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1

Table 2. Principal tight oil plays: oil production and proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other tight oil plays (e.g. Monterey, Woodford)",,,24,253 "All U.S. tight oil plays",,,228,3628 "Note: Includes lease condensate." "Source: U.S. Energy...

2

DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. Operators can use the data on the websites to expand natural gas recovery in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and the central Appalachian Basin of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. As production from conventional natural gas resources declines, natural gas from tight-gas sandstone formations is expected to contribute a growing percentage to the nation's energy supply. "Tight gas" is natural gas

3

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report discusses 3D-3C seismic acquisition and 3D P-wave alternate processing.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

File:EIA-tight-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tight-gas.pdf tight-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 2.04 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Sources U.S. Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-06-06 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:44, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:44, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (2.04 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload You cannot overwrite this file.

7

ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to locate the best locations to drill for them. The tight gas sands of the Piceance Basin have long been understanding of the way that fractures have controlled the production of gas in these tight gas sands an east to west trend of tight gas sand fields that produce a substantial amount of the total gas produced

8

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisors logic, which mimics human experts decision-making process. TGS Advisors recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

SPE Tight Gas Conference, 2009 "Program for the Beneficial Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE Tight Gas Conference, 2009 "Program for the Beneficial Use of Oil Field Produced Water" David B Additional cost of demineralization of water. The (probable) salinity of the produced brine. Environmental. Servicing Schedule weekly #12;Comparison of Desalinated Produced Water with Municipal

17

New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play  

SciTech Connect

While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Hill, D.G. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Pore-scale characterization and modeling of two-phase flow in tight gas sandstones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas resources, particularly tight gas sands, constitute a significant percentage of the natural gas resource base and offer abundant potential for future reserves (more)

Mousavi, Maryam Alsadat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays  

SciTech Connect

Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assessment of API Thread Connections Under Tight Gas Well Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern oil and gas industry of America has seen most of the high quality, easily obtainable resources, already produced, thus causing wells to be drilled deeper in search for unconventional resources. This means Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) must improve in order to withstand harsher conditions; especially the ability of connections to effectively create leak tight seals. This study investigates the use of thread connections in tight gas fields; therefore, an insight into their potential to contribute to fulfilling the energy demands is necessary. Also, a survey of completed projects done in tight gas fields can provide vital information that will establish the minimum requirements thread connection must meet to perform its functions. To make suitable adjustments to ensure safe and efficient operations we must thoroughly understand the many aspects of thread connections. To have this understanding, a review of previous works was carried out that highlights the capabilities and imitations of thread connections. In addition to reviewing previous work done on thread connections; this study measured the viscosity of thread compounds under variable conditions. It was found that viscosity of thread compound falls in the range of 285,667 cP and 47,758 cP when measured between 32.9 degrees F and 121.5 degrees F. This can be very important because thread compound is essential to the function of thread connections. The knowledge of its viscosity can help choose the most suitable compound. By knowing the value of the viscosity of a thread compound it can also be used to form an analytical assessment of the grooved plate method by providing a means to calculate a pressure gradient which impacts the leakage.

Bourne, Dwayne

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hydraulic fracture productivity performance in tight gas sands, a numerical simulation approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulically fractured tight gas reservoirs are one of the most common unconventional sources being produced today, and look to be a regular source of gas (more)

Ostojic, Jakov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

28

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS IN TIGHT GAS SANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on fossil fuels and the decline in their production promote producing hydrocarbon from unconventional sources. Natural gas existing in tight reservoirs has a (more)

Kulga, Ihsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Prediction of Gas Leak Tightness of Superplastically Formed Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some applications, in this case an aluminium box in a subatomic particle detector containing highly sensitive detecting devices, it is important that a formed sheet should show no gas leak from one side to the other. In order to prevent a trial-and-error procedure to make this leak tight box, a method is set up to predict if a formed sheet conforms to the maximum leak constraint. The technique of superplastic forming (SPF) is used in order to attain very high plastic strains before failure. Since only a few of these boxes are needed, this makes, this generally slow, process an attractive production method. To predict the gas leak of a superplastically formed aluminium sheet in an accurate way, finite element simulations are used in combination with a user-defined material model. This constitutive model couples the leak rate with the void volume fraction. This void volume fraction is then dependent on both the equivalent plastic strain and the applied hydrostatic pressure during the bulge process (backpressure).

Snippe, Corijn H. C. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef) PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinders, T. [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum industry commonly uses single-layer models to characterize and forecast long-term production in tight gas reservoir systems. However, most tight gas reservoirs are layered systems where the permeability and porosity of each layer can vary significantly, often over several orders of magnitude. In addition, the drainage areas of each of the layers can be substantially different. Due to the complexity of such reservoirs, the analysis of pressure and production history using single-layer analyses techniques provide incorrect estimates of permeability, fracture conductivity, drainage area, and fracture half-length. These erroneous values of reservoir properties also provide the reservoir engineer with misleading values of forecasted gas recovery. The main objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate the typical errors that can occur in reservoir properties when single-layer modeling methods are used to history match production data from typical layered tight gas reservoirs, and (2) to use the single-layer match to demonstrate the error that can occur when forecasting long-term gas production for such complex gas reservoirs. A finite-difference reservoir simulator was used to simulate gas production from various layered tight gas reservoirs. These synthetic production data were analyzed using single-layer models to determine reservoir properties. The estimated reservoir properties obtained from the history matches were then used to forecast ten years of cumulative gas production and to find the accuracy of gas reserves estimated for tight gas reservoirs when a single-layer model is used for the analysis. Based on the results obtained in this work, I conclude that the accuracy in reservoir properties and future gas flow rates in layered tight gas reservoirs when analyzed using a single-layer model is a function of the degree of variability in permeability within the layers and the availability of production data to be analyzed. In cases where there is an idea that the reservoir presents a large variability in â??â??kâ?, using a multi-layer model to analyze the production data will provide the reservoir engineer with more accurate estimates of long-term production recovery and reservoir properties.

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 15 20 25 30 35 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Associated with oil Coalbed methane Tight gas Shale gas Alaska Non-associated onshore Non-associated...

32

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas reservoirs provide almost one quarter of the current U.S. domestic gas production, with significant projected increases in the next several decades in both the U.S. and abroad. These reservoirs constitute an important play type, with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually acquired by upscaling the detailed 3D geologic models. Earlier studies of flow simulation have developed layer-based coarse reservoir simulation models, from the more detailed 3D geologic models. However, the layer-based approach cannot capture the essential sand and flow. We introduce and utilize the diffusive time of flight to understand the pressure continuity within the fluvial sands, and develop novel adaptive reservoir simulation grids to preserve the continuity of the reservoir sands. Combined with the high resolution transmissibility based upscaling of flow properties, and well index based upscaling of the well connections, we can build accurate simulation models with at least one order magnitude simulation speed up, but the predicted recoveries are almost indistinguishable from those of the geologic models. General practice of well placement usually requires reservoir simulation to predict the dynamic reservoir response. Numerous well placement scenarios require many reservoir simulation runs, which may have significant CPU demands. We propose a novel simulation-free screening approach to generate a quality map, based on a combination of static and dynamic reservoir properties. The geologic uncertainty is taken into consideration through an uncertainty map form the spatial connectivity analysis and variograms. Combining the quality map and uncertainty map, good infill well locations and drilling sequence can be determined for improved reservoir management. We apply this workflow to design the infill well drilling sequence and explore the impact of subsurface also, for a large-scale tight gas reservoir. Also, we evaluated an improved pressure approximation method, through the comparison with the leading order high frequency term of the asymptotic solution. The proposed pressure solution can better predict the heterogeneous reservoir depletion behavior, thus provide good opportunities for tight gas reservoir management.

Zhou, Yijie

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

FORECASTING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF WELLS LOCATED IN TIGHT OIL PLAYS USING ARTIFICIAL EXPERT SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs is promising to account for the declining conventional supplies in the future. However, because of their complex (more)

Bansal, Yogesh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Piceance basin area have created the Mesaverde Group tight gas sand reservoirs. As shown in Figure 2 of siltstones, shales and tight sandstones with a coaly interval at the base. The main producing interval was predominantly from the fluvial point bar sand bodies, with extremely low matrix permeabilities (

35

Mobil completes deep, tight, horizontal gas well in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion and fracturing program for stimulating a horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes sand onshore Germany included casing design, completion fluid selection, overbalanced perforation, analysis of the stimulation treatment, design modification, zone and fracture isolation, well testing and acid stimulation. This paper reviews the field geology, the well design, casing design, describes the completion fluids, perforation techniques, fracture treatment, and methods for zone isolation.

Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Chambers, M.R. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mueller, M.W. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission and the oil & gas industries. The combustion system used in Solar's products are discussed along- bility for the introduction of new combustion systems for gas turbine products to enhance fuel

Ponce, V. Miguel

37

Market model finds tight gas sands R and D offers most promise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional natural gas (UNG) - primarily tight gas sands - offers by far the largest opportunity for reducing gas costs between now and 2000, a team of researchers reported at the Sept. 1984 International Gas Research conference in Washington, DC. The promises of UNG R and D far outweigh those of synthetic natural gas (SNG), the researchers concluded, but stressed that SNG R and D should nonetheless continue - but with a different focus and changed performance goals.

Not Available

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various models featuring horizontal wells with multiple induced fractures have been proposed to characterize flow behavior over time in tight gas and shale gas systems. Currently, there is little consensus regarding the effects of non-ideal fracture geometries and coupled primary-secondary fracture interactions on reservoir performance in these unconventional gas reservoirs. This thesis provides a grid construction tool to generate high-resolution unstructured meshes using Voronoi grids, which provides the flexibility required to accurately represent complex geologic domains and fractures in three dimensions. Using these Voronoi grids, the interaction between propped hydraulic fractures and secondary "stress-release" fractures were evaluated. Additionally, various primary fracture configurations were examined, where the fractures may be non-planar or non-orthogonal. For this study, a numerical model was developed to assess the potential performance of tight gas and shale gas reservoirs. These simulations utilized up to a half-million grid-blocks and consider a period of up to 3,000 years in some cases. The aim is to provide very high-definition reference numerical solutions that will exhibit virtually all flow regimes we can expect in these unconventional gas reservoirs. The simulation results are analyzed to identify production signatures and flow regimes using diagnostic plots, and these interpretations are confirmed using pressure maps where useful. The coupled primary-secondary fracture systems with the largest fracture surface areas are shown to give the highest production in the traditional "linear flow" regime (which occurs for very high conductivity vertical fracture cases). The non-ideal hydraulic fracture geometries are shown to yield progressively lower production as the angularity of these fractures increases. Hence, to design optimum fracture completions, we should endeavor to keep the fractures as orthogonal to the horizontal well as possible. This work expands the current understanding of flow behavior in fractured tight-gas and shale-gas systems and may be used to optimize fracture and completion design, to validate analytical models and to facilitate more accurate reserves estimation.

Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Economics of tight sands gas extraction as affected by r and d. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the economics and resource potential of tight sand formations as a major near-term source of unconventional gas. The main vehicles for analyzing the issues to date are the 1980 study by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) on tight sand resources and two studies based on the NPC's work at different stages of completion for the GRI Center for Energy Systems Analysis (CESA).

Rosenberg, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; Bustin, Mark [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wilcox formation evaluation; Improved procedures for tight-gas-sand evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses risks in tight-gas-sand evaluation, reduced by defining relationships between pore geometry and critical water saturations. These results are integrated with log interpretation to derive an estimated kh that compares favorably with a true kh from production tests. These procedures are potentially applicable for evaluating other complex reservoirs.

Lewis, D.J.; Perrin, J.D. (BP Exploration Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore space. Although the grains in tight sand samples do notfluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predictflow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Soluble Models of Strongly Interacting Ultracold Gas Mixtures in Tight Waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Fermi-Bose mapping method is used to determine the exact ground states of several models of mixtures of strongly interacting ultracold gases in tight waveguides, which are generalizations of the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas (1D Bose gas with point hard cores) and fermionic Tonks-Girardeau (FTG) gas (1D spin-aligned Fermi gas with infinitely strong zero-range attractions). We detail the case of a Bose-Fermi mixture with TG boson-boson (BB) and boson-fermion (BF) interactions. Exact results are given for density profiles in a harmonic trap, single-particle density matrices, momentum distibutions, and density-density correlations. Since the ground state is highly degenerate, we analyze the splitting of the ground manifold for large but finite BB and BF repulsions.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Minguzzi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Mileux Condenses, C.N.R.S., B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France)

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small number of analytical models and published numerical studies there is currently little consensus regarding the large-scale flow behavior over time in such systems. The purpose of this work is to construct a fit-for-purpose numerical simulator which will account for a variety of production features pertinent to these systems, and to use this model to study the effects of various parameters on flow behavior. Specific features examined in this work include hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, multiple porosity and permeability fields, desorption, and micro-scale flow effects. The theoretical basis of the model is described in Chapter I, along with a validation of the model. We employ the numerical simulator to examine various tight gas and shale gas systems and to illustrate and define the various flow regimes which progressively occur over time. We visualize the flow regimes using both specialized plots of rate and pressure functions, as well as high-resolution maps of pressure distributions. The results of this study are described in Chapter II. We use pressure maps to illustrate the initial linear flow into the hydraulic fractures in a tight gas system, transitioning to compound formation linear flow, and then into elliptical flow. We show that flow behavior is dominated by the fracture configuration due to the extremely low permeability of shale. We also explore the possible effect of microscale flow effects on gas effective permeability and subsequent gas species fractionation. We examine the interaction of sorptive diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. We show that microscale porous media can result in a compositional shift in produced gas concentration without the presence of adsorbed gas. The development and implementation of the micro-flow model is documented in Chapter III. This work expands our understanding of flow behavior in tight gas and shale gas systems, where such an understanding may ultimately be used to estimate reservoir properties and reserves in these types of reservoirs.

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

54

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Deloitte Energy Conference Deloitte Energy Conference May 21, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 3 shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to reach half of U.S. output 4 U.S. dry natural gas production trillion cubic feet Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013

56

Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,,, 2010,, 2011,," Change 2011-2010" "Basin","Shale Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves" "Fort Worth","Barnett","TX",1.9,31,2,32.6,0.1,1.6 "Appalachian","Marcellus","PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH",0.5,13.2,1.4,31.9,0.9,18.7 "Texas-Louisiana Salt","Haynesville/Bossier","TX, LA",1.5,24.5,2.5,29.5,1,5 "Arkoma","Fayetteville","AR",0.8,12.5,0.9,14.8,0.1,2.3

58

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-1011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 trillion cubic feet Basin Shale Play State(s) Production Reserves Production Reserves Production Reserves Fort Worth Barnett TX 1.9 31.0 2.0 32.6 0.1 1.6 Appalachian Marcellus PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH 0.5 13.2 1.4 31.9 0.9 18.7 Texas-Louisiana Salt Haynesville/Bossier TX, LA 1.5 24.5 2.5 29.5 1.0 5.0 Arkoma Fayetteville AR 0.8 12.5 0.9 14.8 0.1 2.3 Anadarko Woodford TX, OK 0.4 9.7 0.5 10.8 0.1 1.1 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 0.1 2.5 0.4 8.4 0.3 5.9 Sub-total 5.2 93.4 7.7 128.0 2.5 34.6 Other shale gas plays 0.2 4.0 0.3 3.6 0.1 -0.4 All U.S. Shale Plays 5.4 97.4 8.0 131.6 2.6 34.2 Change 2011-2010 2010 2011 Notes: Some columns may not add up to its subtotal because of independent rounding. Natural gas is wet after lease separation. The above table is

59

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the world will require additional supplies of natural gas to meet the demand for energy. Tight gas reservoirs can be defined as reservoirs where the formation permeability is so low (flowback procedures, production strategy, and reservoir conditions. Residual polymer in the fracture can reduce the effective fracture permeability and porosity, reduce the effective fracture half-length, and limit the well productivity. Our ability to mathematically model the fundamental physical processes governing fluid recovery in hydraulic fractures in the past has been limited. In this research, fracture fluid damage mechanisms have been investigated, and mathematical models and computer codes have been developed to better characterize the cleanup process. The codes have been linked to a 3D, 3-phase simulator to model and quantify the fracture fluid cleanup process and its effect on long-term gas production performances. Then, a comprehensive systematic simulation study has been carried out by varying formation permeability, reservoir pressure, fracture length, fracture conductivity, yield stress, and pressure drawdown. On the basis of simulation results and analyses, new ways to improve fracture fluid cleanup have been provided. This new progress help engineers better understand fracture fluid cleanup, improve fracture treatment design, and increase gas recovery from tight sand reservoirs, which can be extremely important as more tight gas reservoirs are developed around the world.

Wang, Yilin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

62

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

63

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

64

Gas Shale Plays… The Global Transition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

XX. China EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment XX. China EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 XX-1 XX. CHINA SUMMARY China has abundant shale gas and shale oil potential in seven prospective basins: Sichuan, Tarim, Junggar, Songliao, the Yangtze Platform, Jianghan and Subei, Figure XX-1. Figure XX-1. China's Seven Most Prospective Shale Gas and Shale Oil Basins are the Jianghan, Junggar, Sichuan, Songliao, Subei, Tarim, and Yangtze Platform. Source: ARI, 2013. XX. China EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment

65

Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Gas Shale Plays… The Global Transition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 I-1 I. CANADA SUMMARY Canada has a series of large hydrocarbon basins with thick, organic-rich shales that are assessed by this resource study. Figure I-1 illustrates certain of the major shale gas and shale oil basins in Western Canada. Figure I-1. Selected Shale Gas and Oil Basins of Western Canada Source: ARI, 2012. I. Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 I-2 The full set of Canadian shale gas and shale oil basins assessed in this study include:

67

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adjacent fractures. Natural gas composition consists mostlyNatural gas is called wet or dry depending on how large is the lique?able portion of gas composition.

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gas Shale Plays… The Global Transition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

VIII. Poland EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment VIII. Poland EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 VIII-1 VIII. POLAND (INCLUDING LITHUANIA AND KALININGRAD) SUMMARY Poland has some of Europe's most favorable infrastructure and public support for shale development. The Baltic Basin in northern Poland remains the most prospective region with a relatively simple structural setting. The Podlasie and Lublin basins also have potential but are

69

A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane and other higher order hydrocarbons, through C4, with interest in further developing reactions important to methane- and ethane-related chemistry. With the increased demand for energy and the declining conventional hydrocarbons worldwide, energy companies, both majors and independents, are turning to unconventional resources to produce the hydrocarbons required to meet market demand. From coalbed methane to low permeability (tight) gas reservoirs and gas shales, energy companies are making substantial progress in developing the technologies required to bring these unconventional reserves to the market. A common misconception is that there are not enough domestic oil and gas reserves to fuel our economy. The United States imports most of the oil used for transportation fuel and several TCF of natural gas annually. However, there is a very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of gas in place in just the gas shale formations that have been identified in the energy arena (Navigant Study 2008). There are still major gas shale plays and basins that have not been explored and are waiting to be evaluated and developed. The natural gas in shales and other unconventional reservoirs can be used to generate electricity, or it can be turned into liquids and used by the transportation industry. It is also misconstrued that gas shales are relatively new in our industry and something of the future. The first commercially viable gas shale well was drilled in the early 1920s in Pennsylvania, before the famous oil well drilled by Colonel Drake. The objectives of this study are to (1) complete literature review to establish which geologic parameters affect completion techniques in five emerging gas shales: the Antrium, the Barnett, the Haynesville, the Marcellus, and the Woodford; (2) identify the different completion methods; (3) create an economic model for the completion techniques discussed; (4) develop a sensitivity analysis on various economic parameters to determine optimal completion strategy; and (5) create completion flowcharts. Based on the literature review I have done for several gas shale basins, I have identified seven pertinent geologic parameters that influence completion practices. These are depositional environment, total organic content (TOC), average gas content, shale mineralogy, shale thickness, and reservoir pressure. Next, I identified different completion and simulation trends in the industry for the different shale plays. The results from this study show that although there are some stark differences between depths (i.e. the Antrim Shale and the Haynesville Shale), shale plays are very similar in all other geologic properties. Interestingly, even with a large range for the different geological parameters, the completion methods did not drastically differ indicating that even if the properties do not fall within the range presented in this paper does not automatically rule them out for further evaluation in other plays. In addition to the evaluation of geologic properties, this study looked at drilling cost and the production profile for each play. Due to the volatility of the energy industry, economic sensitivity was completed on the price, capital, and operating cost to see what affect it would have on the play. From the analysis done, it is concluded that horizontal drilling in almost any economic environment is economic except for one scenario for the Woodford Shale. Therefore, gas shales plays should still be invested in even in lower price environments and companies should try to take advantage of the lower cost environments that occur during these times. With continual development of new drilling and completion techniques, these plays will become more competitive and can light the path for exploration of new shale plays worldwide.

Agrawal, Archna

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are ...

71

A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Standard / RINS / cellulosic ethanol Growth of natural gas use in transportation

73

Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional gas has become an important resource to help meet our future energy demands. Although plentiful, it is difficult to produce this resource, when locked in a massive sedimentary formation. Among all unconventional gas resources, tight gas sands represent a big fraction and are often characterized by very low porosity and permeability associated with their producing formations, resulting in extremely low production rate. The low flow properties and the recovery factors of these sands make necessary continuous efforts to reduce costs and improve efficiency in all aspects of drilling, completion and production techniques. Many of the recent improvements have been in well completions and hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the main goal of a hydraulic fracture is to create a long, highly conductive fracture to facilitate the gas flow from the reservoir to the wellbore to obtain commercial production rates. Fracture conductivity depends on several factors, such as like the damage created by the gel during the treatment and the gel clean-up after the treatment. This research is focused on predicting more accurately the fracture conductivity, the gel damage created in fractures, and the fracture cleanup after a hydraulic fracture treatment under certain pressure and temperature conditions. Parameters that alter fracture conductivity, such as polymer concentration, breaker concentration and gas flow rate, are also examined in this study. A series of experiments, using a procedure of dynamical fracture conductivity test, were carried out. This procedure simulates the proppant/frac fluid slurries flow into the fractures in a low-permeability rock, as it occurs in the field, using different combinations of polymer and breaker concentrations under reservoirs conditions. The result of this study provides the basis to optimize the fracturing fluids and the polymer loading at different reservoir conditions, which may result in a clean and conductive fracture. Success in improving this process will help to decrease capital expenditures and increase the production in unconventional tight gas reservoirs.

Correa Castro, Juan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

"U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Summary Data Tables, 2011" "Contents" "Table 1: Changes to Proved Reserves, 2011" "Table 2: Principal Tight Oil Plays: Oil...

75

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013

76

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing stimulation technology is used to increase the amount of oil and gas produced from low permeability reservoirs. The primary objective of the process is to increase the conductivity of the reservoir by the creation of fractures deep into the formation, changing the flow pattern from radial to linear flow. The dynamic conductivity test was used for this research to evaluate the effect of closure stress, temperature, proppant concentration, and flow back rates on fracture conductivity. The objective of performing a dynamic conductivity test is to be able to mimic actual field conditions by pumping fracturing fluid/proppant slurry fluid into a conductivity cell, and applying closure stress afterwards. In addition, a factorial design was implemented in order to determine the main effect of each of the investigated factors and to minimize the number of experimental runs. Due to the stochastic nature of the dynamic conductivity test, each experiment was repeated several times to evaluate the consistency of the results. Experimental results indicate that the increase in closure stress has a detrimental effect on fracture conductivity. This effect can be attributed to the reduction in fracture width as closure stress was increased. Moreover, the formation of channels at low proppant concentration plays a significant role in determining the final conductivity of a fracture. The presence of these channels created an additional flow path for nitrogen, resulting in a significant increase in the conductivity of the fracture. In addition, experiments performed at high temperatures and stresses exhibited a reduction in fracture conductivity. The formation of a polymer cake due to unbroken gel dried up at high temperatures further impeded the propped conductivity. The effect of nitrogen rate was observed to be inversely proportional to fracture conductivity. The significant reduction in fracture conductivity could possibly be due to the effect of polymer dehydration at higher flow rates and temperatures. However, there is no certainty from experimental results that this conductivity reduction is an effect that occurs in real fractures or whether it is an effect that is only significant in laboratory conditions.

Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Basin Play States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WY 2 8 Subtotal 204 3,375 Other tight oil plays (e.g. Monterey, Woodford) 24 253 All U.S. tight oil plays 228 3,628 Note: Includes lease condensate. Source: U.S. Energy Information...

79

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , B of A/Merrill Lynch, April 20, 2013

80

An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The supply and demand situation is crucial for the oil and gas industry during the first half of the 21st century. For the future, we (more)

Pilisi, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are a very important element in oil and gas industry due to their distinguished advantages. Horizontal wells are not technically horizontal. This is because of the structural nature of reservoir formations and drilling procedures. In response to the reservoir rocks strength, the horizontal well deviates upward and downward while being drilled forming an undulating path instead of a horizontal. In this study, horizontal wells with an undulating trajectory within a gas reservoir have been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from different sources like an aquifer or a water flood job. In low permeability horizontal wells, hydraulic fracturing introduces water to gas wells. Water distribution is an important issue in gas wells production. In order to achieve the goal of this study, a model has been developed to simulate different situations for a horizontal well with an undulating trajectory in gas reservoirs. This study is a step forward to understand well performance in low permeability gas reservoirs.

Aldousari, Mohammad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

85

Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands: 1986 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents progress for the second year of a five-year project concerned with the pore structure and flow properties of low permeability gas sands. The main objective of work during the first year was to carry out advanced core analysis on cores recovered from the Multi-Well Field Experiment. In Phase 2, the properties of both fractured and non-fractured samples (hereafter referred to as matrix) have been studied. Special attention was given to the combined effect of overburden pressure and water saturation on gas flow. 11 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Morrow, N.R.; Buckley, J.S.; Cather, S.M.; Brower, K.R.; Dandge, V.; Graham, M.; Gonzales, B.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands  

SciTech Connect

Advanced core analysis includes measurements on the matrix properties of the rock. Matrix properties are important even in fractured wells since it is these properties which determine the rate of gas flow into the fractures. Cores are being tested from the fluvial, coastal, and paludal zones of the Mesaverde. At least two cores from each of these zones from all three wells will be analyzed. Properties measured include permeability as a function of confining pressure over the range of 500 to 5000 psi. A minimum of two Klinkenberg permeabilities are being determined from at least five data points. Interpretation includes estimates of pore size from gas slippage. Water adsorption and desorption isotherms will be determined for selected samples with data points being obtained at the following relative humidities: 0, 20, 40, 60, 75, 90, 92, 95 and 98. Porosity measurements from both thin section examination and volumetric measurements are being made. These results will be compared with the porosities of the cored internals determined from logs.

Morrow, N.R.; Brower, K.R.; Ward, J.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources: July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank The information presented in this overview is based on the report Review of Emerging Resources: U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays, which was prepared by INTEK, Inc. for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The full report is attached. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

88

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

89

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for IEA Bilateral Meetings March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, IEA Bilateral Meetings, March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

90

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For Consumer Energy Alliance February 21, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski February 21, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

91

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

92

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society April 08, 2013 | Baltimore, MD By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, Baltimore CFA Society April 08, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

93

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Continuity and permeability development in the tight gas sands of the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between reservoir characteristics and flow regimes exhibited by twenty-one Uinta Basin gas wells represent fluvial, lake margin, and lacustrine deposits. Production data were analyzed to determine the type of flow for each well. This analysis indicated that one well exhibits radial flow, thirteen wells linear flow, and seven wells indeterminate flow regimes. Values of SSP, ..delta..t, R/sub w/ and SP curve patterns were determined from well logs. These data were compared for the three types of flow observed. It appears that SSP, R/sub w/ and SP pattern may be useful in qualitatively distinguishing between sands of low continuity and those with moderate continuity. The permeabilities are considerably higher than those normally attributed to ''tight sands.'' Also permeability correlates inversely with the number of sands completed in each well. Consideration of the orientations of linear features in the area and those of reservoir lenses in outcrops indicates that the relationship between frac orientation and lens geometry cannot be effectively predicted without a good technique to predict lens orientation. Completion strategies to optimize frac efficiency are suggested, based upon the findings of this study.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

Santos, Juan

97

Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

Schroeder, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Methodology to Determine both the Technically Recoverable Resource and the Economically Recoverable Resource in an Unconventional Gas Play  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past decade, the worldwide demand for energy has continued to increase at a rapid rate. Natural gas has emerged as a primary source of US energy. The technically recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have increased from approximately 1,400 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) to approximately 2,100 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2010. The recent declines in gas prices have created short-term uncertainties and increased the risk of developing natural gas fields, rendering a substantial portion of this resource uneconomical at current gas prices. This research quantifies the impact of changes in finding and development costs (FandDC), lease operating expenses (LOE), and gas prices, in the estimation of the economically recoverable gas for unconventional plays. To develop our methodology, we have performed an extensive economic analysis using data from the Barnett Shale, as a representative case study. We have used the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the values of the Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for all the wells in a given gas play, to determine the values of the P10 (10th percentile), P50 (50th percentile), and P90 (90th percentile) from the CDF. We then use these probability values to calculate the technically recoverable resource (TRR) for the play, and determine the economically recoverable resource (ERR) as a function of FandDC, LOE, and gas price. Our selected investment hurdle for a development project is a 20 percent rate of return and a payout of 5 years or less. Using our methodology, we have developed software to solve the problem. For the Barnett Shale data, at a FandDC of 3 Million dollars, we have found that 90 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 46 dollars/Mcf, 50 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 9.2 dollars/Mcf, and 10 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 5.2 dollars/Mcf. The developed methodology and software can be used to analyze other unconventional gas plays to reduce short-term uncertainties and determine the values of FandDC and gas prices that are required to recover economically a certain percentage of TRR.

Almadani, Husameddin Saleh A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The use of cuttings in shale gas play assessment; The Sbaa basin (Algeria) as case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing energy demand, the need for unconventional gas resources has risen. Shale gas is one of these new hydrocarbon resources. Hence, an enhanced workflow (more)

Koolschijn, M.A.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and other gas shale basins in the U.S., this paper discusses the impact of shale gas exploration and production on the potential for CCS in the Marcellus and other units in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison of resource assessment methods and geologic controls--deep natural gas plays and zones, United States and Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep (greater than 4.5 km--15,000 ft) conventional natural gas resources will play an important role in the future energy needs of the United States and Russia. Deep sedimentary basins are widespread in these countries and have formed in a variety of depositional and tectonic settings. Significant volumes of undiscovered deep natural gas are in the Gulf Coast, Anadarko, Permian, and Rocky Mountain basins of the U.S., and in the Timan-Pechora, West Siberia, East Siberia, and North and South Caspian basins of the former Soviet Union. Deep natural gas resources are regularly assessed by the All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Institute (VNIGRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of their normal research activities. Both VNIGRI and the USGS employ similar assessment methods involving play (or zone) analysis using geological data and based on an analysis of confirmed and hypothetical plays using field-size distributions, discovery-process models, and statistical estimation procedures that yield probabilistic estimates of undiscovered accumulations. Resource estimates for the deep structural and statigraphic plays of the Anadarko basin and deep Paleozoic zones in the Timan-Pechora basin are compared and contrasted using both methods. Differences in results of assessments between VNIGRI and USGS arise due to (1) the way in which plays/zones are defined, (2) different geochemical models for hydrocarbon generation as applied to hypothetical plays, (3) variations in the ways in which statistical estimation procedures are applied to plays and regions, and (4) differences in economic and technologic assumptions, reserve growth calculations, and accumulation size limits and ranges.

Dyman, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Belonin, M.D. (All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Technology-Based Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are converting previously uneconomic oil and natural gas resources into proved reserves and production. The Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin is a success story of horizontal drilling, fracturing, and completion technologies. The recent, highly productive oil field discoveries within the Bakken Formation did not come from venturing out into deep uncharted waters heretofore untapped by man, nor from blazing a trail into pristine environs never open to drilling before. Instead, success came from analysis of geologic data on a decades-old producing area, identification of uptapped resources, and application of the new drilling and completion technology necessary to exploit them. In short, it came from using technology

103

X-ray analysis can improve recovery of oil and natural gas |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gas industries are undergoing a revolution that has opened up previously inaccessible resources trapped in shale and tight play formations. Oil and GasFact SheetJanuary 2013...

104

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Preliminary geologic characterization of Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The geology and stratigraphy of natural gas deposits in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming, was investigated. The study will be utilized to help determine the gas potential of the basin.

Johnson, R.C.; Finn, T.M.; Keefer, W.R.; Flores, R.M.; Keighin, C.W.; Szmajter, R.J.; Nuccio, V.F.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

High Hopes, Tight Quarters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hopes, Hopes, Tight Quarters Unique Recycler, world's largest array of permanent magnets, taking shape in crowded Main Injector tunnel. by Mike Perricone, Office of Public Affairs The magnets are numbered in the hundreds; their weight is measured in tons. The available space in the tunnel is usually about four and a half feet, but it can be as little as two or three inches, and the forklifts doing the moving have been custom- designed for these tight quarters. The obstacles include water systems, cable trays, workers performing other installations, and the precisely aligned components of the signature Main Injector accelerator. The consequences of a possible slip-up: Don't even ask. Installation crews can put eight to 10 magnets in place in a day, if the magnets are located close together. Installing a magnet

107

How effective is new variable modified Chaplygin gas to play the role of dark energy- A dynamical system analysis in RS II Brane model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by some previous works of Rudra et al we set to explore the background dynamics when dark energy in the form of New Variable Modified Chaplygin gas is coupled to dark matter with a suitable interaction in the universe described by brane cosmology. The main idea is to find out the efficiency of New variable modified Chaplygin gas to play the role of DE. As a result we resort to the technique of comparison with standard dark energy models. Here the RSII brane model have been considered as the gravity theory. An interacting model is considered in order to search for a possible solution of the cosmic coincidence problem. A dynamical system analysis is performed because of the high complexity of the system . The statefinder parameters are also calculated to classify the dark energy model. Graphs and phase diagrams are drawn to study the variations of these parameters and get an insight into the effectiveness of the dark energy model. It is also seen that the background dynamics of New Variable Modified Chaplygin gas is consistent with the late cosmic acceleration. After performing an extensive mathematical analysis, we are able to constrain the parameters of new variable modified Chaplygin gas as $mgas. Our investigation leads us to the fact that New Variable Modified Chaplygin gas is not as effective as other Chaplygin gas models to play the role of dark energy.

Prabir Rudra; Chayan Ranjit; Sujata Kundu

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of the T+M coupled flow-geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow-thermal-geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, ... Keywords: Double porosity, Fracture propagation, Hydraulic fracturing, Poromechanics, Shale gas, Tensile failure

Jihoon Kim, George J. Moridis

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

110

Crude & Natural Gas Outlook: More Tightness Ahead  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presentation by Guy CarusoAdministratorEnergy Information AdministrationNPRA Annual MeetingSan Antonio, TexasMarch 2004

Information Center

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Shale Play Industry Transportation Challenges,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ High volume commodi-es flows in and out of shale plays · Sand In....Oil in excess of 50 MMT/Yr. · Life of current Shale Oil & Gas explora-on trend ­ 2012) #12;Shale Play Oil Industry A Look at the Baaken · 2-3 Unit Trains

Minnesota, University of

114

Will lecture on: Unconventional Oil and Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are not yet resolved. Ten years ago this category comprised heavy oil, oil shale, coal bed methane, tight gas, and economic aspects of gas shale and tight oil development. The role of oil shale in the emerging energy applied research on heavy oil, gas hydrate, gas shale, tight oil, and oil shale reservoirs. He advises

Schuster, Assaf

115

4. Natural Gas Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

hydraulic fracturing, including shales and low permeability (tight) formations. Total U.S. dry natural gas reserves additions replaced 237 percent of 2007 dry

116

4. Natural Gas Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas fields, i.e., tight sands, shales, and coalbeds. Consideringthegrowingcontributionofthisgastothe National total, the term unconventional is ...

117

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas such as tight gas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas tolocation. Development of shale oil and gas, tar sands, coalGas hydrates will undoubtedly also be present in shales,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

shale oil and gas shale oil and gas IAEE/AEA Meeting January 4, 2014 | Philadelphia, PA By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Key insights on drilling productivity and production trends Adam Sieminski, IAEE/AEA January 4, 2014 2 * The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources * Six tight oil and shale gas plays taken together account for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth over the last 2 years * Higher drilling efficiency and new well productivity, rather than an increase in the rig count, have been the main drivers of recent production growth * Steep legacy production decline rates are being offset by growing

119

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. July 30, 2009 DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and

120

Performance Analysis & Optimization of Well Production in Unconventional Resource Plays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Unconventional Resource Plays consisting of the lowest tier of resources (large volumes and most difficult to develop) have been the main focus of US domestic activity during recent times. Horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing completion technology have been primarily responsible for this paradigm shift. The concept of drainage volume is being examined using pressure diffusion along streamlines. We use diffusive time of flight to optimize the number of hydraulic fracture stages in horizontal well application for Tight Gas reservoirs. Numerous field case histories are available in literature for optimizing number of hydraulic fracture stages, although the conclusions are case specific. In contrast, a general method is being presented that can be used to augment field experiments necessary to optimize the number of hydraulic fracture stages. The optimization results for the tight gas example are in line with the results from economic analysis. The fluid flow simulation for Naturally Fractured Reservoirs (NFR) is performed by Dual-Permeability or Dual-Porosity formulations. Microseismic data from Barnett Shale well is used to characterize the hydraulic fracture geometry. Sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, manual & computer assisted history matching are integrated to develop a comprehensive workflow for building reliable reservoir simulation models. We demonstrate that incorporating proper physics of flow is the first step in building reliable reservoir simulation models. Lack of proper physics often leads to unreasonable reservoir parameter estimates. The workflow demonstrates reduced non-uniqueness for the inverse history matching problem. The behavior of near-critical fluids in Liquid Rich Shale plays defies the production behavior observed in conventional reservoir systems. In conventional reservoirs an increased gas-oil ratio is observed as flowing bottom-hole pressure is less than the saturation pressure. The production behavior is examined by building a compositional simulation model on an Eagle Ford well. Extremely high pressure drop along the multiple transverse hydraulic fractures and high critical gas saturation are responsible for this production behavior. Integrating pore-scale flow modeling (such as Lattice Boltzmann) to the field-scale reservoir simulation may enable quantifying the effects of high capillary pressure and phase behavior alteration due to confinement in the nano-pore system.

Sehbi, Baljit Singh

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

122

Porous Coordination Polymer Composite Membranes for Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This novel architecture should allow the porous coordination polymer to sieve the gas molecules, while being bound into a sealable, gas-tight structure which is...

123

Architecture that affords play  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Play is a form of behavior common to all people. A person's propensity to play depends not only on his physiological and emotional state, but also on his surroundings. This thesis investigates environmental qualities ...

Fallon, Paul Eric

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tight Gas Production ..... 3-B-10 3B-3 Tight Sand Resource Base ..... 3B-1-2 3B-4 Gas Shale Resource Base..... 3B-1-4 3B-5 ...

125

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

126

Formalizing Game-play  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current computer conflict simulation games, or wargames, are opaque in the sense that most of the game mechanisms are not directly visible to the players and are frequently not described in user accessible documentation, have a transient lifetime that ... Keywords: board games, computer conflict simulation games, computer games, formal specification, formalism, game construction, game design, game development, game formalization, game map, game mechanisms, game rules, game specification, game-play, rules, sequence of play, simulation games, strategy board games, war gaming, wargame

Tomas By

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov ... Technology Economics . Theory . ... Risk appetite of industry participants

128

RPSEA Final Report Stratigraphic Controls on Tight-gas Sandstone...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

School of Mines as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology...

129

The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells have been used to increase reservoir recovery, especially in unconventional reservoirs, and hydraulic fracturing has been applied to further extend the contact with the reservoir to increase the efficiency of development. In the past, many models, analytical or numerical, were developed to describe the flow behavior in horizontal wells with fractures. Source solution is one of the analytical/semi-analytical approaches. To solve fractured well problems, source methods were advanced from point sources to volumetric source, and pressure change inside fractures was considered in the volumetric source method. This study aims at developing a method that can predict horizontal well performance and the model can also be applied to horizontal wells with multiple fractures in complex natural fracture networks. The method solves the problem by superposing a series of slab sources under transient or pseudosteady-state flow conditions. The principle of the method comprises the calculation of semi-analytical response of a rectilinear reservoir with closed outer boundaries. A statistically assigned fracture network is used in the study to represent natural fractures based on the spacing between fractures and fracture geometry. The multiple dominating hydraulic fractures are then added to the natural fracture system to build the physical model of the problem. Each of the hydraulic fractures is connected to the horizontal wellbore, and the natural fractures are connected to the hydraulic fractures through the network description. Each fracture, natural or hydraulically induced, is treated as a series of slab sources. The analytical solution of superposed slab sources provides the base of the approach, and the overall flow from each fracture and the effect between the fractures are modeled by applying superposition principle to all of the fractures. It is assumed that hydraulic fractures are the main fractures that connect with the wellbore and the natural fractures are branching fractures which only connect with the main fractures. The fluid inside of the branch fractures flows into the main fractures, and the fluid of the main fracture from both the reservoir and the branch fractures flows to the wellbore. Predicting well performance in a complex fracture network system is extremely challenged. The statistical nature of natural fracture networks changes the flow characteristic from that of a single linear fracture. Simply using the single fracture model for individual fracture, and then adding the flow from each fracture for the network could introduce significant error. This study provides a semi-analytical approach to estimate well performance in a complex fracture network system.

Lin, Jiajing

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gas-Tight Sealing Method - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Computers & Electronics; Consumer Products; Energy & Utilities; Manufacturing & Warehousing; Enabled by the Office of Science. Security ...

131

Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Stability of spinor Fermi gases in tight waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two- and three-body correlation functions of the ground state of an optically trapped ultracold spin-(1/2) Fermi gas (SFG) in a tight waveguide [one-dimensional (1D) regime] are calculated in the plane of even- and odd-wave coupling constants, assuming a 1D attractive zero-range odd-wave interaction induced by a 3D p-wave Feshbach resonance, as well as the usual repulsive zero-range even-wave interaction stemming from 3D s-wave scattering. The calculations are based on the exact mapping from the SFG to a 'Lieb-Liniger-Heisenberg' model with delta-function repulsions depending on isotropic Heisenberg spin-spin interactions, and indicate that the SFG should be stable against three-body recombination in a large region of the coupling constant plane encompassing parts of both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. However, the limiting case of the fermionic Tonks-Girardeau gas, a spin-aligned 1D Fermi gas with infinitely attractive p-wave interactions, is unstable in this sense. Effects due to the dipolar interaction and a Zeeman term due to a resonance-generating magnetic field do not lead to shrinkage of the region of stability of the SFG.

Campo, A. del; Muga, J. G. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Playing for Keeps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inflection points come at you without warning and quickly recede out of reach. We may be nearing one now. If so, we are now about to play for keeps, and we doesnt mean just us security geeks. If anything, its because we ...

Daniel E. Geer

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MANAGING TIGHT BINDING RECEPTORS FOR NEW SPEARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much of the earth's pollution involves compounds of the metallic elements, including actinides, strontium, cesium, technetium, and RCRA metals. Metal ions bind to molecules called ligands, which are the molecular tools that can manipulate the metal ions under most conditions. This DOE-EMSP sponsored program strives (1) to provide the foundations for using the most powerful ligands in transformational separations technologies and (2) to produce seminal examples of their applications to separations appropriate to the DOE EM mission. These ultra tight-binding ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances (from mineralized sites, lesser ligands, and even extremely dilute solutions), but they react so slowly that they are useless in traditional separations methodologies. Two attacks on this problem are underway. The first accommodates to the challenging molecular lethargy by developing a seminal slow separations methodology termed the soil poultice. The second designs ligands that are only tight-binding while wrapped around the targeted metal ion, but can be put in place by switch-binding and removed by switch-release. We envision a kind of molecular switching process to accelerate the union between metal ion and tight-binding ligand. Molecular switching processes are suggested for overcoming the slow natural equilibration rate with which ultra tight-binding ligands combine with metal ions. Ligands that bind relatively weakly combine with metal ions rapidly, so the trick is to convert a ligand from a weak, rapidly binding species to a powerful, slow releasing ligand--during the binding of the ligand to the metal ion. Such switch-binding ligands must react with themselves, and the reaction must take place under the influence of the metal ion. For example, our generation 1 ligands showed that a well-designed linear ligand with ends that readily combine, forms a cyclic molecule when it wraps around a metal ion. Our generation 2 ligands are even more interesting. They convert from rings to structures that wrap around a metal ion to form a cage. These ligands are called cryptands. Switch release is accomplished by photolytic cleavage of a bond to convert a cyclic ligand into a linear ligand or to break similar bonds in a cryptate. Our studies have demonstrated switch binding and switch release with cryptates of calcium. These remarkable cyclic ligands and cage-like ligands are indeed tight-binding and may, in principle, be incorporated in various separations methodologies, including the soil poultice. The soil poultice mimics the way in which microbes secrete extremely powerful ligands into the soil in order to harvest iron. The cellular membrane of the microbe recognizes the iron/ligand complex and admits it into the cell. The soil poultice uses molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to play the role of the cellular membrane. Imprinting involves creation of the polymer in the presence of the metal/ligand complex. In principle, a well design ligand/MIP combination can be highly selective toward almost any targeted metal ion. The principles for that design are the focus of these investigations. An imprinting molecule can interact with the polymer through any, some, or all of the so-called supramolecular modes; e.g., hydrogen bonding, electrostatic charge, minor ligand bonding, Pi-Pi stacking, and hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions. Historically these modes of binding have given MIPs only small re-binding capacities and very limited selectivities. This program has shown that each mode of interaction can be made more powerful than previously suspected and that combinations of different supramolecular interaction modes can produce remarkable synergisms. The results of this systematic study provide a firm foundation for tailoring molecular imprinted polymers for reclamation of specific metal ion, including those important to the DOE EM mission.

DARYLE H BUSCH RICHARD S GIVENS

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment,caverns involved in CAES include stability, air tightness, acceptable surface subsidence, and (later on) an environmentally safe decommissioning and abandonment [

Kim, H.-M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Increased tight oil production, vehicle efficiency reduce ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas overtakes coal as the largest fuel for U.S. electricity generation. ... Over the same period, pipeline imports from Canada fall by 30%, ...

137

A-84: Tight Binding Understanding of Carbon Defects in Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, a coherent transferable tight-binding (TB) parameterization was developed for Fe-C by ... A-54: Used Foundry Sand Reclamation in New Vibratory Unit.

138

Anyon-Fermion Mapping and Applications to Ultracold Gases in Tight Waveguides  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi-Bose mapping method for one-dimensional Bose and Fermi gases with zero-range interactions is generalized to an anyon-fermion mapping and applied to exact solution of several models of ultracold gases with anyonic exchange symmetry in tight waveguides: anyonic Calogero-Sutherland model, anyons with point hard-core interaction (anyonic Tonks-Girardeau gas), and spin-aligned anyon gas with infinite zero-range odd-wave attractions (attractive anyonic Tonks-Girardeau, or AATG, gas). It is proved that for even N{>=}4 there are states of the AATG gas on A, with anyonic phase slips which are odd integral multiples of {pi}/(N-1), of energy lower than that of the corresponding fermionic ground state. A generalization to a spinor Fermi gas state with anyonic symmetry under purely spatial exchange enables energy lowering by the same mechanism.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Shale Gas Matt Ridley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shale Gas Shock Matt Ridley Foreword by Freeman Dyson The Global Warming Policy Foundation GWPF Professor Richard Tol Professor Deepak Lal Dr David Whitehouse Professor Harold Lewis #12;The Shale Gas ....................................................................14 Coal-bed methane and tight gas in sandstone................................15 Shale gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

The U.S. Natural Gas Market in Focus  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tight gas . 26% . 21% . Flame - The U.S. Natural Gas Market in Focus, Howard Gruenspecht, April 17, 2012 . 13 . Oil to natural gas price ratio remains high over the ...

142

Outdoor Play and Playground Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While each classroom strives to accomplish both morning and afternoon outdoor play times, the weather sometimes prohibits such activity, or ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

than average, which means that price volatility can be expected to continue in these tight market conditions. Natural gas demand in 2004 is expected to rise as industrial...

144

Emerging Oil & Gas Supplies: Future Prospects for Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The shale gas & tight oil technology story is only beginning, with much yet to be written Technology is creating new resources out of rocks

145

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

priority challenges associated with safely and prudently developing unconventional shale gas and tight oil resources. Implementation Plan The Program Consortium will...

146

Evaluation of the Sparton Tight-Tolerance AXBT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-six near-simultaneous pairs of conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) and Sparton tight tolerance air expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) temperature profiles were obtained in summer 1991 from a location in the Sargasso Sea. The data were ...

Janice D. Boyd; Robert S. Linzell

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Notes: To reinforce the impact that inventory levels (I.e., tight markets) have on price, note the variation in spot gasoline prices relative to crude oil prices, as shown by the...

148

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

149

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

150

Motivations for play in computer role-playing games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the motivations for play in the context of single- and multi-player digital Role-Playing Games (RPGs) are examined. Survey data were drawn from respondents online and participants in a related experimental study. The results indicate that ...

Anders Tychsen; Michael Hitchens; Thea Brolund

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1997, Rogner published a paper containing an estimate of the natural gas in place in unconventional reservoirs for 11 world regions. Rogner's work was assessing the unconventional gas resource base, and is now considered to be very conservative. Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP) and technically recoverable resource (TRR) in highly uncertain unconventional gas reservoirs, worldwide. We evaluated global unconventional OGIP by (1) developing theoretical statistic relationships between conventional hydrocarbon and unconventional gas; (2) fitting these relationships to North America publically available data; and (3) applying North American theoretical statistical relationships to evaluate the volume of unconventional gas resource of the world. Estimated global unconventional OGIP ranges from 83,300 (P10) to 184,200 (P90) Tcf. To assess global TRR from unconventional gas reservoirs, we developed a computer program that we call Unconventional Gas Resource Assessment System (UGRAS). In the program, we integrated a Monte Carlo technique with an analytical reservoir simulator to estimate the original volume of gas in place and to predict production performance. We used UGRAS to evaluate the probabilistic distribution of OGIP, TRR and recovery factor (RF) for the most productive unconventional gas formations in the North America. The P50 of recovery factor for shale gas, tight sands gas and coalbed methane is 25%, 79% and 41%, respectively. Finally, we applied our global OGIP assessment and these distributions of recovery factor gained from our analyses of plays/formations in the United States to estimate global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource. Global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource is estimated from 43,000 (P10) to 112,000 (P90) Tcf.

Dong, Zhenzhen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional Castle Peak interval, (3) conventional Travis interval, (4) conventional Monument Butte interval, (5) conventional Beluga interval, and (6) conventional Duchesne interval fractured shale/marlstone. We are currently conducting basin-wide correlations to define the limits of the six subplays. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. Outcrop analogs for each subplay except the Travis interval are found in Indian and Nine Mile Canyons. During this quarter, the project team members submitted an abstract to the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for presentation at the 2004 annual national convention in Dallas, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities June 11, 2010 - 4:33pm Addthis Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Joshua DeLung "I think everyone has their heart in it. I think we see weatherization as a really worthy process." Morgan McKane, weatherization auditor at SEVCA Morgan McKane spent most of his career in southeast Vermont working in the

155

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Gasoline inventories indicate how tight the gasoline product market is in any one region. When the gasoline market is tight, it affects the portion of gasoline price is the spread between spot product price and crude oil price. Note that in late 1998-and early 1999 spreads were very small when inventories were quite high. Contrast summers of 1998 or 1999 with summer 2000. Last summer's tight markets, resulting low stocks and transition to Phase 2 RFG added price pressure over and above the already high crude price pressure on gasoline -- particularly in the Midwest. As we ended last winter, gasoline inventories were low, and the spread between spot prices and crude oil were higher than typical as a result. Inventories stayed well below average and the spread during the

156

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Victor Atanasov; Rossen Dandoloff

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Atanasov, Victor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: TightBinding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight­Binding Now that we have shown that /( ~ k; ~r) = \\Gamma P ~ R e i ~ k \\Delta ~ R OE A (~r \\Gamma ~ R) satisfies the Bloch condition, all that remains is to grind the calculation explicitly. First, the wave­function /( ~ k; ~r) must be normalized. Thus Z / \\Lambda / dV = 1 = j

Winokur, Michael

159

The games computers play...: perfectly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial intelligence has had notable success in building high-performance game-playing programs to compete against the best human players; Deep Blue is the obvious example, but there are many more. However, the availability of fast and plentiful machines ...

Jonathan Schaeffer

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

tight oil - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High-Speed Permanent-Magnet Motors for the Oil&Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Enable tight integration of drive motor with compressor ... raw / wet gas design ... Tighter integration of compressor, motor and drive components and ...

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

NETL: News Release - DOE Adds Two More Projects to Boost Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new technologies that can increase natural gas production from low-permeability, or "tight," reservoirs. The new projects - to be carried out by Advanced Resources...

163

Feasibility of calculating petrophysical properties in tight-sand reservoirs using neural networks. Final report, October 1989-July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to determine the feasibility of using neural networks to estimate petrophysical properties in tight sand reservoirs. A second objective was to gain some experience concerning how to approach the development of a future prototype, including what should be done and what should be avoided. Gas Research Institute (GRI) focused the project on tight sands because they contain enormous gas reserves and their complicated lithology represents a challenge to log analysts. The data were supplied by GRI from two of its geographically proximate experimental wells in tight sand formations. The nets were tested in sections of those wells that were not used for training, and in two other wells, one in a geographically close but geologically unrelated formation and one in Wyoming. The feasibility testing demonstrated that the relatively simple neural networks developed have comparable accuracy with standard logging analysis estimates in wells that contributed data to the training set. Transportability of the network was tested by using core measurements in two wells in which the nets were not trained, with inconclusive results. Recommendations were made to increase the accuracy of the neural networks.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Javitz, H.S.; Park, W.; Lee, J.D.; Bergman, A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

Scott, L.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Formation of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs) via Aerodynamic Drift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NASA Kepler mission has revealed an abundant class of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs). The current paradigm for planet formation suggests that small planetesimals will quickly spiral into the host star due to aerodynamic drag, preventing rocky planet formation. In contrast, we find that aerodynamic drift, when acting on an ensemble of solids, can concentrate mass at short orbital periods in gaseous disks. Sublimation fronts may further aid this process. Kepler data suggest that the innermost known planets are found near the silicate sublimation zone. STIP planets should have a wide range of volatile fractions due to aerodynamic drift and H2 dissociation-driven gas accretion. We further propose that the low mass of Mars is evidence that the Solar System was once a proto-STIP.

Boley, Aaron C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Transferable tight-binding parameters: An application to Ni and Ni-Al alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two approaches for obtaining tight-binding parameters for metallic alloys are compared and contrasted with special regard for the application to large scale simulations such as may occur in tight-binding molecular dynamics studies.

Sluiter, M.H.F.; Singh, P.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant-and water-injected hydraulic fractures, Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-precision location technique to improve the image resolution of a hydraulic fracture treatment in a tight gas sand, another thick (~ 450-600 m) interval of productive, tight-gas sands interbedded with mudstones (Dutton in the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field of east Texas. Gas is produced from multiple, low-permeability sands

169

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Playing to retain the advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let P be a monotone decreasing graph property, let G = (V, E) be a graph, and let q be a positive integer. In this paper, we study the (1: q) Maker-Breaker game, played on the edges of G, in which Makers goal is to build a graph that does not satisfy the property P. It is clear that in order for Maker to have a chance of winning, G must not satisfy P. We prove that if G is far from satisfying P, that is, if one has to delete sufficiently many edges from G in order to obtain a graph that satisfies P, then Maker has a winning strategy for this game. We also consider a different notion of being far from satisfying some property, which is motivated by a problem of Duffus, ?Luczak and Rdl [6]. 1

Noga Alon; Dan Hefetz; Michael Krivelevich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The atlas of major Appalachian gas plays. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes. Both pneumatic and hydraulic injection methods will be investigated. Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). Phase 1 is concerned with the development of the grout and a series of predictive models. Phase 1 will also redesign a pneumatic ejector, that was developed to stow limestone, to efficiently stow FBC ash. Phase 2 is a small scale field test at Anker Energy`s Fairfax mine. An inactive panel will be used to evaluate flow, strength, and pressure requirements for hydraulic (grout) injection. The Phase 2 pneumatic injection activities will take place at an Anker Energy mine in Preston County, West Virginia. Air flow requirements, pressure requirements, stowing rate (tons per hour), and stowing efficiency (distance blown) will be determined. Phase 3 is to take 26 months and will be a full scale test at Anker`s eleven acre Long Ridge mine site. The mine will be filled using both pneumatic and hydraulic injection methods. It is expected that the FBC ash will replace what is now an acid mine pool with an alkaline solid so that the ground water will tend to flow around rather than through the previously mined areas. The project will demonstrate whether FBC ash can be successfully disposed of in underground mines.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

173

Tight-binding model for hydrogen-silicon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an empirical tight-binding model for use in molecular-dynamics simulations to study hydrogen-silicon systems. The hydrogen-silicon interaction is constructed to reproduce the electronic energy levels and vibration frequencies of silane (SiH{sub 4}). Further use of the model in the studies of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and of hydrogen on the Si(111) surface also yields results in good agreement with first-principles calculations and experiments.

Min, B.J.; Lee, Y.H.; Wang, C.Z.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M. (Microelectronics Research Center, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States) Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight-Binding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 551 Lecture #27 Title: Tight-Binding Now that we have shown that (~k;~r) = P ~R ei~k~RA(~r ~R-function (~k;~r) must be normalized. Thus Z dV = 1 = j j2 X R X R0 ei~k~R ~R0 Z A(~r ~R0)A(~r ~R)dV Now for each ~R0, the sum over ~R must be the same since the crystal has the same distribution of neighbors

Winokur, Michael

175

Does EIA have data on shale (or tight oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

176

Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas production from low-permeability (tight) gas sandstones is increasingly important in the USA as conventional gas reservoirs are being depleted, and its importance will increase worldwide in future decades. Travis Peak tight sandstones have produced gas since the 1940s. In this study, well log, 2D seismic, core, and production data were used to evaluate the geologic setting and reservoir characteristics of the Travis Peak formation. The primary objective was to assess the potential for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system. The sandstones are fine-grained, moderately well sorted, subangular to subrounded, quartz arenites and subarkoses; reservoir quality decreases with depth, primarily due to diagenetic quartz overgrowths. Evaluation of drilling mud densities suggests that strata deeper than 12,500 ft may be overpressured. Assessment of the geothermal gradient (1.6 F/100 ft) indicates that overpressure may be relict, resulting from hydrocarbon generation by Smackover and Bossier formation potential source rocks. In the study area, Travis Peak cumulative gas production was 1.43 trillion cubic feet from January 1, 1961, through December 31, 2005. Mean daily gas production from 923 wells was 925,000 cubic ft/well/day, during the best year of production. The number of Travis Peak gas wells in high-cost (tight sandstone) fields increased from 18 in the decade 1966-75 to 333 in the decade 1996-2005, when high-cost fields accounted for 33.2% of the Travis Peak gas production. However, 2005 gas production from high cost fields accounted for 63.2% of the Travis Peak total production, indicating that production from high-cost gas wells has increased markedly. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, hydrocarbon occurs in structural, stratigraphic, and combination traps associated with salt deformation. Downdip extension of Travis Peak production will depend on the (1) burial history and diagenesis, (2) reservoir sedimentary facies, and (3) structural setting. Potential Travis Peak hydrocarbon plays include: updip pinch-outs of sandstones; sandstone pinch-outs at margins of salt-withdrawal basins; domal traps above salt structures; and deepwater sands.

Li, Yamin

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

System for recovering methane gas from liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

A system for and method of recovering methane gas from liquid waste which is stored within a pit is disclosed herein. The methane gas is produced by causing the liquid waste to undergo anaerobic fermentation. Therefore, it is necessary to close the pit in an air tight fashion. This is carried out using a cover sheet which is fixedly disposed over the pit in an air tight but readily disengagable fashion. The liquid waste within this air tight pit is preferably agitated intermittently during its storage therein whereby to increase the amount of methane gas produced.

Grabis, D.W.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Kinetics of the Gas-Phase Reactions of OH Radicals, NO3 Radicals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

J. BAKER ET AL. all-glass, gas-tight syringes and transferred via a 1 cm3 stainless steel loop and gas sampling valve onto a 30 m DB-5 megabore column held...

180

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Methods and apparatus for measuring the tightness of enclosures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for measuring tightness of an enclosure such as a building by utilizing alternating pressurization techniques. One method comprises providing apparatus capable of causing an internal volume change for the enclosure, the apparatus including a means for determining the instantaneous volume change, and a means for determining the instantaneous pressure within the enclosure. The apparatus is operated within the enclosure to change the volume thereof, and at least one of the frequency and the displacement is adjusted to achieve a root mean square pressure in the enclosure approximately equal to a reference pressure. At that pressure, the leakage of the enclosure is determined from the instantaneous displacement and instantaneous pressure values. 3 figs.

Modera, M.P.; Sherman, M.H.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

www.myresources.com.au OIL & GAS BULLETIN VOL. 15, NO. 11 PAGE 9 Safety first: Oil rigs off the north west shelf will be studied for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.myresources.com.au OIL & GAS BULLETIN VOL. 15, NO. 11 PAGE 9 NEWS Safety first: Oil rigs off for future successful tight gas exploration projects in Western Australia has been set up and studies the tight gas sand field at its exploration permit in the South Perth Basin. Professor Rezaee said

183

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Western gas sands: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on western gas sands is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Technology Center to encourage the development of very low permeability gas sands in the western United States. The current search is an outgrowth of earlier Government research on tight sands in which nuclear and massive hydraulics fracturing stimulations were tested without definitive results. Based on input from the gas industry, universities, and geologic and engineering consulting firms, activites were broadened to include fundamental research and development. Consequently, the focus of the research for the last several years has been on improving diagnostic instruments for evaluating reservoir and stimulation performances, interpreting geophysical and engineering data, and stimulation techniques. Intergrated geologic studies of three depositional basins that contain tight lenticular sandstone units have also been pursued as part of this new effort. To date, the following tentative conclusions have been formulated: The permeability of the tight gas sands can be as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional gas deposits. Nineteen western geologic basins and trends have been identified that contain significant volumes of tight gas. Gas resources in the priority geologic basins have been estimated as follows: Piceance Basin, 420 Tcf.; Greater Green River Basin, 4971 Tcf.; and Uinta Basin, 21 Tcf. The critical parameters for successfully developing tight sandstone resources are the presence of natural fractures within a reservoir and the effective propped length of hydraulically induced fractures. Stimulation technology is presently insufficient to efficiently recover gas from lenticular, tight reservoirs. 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Learning molecular biology by VR playing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learning by playing is one of the natural way for knowledge and skill acquisition. This paper addresses the issue of learning molecular biology by Virtual Reality (VR) based playing. A software system MolecularStudio is developed using the VR Technology ... Keywords: VR, biology, computer game, learning, playing

BF Lu; KT Lim; JM Zheng; YY Cai

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Price College Energy Institute Energy Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Price College Energy Institute March 05, 2013 | Norman, OK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA's mission and main functions Adam Sieminski , Energy Symposium, March 05, 2013 2 Independent Statistical and Analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy - EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. - By law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government [EIA] ...is the gold standard for energy data around the world, and the

187

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Council The Energy Council March 09, 2013 | Washington, DC by Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA's mission and main functions Adam Sieminski, Energy Council March 09, 2013 2 Independent Statistical and Analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy - EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. - By law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government [EIA] ...is the gold standard for energy data around the world, and the accessibility of it is so much greater than other places - Dan Yergin,

188

Case study of a stimulation experiment in a fluvial, tight-sandstone gas reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that a successful stimulation experiment was conducted in a fluvial sandstone of the Mesaverde formation at the U.S. DOE's Multiwell Experiment (MWX) Site in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The stimulation experiment consisted of stress tests, a three-well prefracture interference test, step-rate/flowback tests, a minifracture, a full stimulation treatment borehole geophone diagnostics during fracturing, and a postfracture interference test.

Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, R.; Thorne, B.J.; Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Branagan, P.T.; Cipolla, C.L. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Gas-Tight Sealing Method for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Energy ...  

Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... the technique employs a surface modification or coating that creates an ...

190

Naturally-Fractured Tight-Gas Reservoirs Phase II Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoirs, San Juan 12 Basin, New Mexico," SPE paper 11642, presented at the 1983 Symposium on Low Permeability, Denver, CO. Munoz, J.: "Delineation of Drainage Area and Flow...

191

Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sand. The Clinton is a tight gas-bearing sandstone. Natural fracturing is thought to account storage field located in Northeastern Ohio. The formation is a tight gas sandstone known as the Clinton for production in economic quantities. Sand occurs in lenses and is largely discontinuous from one well

Mohaghegh, Shahab

192

Identification of Parameters Influencing the Response of Gas Storage Wells to Hydraulic Fracturing with the Aid of a Neural Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

located in Northeastern Ohio. The formation is a tight gas sandstone called the Clinton Sand. All was trained with existing data to identify influential parameters in hydraulic fracturing of the Clinton Sand Characteristics The Clinton reservoir is a tight gas sandstone. Natural fracturing is thought to account

Mohaghegh, Shahab

193

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems. The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Thoma, Greg; Veil, John; Limp, Fred; Cothren, Jackson; Gorham, Bruce; Williamson, Malcolm; Smith, Peter; Sullivan, Bob

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Parabolic Kazhdan-Lusztig R-polynomials for tight quotients of the symmetric groups 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic Kazhdan-Lusztig R-polynomials for tight quotients of the symmetric groups formulas for the parabolic Kazhda* *n- Lusztig R-polynomials of the tight quotients* * to that of the Kazhdan-Lusztig polynomials. In 1987 Deodhar ([5]) introduced parabolic analogues of all

Brenti, Francesco

196

TOWARD TIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST LUMINOSITY RELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large scatters of luminosity relations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been one of the most important reasons preventing the extensive application of GRBs in cosmology. Many efforts have been made to seek tight luminosity relations. With the latest sample of 116 GRBs with measured redshift and spectral parameters, we investigate 6 two-dimensional (2D) correlations and 14 derived three-dimensional (3D) correlations of GRBs to explore the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic scatters of the luminosity relations of GRBs. We find the 3D correlation of E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L to be evidently tighter (at the 2{sigma} confidence level) than its corresponding 2D correlations, i.e., the E{sub peak}-L and {tau}{sub RT}-L correlations. In addition, the coefficients before the logarithms of E{sub peak} and {tau}{sub RT} in the E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L correlation are almost exact opposites of each other. Inputting this situation as a prior reduces the relation to L{proportional_to}(E'{sub peak}/{tau}{sub RT}'){sup 0.842{+-}0.064}, where E'{sub peak} and {tau}'{sub RT} denote the peak energy and minimum rise time in the GRB rest frame. We discuss how our findings can be interpreted/understood in the framework of the definition of the luminosity (energy released in units of time). Our argument about the connection between the luminosity relations of GRBs and the definition of the luminosity provides a clear direction for exploring tighter luminosity relations of GRBs in the future.

Qi Shi; Lu Tan, E-mail: qishi11@gmail.com, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies Alendasocial realism, games, environment, ecology 1. INTRODUCTIONversions of the environment? The answer is multifaceted.

Chang, Alenda Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Playing in the Sandbox Peter Borwein - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neither fish, nor fowl, nor good red herring. - money, money, money. - flexibility, flexibility, flexibility. - money, money, money. Playing in the Sandbox. ?Many talk...

199

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Let's chalk!: strengthening communities through play  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenways (public outdoor walking and biking paths) are unique communities ripe for collaboration. We propose Let's Chalk: a system for collaborative distance sidewalk chalk play that connects greenways in different locations to create an aesthetic experience ... Keywords: aesthetic experience, chalk, community, distance collaboration, greenways, play

Matthew Jennex; Stephanie Louraine; Stephen Miller; Anglica Rosenzweig Castillo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evolving intelligent game-playing agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional game playing programs have relied on advanced search algorithms and hand-tuned evaluation functions to play 'intelligently'. A historical overview of these techniques is provided, followed by a revealing look at recent developments in co-evolutionary ... Keywords: algorithms, artificial intelligence, co-evolution, design, experimentation, game learning, particle swarm optimisation

Nelis Franken; Andries P. Engelbrecht

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Proceedings of the natural gas research and development contractors review meeting  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this meeting was to present results of the research in the DOE-sponsored Natural Gas Program, and simultaneously to provide a forum for real-time technology transfer, to the active research community, to the interested public, and to the natural gas industry, who are the primary users of this technology. The current research focus is to expand the base of near-term and mid-term economic gas resources through research activities in Eastern Tight Gas, Western Tight Gas, Secondary Gas Recovery (increased recovery of gas from mature fields); to enhance utilization, particularly of remote gas resources through research in Natural Gas to Liquids Conversion; and to develop additional, long term, potential gas resources through research in Gas Hydrates and Deep Gas. With the increased national emphasis on the use of natural gas, this forum has been expanded to include summaries of DOE-sponsored research in energy-related programs and perspectives on the importance of gas to future world energy. Thirty-two papers and fourteen poster presentations were given in seven formal, and one informal, sessions: Three general sessions (4 papers); Western Tight Gas (6 papers); Eastern Tight Gas (8 papers); Conventional/Speculative Resources (8 papers); and Gas to Liquids (6 papers). Individual reports are processed separately on the data bases.

Malone, R.D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Public Heath Implications of Unconventional Gas Drilling For presentation to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of hydrocarbons from unconventional reservoirs (tight gas, shale oil/gas) has caused a largeApplications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition material. The closed and unpropped fracture is then non-conductive to the flow of oil or gas

Sibille, Etienne

204

Play Fairway Analysis - Energy Innovation Portal  

Play Fairway Analysis. December 19, 2013. Weve all been there: searching for a lamp in a dark, unfamiliar room. How do you find it? Based on your ...

205

Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation, 2011-2040 (million barrels per day) Permian Basin Bakken Eagle Ford

206

DensEl: An O(N) Tight Binding Code - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2008 ... DensEl is an O(N) (or linear scaling) tight binding code written in the first place by Chris Goringe with contributions by Paul Godwin and David...

207

Natural gas liquids play a greater role in oil and gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and ... topping 2 million barrels per day ... 2012. December; ...

208

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the face of unprecedented levels of domestic natural gas production, ... in New England that hinder natural gas flow from the Marcellus shale play and ...

209

Performance and supply of fluids in a modern gas turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis considers the role fluids play in improving the efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of modern gas turbines. This includes gas turbines used (more)

Askins, John Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING LEADS TO TIGHTLY PACKED PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The known extrasolar multiple-planet systems share a surprising dynamical attribute: they cluster just beyond the Hill stability boundary. Here we show that the planet-planet scattering model, which naturally explains the observed exoplanet eccentricity distribution, can reproduce the observed distribution of dynamical configurations. We calculated how each of our scattered systems would appear over an appropriate range of viewing geometries; as Hill stability is weakly dependent on the masses, the mass-inclination degeneracy does not significantly affect our results. We consider a wide range of initial planetary mass distributions and find that some are poor fits to the observed systems. In fact, many of our scattering experiments overproduce systems very close to the stability boundary. The distribution of dynamical configurations of two-planet systems may provide better discrimination between scattering models than the distribution of eccentricity. Our results imply that, at least in their inner regions which are weakly affected by gas or planetesimal disks, planetary systems should be 'packed', with no large gaps between planets.

Raymond, Sean N. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Barnes, Rory [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Veras, Dimitri [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gorelick, Noel [Google, Inc., 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Greenberg, Richard [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)], E-mail: sean.raymond@colorado.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

212

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cover: Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan. Fugro NPA Satellite Mapping Limited. All rights reserved. No reproduction, copy or transmission of these images may be made without written permission. NPA are corporate affiliates of the Geological Society and have special  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hedberg Series No. 3 Understanding, Exploring and Developing Tight-Gas Sands: 2005 Vail Hedberg Conference to gain a better understanding of the tight-gas sand resource life cycle by encouraging a free exchange to exploit the vast North American tight-gas sand potential and emerging international tight-gas sand plays

Brown, David J.

214

FreezeFrac Improves the Productivity of Gas Shales S. Enayatpour, E. Van Oort, T. Patzek, University of Texas At Austin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 166482 FreezeFrac Improves the Productivity of Gas Shales S. Enayatpour, E. Van Oort, T. Patzek to unconventional hydrocarbon reservers such as oil shales, gas shales, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and gas; Keaney et al., 2004). Successful production of oil and gas from shales with nano-Darcy range permeability

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

215

Production of a Fermi gas of atoms in an optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We prepare a degenerate Fermi gas of potassium atoms by sympathetic cooling with rubidium atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. In a tight lattice, we observe a change of the density of states of the system, which is a signature of quasi two-dimensional confinement. We also find that the dipolar oscillations of the Fermi gas along the tight lattice are almost completely suppressed.

Modugno, G.; Ferlaino, F.; Heidemann, R.; Roati, G.; Inguscio, M. [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, and INFM, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, (Italy)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop analogs are found in the stratigraphically equivalent Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah which displays large-scale dunal cross-strata with excellent reservoir properties and interdunal features such as oases, wadi, and playa lithofacies with poor reservoir properties. Hydrocarbons in the Paradox Formation are stratigraphically trapped in carbonate buildups (or phylloid-algal mounds). Similar carbonate buildups are exposed in the Paradox along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. Reservoir-quality porosity may develop in the types of facies associated with buildups such as troughs, detrital wedges, and fans, identified from these outcrops. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting the project plans, objectives, and products at a booth at the 2003 annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Where is shale gas found Where is shale gas found in the United States? Shale gas is located in many parts of the United States. These deposits occur in shale "plays" - a set of discovered, undiscovered or possible natural gas accumulations that exhibit similar geological characteristics. Shale plays are located within large-scale basins or accumulations of sedimentary rocks, often hundreds of miles across, that also may contain other oil and gas resources. 1 Shale gas production is currently occurring in 16 states. 1 U.S. Government Accountability Office, Report to Congressional Requesters, "Oil and Gas: Information on Shale Resources, Development, and

219

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

FREE PLAY 2007_ Free Play is Next Wave's Independent Game Developers Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Melbourne ABOUT_ Free Play caters for independent and DIY game developers, creatively frustrated-fi, 4-track, DIY and it's probably one of the best and most vibrant areas of Australian culture. Binh

Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ground-play yard-school play-school : a Ludic typology for primary education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores how free play can be promoted, incentivized, and enabled through architecture to reinterpret the elementary school typology within the urban context of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The ...

Williams, Travis Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Social navigation for loosely-coupled information seeking in tightly-knit groups using webwear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many web-based information-seeking tasks are set in a social context where other people's knowledge and advice improves success in finding information. However, when tightly-knit contacts (friends, family, colleagues) are not available, information seeking ... Keywords: collaborative information seeking, social navigation

Scott S. Bateman; Carl A. Gutwin; Gordon I. McCalla

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Efficiency and Fluctuation in Tight-Coupling Model of Molecular Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple tight-coupling model of a molecular chemical engine is proposed. The efficiency of the chemical engine and its average velocity can be explicitly calculated. The diffusion constant is evaluated approximately using the fluctuation theorem. Langevin simulations with stochastic boundary conditions are performed and the numerical results are compared with theoretical calculations.

Hidetsugu Sakaguchi

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

High Performance Biomorphic Image Processing Under Tight Space and Power Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image processing for space systems must be performed under tight space and power constraints while not compromising performance. Traditional computer vision approaches are not ideal because they are notoriously power hungry and physically large. We present ... Keywords: centroid localization chip, computational sensing, focal-plane processing, image process chip, motion detection chip, spatiotemporal convolution chip, vision chip

Ralph Etienne-Cummings; Viktor Gruev; Mathew Clapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Tight Lower Bound to the Outage Probability of Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this correspondence, a tight lower bound to the outage probability of discrete-input Nakagami-m block-fading channels is proposed. The approach permits an efficient method for numerical evaluation of the bound, providing an additional tool for system ... Keywords: Block-fading channel, diversity, error probability, outage probability, rate-diversity tradeoff, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-exponent

K. D. Nguyen; A. Guillen i Fabregas; L. K. Rasmussen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: FWP 49462  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Submitted by: John A. Veil Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, and gas shales. Figure 1 shows EIA projections of the source of natural gas supplies through 2030 productive oil and gas activities in the country today are shale gas plays. Figure 1 ­ U.S. Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

227

Satoshi Hada Department of Gas Turbine Engineering,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satoshi Hada Department of Gas Turbine Engineering, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago must be prevented by developing envi- ronmentally friendly power plants. Industrial gas turbines play a major role in power generation with modern high temperature gas turbines being applied in the gas

Thole, Karen A.

228

Nature in Play: Measuring the Relationship of Nature and Unstructured Play through Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A strong link has been established between children playing in nature and improved physical and emotional health. The intriguing biophilia hypothesis suggests that humans are hardwired with an innate love of nature and that spending time in it is vital for well-being. As we understand natures ability to enhance health and alleviate behavioral disorders, the question is what factors of nature optimize this connection and can be incorporated into childrens everyday environments through design guidelines. Case studies are given for three play spaces containing little nature, some nature, and complete nature in Bonn, Germany. The city has a rich environment and culture with a historic dedication to caring for the environment that made it ideal for a comparison of the presence of nature in play spaces. Methods of research included standard case study procedures as given by Clare Cooper Marcus, Carolyn Francis, and Francis Mark. The narrow time frame of two weeks in October for data collection posed a limitation to the research. Three case studies document play spaces with little nature, some nature, and complete nature. The Auerberg neighborhood playground (little nature) was not well maintained in a space located near apartments for a low socioeconomic class. The Hofgarten urban playground (some nature) contained a well-maintained playground in an urban forest. The Naturpark Rheinland (complete nature) involved a trailhead connecting the neighborhood to the forest where children would gather and play. The results showed that the percentage of natural play compared to all play that occurred in the Auerberg neighborhood playground (12.0%) and the Hofgarten urban playground (11.1%) were nearly equal while the hypothesis suggested the Hofgarten playground would have more natural play. One reason for the unanticipated result is that the maintenance level was high so that the ground plane was cleared of attractive elements of nature, such as leaves and fallen branches. The case studies suggest that topography and the ground plane may have a greater influence on natural play than the presence of overhead tree canopy.

McCleary, Lisa Christine

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

NERSC Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery NERSC Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery NERSC, Berkeley Lab Now Centers for Computational Cosmology Community October 4,...

230

Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change February 27, 2007 -...

231

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves ... EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2012 ...

232

The adsorption effect of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} on density of states for double wall carbon nanotubes by tight binding model  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical approach based on a tight-binding model is developed to study the effects of the adsorption of finite concentrations of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} gas molecules on double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) electronic properties. To obtain proper hopping integrals and random on-site energies for the case of one molecule adsorption, the local density of states for various hopping integrals and random on-site energies are calculated. Since C{sub 6}H{sub 5} molecule is a donor with respect to the carbon nanotubes and their states should appear near the conduction band of the system, effects of various hopping integral deviations and on-site energies for one molecule adsorption are considered to find proper hopping and on-site energies consistent with expected n-type semiconductor. We found that adsorption of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} gas molecules could lead to a (8.0)-(20.0) DWCNT n-type semiconductor. The width of impurity adsorbed gas states in the density of states could be controlled by adsorbed gas concentration.

Fathalian, A., E-mail: a.fathalian@gmail.com [Razi University, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

IN-PILE GAS-COOLED FUEL ELEMENT TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Paper presented at American Nuclear Society Meeting, June I8-21, 1962, Boston, Mass. Design and operating problems of unclad and ceramic gas-cooled reactor fuels in high temperature circulating gas systems will be studied using a test facility now nearing completion at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A shielded air-tight cell houses a closed circuit gas system equipped for dealing with fission products circulating in the gas. Experiments can be conducted on fuel element performance and stability, fission product deposition, gas clean up, activity levels, component and system performance and shielding, and decontamination and maintenance of system hardware. (auth)

Zasler, J.; Huntley, W.R.; Gnadt, P.A.; Kress, T.S.

1962-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Winter LNG deliveries played a limited, yet important role - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total deliveries of liquefied natural gas ... terminals delivering natural gas into the Northeast market, at terminals that rely upon longer duration contracts, ...

236

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

237

Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

238

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

239

Tight bound on coherent-state-based entanglement generation over lossy channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first stage of the hybrid quantum repeaters is entanglement generation based on transmission of pulses in coherent states over a lossy channel. Protocols to make entanglement with only one type of error are favorable for rendering subsequent entanglement distillation efficient. Here we provide the tight upper bound on performances of these protocols that is determined only by the channel loss. In addition, we show that this bound is achievable by utilizing a proposed protocol [K. Azuma, N. Sota, R. Namiki, S. K. Oezdemir, T. Yamamoto, M. Koashi, and N. Imoto, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060303(R) (2009)] composed of a simple combination of linear optical elements and photon-number-resolving detectors.

Azuma, Koji; Sota, Naoya; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Gas centrifuge purge method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

Theurich, Gordon R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Applying the PLEX framework in designing for playfulness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to functionality and usability, interactive products are increasingly expected to provide pleasurable experiences to their users. Playfulness is a part of these experiences. However, playfulness can manifest in many different ways as humans ... Keywords: design framework, design tools, experience-driven design, playfulness, user-centered design

Juha Arrasvuori; Marion Boberg; Jussi Holopainen; Hannu Korhonen; Andrs Lucero; Markus Montola

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Computer game design and the imaginative play of young children  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses preliminary findings of the study of computer game design in relation to current understanding of imaginative play and its developmental value for young children. The crucial role of children's play in their development is well documented. ... Keywords: child development, computer games, design criteria, imaginative play, young children

Irina Verenikina; Jan Herrington

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The effect of thermal treatment on the organization of copper and nickel nanoclusters synthesized from the gas phase  

SciTech Connect

The condensation of 85000 Cu or Ni atoms from the high-temperature gas phase has been simulated by molecular dynamics with the tight binding potential. The efect of the subsequent thermal treatment on the shape and structure of synthesized particles was studied by simulating their gradual heating in a range of 100-1200 K. Some tendencies are revealed that are characteristic of the influence of heat treatment on the nanoparticles synthesized from the gas phase. It is concluded that short-term heating leads to significant ordering of the internal structure in 70% of agglomerated nanoparticles with the predominant formation of spherical shapes. In order to explain this result, the main mechanisms of cluster formation from the gas phase have been analyzed and it is found that the agglomeration temperature plays the main role in the formation of clusters with unified shape and structure. This opens the fundamental possibility of obtaining Cu and Ni nanoclusters with preset size, shape, and structure and, hence, predictable physical properties.

Gafner, Yu. Ya., E-mail: ygafner@khsu.ru; Gafner, S. L.; Chepkasov, I. V. [Katanov Khakassian State University (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever increasing energy demand brings about widespread interest to rapidly, profitably and efficiently develop unconventional resources, among which tight gas sands hold a significant portion. However, optimization of development strategies in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information, and time and budget constraints. Unfortunately, classical full-scale reservoir evaluation cannot be routinely employed by small- to medium-sized operators, given its timeconsuming and expensive nature. In addition, the full-scale evaluation is generally built on deterministic principles and produces a single realization of the reservoir, despite the significant uncertainty faced by operators. This work addresses the need for rapid and cost-efficient technologies to help operators determine optimal well spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast, approximate reservoir simulation model to match and predict production performance in unconventional gas reservoirs. Simulation results were then fit with decline curves to enable direct integration of the reservoir model into a Bayesian decision model. These integrated tools were applied to the tight gas assets of Unconventional Gas Resources Inc. in the Berland River area, Alberta, Canada.

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to (more)

Elkjr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Tools & Models ... Oil production growth in the Bakken shale play mirrors somewhat the growth in natural gas production ... U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov

247

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40 percent of natural gas production and about 35 percent of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

250

Argonne's IFR plays a role in environmentalists' support for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's IFR plays a role in environmentalists' support for nuclear energy Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents...

251

CERN Multimedia Now Playing at DOE's ScienceCinema  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Office of Scientific & Technical Information NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Cathey Daniels, (865) 576-9539 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 25, 2011 CERN Multimedia Now Playing at DOE's...

252

Haynesville-Bossier Shale Play, Texas-Louisiana Salt Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Haynesville-Bossier Shale Play, Texas-Louisiana Salt Basin Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from HPDI, TX Railroad Commission, ...

253

At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission to integrate experimental and computational resources for innovations that support the U.S....

254

EIA - Natural Gas Analysis Basics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Natural Gas Basics for Natural Gas Basics Where Our Natural Gas Comes From Natural Gas Prices Natural Gas Statistics Natural Gas Kid's Page (Not Just for Kids) How natural gas was formed, how we get it, how it is stored and delivered, how it is measured, what it is used for, how it affects the environment and more. Natural Gas Residential Choice This site provides an overview of the status of natural gas industry restructuring in each state, focusing on the residential customer class. About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines State Energy Profiles What role does liquefied natural gas (LNG) play as an energy source for the United States? This Energy In Brief discusses aspects of LNG industry in the United States. LNG is natural gas that has been cooled to about minus 260 degrees Fahrenheit for shipment and/or storage as a liquid. Growth in LNG imports to the United States has been uneven in recent years, with substantial changes in year-over-year imports as a result of suppliers’ decisions to either bring spare cargos to the United States or to divert cargos to countries where prices may be higher. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 12/11/2009)

255

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Electron acceleration by a tightly focused Hermite-Gaussian beam: higher-order corrections  

SciTech Connect

Taking the TEM{sub 1,0}-mode Hermite-Gaussian (H-G) beam as a numerical calculation example, and based on the method of the perturbation series expansion, the higher-order field corrections of H-G beams are derived and used to study the electron acceleration by a tightly focused H-G beam in vacuum. For the case of the off-axis injection the field corrections to the terms of order f{sup 3} (f=1/kw{sub 0}, k and w{sub 0} being the wavenumber and waist width, respectively) are considered, and for the case of the on-axis injection the contributions of the terms of higher orders are negligible. By a suitable optimization of injection parameters the energy gain in the giga-electron-volt regime can be achieved.

Zhao Zhiguo [Department of Physics, Luoyang Normal College, Luoyang 471022 (China); Institute of Laser Physics and Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Yang Dangxiao; Lue Baida [Institute of Laser Physics and Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hybrid Monte-Carlo simulation of interacting tight-binding model of graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, results are presented of Hybrid-Monte-Carlo simulations of the tight-binding Hamiltonian of graphene, coupled to an instantaneous long-range two-body potential which is modeled by a Hubbard-Stratonovich auxiliary field. We present an investigation of the spontaneous breaking of the sublattice symmetry, which corresponds to a phase transition from a conducting to an insulating phase and which occurs when the effective fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ of the system crosses above a certain threshold $\\alpha_C$. Qualitative comparisons to earlier works on the subject (which used larger system sizes and higher statistics) are made and it is established that $\\alpha_C$ is of a plausible magnitude in our simulations. Also, we discuss differences between simulations using compact and non-compact variants of the Hubbard field and present a quantitative comparison of distinct discretization schemes of the Euclidean time-like dimension in the Fermion operator.

Dominik Smith; Lorenz von Smekal

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

258

Discovery of a tight correlation among the prompt emission properties of long Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a correlation among three prompt emission properties of GRBs. These are the isotropic peak luminosity L_iso, the peak energy of the time-integrated prompt emission spectrum E_pk, and the ``high signal" timescale T_0.45, previously used to characterize the variability behavior of bursts. In the rest frame of the source the found correlation reads L_iso\\propto E_pk^1.62 T_0.45^-0.49. We find other strong correlations, but at the cost of increasing the number of variables, involving the variability and the isotropic energy of the prompt emission. With respect to the previous tight correlations found in GRBs the newly found correlation does not require any information from the afterglow phase of the bursts, nor any model-dependent assumption. In the popular scenario in which we are receiving beamed radiation originating in a fireball pointing at us, the found correlation preserves its form in the comoving frame. This helps to explain the small scatter of the correlation, and underlines the role of the local brightness (i.e. the brightness of the visible fraction of the fireball surface). This correlation has been found for 19 objects, and it is hard to establish if any selection bias affects it. Its connection with the prompt local brightness is promising, but a solid physical understanding is still to be found. Despite all that, we find that some properties of the correlation, which we discuss, support its true existence, and this has important implications for the GRB physics. Furthermore, it is possible to use such correlation as an accurate redshift estimator, and its tightness will allow us to use it as a tool to constrain the cosmological parameters (abridged)

C. Firmani; G. Ghisellini; V. Avila-Reese; G. Ghirlanda

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Improving the gas-chromatographic determination of the composition of the gas liberated from a battery  

SciTech Connect

Normally, gas chromatography is used for analyzing the gas composition that is liberated when batteries operate. Earlier work describes a gas-chromatographic technique for determining the composition of gas liberated from a battery. According to this reference, the gas is collected in an inverted burette over water. The gas is either sampled with a batching valve or with a medical syringe, which pierces the connecting vacuum hoses. The gas sample is injected into the chromatographic evaporator, and is separated on the chromatographic column into its individual components, each of which is analyzed on the detector. The method described was used to study gas liberation during the storage of charged nickel-zinc batteries. In the method described above, a high proportion of the gas specimen that accumulates and is collected in the measuring system occurs in the dead space volume. In this situation, it is very difficult to determine the liberated gas composition with a high degree of accuracy when the gas is liberated at low rates. Moreover, this method does not provide reliable system air tightness during long term operation of the batteries. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Dmitriev, V.V.; Zubov, M.S.; Baulov, V.I.; Toguzov, B.M.

1992-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Efficient and tight upper bounds for haplotype inference by pure parsimony using delayed haplotype selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haplotype inference from genotype data is a key step towards a better understanding of the role played by genetic variations on inherited diseases. One of the most promising approaches uses the pure parsimony criterion. This approach is called Haplotype ...

Joo Marques-Silva; Ins Lynce; Ana Graa; Arlindo L. Oliveira

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Role playing games: comparative analysis across two media platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Role Playing Games (RPGs) is a popular game form. RPGs have been translated into all media formats, and are also a rare example of functioning interactive narratives. Despite the popularity of these games, especially within computer games, and the possibility ... Keywords: computer games, information systems, interactive narrative, multiplayer games, role playing game

Anders Tychsen

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

264

Single- and Two-Phase Diversion Cross-Flows Between Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle Subchannels - Data on Flow Resistance and Interfacial Friction Coefficients for the Cross-Flow  

SciTech Connect

Single- and two-phase diversion cross-flows arising from the pressure difference between tight lattice subchannels are our concern in this study. In order to obtain a correlation of the diversion cross-flow, we conducted adiabatic experiments using a vertical multiple-channel with two subchannels simplifying the triangle tight lattice rod bundle for air-water flows at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In the experiments, data were obtained on the axial variations in the pressure difference between the subchannels, the ratio of flow rate in one subchannel to the whole channel, the void fraction in each subchannel for slug-churn and annular flows in two-phase flow case. These data were analyzed by use of a lateral momentum equation based on a two-fluid model to determine both the cross-flow resistance coefficient between liquid phase and channel wall and the gas-liquid interfacial friction coefficient. The resulting coefficients have been correlated in a way similar to that developed for square lattice subchannel case by Kano et al. (2002); the cross-flow resistance coefficient data can be well correlated with a ratio of the lateral velocity due to the cross-flow to the axial one irrespective of single- and two-phase flows; the interfacial friction coefficient data were well correlated with a Reynolds number, which is based on the relative velocity between gas and liquid cross-flows as the characteristic velocity. (authors)

Tatsuya Higuchi; Akimaro Kawahara; Michio Sadatomi; Hiroyuki Kudo [Kumamoto University, 39-1, Kurokami 2-chome, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

266

Coal gas openhole completion well effectiveness in the Piceance Basin, Colorado: Preliminary results, South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983, the Deep Coal Seam Project (DCSP) and the Western Cretaceous Coal Seam Project (WCCSP) of the Gas Research institute has funded research efforts in the Piceance and San Juan basins of Colorado and New Mexico to further the knowledge of all facets of commercial coalbed natural gas reservoir development. Because of WCCSP research into openhole completion well effectiveness in the Fruitland play, and the need to complete a successful Cameo coal openhole well, the South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well was deemed to be an excellent chance for technology transfer and evaluation. Because of implementation of carefully designed air mist drilling and controlled openhole completion techniques, along with a sufficient magnitude of cleat permeability, it appears that the [number sign]11-15 well is commercial. The cavity was installed without major problems. The initial gas production test rate of roughly 280 MCFGPD is one of the best in South Shale Ridge. The [number sign]11-15 well case study is quite important in that it may serve to emphasize the point that the conservative attitude towards commercialization of previously untapped petroleum resources is often not correct. It is now an open question as to whether the conventional wisdom that most of the Cameo coal gas play is too tight to enable commercial production is indeed true, or if by analogy with Fruitland openhole wells, Cameo coal wells that have been hydraulic fracture stimulated are commonly very poorly connected to the cleat permeability of the reservoir. There is no significant reason to believe that the South Shale Ridge area is geologically unique, and thus there is a distinct possibility that more widespread Cameo coal production than has been previously recorded can be achieved.

Close, J.C. (Resource Enterprises, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Dowden, D. (Conquest Oil Co., Greeley, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Acoustic wave propagation in cracked porous rocks and application to interpreting acoustic log data in tight formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rocks in earth's crust usually contain both pores and cracks. Typical examples include tight sandstone and shale rocks that have low porosity but contain abundant microcracks. By extending the classic Biot's poroelastic wavetheory to include the effects of cracks

Xiaoming Tang; Xuelian Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hybrid derivative-free extended Kalman filter for unknown lever arm estimation in tightly coupled DGPS/INS integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential carrier phase observations from GPS (Global Positioning System) integrated with high-rate sensor measurements, such as those from an inertial navigation system (INS) or an inertial measurement unit (IMU), in a tightly coupled approach can ... Keywords: Global positioning system (GPS), Inertial measurement unit (IMU), Kalman filter, Lever arm

Yanrui Geng; Richard Deurloo; Luisa Bastos

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Collective artificial intelligence : simulated role-playing from crowdsourced data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collective Artificial Intelligence (CAl) simulates human intelligence from data contributed by many humans, mined for inter-related patterns. This thesis applies CAI to social role-playing, introducing an end-to-end process ...

Orkin, Jeffrey David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modeling medical devices for plug-and-play interoperability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the challenges faced by clinical engineers is to support the connectivity and interoperability of medical-electrical point-of-care devices. A system that could enable plug-and-play connectivity and interoperability ...

Hofmann, Robert Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Learning how to play Nash, potential games and alternating ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The learning to play Nash problem: four central questions In non ...... Recall that the metric can be used to define the length of piecewise smooth curve c : [a, b]...

272

North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights July 19, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis Energy efficient metal halide lighting is replacing the outdated lighting system at Mecklenburg Park. | Photo courtesy of Michael Jaycocks Energy efficient metal halide lighting is replacing the outdated lighting system at Mecklenburg Park. | Photo courtesy of Michael Jaycocks Nearly 600 games are played on four athletic fields as North Mecklenburg Park, one of the largest parks in Huntersville, N.C. Busy as it is with 277,000 annual visitors, the park had a major problem: The 20-year-old field lighting system was not only inefficient but also increasingly unsafe for recreational softball leagues, high school teams and the public. "Staff would have to turn lights on early for games and practices to be

273

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

275

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

276

ACT sup 2 project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building's performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building's performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ACT{sup 2} project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building`s performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building`s performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gas Turbine Recuperators: Benefits and Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed resources (DR) are projected to be an expanding part of the power generation mix in the future -- with conventional industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines as well as emerging microturbine products playing an important role. This report assesses the role of recuperators in improving the power generation efficiency of simple-cycle gas turbines and microturbines.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

280

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

282

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

283

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

284

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

285

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

287

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

288

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

289

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Liquid-solid impacts with compressible gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Liquid-solid impacts with compressible gas: The role played by gas compressibility in gas cushioned liquid-solid impacts is investigated within a viscous gas and inviscid liquid regime. A full analysis of the en- ergy conservation in the gas

Purvis, Richard

290

EIA - AEO2010 -Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Introduction Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40 percent of natural gas production and about 35 percent of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in “darcies.”)

291

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency June 28, 2010 - 6:03pm Addthis The city of Brea, California, had a problem: The lighting in its Brea Junior High Park was becoming obsolete. The park, one of the busiest maintained by this northern Orange County city, needed the lighting for nighttime use of its sports fields and courts. The existing system was not only extremely inefficient, but scheduled to be phased out of production. That meant the city would soon be unable to buy replacement bulbs. But due to the budget problems plaguing municipalities across California and the country, Brea had trouble finding the money to pay for a complete retrofit -- especially because the savings to the city from more efficient lights would not be large enough to repay the investment quickly.

292

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency June 28, 2010 - 6:03pm Addthis The city of Brea, California, had a problem: The lighting in its Brea Junior High Park was becoming obsolete. The park, one of the busiest maintained by this northern Orange County city, needed the lighting for nighttime use of its sports fields and courts. The existing system was not only extremely inefficient, but scheduled to be phased out of production. That meant the city would soon be unable to buy replacement bulbs. But due to the budget problems plaguing municipalities across California and the country, Brea had trouble finding the money to pay for a complete retrofit -- especially because the savings to the city from more efficient lights would not be large enough to repay the investment quickly.

293

EM Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard Improvements EM Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard Improvements July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The highly-efficient, biomass-fired cogeneration facility at the Savannah River Site replaced a 1950s-era coal-fired plant and will result in significantly reduced pollutant emissions, including a reduction of 100,000 metric tons per year of carbon dioxide emissions. The highly-efficient, biomass-fired cogeneration facility at the Savannah River Site replaced a 1950s-era coal-fired plant and will result in significantly reduced pollutant emissions, including a reduction of 100,000 metric tons per year of carbon dioxide emissions. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's clean energy contributions helped DOE achieve a

294

EM Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard EM Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard Improvements EM Plays Integral Role in Department's Sustainability Scorecard Improvements July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The highly-efficient, biomass-fired cogeneration facility at the Savannah River Site replaced a 1950s-era coal-fired plant and will result in significantly reduced pollutant emissions, including a reduction of 100,000 metric tons per year of carbon dioxide emissions. The highly-efficient, biomass-fired cogeneration facility at the Savannah River Site replaced a 1950s-era coal-fired plant and will result in significantly reduced pollutant emissions, including a reduction of 100,000 metric tons per year of carbon dioxide emissions. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's clean energy contributions helped DOE achieve a

295

Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change February 27, 2007 - 3:49pm Addthis Washington, DC - Continuing to take the lead in addressing global climate change, Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen Johnson, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Administrator Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher discussed Working Group I's contribution to the Fourth Assessment Report released today by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report confirms what President Bush has said about the nature of climate change and it reaffirms the need for continued U.S. leadership in

296

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier. 10 figs.

Dederer, J.T.; Hager, C.A.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Mars, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in shale and other tight rock formations played an important role in the increase of oil and natural gas ...

299

First Edition Geologic Storage Formation Classification: Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage. Currently, these tight organic rich shales are being developed as gas and oil shale plays, such as the Marcellus Shale, and are a significant contributor to the...

300

EPA's Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap July 2006 EPA230-B-06-001 About this Roadmap Natural gas continues to play an important role in meeting our nation's growing energy needs. In 2005, natural gas accounted for 23% of our nation's total energy consumption. 1 The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that domestic consumption of natural gas will continue to increase and that imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) will meet much of the increased demand. 2 LNG, created when natural gas is converted into a liquid state by cooling it to a temperature close to negative 260°F, presents an efficient way to transport natural gas via ship from foreign production areas to the United States. The cooling process reduces the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy dependence of the optical potential of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target  

SciTech Connect

Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding energies from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical potential were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold anomaly observed in the behavior of the potential of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.

Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Niello, J. O. Fernandez [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad de San Martin, B1650BWA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Gragoata, Niteroi, R. J., 24210-340 (Brazil)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

303

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

What community?: facilitating awareness of 'community' through playful triggers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Notions of 'community' are still taken-for-granted in Participatory Design discourse, omitting critical examination of how people participate in projects to achieve and evaluate community-based participation and outcomes. This paper critically reflects ... Keywords: bushfire, community empowerment, design 'scaffolds', participatory disaster risk assessment, playful triggers, visualisation

Yoko Akama; Tania Ivanka

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Games Computers Play: GameTheoretic Aspects of Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Games Computers Play: Game­Theoretic Aspects of Computing Nathan Linial \\Lambda 1 Introduction Computers may interact in great many ways. A parallel computer consists of a group of processors which cooperate in order to solve large­scale computational problems. Computers compete against each other

Linial, Nathan "Nati"

306

Optimization of density functional tight-binding and classical reactive molecular dynamics for high-throughput simulations of carbon materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon materials and nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes) are promising building blocks of nanotechnology. Potential applications include optical and electronic devices, sensors, and nano-scale machines. The multiscale character of processes related ... Keywords: ACM proceedings, BLAS, Cray XT5, LAPACK, advanced materials, density-functional tight binding, high-throughput, linear algebra, material science, molecular dynamics, multiscale-modeling, quantum chemistry, scientific libraries, scientific-computing

Jacek Jakowski; Bilel Hadri; Steven J. Stuart; Predrag Krstic; Stephan Irle; Dulma Nugawela; Sophya Garashchuk

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

308

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

309

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

310

Observation of a Two-Dimensional Fermi Gas of Atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have prepared a degenerate gas of fermionic atoms which move in two dimensions while the motion in the third dimension is 'frozen' by tight confinement and low temperature. In situ imaging provides direct measurement of the density profile and temperature. The gas is confined in a defect-free optical potential, and the interactions are widely tunable by means of a Fano-Feshbach resonance. This system can be a starting point for exploration of 2D Fermi physics and critical phenomena in a pure, controllable environment.

Martiyanov, Kirill; Makhalov, Vasiliy; Turlapov, Andrey [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Ulyanova 46, Nizhniy Novgorod, 603000 (Russian Federation)

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

South Dakota shallow gas hunt heats up  

SciTech Connect

As the search for shallow gas reserves in South Dakota intensifies, most of the exploratory drilling activity is concentrating along the Camp Crook anticline in the northwestern part of the state, where large amounts of gas could be locked in shallow, low-pressure sands. Gas production found in 1977 in the Cretaceous Shannon of the West Short Pine hills field in Harding Co. set off the current gas play. Drilling reports now list some 28 wells in that section of the state, mostly in Harding Co. Previous drilling - notably at the Ardmore gas field in southwestern South Dakota in the 1940s - failed to initiate any exploratory plays. The state remains one of the most undrilled prospective hydrocarbon regions in the US. South Dakota's Cretaceous section is similar to that in Wyoming, where the Dakota and Muddy sandstones are important producers. Numerous sites for exploratory wells lie in the Powder River, Kennedy, and Williston basins.

McCaslin, J.C.

1981-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

All metal valve structure for gas systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A valve assembly with a resilient metal seat member is disclosed for providing a gas-tight seal in a gas handling system. The valve assembly also includes a valve element for sealing against the valve seat member; and an actuating means for operating the valve element. The valve seat member is a one-piece stainless steel ring having a central valve port and peripheral mounting flange, and an annular corrugation in between. A groove between the first and second ridges serves as a flexure zone during operation of the valve member and thus provides the seating pressure between the inner ridge or valve seat and the valve element. The outer annular ridge has a diameter less than said valve element to limit the seating motion of the valve element, preventing non-elastic deformation of the seat member.

Baker, Ray W. (Hamilton, OH); Pawlak, Donald A. (Centerville, OH); Ramey, Alford J. (Miamisburg, OH)

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

Refocused energy policy: a natural gas perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present adminstration's policy on energy development is briefly summarized. While the Department of Energy will be dismantled, several important functions will be preserved and will continue elsewhere in government. The administration's aim is not to present an energy blueprint to predetermine energy solutions, rather, policy is based on the belief that the marketplace must be allowed to determine the most economic and durable energy sources. Revision of the federal leasing policy is discussed. Free market pricing of oil and gas is another key aspect of the new energy policy. The development of advanced technology in the areas of natural gas recovery, methane from coalbed, development of tight sands deposits, geopressured aquifers, and coal gasification is also discussed.

Mares, J.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The presence of natural gas-primarily methane-in the shale layers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was pumped in 1947 on a gas well operated by Pan American Petroleum Corporation in Grant County, Kansas. 2003 to 2004 - Gas production from the Barnett Shale play overtakes the...

316

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

317

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

318

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

319

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

320

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

322

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

323

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

325

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

326

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

327

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

330

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

331

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

332

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

hurricanes. This outcome was the result of less powerful hurricanes in 2008 in terms of wind and storm surge compared with those in 2005. Lack of the supply-and-demand tightness...

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

many of the southern states.(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a relatively tight...

335

A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

(OAK/B204) A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI

Hiroshi Takahashi; Upendra Rohatgi; T.J. Downar

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

Benchmark problems in which equality plays the major role  

SciTech Connect

We have recently heard rumors that researchers are again studying paramodulation [Wos87] in the context of strategy for its control. In part to facilitate such research, and in part to provide test problems for evaluating other approaches to equality-oriented reasoning, we offer in this article a set of benchmark problems in which equality plays the dominant role. The test problems are taken from group theory, Robbins algebra, combinatory logic, and other areas. For each problem, we include appropriate clauses and comment as to its status with regard to provability by an unaided automated reasoning program.

Lusk, E.; Wos, L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Benchmark problems in which equality plays the major role  

SciTech Connect

We have recently heard rumors that researchers are again studying paramodulation (Wos87) in the context of strategy for its control. In part to facilitate such research, and in part to provide test problems for evaluating other approaches to equality-oriented reasoning, we offer in this article a set of benchmark problems in which equality plays the dominant role. The test problems are taken from group theory, Robbins algebra, combinatory logic, and other areas. For each problem, we include appropriate clauses and comment as to its status with regard to provability by an unaided automated reasoning program.

Lusk, E.; Wos, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Soot blower using fuel gas as blowing medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soot blower assembly (10) for use in combination with a coal gasifier (14). The soot blower assembly is adapted for use in the hot combustible product gas generated in the gasifier as the blowing medium. The soot blower lance (20) and the drive means (30) by which it is moved into and out of the gasifier is housed in a gas tight enclosure (40) which completely surrounds the combination. The interior of the enclosure (40) is pressurized by an inert gas to a pressure level higher than that present in the gasifier so that any combustible product gas leaking from the soot blower lance (20) is forced into the gasifier rather than accumulating within the enclosure.

Tanca, Michael C. (Tariffville, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiogenic gas accumulation in TRU waste storage drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted over a four-year time span to determine the effect of high-activity transuranic (TRU) waste on the atmosphere within TRU waste storage drums typical of those generated in Savannah River Plant operation. Routine gas composition analyses showed that a significant amount of hydrogen can accumulate in drums that contain high alpha activity, and that flammable gas mixtures could form in such drums in spite of the radiolytic consumption of oxygen. According to this study, gas pressure accumulation does not pose a threat to the integrity of the TRU waste containers that are now being stored at the Savannah River Plant. Therefore, the 20-year storage criterion is still viable. However, the continued avoidance of a perfectly gas-tight drum seal (e.g., epoxy, metal welding) is recommended. The test drums will continue to be monitored.

Ryan, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas reservoirs have become a major source of energy in recent years. Developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have made these reservoirs more accessible and productive. Apart from other dissimilarities from conventional gas reservoirs, one major difference is that a considerable amount of gas produced from these reservoirs comes from desorption. Ignoring a major component of production, such as desorption, could result in significant errors in analysis of these wells. Therefore it is important to understand the adsorption phenomenon and to include its effect in order to avoid erroneous analysis. The objective of this work was to imbed the adsorbed gas in the techniques used previously for the analysis of tight gas reservoirs. Most of the desorption from shale gas reservoirs takes place in later time when there is considerable depletion of free gas and the well is undergoing boundary dominated flow (BDF). For that matter BDF methods, to estimate original gas in place (OGIP), that are presented in previous literature are reviewed to include adsorbed gas in them. More over end of the transient time data can also be used to estimate OGIP. Kings modified z* and Bumb and McKees adsorption compressibility factor for adsorbed gas are used in this work to include adsorption in the BDF and end of transient time methods. Employing a mass balance, including adsorbed gas, and the productivity index equation for BDF, a procedure is presented to analyze the decline trend when adsorbed gas is included. This procedure was programmed in EXCEL VBA named as shale gas PSS with adsorption (SGPA). SGPA is used for field data analysis to show the contribution of adsorbed gas during the life of the well and to apply the BDF methods to estimate OGIP with and without adsorbed gas. The estimated OGIPs were than used to forecast future performance of wells with and without adsorption. OGIP estimation methods when applied on field data from selected wells showed that inclusion of adsorbed gas resulted in approximately 30 percent increase in OGIP estimates and 17 percent decrease in recovery factor (RF) estimates. This work also demonstrates that including adsorbed gas results in approximately 5percent less stimulated reservoir volume estimate.

Mengal, Salman Akram

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects 2 Projects to Help Boost Gas Flow from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 15, 2001 August 15, 2001 DOE Selects 2 Projects to Help Boost Gas Flow from Low-Permeability Formations New Technologies Targeted at Future Gas Production From "Tight" Formations in Western U.S. MORGANTOWN, WV - America has vast resources of natural gas, but President Bush's National Energy Policy cautions that domestic production of the easier "conventional" gas could peak as early as 2015. To help prepare for the day when the Nation's increasing demand for clean-burning natural gas will have to be met by gas trapped in denser, more difficult-to-produce "unconventional" formations, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected two firms to develop advanced methods for locating and producing these low permeability gas reservoirs.

343

Safety research plan for gas-supply technologies. Final report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a multiyear research plan addressing the safety issues of the following gas supply technologies: conventional natural gas, including deep and sour gas wells; unconventional natural gas (Devonian shale, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and geopressured methane); SNG from coal (surface and in situ), and SNG from biomass. A total of 51 safety issues were identified in the initial review. These safety issues were screened to eliminate those hazards which appeared to be relatively insignificant in terms of accident severity or frequency, or because the potential for resolving the problem through research was considered very low. Twenty-six remaining safety issues were prioritized, and of these, 9 were selected as priority research projects: two under conventional gas; one under unconventional natural gas; and six under SNG from coal. No safety research issues in the biomass area appear to warrant priority consideration.

Tipton, L.M.; Junkin, P.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Existence and flow behavior of gas at low saturation in geopressured formations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first geopressured brine well tested for the Department of Energy produced gas and brine at a ratio far above the solution ratio for the gas in that brine. One explanation advanced was that the geopressured formation contained gas at a low saturation, and that this gas flowed into the well during the test. This hypothesis is examined and found to be untenable based on evidence from well logs, flow tests and thermodynamics, and on currently accepted concepts for migration and accumulation of petroleum. The probable explanation for the observed high gas/water ratios is shown to be a thin, tight gas-bearing layer in the case of one sand and an updip gas cap in the case of the second and tested.

Matthews, C.S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gas Migration In The Opalinus Clay As A Function Of The Gas Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be backfilled in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. After healing and re-saturation of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and saturation of the backfill, the waste containers and the metallic components will corrode resulting in a generation of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon dioxide will be released as a result of oxidation and thermal decomposition of the organic components in the waste and in the clay. If the disposal boreholes and chambers are sealed gas-tight, high gas pressure may be produced leading to the potential generation of fractures in the host rock which could influence the integrity of the repository. Therefore it is essential that the gases migrate through the technical barriers (backfill) or into the surrounding host rock at lower pressure and without any irreversible damage of the repository. In order to estimate the consequences of the gas generation the knowledge of the gas paths in the host rock and the knowledge of the parameters which influence the gas migration in the host rock are important. During an ongoing project at the underground research laboratory Mt. Terri in Switzerland the gas migration in the undisturbed over-consolidated Opalinus Clay is investigated. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

347

LANL to play key role in biofuel development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuel development Biofuel development LANL to play key role in biofuel development LANL to create a proof-of-concept system for commercializing algae-based biofuels or other advanced biofuels that can be transported and sold using the nation's existing fueling infrastructure. January 14, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

348

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Argus Americas Crude Summit January 22, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Six key plays account for nearly all recent growth in oil and natural gas production...

350

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

352

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

353

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4836 bytes) oil.gif (4836 bytes) The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(99), (Washington, DC, January 1999). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery and unconventional gas recovery from tight gas formations, gas shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

354

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

355

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

356

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

357

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

358

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

359

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

360

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

362

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

363

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

364

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

365

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

366

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

367

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

368

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

369

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

370

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

371

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

372

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

373

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

374

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

375

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum engineering literature clearly shows that large proppant volumes and concentrations are required to effectively stimulate low-permeability gas sands. To pump large proppant concentrations, one must use a viscous fluid. However, many operators believe that low-viscosity, low-proppant concentration fracture stimulation treatments known as ??waterfracs?? produce comparable stimulation results in low-permeability gas sands and are preferred because they are less expensive than gelled fracture treatments. This study evaluates fracture stimulation technology in tight gas sands by using case histories found in the petroleum engineering literature and by using a comparison of the performance of wells stimulated with different treatment sizes in the Cotton Valley sands of the East Texas basin. This study shows that large proppant volumes and viscous fluids are necessary to optimally stimulate tight gas sand reservoirs. When large proppant volumes and viscous fluids are not successful in stimulating tight sands, it is typically because the fracture fluids have not been optimal for the reservoir conditions. This study shows that waterfracs do produce comparable results to conventional large treatments in the Cotton Valley sands of the East Texas basin, but we believe it is because the conventional treatments have not been optimized. This is most likely because the fluids used in conventional treatments are not appropriate or have not been used appropriately for Cotton Valley conditions.

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Summary Statistics for Homemade ?Play Dough? -- Data Acquired at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

Using x-ray computerized tomography (CT), we have characterized the x-ray linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of a homemade Play Dough{trademark}-like material, designated as PDA. Table 1 gives the first-order statistics for each of four CT measurements, estimated with a Gaussian kernel density estimator (KDE) analysis. The mean values of the LAC range from a high of about 2700 LMHU{sub D} 100kVp to a low of about 1200 LMHUD at 300kVp. The standard deviation of each measurement is around 10% to 15% of the mean. The entropy covers the range from 6.0 to 7.4. Ordinarily, we would model the LAC of the material and compare the modeled values to the measured values. In this case, however, we did not have the detailed chemical composition of the material and therefore did not model the LAC. Using a method recently proposed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we estimate the value of the effective atomic number, Z{sub eff}, to be near 10. LLNL prepared about 50mL of the homemade 'Play Dough' in a polypropylene vial and firmly compressed it immediately prior to the x-ray measurements. We used the computer program IMGREC to reconstruct the CT images. The values of the key parameters used in the data capture and image reconstruction are given in this report. Additional details may be found in the experimental SOP and a separate document. To characterize the statistical distribution of LAC values in each CT image, we first isolated an 80% central-core segment of volume elements ('voxels') lying completely within the specimen, away from the walls of the polypropylene vial. All of the voxels within this central core, including those comprised of voids and inclusions, are included in the statistics. We then calculated the mean value, standard deviation and entropy for (a) the four image segments and for (b) their digital gradient images. (A digital gradient image of a given image was obtained by taking the absolute value of the difference between the initial image and that same image offset by one voxel horizontally, parallel to the rows of the x-ray detector array.) The statistics of the initial image of LAC values are called 'first order statistics;' those of the gradient image, 'second order statistics.'

Kallman, J S; Morales, K E; Whipple, R E; Huber, R D; Martz, A; Brown, W D; Smith, J A; Schneberk, D J; Martz, Jr., H E; White, III, W T

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

377

MOLECULAR GAS IN INFRARED ULTRALUMINOUS QSO HOSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report CO detections in 17 out of 19 infrared ultraluminous QSO (IR QSO) hosts observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. The cold molecular gas reservoir in these objects is in a range of (0.2-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} (adopting a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor {alpha}{sub CO} = 0.8 M{sub Sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}). We find that the molecular gas properties of IR QSOs, such as the molecular gas mass, star formation efficiency (L{sub FIR}/L'{sub CO}), and CO (1-0) line widths, are indistinguishable from those of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). A comparison of low- and high-redshift CO-detected QSOs reveals a tight correlation between L{sub FIR} and L'{sub CO(1-0)} for all QSOs. This suggests that, similar to ULIRGs, the far-infrared emissions of all QSOs are mainly from dust heated by star formation rather than by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), confirming similar findings from mid-infrared spectroscopic observations by Spitzer. A correlation between the AGN-associated bolometric luminosities and the CO line luminosities suggests that star formation and AGNs draw from the same reservoir of gas and there is a link between star formation on {approx}kpc scale and the central black hole accretion process on much smaller scales.

Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C.-N. [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Gao, Y.; Tan, Q. H. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Mao, S. [National Astronomical Observatories of China, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Omont, A. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095, UPMC and CNRS, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Flaquer, B. O.; Leon, S. [Instituto de Radioastronomia Milimetrica (IRAM), Avenida Divina Pastora 7, Nucleo Central, 18012 Granada (Spain); Cox, P., E-mail: xyxia@bao.ac.cn [Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM), F-38406 St. Martin d'Heres (France)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s  

SciTech Connect

In the next five years, the DOE expects to build systemsthat approach a petaflop in scale. In the near term (two years), DOE willhave several near-petaflops systems that are 10 percent to 25 percent ofa peraflop-scale system. A common feature of these precursors to petaflopsystems (such as the Cray XT3 or the IBM BlueGene/L) is that they rely onan unprecedented degree of concurrency, which puts stress on every aspectof HPC system design. Such complex systems will likely break current bestpractices for fault resilience, I/O scaling, and debugging, and evenraise fundamental questions about languages and application programmingmodels. It is important that potential problems are anticipated farenough in advance that they can be addressed in time to prepare the wayfor petaflop-scale systems. This report considers the following fourquestions: (1) What software is on a critical path to make the systemswork? (2) What are the strengths/weaknesses of the vendors and ofexisting vendor solutions? (3) What are the local strengths at the labs?(4) Who are other key players who will play a role and canhelp?

Kramer, Bill; Carter, Jonathan; Skinner, David; Oliker, Lenny; Husbands, Parry; Hargrove, Paul; Shalf, John; Marques, Osni; Ng, Esmond; Drummond, Tony; Yelick, Kathy

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

382

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

383

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

384

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

385

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

386

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

387

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

388

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

391

Pairing, Off-Diagonal Long-Range Order, and Quantum Phase Transition in Strongly Attracting Ultracold Bose Gas Mixtures in Tight Waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of two 1D ideal Bose gases A and B with strong odd-wave AB attractions induced by a p-wave AB Feshbach resonance is studied. The model is solved exactly by a Bose-Bose duality mapping, and it is shown that there is no A-component or B-component Bose-Einstein condensation and no AB-pair off-diagonal long-range order (ODLRO), but both AA-pair and BB-pair ODLRO. After generalization by adding even-wave AA and BB repulsions and reducing the strength of the odd-wave AB attraction by Feshbach resonance detuning, a quantum phase transition occurs between a phase with AB contact nodes and one with no such nodes.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Beyond the Gas Phase: Towards Modeling Bulk Ionic Liquids with a Comparison of Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB) to Density Functional Theory (DFT).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal-fired power plants are a leading contributor to the increase in CO2 released into the atmosphere. Alkanolamines are considered a potential solvent to capture this (more)

Danser, Mandelle Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development of techniques for optimizing selection and completion of western tight gas sands. Phase II report, 1 January Feb 1979--28 February 1979  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II work included the measurement of sandstone bed structural elements at 16 sites on Cretaceous Marine Marginal sandstone beds and at 16 sites on beds in a Lower Tertiary lacustrine sequence in eastern Utah. This work was aimed at defining the internal geometrical characteristics of these two types of reservoir rocks.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

395

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

396

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

397

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

398

A Political Ecology of Hydraulic Fracturing for Natural Gas in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[:] shale gas in the US, sand mines in Wisconsin, oil in the Ecuadoran Amazon, oil in the Niger Delta's Marcellus Shale Laura J. Stroup, Ph.D. Dept. of Geography, Texas State University Michael H. Finewood, Ph ! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Scott, Christopher

399

A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 APPENDIX1 Contents A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1 A3. GHG FOR FLOWBACK GAS CAPTURE IN SHALE PLAYS..9 A5. REFERENCES

400

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

402

A UNIVERSAL NEUTRAL GAS PROFILE FOR NEARBY DISK GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Based on sensitive CO measurements from HERACLES and H I data from THINGS, we show that the azimuthally averaged radial distribution of the neutral gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub HI}+ {Sigma}{sub H2}) in 33 nearby spiral galaxies exhibits a well-constrained universal exponential distribution beyond 0.2 Multiplication-Sign r{sub 25} (inside of which the scatter is large) with less than a factor of two scatter out to two optical radii r{sub 25}. Scaling the radius to r{sub 25} and the total gas surface density to the surface density at the transition radius, i.e., where {Sigma}{sub HI} and {Sigma}{sub H2} are equal, as well as removing galaxies that are interacting with their environment, yields a tightly constrained exponential fit with average scale length 0.61 {+-} 0.06 r{sub 25}. In this case, the scatter reduces to less than 40% across the optical disks (and remains below a factor of two at larger radii). We show that the tight exponential distribution of neutral gas implies that the total neutral gas mass of nearby disk galaxies depends primarily on the size of the stellar disk (influenced to some degree by the great variability of {Sigma}{sub H2} inside 0.2 Multiplication-Sign r{sub 25}). The derived prescription predicts the total gas mass in our sub-sample of 17 non-interacting disk galaxies to within a factor of two. Given the short timescale over which star formation depletes the H{sub 2} content of these galaxies and the large range of r{sub 25} in our sample, there appears to be some mechanism leading to these largely self-similar radial gas distributions in nearby disk galaxies.

Bigiel, F. [Institut fuer theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Blitz, L., E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Astronomy, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Variability of the Mancos shale: developing preliminary depositional and sequence stratigraphic models of a developing shale gas play.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With shale resources becoming increasingly more important in the global energy fuel mixture, a thorough understanding of heterogeneities present within individual units is crucial to (more)

Horton, Brendan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ORNL trip (3/25~4/1)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A diagenetic mechanism for the formation of shear fractures in shales hosting deep tight gas plays, AAAG meeting, June - Denver. Santamarina, J.C. and Jang, J. (2009), Gas...

406

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

HIGH DETAIL STATIONARY OPTIMIZATION MODELS FOR GAS NETWORKS --PART 1: MODEL COMPONENTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCHMIDT, MARC C. STEINBACH, BERNHARD M. WILLERT Abstract. Economic reasons and the regulation of gas markets create a growing need for mathematical optimization in natural gas networks. Real life planning after fixing discrete decisions with coarsely approximated physics. 1. Introduction Natural gas plays

Steinbach, Marc

408

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­510 INTRODUCTION Gas hydrates are naturally occurring solids, nonstoichio- metric clathrates, stable at relatively and in sedimentary strata of continen- tal deep sea areas and are typically composed of natural gas, mainly methane have suggested that methane concentra- tions play an important role in gas hydrate investigations. Very

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

409

Oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950 C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).

Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Western gas sands project status report  

SciTech Connect

The Western Gas Sands Project Plan, Project Implementation Plans and Project Plan Document FY 78 are in various stages of preparation. Information gathering by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of the initial data base for many of the project activities is nearing completion. Some base maps are complete and field investigations in the principal areas of interest are being conducted. Research and development by Energy Research Centers and National Laboratories were directed toward new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics experiments, mathematical modeling, and data analysis. The Uinta Basin in Utah and Piceance Basin in Colorado have ongoing massive hydraulic fracture (MHF) experiments in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas formations. These are: CER Corporation, MHF 3; Gas Producing Enterprises, Natural Buttes No. 14, 18, 19, 20; Mobil Oil, F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas, 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has been awarded a contract to determine if productivity in low permeability reservoirs can be improved by reducing the interstitialwater saturation. They will be using two wells, the Sprague No. 1 and Miller No. 1, completed in the Dakota J formation in the Wattenberg Field in north central Colorado. All of the massive hydraulic fracture wells, with the exception of the Pacific Transmission well, have been fractured as planned. The Mobil and GPE No. 14, 18, and 20 wells show significant improvement as compared to original flow rates. The Mobil well is being tested for additional MHF treatments. Sandia Laboratories is continuing their research program in hydraulic fracturing at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS).

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NERSC Global Filesystem Played a Key Role in Discovery of the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NGFS Played a Key Role in Neutrino Finding NERSC Global Filesystem Played a Key Role in Discovery of the Last Neutrino Mixing Angle February 7, 2013 | Tags: High Energy Physics...

412

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the natural gas potential of the Devonian Age shales of West Virginia. For this, the study: (1) compiles the latest geological and reservoir data to establish the gas in-place; (2) analyzes and models the dominant gas production mechanisms; and (3) examines alternative well stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering the in-place gas. The major findings of the study include the following: (1) The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Huron, Rhinestreet, and Marcellus intervals) in West Virginia is estimated to range from 11 to 44 trillion cubic feet. (2) The Devonian shales in this state entail great geological diversity; the highly fractured, permeable shales in the southwest respond well to traditional development practices while the deep, tight shales in the eastern and northern parts of the state will require new, larger scale well stimulation technology. (3) Beyond the currently developed Huron and Rhinestreet shale intervals, the Marcellus shale offers a third attractive gas zone, particularly in the north central portion of the state. 21 references, 53 figures, 27 tables.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Guidelines for personalizing the player experience in computer role-playing games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer role-playing games (CRPGs) are a genre of games that aims at providing similar gaming experience as paper and pen role-playing games. Personalized player experience is one main factor when capturing and maintaining interest of the player. However ... Keywords: computer role-playing games, personalization

Juha-Matti Vanhatupa

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

File:EIA-shale-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

shale-gas.pdf shale-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 377 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-10 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:38, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:38, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (377 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

417

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

418

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

419

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

420

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

422

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

423

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

424

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

425

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

426

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

427

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

428

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

429

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

430

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

431

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

432

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

433

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

434

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

435

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

436

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

437

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

438

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

439

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

440

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

442

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probabilistic, Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems Probabilistic, Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems DE-FC26-06NT42930 Goal The project goal is the development of modules for a web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas exploration and production companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of oil and gas reserves in sensitive areas in the Fayetteville Shale Play in central Arkansas. This decision support tool will rely on creation of a database of existing exploration and production (E&P) technologies that are known to have low ecosystem impact. Performers University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas

443

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Exploring Constructions of the Meanings of Play among Korean Preservice Kindergarten Teachers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to explore what the word "play" means and implies for Korean preservice kindergarten teachers in an early childhood teacher education program. The research questions under investigation were: (1) How do Korean preservice teachers with an early childhood emphasis view play? (2) How do factors such as culture and education influence the constructing of these views? The participants were ten Korean preservice kindergarten teachers enrolled in the Department of Early Childhood Education in one teacher education college in Korea. The data for this study was collected through in-depth qualitative interviews both individual and group and other qualitative methods. The findings of this study showed that Korean preservice kindergarten teachers had a conceptual conflict in the perception of general play and educational play. General play was considered as a fun, enjoyable, and spontaneous activity that is engaged in without concern for a specific outcome. General play was also thought as the opposite concept to work or study. Educational play was regarded as an ironical concept, since Korean preservice kindergarten teachers thought that learning occurs through working, not playing. Korean preservice kindergarten teachers theoretically advocated for the pedagogy of learning through play, just as they were taught in the teacher education program. However, Korean preservice kindergarten teachers did not agree with the practical effect of play on children's learning. Korean preservice kindergarten teachers were more supportive of a structured and pre-planned program for young children, believing that it resulted in better learning opportunities for children than a play-oriented program. The findings of the study revealed that personal experiences with play, the kind of education of the preservice teachers themselves received in their teacher training program, and Korean culture had significant roles in influencing the participant preservice teachers' ideas on play. This study implies that interpretations of play as an educational tool vary from culture to culture. Further research is needed to more deeply understand how views and attitudes on play are created and enacted.

Ahn, Soo Young

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein reservoir being the Marcellus Shale play. The Marcellus Shale play stretches across an area of 95,000 square

Mohaghegh, Shahab

446

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

447

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

448

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

449

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

450

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

451

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

452

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

453

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

454

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Author: M. Sharma Venue: Industry Workshop, Austin, Texas, May 7, 2008 (http://www.cpge.utexas.edu) Abstract: The Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control project consists of a set of 9 projects (5 related to fracturing and 4 related to sand control) that are currently underway. The project began in 2006 and is planned to continue for at least 2 years (2008). Each member company contributes $50,000 per year as a grant to the University and in return receives all the research results from the projects underway. F1. Energized fractures in tight gas sands/ gas shales (Kyle Freihof, Mukul Sharma) F2. Refracturing and stress reorientation in sands / shales (Vasudev Singh, Nicolas Rousell, Mukul Sharma)

455

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well

456

All-metal valve structure for gas systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A valve assembly with a resilient metal seat member is disclosed for providing a gas-tight seal in a gas handling system. The valve assembly also includes a valve element for sealing against the valve seat member; and an actuating means for operating the valve element. The valve seat member is a one-piece stainless steel ring having a central valve port and peripheral mounting flange, and an annular corrugation in between. A groove between the first and second ridges serves as a flexure zone during operation of the valve member and thus provides the seating pressure between the inner ridge or valve seat and the valve element. The outer annular ridge has a diameter less than said valve element to limit the seating motion of the valve element, preventing non-elastic deformation of the seat member.

Baker, R.W.; Pawlak, D.A.; Ramey, A.J.

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

458

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

459

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

460

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas plays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

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