermeable barrier between the interior of each heat-injecting well and the adjacent deposit, and then heating the interior of each heat-injecting well at a temperature sufficient to conductively heat oil shale kerogen and cause pyrolysis products to form fractures within the oil shale deposit through which the pyrolysis products are displaced into at least one production well. The improvement is for enhancing the uniformity of the heat fronts moving through the oil shale deposit. Also described is a process for exploiting a target oil shale interval, by progressively expanding a heated treatment zone band from about a geometric center of the target oil shale interval outward, such that the formation or extension of vertical fractures from the heated treatment zone band to the periphery of the target oil shale interval is minimized.

Van Meurs, P.; DeRouffignac, E.P.; Vinegar, H.J.; Lucid, M.F.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Oil shale of the Uinta Basin, northeastern Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary rocks, which occupy the interior of the Uinta basin, have been subdivided into four formations: Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Uinta. The division is based on stratigraphic and paleontologic evidence. Hydrocarbon materials have been found in all four formations, although bedded deposits (asphaltic sandstone and oil shale) are known only in the Wasatch and Green River. Veins of gilsonite, elaterite, ozocerite, and other related hydrocarbons cut all the Tertiary formation of the Uinta basin. Good oil shale (Uinta basin of Utah) is black or brownish black except on weathered surfaces, where it is blue-white or white. It is fine grained, slightly calcareous, and usually free from grit. It is tough and in thin-bedded deposits remarkably flexible. Although oil shale consists of thin laminae, this is not apparent in some specimens until after the rock has been heated and the oil driven off. Freshly broken oil shale gives off a peculiar odor similar to that of crude petroleum. Oil shale contains a large amount of carbonaceous matter (largely remains of lower plants, including algae), which is the source of the distillation products. Thin splinters of oil shale will burn with a very sooty flame and give off an asphaltic odor. Lean specimens of oil shale have a higher specific gravity than rich specimens and are generally heavier than coal.

Winchester, D.E.

1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

345

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

346

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a 1979 exploratory oil well blew out and leaked oil foraddicted to oil directly causes spills as well as globalmagnitudes of past oil spills. They are well aware of the

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine.

George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Abandoned oil fields in Alaska, California, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication lists approximately 250 abandoned oil fields in Alaska, California, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil before abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery data of field; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas reservoirs provide almost one quarter of the current U.S. domestic gas production, with significant projected increases in the next several decades in both the U.S. and abroad. These reservoirs constitute an important play type, with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually acquired by upscaling the detailed 3D geologic models. Earlier studies of flow simulation have developed layer-based coarse reservoir simulation models, from the more detailed 3D geologic models. However, the layer-based approach cannot capture the essential sand and flow. We introduce and utilize the diffusive time of flight to understand the pressure continuity within the fluvial sands, and develop novel adaptive reservoir simulation grids to preserve the continuity of the reservoir sands. Combined with the high resolution transmissibility based upscaling of flow properties, and well index based upscaling of the well connections, we can build accurate simulation models with at least one order magnitude simulation speed up, but the predicted recoveries are almost indistinguishable from those of the geologic models. General practice of well placement usually requires reservoir simulation to predict the dynamic reservoir response. Numerous well placement scenarios require many reservoir simulation runs, which may have significant CPU demands. We propose a novel simulation-free screening approach to generate a quality map, based on a combination of static and dynamic reservoir properties. The geologic uncertainty is taken into consideration through an uncertainty map form the spatial connectivity analysis and variograms. Combining the quality map and uncertainty map, good infill well locations and drilling sequence can be determined for improved reservoir management. We apply this workflow to design the infill well drilling sequence and explore the impact of subsurface also, for a large-scale tight gas reservoir. Also, we evaluated an improved pressure approximation method, through the comparison with the leading order high frequency term of the asymptotic solution. The proposed pressure solution can better predict the heterogeneous reservoir depletion behavior, thus provide good opportunities for tight gas reservoir management.

Zhou, Yijie

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Tight bound on coherent-state-based entanglement generation over lossy channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first stage of the hybrid quantum repeaters is entanglement generation based on transmission of pulses in coherent states over a lossy channel. Protocols to make entanglement with only one type of error are favorable for rendering subsequent entanglement distillation efficient. Here we provide the tight upper bound on performances of these protocols that is determined only by the channel loss. In addition, we show that this bound is achievable by utilizing a proposed protocol [K. Azuma, N. Sota, R. Namiki, S. K. Oezdemir, T. Yamamoto, M. Koashi, and N. Imoto, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060303(R) (2009)] composed of a simple combination of linear optical elements and photon-number-resolving detectors.

Azuma, Koji; Sota, Naoya; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

353

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Palm oil pundit speaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry, director of Godrej International Ltd. in Mumbai, India, spoke about palm oil on March 15, 2010, during the 2010 Annual Convention of the National Institute of Oilseed Products in Palm Springs, California, USA. Palm oil pundit speaks ...

355

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

356

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well below unity accounts for the broad trends we see in the share of oil purchases in totalWells. ” Middle panel: percent of U.S. total crude oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced reservoir characterizstion in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills Pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shales reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and, CO{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills field. The project took a major step in the third quarter of 1996 with the drilling of the pilot injector well. The well spudded on July 1 and was completed on July 29 at a total measured depth of 4907 ft. The well was cored continuously through the entire Brown Shale and the productive portion of the Antelope Shale to just below the P2 e-log marker. The reservoir matrix and fluid characterization are discussed in this report.

Smith, S.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Oil Peak or Panic?  

SciTech Connect

In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale oil using the same strategy. Due to its higher viscosity and eventual 2-phase flow conditions when the formation pressure drops below the oil bubble point pressure, shale oil is likely to be limited to lower recovery efficiency than shale gas. However, the recently discovered Eagle Ford shale formations is significantly over pressured, and initial formation pressure is well above the bubble point pressure in the oil window. This, coupled with successful hydraulic fracturing methodologies, is leading to commercial wells. This study evaluates the recovery potential for oil produced both above and below the bubble point pressure from very low permeability unconventional shale oil formations. We explain how the Eagle Ford shale is different from other shales such as the Barnett and others. Although, Eagle Ford shale produces oil, condensate and dry gas in different areas, our study focuses in the oil window of the Eagle Ford shale. We used the logarithmically gridded locally refined gridding scheme to properly model the flow in the hydraulic fracture, the flow from the fracture to the matrix and the flow in the matrix. The steep pressure and saturation changes near the hydraulic fractures are captured using this gridding scheme. We compare the modeled production of shale oil from the very low permeability reservoir to conventional reservoir flow behavior. We show how production behavior and recovery of oil from the low permeability shale formation is a function of the rock properties, formation fluid properties and the fracturing operations. The sensitivity studies illustrate the important parameters affecting shale oil production performance from the stimulated reservoir volume. The parameters studied in our work includes fracture spacing, fracture half-length, rock compressibility, critical gas saturation (for 2 phase flow below the bubble point of oil), flowing bottom-hole pressure, hydraulic fracture conductivity, and matrix permeability. The sensitivity studies show that placing fractures closely, increasing the fracture half-length, making higher conductive fractures leads to higher recovery of oil. Also, the thesis stresses the need to carry out the core analysis and other reservoir studies to capture the important rock and fluid parameters like the rock permeability and the critical gas saturation.

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and T

362

Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing oils for use, application and precautions are discussed.

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a “negative” storage cost for oil in the form of a bene?tin levels. oil for more than your costs, that is, if P t+1 QSaudi oil, and M S the Saudi’s marginal cost of production.

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

369

Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas A large new resource of recoverable oil has been identified in the San Andres dolomite Formation. Residual Oil Zones, ROZs, up to 300 ’ thick containing 20-40 % oil in pores of the dolomitic reservoir are present both below and between presently productive fields. The oil in the ROZs is residual, i.e., not recoverable by primary production methods or water flooding, but oil is recoverable using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods such as CO2 EOR. Although preliminary at this stage, the estimated oil in place in the ROZ’s

Basin Of New Mexico; West Texas; West Texas; Dr. Robert Trentham; L. Steven Melzer; David Vance; Arcadis U. S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) studies oil recovery mechanisms relevant to thermal and heavy-oil production. The scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. In August of 2000 we received funding from the U. S. DOE under Award No. DE-FC26-00BC15311 that completed December 1, 2003. The project was cost shared with industry. Heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o} API) is an underutilized energy resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods. Heating reduces oil viscosity dramatically. Hence, thermal recovery is especially important because adding heat, usually via steam injection generally improves displacement efficiency. The objectives of this work were to improve our understanding of the production mechanisms of heavy oil under both primary and enhanced modes of operation. The research described spanned a spectrum of topics related to heavy and thermal oil recovery and is categorized into: (1) multiphase flow and rock properties, (2) hot fluid injection, (3) improved primary heavy-oil recovery, (4) in-situ combustion, and (5) reservoir definition. Technology transfer efforts and industrial outreach were also important to project effort. The research tools and techniques used were quite varied. In the area of experiments, we developed a novel apparatus that improved imaging with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and high-pressure micromodels etched with realistic sandstone roughness and pore networks that improved visualization of oil-recovery mechanisms. The CT-compatible apparatus was invaluable for investigating primary heavy-oil production, multiphase flow in fractured and unfractured media, as well as imbibition. Imbibition and the flow of condensed steam are important parts of the thermal recovery process. The high-pressure micromodels were used to develop a conceptual and mechanistic picture of primary heavy-oil production by solution gas drive. They allowed for direct visualization of gas bubble formation, bubble growth, and oil displacement. Companion experiments in representative sands and sandstones were also conducted to understand the mechanisms of cold production. The evolution of in-situ gas and oil saturation was monitored with CT scanning and pressure drop data. These experiments highlighted the importance of depletion rate, overburden pressure, and oil-phase chemistry on the cold production process. From the information provided by the experiments, a conceptual and numerical model was formulated and validated for the heavy-oil solution gas drive recovery process. Also in the area of mechanisms, steamdrive for fractured, low permeability porous media was studied. Field tests have shown that heat injected in the form of steam is effective at unlocking oil from such reservoir media. The research reported here elucidated how the basic mechanisms differ from conventional steamdrive and how these differences are used to an advantage. Using simulations of single and multiple matrix blocks that account for details of heat transfer, capillarity, and fluid exchange between matrix and fracture, the importance of factors such as permeability contrast between matrix and fracture and oil composition were quantified. Experimentally, we examined the speed and extent to which steam injection alters the permeability and wettability of low permeability, siliceous rocks during thermal recovery. Rock dissolution tends to increase permeability moderately aiding in heat delivery, whereas downstream the cooled fluid deposits silica reducing permeability. Permeability reduction is not catastrophic. With respect to wettability, heat shifts rock wettability toward more water wet conditions. This effect is beneficial for the production of heavy and medium gravity oils as it improves displacement efficiency. A combination of analytical and numerical studies was used to examine the efficiency of reservoir heating using nonconventional wells such as horizontal and multi

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

Robertson, Eric P

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

NETL: News Release - DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test CO2 Injection Begins in Existing Production Well to Evaluate CO2 Storage Potential, Oil Recovery Washington, D.C. - A U.S. Department...

374

Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996 - June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability Of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shales reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and, CO{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas can be subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced EOR pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills project realized it`s first major milestone in the second quarter of 1996 with the pending drilling of proposed project injection well. Regional fracture characterization work was also initiated in the second quarter. This report summarizes the status of those efforts.

Smith, S.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in shale and other tight rock formations played an important role in the increase of oil and natural gas ...

376

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bpd (Figure 1). The growth results largely from a significant increase in onshore crude oil production, particularly from shale and other tight formations. After about 2020,...

377

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

period. The projected growth results largely from a significant increase in onshore crude oil production, particularly from shale and other tight formations, which has been spurred...

378

Geology and technology drive estimates of technically ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 unproved TRRs are shown in the figures above for the major shale gas and tight oil formations.

379

HMNewsFall05.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including, for example, natural gas from tight gas and methane hydrate formations, oil shale and oiltar sands, and geological sequestration of carbon dioxide and other...

380

Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Monte Carlo Simulations of Neutron Oil well Logging Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations of simple neutron oil well logging tools into typical geological formations are presented.The simulated tools consist of both 14 MeV pulsed and continuous Am-Be neutron sources with time gated and continuous gamma ray detectors respectively.The geological formation consists of pure limestone with 15% absolute porosity in a wide range of oil saturation.The particle transport was performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System, MCNP-4B.Several gamma ray spectra were obtained at the detector position that allow to perform composition analysis of the formation.In particular, the ratio C/O was analyzed as an indicator of oil saturation.Further calculations are proposed to simulate actual detector responses in order to contribute to understand the relation between the detector response with the formation composition

Azcurra, M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various models featuring horizontal wells with multiple induced fractures have been proposed to characterize flow behavior over time in tight gas and shale gas systems. Currently, there is little consensus regarding the effects of non-ideal fracture geometries and coupled primary-secondary fracture interactions on reservoir performance in these unconventional gas reservoirs. This thesis provides a grid construction tool to generate high-resolution unstructured meshes using Voronoi grids, which provides the flexibility required to accurately represent complex geologic domains and fractures in three dimensions. Using these Voronoi grids, the interaction between propped hydraulic fractures and secondary "stress-release" fractures were evaluated. Additionally, various primary fracture configurations were examined, where the fractures may be non-planar or non-orthogonal. For this study, a numerical model was developed to assess the potential performance of tight gas and shale gas reservoirs. These simulations utilized up to a half-million grid-blocks and consider a period of up to 3,000 years in some cases. The aim is to provide very high-definition reference numerical solutions that will exhibit virtually all flow regimes we can expect in these unconventional gas reservoirs. The simulation results are analyzed to identify production signatures and flow regimes using diagnostic plots, and these interpretations are confirmed using pressure maps where useful. The coupled primary-secondary fracture systems with the largest fracture surface areas are shown to give the highest production in the traditional "linear flow" regime (which occurs for very high conductivity vertical fracture cases). The non-ideal hydraulic fracture geometries are shown to yield progressively lower production as the angularity of these fractures increases. Hence, to design optimum fracture completions, we should endeavor to keep the fractures as orthogonal to the horizontal well as possible. This work expands the current understanding of flow behavior in fractured tight-gas and shale-gas systems and may be used to optimize fracture and completion design, to validate analytical models and to facilitate more accurate reserves estimation.

Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; Bustin, Mark [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013. Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 ...

387

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

389

File:Uscells1msmall.oil.gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uscells1msmall.oil.gas.pdf Uscells1msmall.oil.gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage US Oil & Natural Gas Production Map Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 3.33 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description US Oil & Natural Gas Production Map Sources USGS Authors derived from Mast, et al, 1998 Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Extent country Countries United States UN Region Northern America US Oil & Natural Gas Production Map (PDF Format) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:31, 6 January 2011 Thumbnail for version as of 17:31, 6 January 2011 1,650 × 1,275 (3.33 MB) Kch (Talk | contribs) US Oil & Natural Gas Production Map (PDF Format)

390

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Watch April 19, 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil & Gas A large stockbuild in crude oil inventories contributed to blunt crude oil inputs ...

391

Anyon-Fermion Mapping and Applications to Ultracold Gases in Tight Waveguides  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi-Bose mapping method for one-dimensional Bose and Fermi gases with zero-range interactions is generalized to an anyon-fermion mapping and applied to exact solution of several models of ultracold gases with anyonic exchange symmetry in tight waveguides: anyonic Calogero-Sutherland model, anyons with point hard-core interaction (anyonic Tonks-Girardeau gas), and spin-aligned anyon gas with infinite zero-range odd-wave attractions (attractive anyonic Tonks-Girardeau, or AATG, gas). It is proved that for even N{>=}4 there are states of the AATG gas on A, with anyonic phase slips which are odd integral multiples of {pi}/(N-1), of energy lower than that of the corresponding fermionic ground state. A generalization to a spinor Fermi gas state with anyonic symmetry under purely spatial exchange enables energy lowering by the same mechanism.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Soluble Models of Strongly Interacting Ultracold Gas Mixtures in Tight Waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Fermi-Bose mapping method is used to determine the exact ground states of several models of mixtures of strongly interacting ultracold gases in tight waveguides, which are generalizations of the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas (1D Bose gas with point hard cores) and fermionic Tonks-Girardeau (FTG) gas (1D spin-aligned Fermi gas with infinitely strong zero-range attractions). We detail the case of a Bose-Fermi mixture with TG boson-boson (BB) and boson-fermion (BF) interactions. Exact results are given for density profiles in a harmonic trap, single-particle density matrices, momentum distibutions, and density-density correlations. Since the ground state is highly degenerate, we analyze the splitting of the ground manifold for large but finite BB and BF repulsions.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Minguzzi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Mileux Condenses, C.N.R.S., B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France)

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Electron acceleration by a tightly focused Hermite-Gaussian beam: higher-order corrections  

SciTech Connect

Taking the TEM{sub 1,0}-mode Hermite-Gaussian (H-G) beam as a numerical calculation example, and based on the method of the perturbation series expansion, the higher-order field corrections of H-G beams are derived and used to study the electron acceleration by a tightly focused H-G beam in vacuum. For the case of the off-axis injection the field corrections to the terms of order f{sup 3} (f=1/kw{sub 0}, k and w{sub 0} being the wavenumber and waist width, respectively) are considered, and for the case of the on-axis injection the contributions of the terms of higher orders are negligible. By a suitable optimization of injection parameters the energy gain in the giga-electron-volt regime can be achieved.

Zhao Zhiguo [Department of Physics, Luoyang Normal College, Luoyang 471022 (China); Institute of Laser Physics and Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Yang Dangxiao; Lue Baida [Institute of Laser Physics and Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hybrid Monte-Carlo simulation of interacting tight-binding model of graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, results are presented of Hybrid-Monte-Carlo simulations of the tight-binding Hamiltonian of graphene, coupled to an instantaneous long-range two-body potential which is modeled by a Hubbard-Stratonovich auxiliary field. We present an investigation of the spontaneous breaking of the sublattice symmetry, which corresponds to a phase transition from a conducting to an insulating phase and which occurs when the effective fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ of the system crosses above a certain threshold $\\alpha_C$. Qualitative comparisons to earlier works on the subject (which used larger system sizes and higher statistics) are made and it is established that $\\alpha_C$ is of a plausible magnitude in our simulations. Also, we discuss differences between simulations using compact and non-compact variants of the Hubbard field and present a quantitative comparison of distinct discretization schemes of the Euclidean time-like dimension in the Fermion operator.

Dominik Smith; Lorenz von Smekal

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

Discovery of a tight correlation among the prompt emission properties of long Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a correlation among three prompt emission properties of GRBs. These are the isotropic peak luminosity L_iso, the peak energy of the time-integrated prompt emission spectrum E_pk, and the ``high signal" timescale T_0.45, previously used to characterize the variability behavior of bursts. In the rest frame of the source the found correlation reads L_iso\\propto E_pk^1.62 T_0.45^-0.49. We find other strong correlations, but at the cost of increasing the number of variables, involving the variability and the isotropic energy of the prompt emission. With respect to the previous tight correlations found in GRBs the newly found correlation does not require any information from the afterglow phase of the bursts, nor any model-dependent assumption. In the popular scenario in which we are receiving beamed radiation originating in a fireball pointing at us, the found correlation preserves its form in the comoving frame. This helps to explain the small scatter of the correlation, and underlines the role of the local brightness (i.e. the brightness of the visible fraction of the fireball surface). This correlation has been found for 19 objects, and it is hard to establish if any selection bias affects it. Its connection with the prompt local brightness is promising, but a solid physical understanding is still to be found. Despite all that, we find that some properties of the correlation, which we discuss, support its true existence, and this has important implications for the GRB physics. Furthermore, it is possible to use such correlation as an accurate redshift estimator, and its tightness will allow us to use it as a tool to constrain the cosmological parameters (abridged)

C. Firmani; G. Ghisellini; V. Avila-Reese; G. Ghirlanda

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils  

SciTech Connect

The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation includes 1.5% of an alkali, 0.4% of a nonionic surfactant, and 0.48% of a polymer. The secondary waterflood in a 1D sand pack had a cumulative recovery of 0.61 PV in about 3 PV injection. The residual oil saturation to waterflood was 0.26. Injection of tertiary alkaline-surfactant-polymer slug followed by tapered polymer slugs could recover almost 100% of the remaining oil. The tertiary alkali-surfactant-polymer flood of the 330 cp oil is stable in three-dimensions; it was verified by a flood in a transparent 5-spot model. A secondary polymer flood is also effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. The secondary polymer flood recovered about 0.78 PV of oil in about 1 PV injection. The remaining oil saturation was 0.09. The pressure drops were reasonable (<2 psi/ft) and depended mainly on the viscosity of the polymer slug injected. For the heavy crude oil (of viscosity 10,000 cp), low viscosity (10-100 cp) oil-in-water emulsions can be obtained at salinity up to 20,000 ppm by using a hydrophilic surfactant along with an alkali at a high water-to-oil ratio of 9:1. Very dilute surfactant concentrations (~0.1 wt%) of the synthetic surfactant are required to generate the emulsions. It is much easier to flow the low viscosity emulsion than the original oil of viscosity 10,000 cp. Decreasing the WOR reverses the type of emulsion to water-in-oil type. For a low salinity of 0 ppm NaCl, the emulsion remained O/W even when the WOR was decreased. Hence a low salinity injection water is preferred if an oil-in-water emulsion is to be formed. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil followed by tertiary injection of alkaline-surfactants is very effective. Waterflood has early water breakthrough, but recovers a substantial amount of oil beyond breakthrough. Waterflood recovers 20-37% PV of the oil in 1D sand pack in about 3 PV injection. Tertiary alkali-surfactant injection increases the heavy oil recovery to 50-70% PV in 1D sand packs. As the salinity increased, the oil recovery due to alkaline surfactant flood increased, but water-in-oil emulsion was p

Kishore Mohanty

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Shale oil: process choices  

SciTech Connect

The four broad categories of shale-oil processing are discussed. All of these processes share the basic function of retorting oil-shale rock at high temperature so that the kerogen material in the rocks is thermally decomposed to shale oil and gaseous products. The technologies and the organizations working on their development are: solids-to-solids heating, The Oil Shale Co. (TOSCO) and Lurgi-Rhur; gas-to-solids heating with internal gas combustion, U. S. Bureau of Mines, Development Engineering Inc. and Union Oil of California; gas-to-solid heating with external heat generation, Development Engineering, Union Oil, Petrobas, and Institute of Gas Technology; and in-situ retorting, Occidental Petroleum Corp. The TOSCO II process is considered proven and on the verge of commercialization. (BLM)

1974-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Process of treating oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process of destructively distilling oil shale is described consisting in subjecting the oil shale containing aluminum to the action of heat and pressure to destructively distill it and separate the light oil constituents. Chlorine gas is simultaneously passed through the hot oil shale countercurrent to the direction of movement of the oil shale.

Egloff, G.

1927-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

402

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

403

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

405

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

406

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

407

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

408

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

409

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

410

Residual Fuel Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

411

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

413

Oil And The Macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper examines the oil price-macro economy relationship by means of analyzing the impact ofoil price on Industrial production, real effective exchange rate, long… (more)

Al-Ameri, Leyth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

California Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of different quality crudes vary over time based on the value the market places on such quality attributes. A heavy crude oil has more heavy, ...

415

Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation includes 1.5% of an alkali, 0.4% of a nonionic surfactant, and 0.48% of a polymer. The secondary waterflood in a 1D sand pack had a cumulative recovery of 0.61 PV in about 3 PV injection. The residual oil saturation to waterflood was 0.26. Injection of tertiary alkaline-surfactant-polymer slug followed by tapered polymer slugs could recover almost 100% of the remaining oil. The tertiary alkali-surfactant-polymer flood of the 330 cp oil is stable in three-dimensions; it was verified by a flood in a transparent 5-spot model. A secondary polymer flood is also effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. The secondary polymer flood recovered about 0.78 PV of oil in about 1 PV injection. The remaining oil saturation was 0.09. The pressure drops were reasonable (polymer slug injected. For the heavy crude oil (of viscosity 10,000 cp), low viscosity (10-100 cp) oil-in-water emulsions can be obtained at salinity up to 20,000 ppm by using a hydrophilic surfactant along with an alkali at a high water-to-oil ratio of 9:1. Very dilute surfactant concentrations (~0.1 wt%) of the synthetic surfactant are required to generate the emulsions. It is much easier to flow the low viscosity emulsion than the original oil of viscosity 10,000 cp. Decreasing the WOR reverses the type of emulsion to water-in-oil type. For a low salinity of 0 ppm NaCl, the emulsion remained O/W even when the WOR was decreased. Hence a low salinity injection water is preferred if an oil-in-water emulsion is to be formed. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil followed by tertiary injection of alkaline-surfactants is very effective. Waterflood has early water breakthrough, but recovers a substantial amount of oil beyond breakthrough. Waterflood recovers 20-37% PV of the oil in 1D sand pack in about 3 PV injection. Tertiary alkali-surfactant injection increases the heavy oil recovery to 50-70% PV in 1D sand packs. As the salinity increased, the oil recovery due to alkaline surfactant flood increased, but water-in-oil emulsion was p

Kishore Mohanty

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Non-subsidence method for developing an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

A non-subsidence method for developing an in situ oil shale retort tract in a subterranean formation containing oil shale includes forming a number of spaced apart rows of in situ oil shale retorts, leaving intervening zones of unfragmented formation between adjacent rows of retorts for supporting the overburden loads without substantial subsidence. Each retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. The retorts in each row are separated by gas barriers that provide support for the overburden load above each row of retorts. After retorting, a stabilizing material is introduced into the void spaces in the spent in situ oil shale retorts for increasing the compressive strength of the fragmented masses of spent oil shale particles in the spent in situ retorts. Thereafter, separate rows of in situ oil shale retorts are formed in corresponding intervening zones of unfragmented formation. The retorts in each intervening row are separated by gas barriers that provide partial support for the overburden load above each row of intervening retorts. Separate barriers of unfragmented formation are left between the retorts in each intervening row and adjacent rows of spent retorts. This shifts the overburden load to the spent retorts and to the intervening barriers of unfragmented formation, as well as to the barriers of formation between individual retorts in the intervening rows of retorts, which collectively support overburden loads without substantial subsidence during the operating life of the retorts in the intervening rows.

Hutchins, N.M.

1983-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Processing of Soybean Oil into Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abundant and easily refined, petroleum has provided high energy density liquid fuels for a century. However, recent price fluctuations, shortages, and concerns over the long term supply and greenhouse gas emissions have encouraged the development of alternatives to petroleum for liquid transportation fuels (Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004). Plant-based fuels include short chain alcohols, now blended with gasoline, and biodiesels, commonly derived from seed oils. Of plant-derived diesel feedstocks, soybeans yield the most of oil by weight, up to 20% (Mushrush, Willauer et al. 2009), and so have become the primary source of biomass-derived diesel in the United States and Brazil (Lin, Cunshan et al. 2011). Worldwide ester biodiesel production reached over 11,000,000 tons per year in 2008 (Emerging Markets 2008). However, soybean oil cannot be burned directly in modern compression ignition vehicle engines as a direct replacement for diesel fuel because of its physical properties that can lead to clogging of the engine fuel line and problems in the fuel injectors, such as: high viscosity, high flash point, high pour point, high cloud point (where the fuel begins to gel), and high density (Peterson, Cook et al. 2001). Industrial production of biodiesel from oil of low fatty-acid content often follows homogeneous base-catalyzed transesterification, a sequential reaction of the parent triglyceride with an alcohol, usually methanol, into methyl ester and glycerol products. The conversion of the triglyceride to esterified fatty acids improves the characteristics of the fuel, allowing its introduction into a standard compression engine without giving rise to serious issues with flow or combustion. Commercially available biodiesel, a product of the transesterification of fats and oils, can also be blended with standard diesel fuel up to a maximum of 20 vol.%. In the laboratory, the fuel characteristics of unreacted soybean oil have also been improved by dilution with petroleum based fuels, or by aerating and formation of microemulsions. However, it is the chemical conversion of the oil to fuel that has been the area of most interest. The topic has been reviewed extensively (Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004), so this aspect will be the focus in this chapter. Important aspects of the chemistry of conversion of oil into diesel fuel remain the same no matter the composition of the triglyceride. Hence, although the focus in this book is on soybean oil, studies on other plant based oils and simulated oils have occasional mention in this chapter. Valuable data can be taken on systems that are simpler than soybean based oils, with fewer or shorter chain components. Sometimes the triglycerides will behave differently under reaction conditions, and when relevant, these have been noted in the text. Although the price of diesel fuel has increased, economical production of biodiesel is a challenge because of (1) the increasing price of soybean oil feedstocks and reagent methanol, (2) a distributed supply of feedstocks that reduces the potential for economies of scale, (3) processing conditions that include pressures and temperatures above ambient, and (4) multiple processing steps needed to reduce contaminant levels to ASTM specification D6751 limits (Vasudevan & Briggs 2008). Much of the cost of biodiesel production is related to the conversion of the oil to the methyl ester and so there has been an emphasis to research improved methods of converting soybean oil to biodiesel. However, most of these studies have taken place at the bench scale, and have not demonstrated a marked improvement in yield or reduced oil-to-methanol ratio in comparison with standard base-catalyzed transesterification. One aspect that has a short term chance of implementation is the improvement of the conversion process by the use of a continuous rather than batch process, with energy savings generated by combined reaction and separation, online analysis, and reagent methanol added by titration as needed to produce ASTM specification grade fuel. By adapting process intensif

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solution mining and heating by oxidation for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation. A second fluid is produced from the portion. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. A controlled amount of oxidant is provided to the portion of the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Bakken Shale Oil Production Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the conventional reservoirs decrease in discovering, producing and reserving, unconventional reservoirs are more remarkable in terms of discovering, development and having more reserve. More fields have been discovered where Barnett Shale and Bakken Shale are the most recently unconventional reservoir examples. Shale reservoirs are typically considered self-sourcing and have very low permeability ranging from 10-100 nanodarcies. Over the past few decades, numerous research projects and developments have been studied, but it seems there is still some contention and misunderstanding surrounding shale reservoirs. One of the largest shale in the United State is the Bakken Shale play. This study will describe the primary geologic characteristics, field development history, reservoir properties,and especially production trends, over the Bakken Shale play. Data are available for over hundred wells from different companies. Most production data come from the Production Data Application (HDPI) database and in the format of monthly production for oil, water and gas. Additional 95 well data including daily production rate, completion, Pressure Volume Temperature (PVT), pressure data are given from companies who sponsor for this research study. This study finds that there are three Types of well production trends in the Bakken formation. Each decline curve characteristic has an important meaning to the production trend of the Bakken Shale play. In the Type I production trend, the reservoir pressure drops below bubble point pressure and gas releasingout of the solution. With the Type II production trend, oil flows linearly from the matrix into the fracture system, either natural fracture or hydraulic fracture. Reservoir pressure is higher than the bubble point pressure during the producing time and oil flows as a single phase throughout the production period of the well. A Type III production trend typically has scattering production data from wells with a different Type of trend. It is difficult to study this Type of behavior because of scattering data, which leads to erroneous interpretation for the analysis. These production Types, especially Types I and II will give a new type curve matches for shale oil wells above or below the bubble point.

Tran, Tan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues on Aluminum Sheet and Foil by Using Elemental Analysis and Fourier  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Relaxation studies on oil, pressboard and oil impregnated pressboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a laboratory relaxation study with FDS and RVM was carried out for a period of 3 years with the fabricated oil (OIL),… (more)

Cao, Hongyan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Shale Oil Upgrading Utilizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companies providing oil samples of at least five (5) gallons include Chevron, Oil Shale Exploration Company (OSEC), and Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Background Work performed...

424

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

425

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - High World Oil Price Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table D1. World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table D2. World total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

426

Underground oil shale retorting. [Basic principles are outlined  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic principles involved in combustion processing of oil shale are outlined. The manual is designed to serve as an introduction to the subject for the support personnel of the LLL Oil Shale Project. The material is presented in a simple two page format with one page devoted to a figure or table and the facing page contains a brief description of that material. Thus, it can serve as a self-study guide. Following a brief description of oil shale, how it was formed, and the extent of the resource, an overview of the concepts and major technical problems of Modified In-Situ (MIS) Oil Shale Retorting is presented. Finally, the liquid product, shale oil, is compared with typical petroleum crudes.

Campbell, J.H.; Raley, J.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

428

Distillate and Crude Oil Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fuel and residential heating oil prices on the East Coast is being driven by higher crude oil prices than last year and higher spreads. Crude oil is projected to average almost...

429

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Oil and Natural Gas Supply > Events Oil and Natural Gas Supply Events The following is a listing of events of interest to the oil and natural gas community....

430

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book highlights various aspects of Australasian edible oils. Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Soft Bound Books Oils and Fats Specialist

432

Vertical pump turbine oil environmental evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Oregon low-temperature geothermal injection well construction, siting and receiving formations requires approval by the Water Resources Department (OWRD). In addition, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) has regulations concerning injection. Conversations with the OWRD and ODEQ representatives indicated they were very concerned about the potential for contamination of the geothermal (and cooler but hydraulically connected) aquifers by oils and grease. Their primary concern was over the practice of putting paraffin, motor oils and other hydrocarbons in downhole heat exchanger (DHE) wells to prevent corrosion. They also expressed considerable concern about the use of oil in production well pumps since the fluids pumped would be injected. Oregon (and Idaho) prohibit the use of oil-lubricated pumps for public water supplies except in certain situations where non-toxic food-grade lubricants are used. Since enclosed-lineshaft oil-lubricated pumps are the mainstay of direct-use pumping equipment, the potential for restricting their use became a concern to the Geo-Heat Center staff. An investigation into alternative pump lubrication schemes and development of rebuttals to potential restrictions was proposed and approved as a contract task. (SM)

Culver, G.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Assay products from Green River oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from 66 material-balanced assays conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Laramie Energy Technology Center, and The Oil Shale Corporation were compiled and analyzed to determine the pyrolysis stoichiometry for Green River formation oil shales originating in and near the Mahogany zone. Shale samples came from four sites in Colorado and one in Utah, and ranged in oil content from 12 to 258 L/Mg (3 to 62 gal/ton). Average values and pairwise correlation coefficients are reported for all data (except sulfur analyses) available on the shales, e.g., elemental analyses of shales and oils, distribution of organic carbon in products, gas composition, and some ratios of elemental composition. The wide range of organic carbon contents made it possible to demonstrate the sensitivity of assay product distribution to oil shale grade. A linear correlation for shale grade as a function of weight percent organic carbon in raw shale is presented. An average stoichiometry for pyrolysis of the organic material is also calculated and compared with others available in the literature.

Singleton, M.F.; Koskinas, G.J.; Burnham, A.K.; Raley, J.H.

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Innovative technologies for managing oil field waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, the oil industry generates millions of barrels of wastes that need to be properly managed. For many years, most oil field wastes were disposed of at a significant cost. However, over the past decade, the industry has developed many processes and technologies to minimize the generation of wastes and to more safely and economically dispose of the waste that is generated. Many companies follow a three-tiered waste management approach. First, companies try to minimize waste generation when possible. Next, they try to find ways to reuse or recycle the wastes that are generated. Finally, the wastes that cannot be reused or recycled must be disposed of. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) has evaluated the feasibility of various oil field waste management technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy. This paper describes four of the technologies Argonne has reviewed. In the area of waste minimization, the industry has developed synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs) that have the desired drilling properties of oil-based muds without the accompanying adverse environmental impacts. Use of SBMs avoids significant air pollution from work boats hauling offshore cuttings to shore for disposal and provides more efficient drilling than can be achieved with water-based muds. Downhole oil/water separators have been developed to separate produced water from oil at the bottom of wells. The produced water is directly injected to an underground formation without ever being lifted to the surface, thereby avoiding potential for groundwater or soil contamination. In the area of reuse/recycle, Argonne has worked with Southeastern Louisiana University and industry to develop a process to use treated drill cuttings to restore wetlands in coastal Louisiana. Finally, in an example of treatment and disposal, Argonne has conducted a series of four baseline studies to characterize the use of salt caverns for safe and economic disposal of oil field wastes.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Assessment

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Middle East oil show: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This conference proceedings represent the second volume of a two volume set of papers dealing with oil and gas development concepts in the Middle East. It presents papers dealing with enhanced recovery techniques, methods for predicting productivity of wells, computer modeling methods for reservoirs, methods for minimizing water influx and formation damage, offshore platform designs, and advances in various geophysical logging and surveying techniques. Papers deal with both the onshore and offshore environments.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project “Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.” The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Thoma, Greg; Veil, John; Limp, Fred; Cothren, Jackson; Gorham, Bruce; Williamson, Malcolm; Smith, Peter; Sullivan, Bob

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

437

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

440

Oil price analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport has been in the whole history of mankind the basic and determining mover of the human society shape. It determined not only the position of towns, but also their inner design and it was also last but not least the basic element of the economic ... Keywords: GDP, deposit, fuels, history, market equilibrium, oil, oil reserves, price

Zdenek Riha; Viktorie Jirova; Marek Honcu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight oil formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Edible Oils Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains four (4) titles regarding frying and edible oils. Edible Oils Package Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages 1766A8D5F05863694E128DE1C47D07C3 This Value Package includes: ...

442

Menhaden Fish Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes Menhaden Oil Specific Gravity (SG) 15.5/15.5°C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.912– 0.930 25/25°C Other SG Refractive Index (RI) 25°C 40°C Other RI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (65) 1

443

Refining of shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The refining of shale oil is reviewed to assess the current state-of-the-art, especially as to the avaiability of technology suitable for operation on a commercial scale. Oil shale retorting processes as they affect the quality of the crude shale oil for refining, exploratory research on the character and refining of shale oil, and other published refining background leading to the present status are discussed. The initial refining of shale oil requires the removal of a large concentration of nitrogen, an added step not required for typical petroleum crude oils, and recently published estimates show that the total cost of refining will be high. Specific technoloy is reported by industry to be technically proven and available for commercial-scale refining. Although the refining will be more costly than that of petroleum, the viability of a shale oil industry will also be affected greatly by the technology and costs of producing the crude shale oil, environmental costs, and future price and tax treatment, and these are outside the scope of this study of refining.

Lanning, W.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Oil and Natural Gas - Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search NETL Oil and Natural Gas Document Information Oil & Natural Gas Document Repository Results will be shown in two categories. "Document Database Results" provides...

446

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

447

oil | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil oil Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

448

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hybrid derivative-free extended Kalman filter for unknown lever arm estimation in tightly coupled DGPS/INS integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential carrier phase observations from GPS (Global Positioning System) integrated with high-rate sensor measurements, such as those from an inertial navigation system (INS) or an inertial measurement unit (IMU), in a tightly coupled approach can ... Keywords: Global positioning system (GPS), Inertial measurement unit (IMU), Kalman filter, Lever arm

Yanrui Geng; Richard Deurloo; Luisa Bastos

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

ACT sup 2 project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building's performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building's performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

ACT{sup 2} project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building`s performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building`s performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453